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(New York Magazine)   If Jack Lew is confirmed as Treasury secretary, he's either going to have to change his penmanship or US dollar bills are going to start bearing the most craptacular signature ever   (nymag.com) divider line 158
    More: Scary, Jack Lew, United States, dollars, drinking straws, treasury secretary  
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22952 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jan 2013 at 4:57 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



158 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-09 02:54:35 PM
Geez it looks like Billy's path home in Family Circus.  Maybe he should switch to a plain simple X.
 
2013-01-09 03:00:58 PM
It looks like someone lost a pube at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
 
2013-01-09 03:01:10 PM
Ok, that was actually worse than I was expecting.  And I thought I was bad only bothering with three letters.
 
2013-01-09 03:26:12 PM
That's some mighty fine penmanship there, Lew.
 
2013-01-09 04:02:25 PM
Love it.
 
2013-01-09 04:02:37 PM
I may have to revise my "Obama's cabinet is his prerogative" position now.
 
2013-01-09 04:06:22 PM
i105.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-09 04:12:46 PM
www.catherineomega.com

Even the bill from Idiocracy seems to have a legible signature on it, instead of a squiggle.
 
2013-01-09 04:18:56 PM
OTOH, it would help our deficit problem if the Treasury Secretary has trouble cashing checks.
 
2013-01-09 04:32:48 PM
Thanks for stealing my "worst signature anyone has ever seen" throne. Seriously, people mock mine all the time. Even doctors recoil in horror when they see it. Am not sure how I developed it, but it seems to have happened around college when I had to sign so many forms that one day I said, "Fark it, I'm going in dry" and began scribbling. Prior to that it was legible.

/the lady at the DMV actually said, "Really? This is your signature?"
//she also didn't remind me to take off my baseball cap, so now my license is apparently issue to a retard in a New Orleans Saints hat who can't write his own name
 
2013-01-09 04:49:17 PM
Meh.  A more interesting article would have been "Treasury secretaries through history changing their signatures when it actually comes time to sign US money."  They briefly referenced one example at the end.
 
2013-01-09 04:59:10 PM
Am I the only who found the caption on TFA picture hilarious?
 
2013-01-09 05:01:24 PM
So the new Treasury Secretary is OoooooO?
 
2013-01-09 05:01:59 PM
Wow that signature makes me look like a master caligrapher(sp)
 
2013-01-09 05:02:11 PM
Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.
 
2013-01-09 05:02:22 PM
I like these:
upload.wikimedia.org

Christopher Columbus.
 
2013-01-09 05:03:21 PM

FloydA: [i105.photobucket.com image 500x536]


I love you SO MUCH right now.

/"You'll be the first to die!"
 
2013-01-09 05:03:36 PM
This is a very big deal.
 
2013-01-09 05:03:38 PM
I keep seeing people who's signurature is an upsided down cursive e. just a loop.

it's like signing with an X except you're too lazy to pick the pen up off the paper.
 
2013-01-09 05:04:33 PM
If this is the worst of our problems, we are in pretty good shape.
 
2013-01-09 05:06:18 PM
It's a little dangerous because it makes you question why we do anything with signatures (99.9% of the time they aren't checked, they are never identical, wtf 12th-century-bs-is-this?). Rather like minting a trillion dollar coin makes you question what the fark a dollar is. They're both pertinent questions, but they're questions everyone would rather not have raised.
 
2013-01-09 05:07:50 PM
Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.
 
2013-01-09 05:09:23 PM
americanbuilt.us
 
2013-01-09 05:10:07 PM

AngryTeacher: If this is the worst of our problems, we are in pretty good shape.


It's not.  We've just decided to focus on the piddly small problems, since we've given up trying to solve the horrible, world-destroying ones.
 
2013-01-09 05:10:29 PM
I sign everything with my penis.
www.earlcarterlaw.com
I am no longer allowed in my bank.

www.earlcarterlaw.com
Fountain penis?
 
2013-01-09 05:10:42 PM

tnpir: Am I the only who found the caption on TFA picture hilarious?


You are not. That was great.
 
2013-01-09 05:11:35 PM
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com

Fountain penis.
 
2013-01-09 05:12:20 PM
Jesus, you want a guy as treasury secretary who's too lazy to write one farking letter in his signature?
 
2013-01-09 05:12:27 PM

tnpir: Am I the only who found the caption on TFA picture hilarious?


No. The pic and the caption were LOL-worthy.
 
2013-01-09 05:13:03 PM
I actually think that's a cool signature.
 
2013-01-09 05:13:20 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


In my state it only legal to write our your ENTIRE (first, middle, and last) name when buying a house, no shortcuts. The lawyer was definitely prepared for this, he basically instructed me "not your signature, just write it our in cursive", knowing the two are rarely the same.
 
2013-01-09 05:13:35 PM

Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.


Cursive is kind of unnecessary.
 
2013-01-09 05:15:13 PM

mercator_psi: FloydA: [i105.photobucket.com image 500x536]

I love you SO MUCH right now.

/"You'll be the first to die!"


I wish I never see a spring again in my life!
 
2013-01-09 05:15:56 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


Bad idea to ask certain types of people to make a decision on the spot, particularly anyone who's work involves constantly checking people against a checklist provided by someone else before passing that info on to another person who rechecks and actually signs off on it. Just scrawl down your signature and let them work out later if there is an issue.
 
2013-01-09 05:16:26 PM
I'll just leave this here.,..
galeri5.uludagsozluk.com
 
2013-01-09 05:16:26 PM

FloydA: [i105.photobucket.com image 500x536]


MST3K Content Requirement for Fark Thread #7526923: Satisfied.
 
