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(Bubblews)   Oh, and btw, the Earth might get struck by Asteroid Apophis today. Just saying   (bubblews.com) divider line 198
    More: Scary, Asteroid Apophis, Apophis, Earth  
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17338 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jan 2013 at 10:44 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-09 10:45:29 AM
If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.
 
2013-01-09 10:45:41 AM
Message from Mars...

i1260.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-09 10:46:24 AM
I'm more curious to see if manages to clip a satellite or two on the way past.
 
2013-01-09 10:46:58 AM
and this article says 15 million kms away today


http://ca.news.yahoo.com/asteroid-extremely-remote-possibility-striki n g-earth-2036-makes-090011942.html
 
2013-01-09 10:47:23 AM
Stoopid Mayans and their shiatty calendar.
 
2013-01-09 10:48:01 AM
It's Obamas fault.
 
2013-01-09 10:48:14 AM
I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?
 
2013-01-09 10:48:40 AM
Can the feline population rise up and topple the worlds governments? It's certainly possible.
But not likely.
 
2013-01-09 10:49:07 AM
I'm not saying it's aliens.
 
2013-01-09 10:49:11 AM

John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?


Exactly. This guy (or gal) is an idiot. And a fear-monger. A fear-mongering idiot.
 
2013-01-09 10:49:52 AM
Did it come from the Arachnid quarantine zone?

/want to know more
 
2013-01-09 10:50:27 AM
How convenient. An asteroid'shiatting Earth on the same day my cable bill is due.

Take THAT, Comcast!
 
2013-01-09 10:50:38 AM
Paging George Clooney and Jimmy Kimmel...

i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2013-01-09 10:50:55 AM
Don't get my hopes up.

/hungover
 
2013-01-09 10:51:07 AM
Except for the part where NO.
 
2013-01-09 10:51:50 AM

HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.


There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.
 
2013-01-09 10:52:19 AM
It's listed as peaking at 40 lunar distances. So 13,000 is only off by 730 times.
 
2013-01-09 10:52:48 AM

John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?


From the Institute for Rectal Astronomy.
 
2013-01-09 10:52:49 AM
Fark you, Gamilons!
 
2013-01-09 10:52:52 AM

John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?


2029 it is supposed to be around 20,000 mi
 
2013-01-09 10:53:16 AM
 
2013-01-09 10:53:39 AM
I might have a foursome with Mila Kunis, Scarlett Johansen and Zoe Seldana today. Just saying.
 
2013-01-09 10:53:44 AM
That would solve our global warming problems
 
2013-01-09 10:53:44 AM

TheOther: Stoopid Mayans and their shiatty calendar.


They hadn't invented the word for leap year back then
 
2013-01-09 10:53:58 AM
blastr.com
 
2013-01-09 10:54:24 AM

99sportster: John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?

Exactly. This guy (or gal) is an idiot. And a fear-monger. A fear-mongering idiot.


I'm thinking it's supposed to pass within 13,000 miles on the second pass. When the asteroid was first discovered, it actually had a decent chance of hitting on the second pass, receiving a risk number of "4", and was the first asteroid to have received a risk rating higher than "1".
 
2013-01-09 10:54:27 AM
Where's SG1 when you need them?
 
2013-01-09 10:54:32 AM
i47.tinypic.com
 
2013-01-09 10:54:55 AM
If it hits the Westboro Baptist Church, I'm all for it.
 
2013-01-09 10:54:57 AM
Uh, yeah, no there isn't.

the risk from Apophis is already essentially zero.

"What does essentially zero mean exactly? Let's review some history. When Apophis was discovered in 2004, astronomers calculated that there was a very small probability (up to 2.7%) that it would strike the Earth in 2029. That was clearly unsettling, but the concern was short-lived. The 2029 impact possibility was quickly ruled out, but, almost as quickly, another possibility reared its head: a possible impact in 2036. For a time, astronomers thought there was a 1-in-45,000 chance that Apophis would strike Earth on April 13, 2036. Then, in October 2009, the numbers were updated again, and the impact possibility decreased again. Currently, the chance of an impact with Earth by asteroid Apophis in 2036 has dropped to about 1-in-250,000. While greater than your chance of winning a lottery (many millions to one), it's still very very unlikely. That's the number David Helfand calls essentially zero. Astronomers believe the possibility will drop to absolutely zero after the early 2013 pass by Apophis."

There is zero chance that it hits us this pass. They think there is a minute chance that is essentially zero that it could hit us in 2036 but they'll be certain after it passes.
 
2013-01-09 10:54:57 AM

KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.


Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something
 
2013-01-09 10:55:05 AM

fat boy: John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?

2029 it is supposed to be around 20,000 mi


Yeah, the 9 million is for this pass. That's not the problem. After this pass though, the next is going to be very close. We won't know until after this pass and we can get more observations.
 
2013-01-09 10:55:15 AM

Mr.Hawk: Can the feline female population rise up and topple the worlds governments? It's certainly possible.
But not likely.


FTFY
 
2013-01-09 10:55:17 AM
FTA: "...but its probably not a planet killer."

Good to know!
 
2013-01-09 10:55:30 AM
hold on now. I checked Spaceweather.com and there is nothing for today in the section at the bottom "Recent & Upcoming Earth-asteroid encounters:"
 
2013-01-09 10:55:30 AM
and monkey might fly out of my butt.
 
2013-01-09 10:56:09 AM

HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.

Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something


It is the next pass that is the problem, not this one.
 
2013-01-09 10:56:48 AM

digitalrain: FTA: "...but its probably not a planet killer."

Good to know!


www.stardestroyer.net

They're not hard to spot.
 
2013-01-09 10:56:58 AM
Apophis has the same first three letters as Apocalypse, and indeed almost sounds like Apocalypse. COINCIDENCE? I THINK NOT!
 