2013-01-09 05:17:23 PM

toraque: AngryTeacher: If this is the worst of our problems, we are in pretty good shape.

It's not.  We've just decided to focus on the piddly small problems, since we've given up trying to solve the horrible, world-destroying ones.


Remember when we were the country that could accomplish anything?
 
2013-01-09 05:17:59 PM
Clearly, this is the most pressing matter we've had to date.
 
2013-01-09 05:18:48 PM

Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.


My kid is in 4th grade and has learned cursive... in public school.

Her penmanship is better than mine.
 
2013-01-09 05:19:38 PM
When people look at my signature, I say, "I don't have the education of a doctor, but I do have the signature of one". It is bad. And it seems like the harder I try, the worse it gets.
 
2013-01-09 05:19:43 PM
He can always do Google Doodles . . .
 
2013-01-09 05:19:55 PM

2xhelix: Geez it looks like Billy's path home in Family Circus.  Maybe he should switch to a plain simple X.


It's actually a very good signature. Signatures with loops are much harder to forge because the strokes are heavily tied to the geometry of your hand. Something like this would be very difficult to replicate and still look smooth. If you don't believe me try it. Note that the arc traced by the lowest point of each loop is distinctive.
 
2013-01-09 05:21:17 PM
 
2013-01-09 05:21:20 PM
Well I don't see a smiley face in his signature, so at least it's not a conspiracy.
 
2013-01-09 05:21:27 PM

It's Me Bender: I'll just leave this here.,..
[galeri5.uludagsozluk.com image 570x559]

heahea.org
 
2013-01-09 05:21:59 PM

Lawnchair: It's a little dangerous because it makes you question why we do anything with signatures (99.9% of the time they aren't checked, they are never identical, wtf 12th-century-bs-is-this?). Rather like minting a trillion dollar coin makes you question what the fark a dollar is. They're both pertinent questions, but they're questions everyone would rather not have raised.


Well, if it makes you feel any better, all across America election clerks with absolutely no training in handwriting analysis used signature validation to throw out tens of thousands of absentee ballots in our last election. So, signatures are still used as a pretext to systematically disenfranchise voters. You can't say that we don't use them for anything.
 
2013-01-09 05:22:03 PM

Bit'O'Gristle: Jesus, you want a guy as treasury secretary who's too lazy to write one farking letter in his signature?



That's it, I'm never voting for Oblahma again.
 
2013-01-09 05:22:11 PM

AngryTeacher: toraque: AngryTeacher: If this is the worst of our problems, we are in pretty good shape.

It's not.  We've just decided to focus on the piddly small problems, since we've given up trying to solve the horrible, world-destroying ones.

Remember when we were the country that could accomplish anything?


Not really.
 
2013-01-09 05:22:24 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


Banker didn't know his stuff - the answer is "your signature".

With respect to the promissory note, UCC 3-401 validated your chicken scratch signature, even if it was just an "X". UCC 3-401 states "(b) A signature may be made . . . (ii) by the use of any name, including a trade or assumed name, or by a word, mark, or symbol executed or adopted by a person with present intention to authenticate a writing. . ." With respect to a lot of the other instruments, it's covered by state law, but I'm not aware of any state law that requires a signature to be legible letters...
 
2013-01-09 05:22:32 PM
I like his signature. Then again, I might be a bit biased as my signature is just two squiggles. But I can do them in roughly .1 seconds, and really, it would be as hard as any other signature to forge.
 
2013-01-09 05:22:44 PM
O_o laughs hysterically...
 
2013-01-09 05:23:32 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


Maybe I'm completely missing the point, but a signature isn't supposed to be legible so much as it's supposed to be consistent, hard to replicate, and identifiable based on a known sample (not that any one ever has any reason to bother). A sort of random looking scribble can be that, a loopy line that I can draw right now having looked at it for 15 seconds, not so much.

Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.


I acknowledge that you're trolling, but now that everyone can type almost as fast as they can think cursive is pretty pointless.
 
2013-01-09 05:24:19 PM

Archae hippy: pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.

In my state it only legal to write our your ENTIRE (first, middle, and last) name when buying a house, no shortcuts. The lawyer was definitely prepared for this, he basically instructed me "not your signature, just write it our in cursive", knowing the two are rarely the same.


Huh. NC has some odd laws then, although I'd love a citation on this one. Mass. law would handle it differently.
 
2013-01-09 05:24:53 PM
That's a great signature. Mine is usually just a big M sometimes it even has extra humps.
 
2013-01-09 05:25:19 PM

It's Me Bender: I'll just leave this here.,..
[galeri5.uludagsozluk.com image 570x559]

commonwealcuckoos.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-01-09 05:25:41 PM

Kilroy Evans: tnpir: Am I the only who found the caption on TFA picture hilarious?

You are not. That was great.


Best part of the article.
 
2013-01-09 05:26:17 PM
His penmanship may suck, but I heard a story about Jack Lew on NPR a few weeks ago. Apparently, Boehner and Cantor don't like negotiating with him because he's too smart for their wharrgarble.

That's reason enough for me to confirm him.
 
2013-01-09 05:32:08 PM
For comparison's sake

http://www.uspapermoney.info/sign/secretaries.html

Henry H Fowler FTW
 
2013-01-09 05:34:41 PM
a.abcnews.com
 
2013-01-09 05:34:55 PM
www.vintoniowa.org
 
2013-01-09 05:35:15 PM

dickfreckle: /she also didn't remind me to take off my baseball cap, so now my license is apparently issue to a retard in a New Orleans Saints hat who can't write his own name


Must be a lot of those going around.
 
2013-01-09 05:36:29 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


I thought the whole point of a signature was that it was a signifier for the person signing? As in, any jackass could just sign someone's name and not actually be that person, but a signature is something unique to the individual and more difficult to forge. In defense of all the Bank guys you've dealt with, there's usually a spot on a legal document to print the signee's names, and it's sort of assumed that the signature in all the different spots is done by the signee mentioned in the document.
 
2013-01-09 05:36:35 PM
It's not like the signature is the only unforgeable part of the bill, you know.
 
2013-01-09 05:38:56 PM
I think his signature is hilarious! Can't wait to see it on money.
 
2013-01-09 05:39:46 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


People make comments on my signature all the time. One cashier actually cleared mine off the digital pad and told me to use my real one. I said it was and showed her my license and FOID card.

Everyone says I made it up but when I write my name in cursive next to my signature is when they can suddenly see the J,q, and s. it just mutated along the years.

Someone once asked if it would change should I get married and change my last name. I really don't know.
 
2013-01-09 05:41:15 PM
groppet:

Wow that signature makes me look like a master caligrapher(sp)

I don't get it. My signature might be sloppy and almost indecipherable but you can clearly make out my initials and a letter or two in each name. My general handwriting ain't much better since I bought a computer ~20 years ago: I used to be able to write in cursive very legibly, but lack of practice makes imperfect.

Can this guy really write? Can he even read?
 
ows
2013-01-09 05:41:33 PM
discrimination lawsuit or what?

and yes, i am anti semetic
 
2013-01-09 05:41:48 PM

Nehllah: I acknowledge that you're trolling, but now that everyone can type almost as fast as they can think cursive is pretty pointless.


When modern Americans think of cursive, they imagine that they're part of a long unbroken cultural tradition going back hundreds of years. They see a loss of cursive as a loss of cultural tradition; we are abandoning the handwriting of our forefathers.

But what we think of as cursive was basically just a number of different scripts that were developed by educators in the late 19th century because they were a suitable match for the type of fountain pens that were available to students at the time, and because the body motions used to teach those scripts matched whatever crackpot theories of industrial education the creators happened to believe in.

What I'm saying is that cursive has existed only because of false nostalgia since the invention of the ball point pen.
 
ows
2013-01-09 05:44:32 PM
i wonder if beryankme will be replaced by another.
 
2013-01-09 05:48:00 PM
Also when I first started at my job the director told me I had to change my signature to make it legible in case I ever had to sign court documents or whatever.

I refused and said that would probably only cause more problems should the validity of my signature ever come into question. May as well stay consistent and know it is mine.

FWIW, I have beautiful penmanship.
 
2013-01-09 05:49:36 PM
If I was Secretary the signature would look like it was written in crayon by a 4 year old.
 
2013-01-09 05:53:58 PM

Archae hippy: pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.

In my state it only legal to write our your ENTIRE (first, middle, and last) name when buying a house, no shortcuts. The lawyer was definitely prepared for this, he basically instructed me "not your signature, just write it our in cursive", knowing the two are rarely the same.


This is so annoying. I ended up writing my middle name as connected print letters because I can't remember how to do all the letters in cursive. Especially the upper case one.
 
2013-01-09 05:56:17 PM
Rirruto?
 
2013-01-09 05:56:28 PM
Ego edo infantia cattus:
img811.imageshack.us

Wow. The government's obviously out of original ideas.
 
2013-01-09 05:56:50 PM
Lew could change us over to the Lev, Bulgaria's special currency. While the bills today have a readable signature, the old commie ones didn't.

thedesigninspiration.com

www.shopbulgaria.com
 
2013-01-09 05:59:49 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com

\ I am disappoint
\\that it took this long to see this pic
 
2013-01-09 06:00:39 PM
I read 'craptacular' as 'caterpillar' surprised by the accuracy.
 
2013-01-09 06:02:36 PM
If the only thing anyone can find to complain about is the guy's signature, fark it. Sign him up.

Who gives a rat's ass?
 
2013-01-09 06:05:17 PM

BitwiseShift: Lew could change us over to the Lev, Bulgaria's special currency. While the bills today have a readable signature, the old commie ones didn't.

[thedesigninspiration.com image 552x269]

[www.shopbulgaria.com image 611x300]


Guy on the bill in top pic has bacon chin. Tasty, crispy bacon chin.
 
2013-01-09 06:06:27 PM

911Jenny: Someone once asked if it would change should I get married and change my last name. I really don't know.


I tacked on a pathetic attempt at my new last name to mine. After a year it started to look like the rest of my signature.
 
2013-01-09 06:06:50 PM
Stop making dollar bills, make $1 coins instead. Problem solved. You're welcome. For bonus points, eliminate the penny, and maybe the nickel too.
 
2013-01-09 06:08:05 PM
If I could imagine it, I'd think "Ghetto pubes".
 
2013-01-09 06:11:25 PM
Wow, and I thought mine was bad. In one way it is so bad that it would be kind of awesome to see that on our currency. Pretty much sums up the current state of our government.
 
2013-01-09 06:12:28 PM
I used to know an older mentally disabled woman. She would write me letters which basically consisted of repeated Jack Lew signatures of varying lengths.
 
2013-01-09 06:14:58 PM
I can't remember cursive so my signature is just a sloppy print version of my name.
/also forgot long division
 
2013-01-09 06:15:09 PM

Skwrl: pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.

Banker didn't know his stuff - the answer is "your signature".