2013-01-09 10:58:28 AM
Ummm, article writer.... Apophis will pass within 15 MILLION km today, not 15,000 km. Big difference.
 
2013-01-09 10:59:04 AM
Yeah, thanks for the misleading headline, subby. The danger from this is not on this pass, but on subsequent.  Such headlines just get people to dismiss this as nothing when there is actually a danger. At the moment this is the most potentially dangerous we have ever seen. That will be refined after this pass.
 
2013-01-09 10:59:05 AM
Everything will appear to be fine, until the System Lords give it a last-minute nudge, allowing them to destroy the Earth without alerting the Asgard. Nice knowing you.
 
2013-01-09 10:59:06 AM

ima turkey: It's Obamas fault.


Somebody link the chapelle show skit please.

/how prescient
 
2013-01-09 10:59:10 AM

KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.

Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something

It is the next pass that is the problem, not this one.


Thanks, I finally saw the rest of the thread. I'm clueless.
 
2013-01-09 10:59:26 AM

KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.

Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something

It is the next pass that is the problem, not this one.


Yeah but even if we calculate that it's going to hit us, we have 20 years to train Bruce Willis and his team instead of just a few months so we're gonna be fine. I don't know if he'll volunteer to blow himself up again.
 
2013-01-09 11:00:05 AM
Today's Forecast: Partly sunny with a slight chance of catastrophic meteors. High 55, Low 35...
 
2013-01-09 11:00:10 AM

HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.

Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something

It is the next pass that is the problem, not this one.

Thanks, I finally saw the rest of the thread. I'm clueless.


Not really, the headline here isn't helping heh.
 
2013-01-09 11:01:34 AM
So what you're saying is there's no reason to save the finer things
Link
 
2013-01-09 11:02:39 AM
Was this article written by the GOP or faux news or something? It's about the same level of argument.

"Could we get hit by this asteroid? It's possible!"
Science: the asteroid has a trajectory, we have calculated it, we know where it's going.

the end.
 
2013-01-09 11:03:48 AM
Impact simulator.. have fun playing with the possibilities.
 
2013-01-09 11:04:35 AM

Carn: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.

Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something

It is the next pass that is the problem, not this one.

Yeah but even if we calculate that it's going to hit us, we have 20 years to train Bruce Willis and his team instead of just a few months so we're gonna be fine. I don't know if he'll volunteer to blow himself up again.


The real danger is going to be probabilities. People don't understand how they work. They will come out with a probability that it will hit when people want a yes no. This is big enough to possibly kill everyone, even the preppers in their bunkers. What kind of probability is acceptable? It we wait until they are 99% sure, it will be too late to deflect it. If we start early when they are 1/1000 sure, we can still do it, and the earlier we start the cheaper the mission.  Certain elements of society aren't going to want to spend money at the 1/1000 level.  Plus we don't really know enough about how to deflect these things, there are a lot of untested ideas like coating them with paint to cause a very small push by sunlight, but those things have to be applied early.
 
2013-01-09 11:04:43 AM
Earth always gets picked last at cosmic dodgeball. She just stands there and giggles sardonically
 
2013-01-09 11:05:30 AM

Carn: Uh, yeah, no there isn't.

the risk from Apophis is already essentially zero.

"What does essentially zero mean exactly? Let's review some history. When Apophis was discovered in 2004, astronomers calculated that there was a very small probability (up to 2.7%) that it would strike the Earth in 2029. That was clearly unsettling, but the concern was short-lived. The 2029 impact possibility was quickly ruled out, but, almost as quickly, another possibility reared its head: a possible impact in 2036. For a time, astronomers thought there was a 1-in-45,000 chance that Apophis would strike Earth on April 13, 2036. Then, in October 2009, the numbers were updated again, and the impact possibility decreased again. Currently, the chance of an impact with Earth by asteroid Apophis in 2036 has dropped to about 1-in-250,000. While greater than your chance of winning a lottery (many millions to one), it's still very very unlikely. That's the number David Helfand calls essentially zero. Astronomers believe the possibility will drop to absolutely zero after the early 2013 pass by Apophis."

There is zero chance that it hits us this pass. They think there is a minute chance that is essentially zero that it could hit us in 2036 but they'll be certain after it passes.


strawberrythreads.files.wordpress.com
So you're telling me there's a chance... *YEAH!*
 
2013-01-09 11:05:50 AM
Meh, we've had a good run.
 
2013-01-09 11:06:25 AM
Not a problem - I'm insured by AllState - they'll take care of me.

/born Jan 8th 2013
 
2013-01-09 11:06:43 AM
Bull shiat
 
2013-01-09 11:07:54 AM
The answer to any headline that ends in a question mark is always "No".
 
2013-01-09 11:08:01 AM
How about I get a fresh bottle of brandy, put my seatbelt on and ride it out.
 
rpm
2013-01-09 11:08:04 AM

Well what do you know. From the FAQ on that site

You will get paid for every view, comment, like/dislike and social media share on every post you create. The payout (per) will vary based on how much ad revenue Bubblews is making at the time. Although we do split ad revenue 50/50. We believe every user should be an equal partner.
 
2013-01-09 11:08:19 AM

KarmicDisaster: Yeah, thanks for the misleading headline, subby. The danger from this is not on this pass, but on subsequent.  Such headlines just get people to dismiss this as nothing when there is actually a danger. At the moment this is the most potentially dangerous we have ever seen. That will be refined after this pass.


Settle down, Chicken Little. Here's one from NASA.