With respect to the promissory note, UCC 3-401 validated your chicken scratch signature, even if it was just an "X". UCC 3-401 states "(b) A signature may be made . . . (ii) by the use of any name, including a trade or assumed name, or by a word, mark, or symbol executed or adopted by a person with present intention to authenticate a writing. . ." With respect to a lot of the other instruments, it's covered by state law, but I'm not aware of any state law that requires a signature to be legible letters...


IIRC, states don't have to adopt the UCC as it's written. They can modify it to suit the needs of the state.

Also, what does Article 3 have to do with mortgages?
 
2013-01-09 06:17:44 PM
He'll change. Geitner did.
www.marketplace.org
 
2013-01-09 06:29:38 PM
What use are those signatures on credit card machines? I purposely make the most unintelligible scribble I can.
The technology exists that every one of those could be a thumbprint reader, it would do away with a massive amount of CC fraud.
 
2013-01-09 06:29:52 PM

Nehllah: Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.

I acknowledge that you're trolling, but now that everyone can type almost as fast as they can think cursive is pretty pointless.


Since they are no longer writing with quills and ink or fountain pens, cursive is pretty farking pointless. Better to teach them to properly and efficiently use a keyboard.
 
2013-01-09 06:33:24 PM
 
2013-01-09 06:38:28 PM

mercator_psi: FloydA: [i105.photobucket.com image 500x536]

I love you SO MUCH right now.


I know.

/"You'll be the first to die!"

I hope so.
 
2013-01-09 06:46:01 PM

CipollinaFan: Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.

Cursive is kind of unnecessary.


For a few hundred years, it's been the dominant form of written english. It's still in regular use by a whole hell of a lot of people, myself included, and learning to write cursive is how you learn to read it. It's necessary.

And yes, I write in cursive. I actually switched back to it fairly recently, when I realized that I often link letters anyway when printing, and that my cursive handwriting looks a whole hell of a lot better than my print does. If you can't read it, that's your problem, not mine.
 
2013-01-09 06:47:56 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


Mine has a sort-of 'M', and the rest is a scrawl. Nobody has told me that they won't accept it yet, and it's been this way for 15 years or more.
 
2013-01-09 06:58:58 PM

The Larch: Nehllah: I acknowledge that you're trolling, but now that everyone can type almost as fast as they can think cursive is pretty pointless.

When modern Americans think of cursive, they imagine that they're part of a long unbroken cultural tradition going back hundreds of years. They see a loss of cursive as a loss of cultural tradition; we are abandoning the handwriting of our forefathers.

But what we think of as cursive was basically just a number of different scripts that were developed by educators in the late 19th century because they were a suitable match for the type of fountain pens that were available to students at the time, and because the body motions used to teach those scripts matched whatever crackpot theories of industrial education the creators happened to believe in.

What I'm saying is that cursive has existed only because of false nostalgia since the invention of the ball point pen.


Wrong. STANDARDIZED Cursive has only existed since the late 19th Century. People before that still wrote in cursive script, it's just that the exact choice of how to write various letters varied from person to person- see John Hancock's J upthread. My cursive isn't precisely standard, either- I hate the loopy A in the standard script, so I use one that looks pretty much like the one the Braves use on their hat. My S doesn't have that diagonal line and loop at the top, and some of my letter to letter transitions join with a point rather than the smooth hump that the standard form tells you to use. Cursive isn't used because of nostalgia or whatever, it's just a very practical and efficient way to write.


wingnut396: Nehllah: Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.

I acknowledge that you're trolling, but now that everyone can type almost as fast as they can think cursive is pretty pointless.

Since they are no longer writing with quills and ink or fountain pens, cursive is pretty farking pointless. Better to teach them to properly and efficiently use a keyboard.


Because all written communication ever will be done with a computer and a keyboard? Hate to break it to ya, but while typing is obviously the dominant form of writing today, handwriting will never, ever, go away. And yes, knowing how to read the system of handwriting that has dominated for centuries because it can create a fairly neat result easily and quickly is a pretty damn useful skill.
 
2013-01-09 06:59:13 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


I was actually told by the lawyers to not put my legal initials on my mortgage. My "initials" on everything since HS have been C2 and not the first letter of my first, middle, and last names. I told them OK, but if I was ever questioned under oath if these "pointing to the three letters they wanted me to write" were my initials, I would have to answer no. I then proceeded to put those letters at the 47 hundred places it was wanted.
 
2013-01-09 07:01:21 PM
Who the fark even looks at the signature on their money?
 
2013-01-09 07:07:55 PM
I think it looks cool.
 
2013-01-09 07:14:17 PM
I sign my first name beautifully. But then, when I sign my last name it looks like a kindergartner did it. Always has. My last name is just a bunch of looping letters in a row, tbh it looks like jack lew's signature upside down.
 
2013-01-09 07:14:30 PM
I used to be able to sign my name in cursive just fine, until one trip overseas when I had to countersign about 40 travelers cheques in a row. Something broke that day and I've never been able to easily write my name in cursive since. In fact, my signature has gotten progressively more minimalist with time. Only the capital L in my first name is consistently recognizable any more.

/usually write in a highly connected print
//even there I've begun to scrawl through words and drop parts of letters
 
2013-01-09 07:15:18 PM
Oh, and fwiw I like Lew's signature as is.
 
2013-01-09 07:23:12 PM

toraque: AngryTeacher: If this is the worst of our problems, we are in pretty good shape.