"The future for Apophis on Friday, April 13 of 2029 includes an approach to Earth no closer than 29,470 km (18,300 miles, or 5.6 Earth radii from the center, or 4.6 Earth-radii from the surface) over the mid-Atlantic, appearing to the naked eye as a moderately bright point of light moving rapidly across the sky. Depending on its mechanical nature, it could experience shape or spin-state alteration due to tidal forces caused by Earth's gravity field.

This is within the distance of Earth's geosynchronous satellites. However, because Apophis will pass interior to the positions of these satellites at closest approach, in a plane inclined at 40 degrees to the Earth's equator and passing outside the equatorial geosynchronous zone when crossing the equatorial plane, it does not threaten the satellites in that heavily populated region.

Using criteria developed in this research, new measurements possible in 2013 (if not 2011) will likely confirm that in 2036 Apophis will quietly pass more than 49 million km (30.5 million miles; 0.32 AU) from Earth on Easter Sunday of that year (April 13)."
 
2013-01-09 11:08:38 AM

99sportster: John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?

Exactly. This guy (or gal) is an idiot. And a fear-monger. A fear-mongering idiot.


The new normal, I suspect, although the site's name of "Bubblews" is a tip-off that this isn't Edward R. Murrow country.

Mouth-breathing scribe needs a ruler, followed by a brief EVA with a cracked helmet visor.
 
2013-01-09 11:09:12 AM
There are a lot of other articles from more reputable sites, just google it if you want to know more. Not sure why this dork site and work headline was picked to green.
 
2013-01-09 11:09:17 AM

HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.


www.mjhsbnn.com

Oh really???
 
2013-01-09 11:10:22 AM
At this rate Apophis will hit us before TFA loads.
 
2013-01-09 11:10:30 AM

The Bestest: I might have a foursome with Mila Kunis, Scarlett Johansen and Zoe Seldana today. Just saying.


"I've seen penis fractures and tongue fractures, son, but never on the same person at the same time."
 
2013-01-09 11:10:40 AM

KarmicDisaster: Carn: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.

Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something

It is the next pass that is the problem, not this one.

Yeah but even if we calculate that it's going to hit us, we have 20 years to train Bruce Willis and his team instead of just a few months so we're gonna be fine. I don't know if he'll volunteer to blow himself up again.

The real danger is going to be probabilities. People don't understand how they work. They will come out with a probability that it will hit when people want a yes no. This is big enough to possibly kill everyone, even the preppers in their bunkers. What kind of probability is acceptable? It we wait until they are 99% sure, it will be too late to deflect it. If we start early when they are 1/1000 sure, we can still do it, and the earlier we start the cheaper the mission.  Certain elements of society aren't going to want to spend money at the 1/1000 level.  Plus we don't really know enough about how to deflect these things, there are a lot of untested ideas like coating them with paint to cause a very small push by sunlight, but those things have to be applied early.


Honestly, I would support a mission like this even if we know it'll be close but not really dangerous, because it would be a good prep in case one every is in a direct path. However, I don't think many people would support that kind of expense.
 
2013-01-09 11:10:41 AM
as long as it doesn't hit on the gulf coast or the gulf of mexico i'll be fine
 
2013-01-09 11:11:25 AM

bighairyguy: If it hits the Westboro Baptist Church, I'm all for it.


Well, they got burned last night...
 
2013-01-09 11:12:01 AM

Carn: KarmicDisaster: Yeah, thanks for the misleading headline, subby. The danger from this is not on this pass, but on subsequent.  Such headlines just get people to dismiss this as nothing when there is actually a danger. At the moment this is the most potentially dangerous we have ever seen. That will be refined after this pass.

Settle down, Chicken Little. Here's one from NASA.

"The future for Apophis on Friday, April 13 of 2029 includes an approach to Earth no closer than 29,470 km (18,300 miles, or 5.6 Earth radii from the center, or 4.6 Earth-radii from the surface) over the mid-Atlantic, appearing to the naked eye as a moderately bright point of light moving rapidly across the sky. Depending on its mechanical nature, it could experience shape or spin-state alteration due to tidal forces caused by Earth's gravity field.

This is within the distance of Earth's geosynchronous satellites. However, because Apophis will pass interior to the positions of these satellites at closest approach, in a plane inclined at 40 degrees to the Earth's equator and passing outside the equatorial geosynchronous zone when crossing the equatorial plane, it does not threaten the satellites in that heavily populated region.

Using criteria developed in this research, new measurements possible in 2013 (if not 2011) will likely confirm that in 2036 Apophis will quietly pass more than 49 million km (30.5 million miles; 0.32 AU) from Earth on Easter Sunday of that year (April 13)."


" will likely confirm " Like I said, people aren't going to be able to understand how probabilites work and decide how much risk they want to take. Right now it is not a big risk, but it is there. As we know more, we can get a better estimate of the odds. ATM it looks like we are mostly safe.
 
2013-01-09 11:12:40 AM
Since everything happens in Australia first, let's see what happens there. If Australia gets hit, then we know we're farked.

/apocalypses work that way, right?
 
2013-01-09 11:12:45 AM
Followed by faultlines that cannot sit still.
Followed by millions of dumbfounded dipshiats.
 
2013-01-09 11:13:29 AM

Carn: KarmicDisaster: Carn: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: KarmicDisaster: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

There is if we act now, there isn't if we wait until we are "sure" in 2029. They will have a better orbit this year after more observations. Then we will may to decide what to do. Maybe it will depend on who it will hit.

Where are you getting 2029 from? I thought this thing was near us today.

/farking from my phone so I might have missed something

It is the next pass that is the problem, not this one.

Yeah but even if we calculate that it's going to hit us, we have 20 years to train Bruce Willis and his team instead of just a few months so we're gonna be fine. I don't know if he'll volunteer to blow himself up again.

The real danger is going to be probabilities. People don't understand how they work. They will come out with a probability that it will hit when people want a yes no. This is big enough to possibly kill everyone, even the preppers in their bunkers. What kind of probability is acceptable? It we wait until they are 99% sure, it will be too late to deflect it. If we start early when they are 1/1000 sure, we can still do it, and the earlier we start the cheaper the mission.  Certain elements of society aren't going to want to spend money at the 1/1000 level.  Plus we don't really know enough about how to deflect these things, there are a lot of untested ideas like coating them with paint to cause a very small push by sunlight, but those things have to be applied early.

Honestly, I would support a mission like this even if we know it'll be close but not really dangerous, because it would be a good prep in case one every is in a direct path. However, I don't think many people would support that kind of expense.


I dunno, we won't want to mess with a real Earth crosser until we have some experience I think. We need a mission to try to push some safe asteroid around first to get some data on how well it works.
 
2013-01-09 11:13:50 AM
My 7 foot long leucistic rat snake is named Apophis.  Surely he will save us.
 
2013-01-09 11:13:57 AM
Your blog sucks.

Today was never a possible impact, just a chance to line up a future impact. Better data has ruled out 2029 but there's still a tiny chance for 2036 and beyond. Keep an eye on http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/risk/ to see what else might be heading our way.

There are pictures (well, a few pixels) of Apophis here if anyone's curious.
 
2013-01-09 11:14:14 AM

rpm: Well what do you know. From the FAQ on that site

You will get paid for every view, comment, like/dislike and social media share on every post you create. The payout (per) will vary based on how much ad revenue Bubblews is making at the time. Although we do split ad revenue 50/50. We believe every user should be an equal partner.


I saw no ads. What do I win?
 
2013-01-09 11:16:49 AM

WarszawaScream: My 7 foot long leucistic rat snake is named Apophis.


Funny, that's what I say to the missus.
 
2013-01-09 11:17:58 AM
Complete Bullshiat. Apophis is 0.0966 AU. 1AU= 149 597 871 kilometers

That is 14,451,154km away.....

Someone got thier math wrong.
 
2013-01-09 11:17:59 AM
I didn't want to live into my 40's. Give me a baby or bring on the death comet.
 
2013-01-09 11:18:50 AM

Guns n' Farkin Roses: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

[www.mjhsbnn.com image 350x237]

Oh really???


Too bad we don't have an operating manned spaceship of any type to get him there.  Only Russia and China have manned rockets now, and they can only reach low Earth orbit which will just give them a better view of the fireworks.
 
2013-01-09 11:19:57 AM

KarmicDisaster: Carn: KarmicDisaster: Yeah, thanks for the misleading headline, subby. The danger from this is not on this pass, but on subsequent.  Such headlines just get people to dismiss this as nothing when there is actually a danger. At the moment this is the most potentially dangerous we have ever seen. That will be refined after this pass.

Settle down, Chicken Little. Here's one from NASA.

"The future for Apophis on Friday, April 13 of 2029 includes an approach to Earth no closer than 29,470 km (18,300 miles, or 5.6 Earth radii from the center, or 4.6 Earth-radii from the surface) over the mid-Atlantic, appearing to the naked eye as a moderately bright point of light moving rapidly across the sky. Depending on its mechanical nature, it could experience shape or spin-state alteration due to tidal forces caused by Earth's gravity field.

This is within the distance of Earth's geosynchronous satellites. However, because Apophis will pass interior to the positions of these satellites at closest approach, in a plane inclined at 40 degrees to the Earth's equator and passing outside the equatorial geosynchronous zone when crossing the equatorial plane, it does not threaten the satellites in that heavily populated region.

Using criteria developed in this research, new measurements possible in 2013 (if not 2011) will likely confirm that in 2036 Apophis will quietly pass more than 49 million km (30.5 million miles; 0.32 AU) from Earth on Easter Sunday of that year (April 13)."

" will likely confirm " Like I said, people aren't going to be able to understand how probabilites work and decide how much risk they want to take. Right now it is not a big risk, but it is there. As we know more, we can get a better estimate of the odds. ATM it looks like we are mostly safe.


Now that I think about it, I think it'll be better if it is more likely to hit us. We have 23 (16?) years to prepare, and it wouldn't destroy the entire planet if we failed. Do we go with mega-ground based cannons? Lunar deflection ray? Lunar atomic asteroid smasher? Bruce Willis style commando team? Anything that encourages us to start exploring at least our own solar system and paves the way for colonizing space is a good thing. Something will eventually do very bad things to Earth's surface. Solar flare, asteroid, angry aliens, Justin Bieber, something. Sure, it might be a million years, but ask the dinosaurs if they think they should have spent more on asteroid defense technology.
 
2013-01-09 11:20:12 AM

shifter_: Complete Bullshiat. Apophis is 0.0966 AU. 1AU= 149 597 871 kilometers

That is 14,451,154km away.....

Someone got thier math wrong.


Gah, I give up. How many people are going to come in here to say that the headline is stupid. The mods must be crazy.
 
2013-01-09 11:20:30 AM

Deucednuisance: Well, they got burned last night...


Well, crap, that's the wrong clip, and I don't see the right one onsite.

Nevermind....
 
2013-01-09 11:20:35 AM

John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?


marketing department
 
2013-01-09 11:20:55 AM
XUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUR!


Someone get me a Gunstar and we'll get this sorted out.
 
2013-01-09 11:21:09 AM

ha-ha-guy: I'm more curious to see if manages to clip a satellite or two on the way past.


It won't. But if it did, wouldn't it be hilarious if it took out Best Korea's?
 
2013-01-09 11:21:48 AM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: Impact simulator.. have fun playing with the possibilities.


Damn, was hoping for more explosions. Still, the animation does always have the projectile slamming into the North East US, so there's that.

/I keed!
 