It's not.  We've just decided to focus on the piddly small problems, since we've given up trying to solve the horrible, world-destroying ones.


after thinking about it .... ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
:(
 
2013-01-09 07:27:09 PM
Not to sound judgemental myself, but man, what a stupid thing to be so judgemental over. Who cares how he signs his name?

American priorities are baffling. If he scrawled it on his gun, would you still make him change it? Or would that count as registering the firearm?
 
2013-01-09 07:34:50 PM

SkittleBrau: BitwiseShift: Lew could change us over to the Lev, Bulgaria's special currency. While the bills today have a readable signature, the old commie ones didn't.

[thedesigninspiration.com image 552x269]

[www.shopbulgaria.com image 611x300]

Guy on the bill in top pic has bacon chin. Tasty, crispy bacon chin.


Thanks a lot -- now I can't stop seeing that.
 
2013-01-09 07:34:57 PM
Are we certain he wasn't just playing around with a Spirograph or something? O_o
 
2013-01-09 07:38:20 PM

cptjeff: For a few hundred years, it's been the dominant form of written english. It's still in regular use by a whole hell of a lot of people, myself included, and learning to write cursive is how you learn to read it. It's necessary.


Nothing written in cursive is necessary for anyone else to read. If it's imperative that someone else understand, print or type it. Cursive is dead and needs to be buried because it's stinking up the joint.
 
2013-01-09 07:46:00 PM
I hereby offer Sec'y-designate Lew my impeccable cursive version of his name for a one-time fee of $25,000.
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2013-01-09 07:46:19 PM

dickfreckle: Thanks for stealing my "worst signature anyone has ever seen" throne. Seriously, people mock mine all the time. Even doctors recoil in horror when they see it. Am not sure how I developed it, but it seems to have happened around college when I had to sign so many forms that one day I said, "Fark it, I'm going in dry" and began scribbling. Prior to that it was legible.

/the lady at the DMV actually said, "Really? This is your signature?"
//she also didn't remind me to take off my baseball cap, so now my license is apparently issue to a retard in a New Orleans Saints hat who can't write his own name


Silver lining: that'll give you a little bit more leeway on a DUI stop.

"Honestly occifer. I'm naturally this idiotic looking!"
 
2013-01-09 07:53:35 PM
Cue the Republicans complaining that Obama didn't do proper vetting again.
 
2013-01-09 07:55:51 PM
I have , for all intents and purposes, forgotten how to write by hand, at least in cursive. I can still print in big caps because my job requires it. I do have a pretty legible signiture.

John Lew's the man, credited with a lot of the Obama win and putting the GOP in the hot seat over the fiscal cliff.

Like Hagel and Kerry, he will be an excellent Cabinet secretary
 
2013-01-09 08:00:59 PM

Nehllah: I acknowledge that you're trolling, but now that everyone can type almost as fast as they can think cursive is pretty pointless.


The most useful class I ever took was keyboarding class when I was in Jr High in the 80s.
 
2013-01-09 08:01:17 PM
Jack LOoooooooOOo
 
2013-01-09 08:05:18 PM

Stranded On The Planet Dumbass: What use are those signatures on credit card machines? I purposely make the most unintelligible scribble I can.
The technology exists that every one of those could be a thumbprint reader, it would do away with a massive amount of CC fraud.


Fun Fact: Those can be defeated by making a cast of a fingerprint with a gummi bear. A mold can be made from a flat image of any fingerprint. Flatten the gummi bear into a thin sheet on the mold, then place onto the fingertip.
 
2013-01-09 08:08:33 PM
That gave me the biggest lol so far this year, and I won't be surprised if it takes me all the way into February.
 
2013-01-09 08:09:00 PM

1. Put snakes on plane: cptjeff: For a few hundred years, it's been the dominant form of written english. It's still in regular use by a whole hell of a lot of people, myself included, and learning to write cursive is how you learn to read it. It's necessary.

Nothing written in cursive is necessary for anyone else to read. If it's imperative that someone else understand, print or type it. Cursive is dead and needs to be buried because it's stinking up the joint.


I'm sorry, but the onus is on you to be able to read and write the english language, and cursive script is still a pretty major part of the written form of the language. If you can't do that, I don't particularly feel like it's my responsibility to go out of my way to accommodate your deficiency. You lacking the basic skills required to read your own language is not really my problem.
 
2013-01-09 08:09:49 PM
It looks more like someone testing a ball point pen to see if it still has ink than a signature.
 
2013-01-09 08:11:21 PM

stu1-1: Ego edo infantia cattus:
[img811.imageshack.us image 320x176]

Wow. The government's obviously out of original ideas.


It must have been intentional, and I'd agree with that decision. Monopoly money would be the most entrenched system of colored currency in many Americans' minds. Why fight it?
 
2013-01-09 08:11:22 PM
Suddenly I have an opinion on this matter!
 
2013-01-09 08:20:22 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


Wow. You sound like a real ass.
 
2013-01-09 08:22:07 PM
If your name was 'Jack Lew', would you want it to be clearly readable?

/Having the word signature ever on a bill might be an honor.
 
2013-01-09 08:22:10 PM

Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.


Already has. By the time anyone tried, I was already typing 90WPM, so I wasn't interested in anything other than learning to read it clearly. Still can't read the backward squiggles of some people.

That said, I feel like I put in more effort with my M, line, and two loops.
 
2013-01-09 08:26:16 PM
Signature on money MIGHT look like a scribble?!

i651.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-09 08:32:44 PM
I work at the US Mint, so I'm getting a kick out of some of these responses.
 
2013-01-09 08:35:53 PM
This is the same guy that took a $900,000 bonus at Citibank during the bail out - right? Yup.
 
2013-01-09 08:51:37 PM
Question.....

My signature developed before I was 18. I worked in a ski shop where we set up rental skis. Folks would come in, fill out the rental agreement where they had to give their weight, height, etc.

I would then set up the ski boot bindings based upon the variables filled in by the customers. Part of the process was using a torque device to test the release limits of the binding.

At each step in the process, I had to sign and record the measured release values. It was a total of five signatures per set of skis.

This thread got me thinking..... Was my signature legally binding? I was under 18, yet certified as a technician by the binding manufacturers.
 
2013-01-09 08:56:07 PM

cptjeff: 1. Put snakes on plane: cptjeff: For a few hundred years, it's been the dominant form of written english. It's still in regular use by a whole hell of a lot of people, myself included, and learning to write cursive is how you learn to read it. It's necessary.

Nothing written in cursive is necessary for anyone else to read. If it's imperative that someone else understand, print or type it. Cursive is dead and needs to be buried because it's stinking up the joint.

I'm sorry, but the onus is on you to be able to read and write the english language, and cursive script is still a pretty major part of the written form of the language. If you can't do that, I don't particularly feel like it's my responsibility to go out of my way to accommodate your deficiency. You lacking the basic skills required to read your own language is not really my problem.


"Gosh, I better learn to write in cursive so I can read some random delusional guy's gibberish!" --no one ever
 
2013-01-09 09:03:26 PM

JoeBobMel: Question.....

My signature developed before I was 18. I worked in a ski shop where we set up rental skis. Folks would come in, fill out the rental agreement where they had to give their weight, height, etc.

I would then set up the ski boot bindings based upon the variables filled in by the customers. Part of the process was using a torque device to test the release limits of the binding.

At each step in the process, I had to sign and record the measured release values. It was a total of five signatures per set of skis.

This thread got me thinking..... Was my signature legally binding? I was under 18, yet certified as a technician by the binding manufacturers.


Yes. In that instance, you were not representing yourself, but you were acting on behalf of the shop you were working for. As a duly authorized representative of the business, your signature as a representative of the store is binding on them.

Additionally, under 18, contracts you enter into are voidable, not void. They're valid unless you choose to make them invalid, through means that are dependent on state law (ever wonder why they won't let a 16 year old buy a car without parents countersigning? Somebody sold a car to a 16 girl once, she transferred the ownership to her boyfriend, and voided the contract. No longer in possession of the goods, so she couldn't be forced to return them. Under 18, so incapable of giving full legal consent, allowing her to void the contract). But you weren't signing a contract on your own behalf on any of this, so that doesn't matter at all- you were signing on behalf of the business, which had authorized you to do it, and the corporate person was fully capable of consent to a contract.
 
2013-01-09 09:05:51 PM

1. Put snakes on plane: cptjeff: 1. Put snakes on plane: cptjeff: For a few hundred years, it's been the dominant form of written english. It's still in regular use by a whole hell of a lot of people, myself included, and learning to write cursive is how you learn to read it. It's necessary.

Nothing written in cursive is necessary for anyone else to read. If it's imperative that someone else understand, print or type it. Cursive is dead and needs to be buried because it's stinking up the joint.

I'm sorry, but the onus is on you to be able to read and write the english language, and cursive script is still a pretty major part of the written form of the language. If you can't do that, I don't particularly feel like it's my responsibility to go out of my way to accommodate your deficiency. You lacking the basic skills required to read your own language is not really my problem.

"Gosh, I better learn to write in cursive so I can read some random delusional guy's gibberish!" --no one ever


So, you're admitting that you have absolutely no rebuttal. Got it.
 
2013-01-09 09:08:21 PM

pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.


I had a similar problem when I did a refi, and they also acted like I was the first person ever to have the issue. They told me that my signature had to legibly include every letter of my name, which my normal signature definitely does not. I told them that I could do that, but it wouldn't be my normal signature and likely wouldn't look the same each time. After watching me try this on scrap paper several times, they relented and let me use my normal signature, but told me there would probably be paperwork issues with this. Never had a problem.

They were also extremely anal about signatures not crossing the top or bottom line of a given field, which was annoying and required using spares multiple times.

/ cool signature bro
 
2013-01-09 09:21:17 PM

cptjeff: Additionally, under 18, contracts you enter into are voidable, not void.


I'd always figured it was on the business's and manufacturer's liability. Just had never given any thought as to the age until now...

Yup. My signature is a mess.
 
2013-01-09 09:35:19 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-01-09 09:41:36 PM
Hmmm. If you change the first letters in Jack Lew around, you get "Lack Jew."

Does Obama's cabinet have any Jews in it? Is this his way of trolling the Jewish population and punishing Israel?

Think about it.
 
2013-01-09 09:48:03 PM
I, for one, welcome our new loopy-schwoopy overlords.
 
2013-01-09 10:03:23 PM
Uh, Lew is Jewish. His name is Jacob J. Lew. I think that's the name he's signing as his signature. Looks more like Jacob than Jack.
 
2013-01-09 10:12:47 PM

CipollinaFan: So the new Treasury Secretary is OoooooO?


THIS.

/Does he not know cursive? Those aren't  letters, they're spirals.
 
2013-01-09 11:13:52 PM
pixel.nymag.com
 
2013-01-09 11:15:54 PM
I hope he doesn't change it. At least sign your real signature to those bogus bucks.
 
2013-01-09 11:20:06 PM

Glancing Blow: [www.vintoniowa.org image 640x373]


p.twimg.com
It's Herbie Hancock, durrrrrrr....
 