2013-01-09 11:22:50 AM

ima turkey: It's Obamas fault.


Yup, totally Obamas fault  Link
 
2013-01-09 11:23:41 AM

Carn: Honestly, I would support a mission like this even if we know it'll be close but not really dangerous, because it would be a good prep in case one every is in a direct path. However, I don't think many people would support that kind of expense.


Agreed. It'd be REALLY good for us as a species to get some practice at doing something like this. And to people complaining about the cost, just think about how expensive it will be if we all have to pitch in to help rebuild, say, all of South America. It would be thousands, if not millions, of times cheaper to launch a couple of rockets now.
 
2013-01-09 11:23:47 AM

John Napkintosh: I'm reading 9 million miles on other sites. Where the hell did this site get 13,000 miles?


Gallop did the calculations. To be fair they did say there was a +/- 10,000,000 mile error.
 
2013-01-09 11:24:12 AM
media.comicvine.com

He's not that big, couldn't possibly do that much damage.
 
2013-01-09 11:26:08 AM
OK, so it's almost certainly not a happening deal. But let's say, for the sake of argument only, that the 2029 thing was a significant risk. Significant to the extent that "something must be done".

What is the current thinking on how to attack such a problem, if we got started on it today? Sixteen years is a fairly long time, and we can assume some technological advances will occur... but we can't know what they will be.

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

/just a 'what if'
//this time
 
2013-01-09 11:28:57 AM
You have no chance to survive make your time.
 
2013-01-09 11:30:43 AM

Mr_Fabulous: OK, so it's almost certainly not a happening deal. But let's say, for the sake of argument only, that the 2029 thing was a significant risk. Significant to the extent that "something must be done".

What is the current thinking on how to attack such a problem, if we got started on it today? Sixteen years is a fairly long time, and we can assume some technological advances will occur... but we can't know what they will be.

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

/just a 'what if'
//this time


Yes, because 16 years is plenty of time to halt a looming international catastrophe. Just look how well Kyoto did.
 
2013-01-09 11:31:30 AM
Where is Superman? Oh No we have no phone booths!
 
2013-01-09 11:32:42 AM

zarberg: [media.comicvine.com image 300x216]

He's not that big, couldn't possibly do that much damage.


What if he's stuffed full of naquadah?

/don't ask me how.
 
2013-01-09 11:34:37 AM

Bungles: Just look how well Kyoto did.


I've been to Kyoto; it's a lovely town.

No idea what point you're trying to make, but clearly you didn't understand my question. Good day.
 
2013-01-09 11:34:42 AM

Mr_Fabulous: What is the current thinking on how to attack such a problem, if we got started on it today?


Current thinking? Burn down all of the world's observatories and then go back to watching reality TV.
 
2013-01-09 11:34:58 AM
Meh. Even if it hits us, it's not big enough to affect us on a global scale. On the off chance it hits land it will ruin a bunch of people's day, but we're not talking an extinction level event.
 
2013-01-09 11:35:13 AM
According to another article, it will be streamed live by an Australian site on Thursday around 11:00 am (Australian) from a space camera, SLOOH. Check back before 4:00 pm (LA, PST) or 7:00 pm (Ottawa, EST). There's an event count down clock on the site.

Here's a world clock.

Don't take my word for it. Check the time for yourself to be sure you get the right local time and other details.
 
2013-01-09 11:35:32 AM
There is an exciting one coming up in February, but only in the sense of potential satellite damage.

DA14
 
2013-01-09 11:37:24 AM

Mr_Fabulous: OK, so it's almost certainly not a happening deal. But let's say, for the sake of argument only, that the 2029 thing was a significant risk. Significant to the extent that "something must be done".

What is the current thinking on how to attack such a problem, if we got started on it today? Sixteen years is a fairly long time, and we can assume some technological advances will occur... but we can't know what they will be.

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

/just a 'what if'
//this time


That NASA article I linked above had a few things in there but it seems they haven't wasted too much money on theoreticals. One of the ideas is to add some kind of reflective surface to the asteroid on one of the next passes to make it absorb more energy and knock it off course. Although, not sure what the vessel would be. Super duper space drone?
 
2013-01-09 11:37:30 AM

Mr_Fabulous: Bungles: Just look how well Kyoto did.

I've been to Kyoto; it's a lovely town.

No idea what point you're trying to make, but clearly you didn't understand my question. Good day.



Umm. Kyoto Protocol

My point is, even if we start now, absolutely nothing will be done. Beyond lots and lots of arguing.
 
2013-01-09 11:37:54 AM

Ivo Shandor: Current thinking? Burn down all of the world's observatories and then go back to watching reality TV.


Is Kim K. thinking about lowering the pressure in her butt?
 
2013-01-09 11:45:15 AM

Carn: Mr_Fabulous: OK, so it's almost certainly not a happening deal. But let's say, for the sake of argument only, that the 2029 thing was a significant risk. Significant to the extent that "something must be done".

What is the current thinking on how to attack such a problem, if we got started on it today? Sixteen years is a fairly long time, and we can assume some technological advances will occur... but we can't know what they will be.

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

/just a 'what if'
//this time

That NASA article I linked above had a few things in there but it seems they haven't wasted too much money on theoreticals. One of the ideas is to add some kind of reflective surface to the asteroid on one of the next passes to make it absorb more energy and knock it off course. Although, not sure what the vessel would be. Super duper space drone?


Thanks.

Yeah, I have a feeling that an impending explosive disaster of global scale would probably free up some resources pronto. But I'm still not clear on what they'd actually do. (I'm also not clear on how a "reflective surface" would "absorb more energy," but that whole concept seems dodgy to me anyway.)

Someday, it's gonna be for realzies. And someone very bright is going to have to come with something very practicable.
 
2013-01-09 11:46:26 AM
So, what are some of the variables in the 2029 approach that affect the probability of an impact in 2032? Is it a matter of how much its velocity changes as a result of interacting with the Earth/Moon system? Is it a question of if it strikes an unsuspecting "weather satellite?"
 
2013-01-09 11:46:37 AM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: Did it come from the Arachnid quarantine zone?

/want to know more


If it hits Buenos Aires at least we don't have to listen to the argie bargie cry about wanting the Falklands back any longer. So win-win situation.

Besides the danger is the next pass of the asteroid if it happens to go through a certain window this time around.
 
2013-01-09 11:48:06 AM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: Impact simulator.. have fun playing with the possibilities.


After plugging in numbers for a small planet-sized body:

"
The Earth is completely disrupted by the impact and its debris forms a new asteroid belt orbiting the sun between Venus and Mars.
100 percent of the Earth is melted
Depending on the direction and location the collision, the impact may make a significant change in the tilt of Earth's axis.
Depending on the direction and location of impact, the collision may cause a change in the length of the day of up to 8470 hours.
The impact shifts the Earth's orbit noticeably."

That would be a bad day...
 
2013-01-09 11:49:41 AM

Bungles: Umm. Kyoto Protocol

My point is, even if we start now, absolutely nothing will be done.



Ah, got you now.

I think it might be different if we were facing one single, explosive moment of doom instead of an arguably arguable long-term trend of warmer weather (note: I understand it's not really "arguable" at this point). But my worst fear is... you might be right, and it won't matter.
 
2013-01-09 11:50:57 AM
John Carmack tried to warn us...

/runs to his ark
 
2013-01-09 11:53:33 AM
Is it gonna hit us Cowardly Lion?!?!

www.snopes.com

Nope, not gonna hit us ... sadly ...

www.snopes.com
 
2013-01-09 11:55:02 AM
I'd happily put up with some ice age sh*t if the damn asteroid would take out all the fundies, science deniers, people who use ALL CAPS WHILE TYPING, terrorists of any religion, the Wall Street morons who f*cked the economy, anyone who wears socks with sandals, and anybody else I don't like.

\time for *more* caffiene
 
2013-01-09 11:55:03 AM

Mr_Fabulous: Bungles: Umm. Kyoto Protocol

My point is, even if we start now, absolutely nothing will be done.


Ah, got you now.

I think it might be different if we were facing one single, explosive moment of doom instead of an arguably arguable long-term trend of warmer weather (note: I understand it's not really "arguable" at this point). But my worst fear is... you might be right, and it won't matter.


The problem is, we don't have an efficient system for inter-governmental cooperation that doesn't take forever, and one that didn't would be wildly undemocratic.

The only real hope would probably be China saying "screw this" and doing it entirely themselves using massive compulsory work camps.
 
2013-01-09 11:56:36 AM

kvinesknows: and this article says 15 million kms away today


http://ca.news.yahoo.com/asteroid-extremely-remote-possibility-striki n g-earth-2036-makes-090011942.html


Do you dare doubt the scientific rigor of Bubblews?
 
2013-01-09 11:57:10 AM
just FYI:

I could stay awake just to hear you breathing
Watch you smile while you are sleeping
While you're far away and dreaming
I could spend my life in this sweet surrender
I could stay lost in this moment forever
Where every moment spent with you is a moment I treasure

Don't want to close my eyes
I don't want to fall asleep
Cause I'd miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing
Cause even when I dream of you
The sweetest dream will never do
I'd still miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing
 
2013-01-09 11:57:14 AM
Ban asteroids!
 
2013-01-09 11:59:37 AM

Biness: just FYI:

I could stay awake just to hear you breathing
Watch you smile while you are sleeping
While you're far away and dreaming
I could spend my life in this sweet surrender
I could stay lost in this moment forever
Where every moment spent with you is a moment I treasure

Don't want to close my eyes
I don't want to fall asleep
Cause I'd miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing
Cause even when I dream of you
The sweetest dream will never do
I'd still miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing


Damn you to hell.
 
2013-01-09 12:02:12 PM
From what I have seen, it's supposed to pass by at 30,000 kilometres above the Earth today.

Either way, load Milla Jovovich onto the pillar and get the stones from the freaky blue b*tch over there...
 
2013-01-09 12:02:42 PM

Carn: Biness: just FYI:

I could stay awake just to hear you breathing
Watch you smile while you are sleeping
While you're far away and dreaming
I could spend my life in this sweet surrender
I could stay lost in this moment forever
Where every moment spent with you is a moment I treasure

Don't want to close my eyes
I don't want to fall asleep
Cause I'd miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing
Cause even when I dream of you
The sweetest dream will never do
I'd still miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing

Damn you to hell.


Lying close to you feeling your heart beating
And I'm wondering what you're dreaming
Wondering if it's me you're seeing
Then I kiss your eyes
And thank God we're together
I just want to stay with you in this moment forever
Forever and ever

/you're going to get taken out by an asteroid with this stuck in your head
//no you're not, but can you imagine?!
 
2013-01-09 12:02:50 PM
Apophis has a diameter of 275 metres. That's big but not world-destroying big.

Check out possible scenarios at : Purdue Earth Impact Simulator.

Assumptions
At 100 kilometres distance (60 miles), composed of dense rock, and hitting sedimentary rock at 45 degrees, it would sound like heavy traffic (on top of any noise in the vicinity). The airblast speed would be 28.8 mph, 5 minutes after impact. The crater would be more than twice as big as the famous Meteor Crater in Arizona, so you would definitely want to be more than 30 miles away, and my 60 mile distance would be safe enough I think. Different assumptions produce different results. The most important assumption would be a water landing (with about 70% of the Earth's surface water or sea ice).