2013-01-09 11:41:18 PM

911Jenny: pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.

People make comments on my signature all the time. One cashier actually cleared mine off the digital pad and told me to use my real one. I said it was and showed her my license and FOID card.

Everyone says I made it up but when I write my name in cursive next to my signature is when they can suddenly see the J,q, and s. it just mutated along the years.

Someone once asked if it would change should I get married and change my last name. I really don't know.


I have two signatures, basically.  I have to sign off on stuff at work all the stupid time, for credit card slips, etc., and it's illegible but unique, fairly consistent, and damn quick.  For anything official, I have something that's still unique but fair more legible, and takes more annoying time.. so that one for drivers license, taxes, etc.  I just do the quick illegible but unique one for the bank 'cause they know me anyway, unless there's a new teller.

As I've grown older, essentially, my signature's just changed into my Dad's, and more or less is just 5 lines even though my name has 16 letters.

/I LEARNED IT FROM WATCHING YOU, DAD.
 
2013-01-09 11:48:36 PM
It could have been worse, what I Prince was our Treasury Sec.?
 
2013-01-09 11:55:17 PM

Lydia_C: I used to be able to sign my name in cursive just fine, until one trip overseas when I had to countersign about 40 travelers cheques in a row. Something broke that day and I've never been able to easily write my name in cursive since. In fact, my signature has gotten progressively more minimalist with time. Only the capital L in my first name is consistently recognizable any more.

/usually write in a highly connected print
//even there I've begun to scrawl through words and drop parts of letters


I wonder if everyone's tendency to do that with handwriting has anything to do with why we're able to discern words based on first & last letters and general shape. A few studies have found that the innards can be as jumbled as you want as long as they're roughly the same up and down strokes, and you can still read nearly as fast as usual.
 
2013-01-10 01:02:20 AM
CSB time:

When I trained in pro-wrestling, one of the traveling and off-time things my trainer did (And he was very big on the non-ring stuff... the things that make you a good character) was to learn to sign things. Signing our name - not our real name of course, and not our real signature, but our character or a fake version of our signature. Fake because use your "Real" signature and people could try to sign checks with it. Heels signed with sharp points and very fast - like they didn't want to do it. Faces sign with loopy, interesting, clean letters that look distinctive and are friendly.

For about 3 months after a day of signing a notebook repeatedly as my character at the time while on a long train ride I couldn't sign my real signature. It permanently changed how I do it in real life - everyone says I have an awesome signature.

/no, no examples
//no, I never got anywhere wrestling, got hurt before I got to do anything fun
///and McMahon sucks.
 
x23
2013-01-10 01:41:25 AM
all i know is that my previous very nice handwriting is practically illegible these days... thanks to the last 15-20 years of using a computer as a primary means of writing anything. even worse now that i don't even use it to write shopping lists / to-do lists (thanks smartphone).

in high school / college my mom could write in cursive in a mirror image faster than she could normally. would take all her notes that way. it looks pretty weird. but if you hold it to a mirror it looks just like it would had she written it correctly. /csb
 
2013-01-10 01:50:20 AM

theknuckler_33: Thisbymaster: Well the next generation isn't being taught how to write in cursive so this is only going to get worse.

My kid is in 4th grade and has learned cursive... in public school.

Her penmanship is better than mine.


I was required to use nothing but cursive in the 4th grade(back in 1980). Soon as it was over, no more of that.

"But your handwriting was so nice!"
"Yeah, it took me 2 seconds per letter for everything!"
 
2013-01-10 02:18:01 AM
I remember a couple of times doing temp work for the IRS in my younger years, processing quarterly payments, and they insisted I sign with my full first name and middle name.. well, I don't sign anything as Alexander.. but it was their way. Then they had me do it again, left handed.. just to make sure no one could ever read it at all.
 
2013-01-10 02:44:24 AM
He probably should have tried to get the ink to flow from the pen on some scrap paper first before trying to sign.

Also, my original signature was basically cursive and far too legible and orderly for a "proper" signature. It took years to learn to write my own name worse and worse until it was an acceptable signature.
 
2013-01-10 03:05:13 AM

Stranded On The Planet Dumbass: What use are those signatures on credit card machines? I purposely make the most unintelligible scribble I can.
The technology exists that every one of those could be a thumbprint reader, it would do away with a massive amount of CC fraud.


Unlike my fingerprints, I don't leave my signature on literally everything I pick up or touch.
 
2013-01-10 04:55:53 AM
Francis E Spinner had the baddest signature on US currency.

upload.wikimedia.org

Here it is on the 1869 $10 "Jackass" note. Click to go to larger version.

imageshack.us

imageshack.us

When our former President Abe Lincoln got a hold of some of these new notes, he remarked to his cabinet how unique the signature was and much labor it would be for Spinner to sign all these notes. He didn't seem to understand that the signature was printed and not signed.
 
2013-01-10 06:00:34 AM
"In June 2006, Lew was named chief operating officer of Citigroup's Alternative Investments unit, a proprietary trading group. The unit he oversaw invested in a hedge fund "that bet on the housing market to collapse.""


Great, just what we need. Exchanging one crooked Wall Street insider (Geithner) that was an accessory to the financial Crash of 2008 for another (Lew).

Whether Democrat or Republican, TBTB that run and own this country can't be stopped.
 
2013-01-10 06:04:25 AM
pumasunleashed.files.wordpress.com

"Lew's nomination was followed with criticism[32][33][34][35] after renewed reports that he received over $900,000 in bonuses while working as COO of Citigroup, following the company's $45 billion in TARP rescue funds"


Hmmm, no conflict of interest there.