In other words, a,n Apophis impact would have a couple of upsides, one, it would prevent a future Apophis impact, and two, it would be very educational for geologists, disaster planers and the population of Earth in general.

I think I might add it to my bucket list: be very far from a minor NEO impact in a remote area. Provided it did not hit anything important or close by, it would be a very interesting life lesson for the human race.
 
2013-01-09 12:04:03 PM

BraveNewCheneyWorld: Impact simulator.. have fun playing with the possibilities.


OK... I've had waaaay to much morbid fun with that.
 
2013-01-09 12:04:29 PM

Mr.Sharpy: So, what are some of the variables in the 2029 approach that affect the probability of an impact in 2032? Is it a matter of how much its velocity changes as a result of interacting with the Earth/Moon system? Is it a question of if it strikes an unsuspecting "weather satellite?"


From what I recall seeing about this on documentaries, it's just that the measurements are so precise to figure out exactly where it's going to be in 15 years that they just can't measure them accurately enough until it gets really really close. There's a "keyhole" that they have mapped out, and if it ends up passing through that particular window, then it's a big Uh Oh.
 
2013-01-09 12:07:07 PM
When asteroids are oulawed, then only outla.....ah screw it!
 
2013-01-09 12:07:20 PM

Carn: There is zero chance that it hits us this pass. They think there is a minute chance that is essentially zero that it could hit us in 2036 but they'll be certain after it passes.


Or they'll come back and say, "Hey, guys... we're going to buy lottery tickets. Just sayin'."
 
2013-01-09 12:13:50 PM
I wish amateur astronomers would tell us whether it is going to hit in 2029 - because the government wouldn't tell us if it would.
 
2013-01-09 12:14:26 PM

kvinesknows: and this article says 15 million kms away today


http://ca.news.yahoo.com/asteroid-extremely-remote-possibility-striki n g-earth-2036-makes-090011942.html


It should be about ~0.09 - 0.1 AU away right now, or a tenth the distance between the earth and sun, so yeah, ~14-15 million km. About 40 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon. It won't be until 2029 that it comes near as close as TFA says.
 
2013-01-09 12:15:41 PM
i.imgur.com

(Original version: Bob the Angry Flower, Asteroid 2030)

The cartoon from 13 years ago was originally in reference to 2000 SG344, but there's still a sliver of hope in the form of 2011 AG5, which will make a keyhole pass in 2023.
 
2013-01-09 12:21:47 PM
Just because we KNOW about this asteroid and can track it's movements, doesn't mean it's safe. Who knows what might happen to change it's course? Another asteroid hit's it, perhaps. And it also doesn't mean it's time to stop looking for these things. There are billions of them out there. One could strike the planet out of a clear sky before I finish typing this. (looks up. Wheewww....)

It's not like I spend my time concerned about these things... But we humans have been here for such a brief amount of time, and we think we are so smart. It's been a long time since there was a real disaster... Consider that if you think it's impossible.

Sleep well...
 
2013-01-09 12:24:46 PM

KarmicDisaster: shifter_: Complete Bullshiat. Apophis is 0.0966 AU. 1AU= 149 597 871 kilometers

That is 14,451,154km away.....

Someone got thier math wrong.

Gah, I give up. How many people are going to come in here to say that the headline is stupid. The mods must be crazy.


I think the article writer confused AU and LD.......
 
2013-01-09 12:24:56 PM

brantgoose: Apophis has a diameter of 275 metres. That's big but not world-destroying big.

Check out possible scenarios at : Purdue Earth Impact Simulator.

Assumptions
At 100 kilometres distance (60 miles), composed of dense rock, and hitting sedimentary rock at 45 degrees, it would sound like heavy traffic (on top of any noise in the vicinity). The airblast speed would be 28.8 mph, 5 minutes after impact. The crater would be more than twice as big as the famous Meteor Crater in Arizona, so you would definitely want to be more than 30 miles away, and my 60 mile distance would be safe enough I think. Different assumptions produce different results. The most important assumption would be a water landing (with about 70% of the Earth's surface water or sea ice).

In other words, a,n Apophis impact would have a couple of upsides, one, it would prevent a future Apophis impact, and two, it would be very educational for geologists, disaster planers and the population of Earth in general.

I think I might add it to my bucket list: be very far from a minor NEO impact in a remote area. Provided it did not hit anything important or close by, it would be a very interesting life lesson for the human race.


Did you remember to set the velocity appropriately? Apophis is traveling at 30 km/s. Doesn't seem to change too much though.
 
2013-01-09 12:25:46 PM

Bungles: digitalrain: FTA: "...but its probably not a planet killer."

Good to know!

[www.stardestroyer.net image 550x413]

They're not hard to spot.


I thought that they looked more like this.

abagond.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-01-09 12:25:56 PM

Cheese eating surrender monkey: zarberg: [media.comicvine.com image 300x216]

He's not that big, couldn't possibly do that much damage.

What if he's stuffed full of naquadah?

/don't ask me how.


They could just expand a hyperdrive bubble around him and go through the Earth in hyperspace.
 
2013-01-09 12:26:44 PM
Sounds apocryphal.
 
2013-01-09 12:27:33 PM

Biness: Carn: Biness: just FYI:

I could stay awake just to hear you breathing
Watch you smile while you are sleeping
While you're far away and dreaming
I could spend my life in this sweet surrender
I could stay lost in this moment forever
Where every moment spent with you is a moment I treasure

Don't want to close my eyes
I don't want to fall asleep
Cause I'd miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing
Cause even when I dream of you
The sweetest dream will never do
I'd still miss you babe
And I don't want to miss a thing

Damn you to hell.