The fox guarding the henhouse...
 
2013-01-10 07:40:05 AM
Hey guys, *tells a fascinating story about my signature*. I'm glad we had this talk
 
2013-01-10 08:18:16 AM

Goodfella: Great, just what we need. Exchanging one crooked Wall Street insider (Geithner) that was an accessory to the financial Crash of 2008 for another (Lew).


It amuses (and saddens) me to no end how lefties have uncritically repeated the assertion that Geithner worked on Wall Street, Goldman Sachs in particular.
 
2013-01-10 08:45:02 AM

The Larch: Lawnchair: It's a little dangerous because it makes you question why we do anything with signatures (99.9% of the time they aren't checked, they are never identical, wtf 12th-century-bs-is-this?). Rather like minting a trillion dollar coin makes you question what the fark a dollar is. They're both pertinent questions, but they're questions everyone would rather not have raised.

Well, if it makes you feel any better, all across America election clerks with absolutely no training in handwriting analysis used signature validation to throw out tens of thousands of absentee ballots in our last election. So, signatures are still used as a pretext to systematically disenfranchise voters. You can't say that we don't use them for anything.


I don't sign the back of cards because they never farking look anyway. And when they do, it's a *signature* are they looking to see if it's the same name even? Nope... I prefer to give them a clear, obvious reason, if they are told to look at the backs of cards, to ask for ID.

Elsewise, I've signed my name as Shamu before. That shiat doesn't matter and nobody cares. Cursive is stupid and art is dead.
 
2013-01-10 08:54:51 AM

GAT_00: Ok, that was actually worse than I was expecting.  And I thought I was bad only bothering with three letters.


Mine resembles two letters with a half ass scribble job inbetween.
And it's never the same.

I hate using writing tools. I suck and should only be allowed to use electronic forms of written communication

/or grunts and nods, they work too.
//my wife thinks my sig is worse then a doctors. At least I know what the letters in mine are.
 
2013-01-10 09:37:24 AM

Aexia: Goodfella: Great, just what we need. Exchanging one crooked Wall Street insider (Geithner) that was an accessory to the financial Crash of 2008 for another (Lew).

It amuses (and saddens) me to no end how lefties have uncritically repeated the assertion that Geithner worked on Wall Street, Goldman Sachs in particular.



Worse: the NY Fed.
 
2013-01-10 10:35:41 AM

cannibalparrot: Skwrl: pudding7: Sounds like a conversation I've had the few times we've refinanced our mortgage.

Bank guy: "sign your name everywhere there's a tab"
Me: "do you want my signature or do you want me to sign my name?"
Bank guy: "Huh?"
Me: "Well, my signature is illegible and no longer has much to do with the letters in my name.  Or I could just write my name in cursive, but that's not really my signature.  Which do you want?"
Bank guy: "Uhm...."

I think we've refinance three times, and each time they seem completely unprepared for this situation.  I can't be the only one who's signature looks nothing like their name.

Banker didn't know his stuff - the answer is "your signature".

With respect to the promissory note, UCC 3-401 validated your chicken scratch signature, even if it was just an "X". UCC 3-401 states "(b) A signature may be made . . . (ii) by the use of any name, including a trade or assumed name, or by a word, mark, or symbol executed or adopted by a person with present intention to authenticate a writing. . ." With respect to a lot of the other instruments, it's covered by state law, but I'm not aware of any state law that requires a signature to be legible letters...

IIRC, states don't have to adopt the UCC as it's written. They can modify it to suit the needs of the state.

Also, what does Article 3 have to do with mortgages?


Of course they don't always, but many states have. Article 3 would cover the promissory note (i.e., the debt instrument). The mortgage/security interest would be covered by laws applicable to real estate in that jurisdiction.
 
2013-01-10 12:12:04 PM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: As I've grown older, essentially, my signature's just changed into my Dad's, and more or less is just 5 lines even though my name has 16 letters.

/I LEARNED IT FROM WATCHING YOU, DAD.


foxyshadis: I wonder if everyone's tendency to do that with handwriting has anything to do with why we're able to discern words based on first & last letters and general shape. A few studies have found that the innards can be as jumbled as you want as long as they're roughly the same up and down strokes, and you can still read nearly as fast as usual.


Speaking from experience, I can say some of the reasons include really long fricking names and forms. My dad's signature is merely D, then a squiggly line, D again, and a longer squiggly line. Mine was similar, only with flat lines instead of squiggles (I'm really lazy). Having a long name sucks when filling in school forms. It sucks to infinity when you're laboriously writing out your name on mortgage paperwork 30 times.
 
2013-01-10 01:27:28 PM
pixel.nymag.com
i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-10 02:35:57 PM

saintstryfe: CSB time:

When I trained in pro-wrestling, one of the traveling and off-time things my trainer did (And he was very big on the non-ring stuff... the things that make you a good character) was to learn to sign things. Signing our name - not our real name of course, and not our real signature, but our character or a fake version of our signature. Fake because use your "Real" signature and people could try to sign checks with it. Heels signed with sharp points and very fast - like they didn't want to do it. Faces sign with loopy, interesting, clean letters that look distinctive and are friendly.

For about 3 months after a day of signing a notebook repeatedly as my character at the time while on a long train ride I couldn't sign my real signature. It permanently changed how I do it in real life - everyone says I have an awesome signature.

/no, no examples
//no, I never got anywhere wrestling, got hurt before I got to do anything fun
///and McMahon sucks.


You're still real to me dammit!
 
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