Lying close to you feeling your heart beating
And I'm wondering what you're dreaming
Wondering if it's me you're seeing
Then I kiss your eyes
And thank God we're together
I just want to stay with you in this moment forever
Forever and ever

/you're going to get taken out by an asteroid with this stuck in your head
//no you're not, but can you imagine?!


I think if I had that song in my head when the asteroid was coming I'd tell it to hurry up. I turned on my thrash radio station on Pandora after you gave me that ear poison. Currently I'm enjoying the end of Sanitarium by Metallica. I guess it's fitting for this discussion too.

Welcome to where time stands still
No one sleeps and no one will
 
2013-01-09 12:28:13 PM

Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?



My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?
 
2013-01-09 12:31:25 PM

Mr_Fabulous: Someday, it's gonna be for realzies. And someone very bright is going to have to come with something very practicable.


The first step would be to land a few radio transponders on it so that it could be tracked much more precisely. That doesn't require any new technology, just a funding and engineering push to get it done in time. Of course if the updated information then rules out an impact, everyone will scream that the whole thing was just a Y2K-style scam.

Assuming that it will still hit, if it's small enough you could just live with it or evacuate the target region. If it's large or if it's heading for one of your important cities then you move on to deflection. At this point you risk provoking wars, e.g. if Russia decides to deflect it away from their territory into some part of China but China isn't too keen on the idea. If you're going to do it at all, you need to provide reasonable assurance that you can deflect it far enough to miss the planet completely.

As for deflection mechanisms, several have been proposed. Nuclear bombs detonated just above the surface, a nuclear-reactor-powered spacecraft with an ion engine, a robot to mine chunks of the asteroid and throw them of into space, etc. It really depends how large the object is and how much time you have, and there's a chance that the final answer will be "sucks to be you, should have built that Mars colony when you had the chance".
 
2013-01-09 12:32:14 PM
When these things come up I amuse myself by imagining our current government(s) reaction to an actual threat. No running in the streets for me, I'll die laughing at watching congress arguing over spending cuts to fund the "We're all going to die, please do something" bill.
 
2013-01-09 12:35:55 PM
say... how come in deep impact and Armageddon they pretty much knew EXACTLY where on earth it would hit but they dont even know IF this one will hit Earth, never mind where. Has forecasting technology gotten worse since 1998?
 
2013-01-09 12:36:32 PM

ha-ha-guy: I'm more curious to see if manages to clip a satellite or two on the way past.


Billion-to-one odds. There's a lot more empty space to travel through than there are satellites in orbit.
 
2013-01-09 12:36:32 PM
Part of me really wants to see a sizable asteroid strike the planet. Not a planet or civilization killer, but one big enough to put a big f*cking hole in the ground. Just think of the invaluable scientific data we could collect witnessing an actually meteor impact. Granted it would most like hit the ocean and drown millions, but still, kinda cool.
 
2013-01-09 12:42:25 PM

Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?


Absolutely. Think of any large artillery guns. There is a housing that allows the gun to recoil but stay in its position. This is just classic Newtonian physics. In space of course, you have no resistance (large ship, planetary mass, etc) to absorb the impact. If it were mounted on the moon, that might be enough mass to offset the firing, but it's possible that a big enough gun could actually alter the moon's orbit, which would be bad. You could have it floating in its own orbit but you'd need thrusters to fire when the gun did to keep it stabilized or the thing would spin itself all over the damn place. What would be easier potentially is a giant laser, but a projectile might be more effective.
 
2013-01-09 12:42:31 PM

kvinesknows: say... how come in deep impact and Armageddon they pretty much knew EXACTLY where on earth it would hit but they dont even know IF this one will hit Earth, never mind where. Has forecasting technology gotten worse since 1998?


No. Those were movies.
 
2013-01-09 12:47:40 PM
Armageddon is one of the most horrible movies ever made.
 
2013-01-09 12:48:20 PM

Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?



My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?


If I understand this correctly, the magnetic accelerators are pulling the ballistic. Pretty sure the recoil, at least on a terrestrial version, is negligible to nonexistent. In space, with no gravity well acting on the whole mechanism I'm not sure if you'd need the counter thrust or not.
 
2013-01-09 12:52:16 PM
Wait for 2036
 
2013-01-09 12:53:25 PM
...so the Mayans were not that far off after all? Ha! HA!

waitwut?
 
2013-01-09 12:56:42 PM

Carn: Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?

Absolutely. Think of any large artillery guns. There is a housing that allows the gun to recoil but stay in its position. This is just classic Newtonian physics. In space of course, you have no resistance (large ship, planetary mass, etc) to absorb the impact. If it were mounted on the moon, that might be enough mass to offset the firing, but it's possible that a big enough gun could actually alter the moon's orbit, which would be bad. You could have it floating in its own orbit but you'd need thrusters to fire when the gun did to keep it stabilized or the thing would spin itself all over the damn place. What would be easier potentially is a giant laser, but a projectile might be more effective.


But it's not an artillery gun. It's a rail gun. There's no explosion delivering force to the ballistic. There's a magnetic field pulling it instead. Then a field further down the barrel turns on, the original turns off and the object is advanced down the barrel. This provides the acceleration. Traditional weapons use explosives, which produce recoil (it's really the Newtonian side effect of channeling that force into a linear vector). No explosion means no recoil.

/in space the changing location of the ballistic's gravity field could produce a similar effect in the opposite direction
 
2013-01-09 12:59:12 PM
So should I take back my purple Nikes or what?
 
2013-01-09 12:59:17 PM

KingsleyZisou: Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?

If I understand this correctly, the magnetic accelerators are pulling the ballistic. Pretty sure the recoil, at least on a terrestrial version, is negligible to nonexistent. In space, with no gravity well acting on the whole mechanism I'm not sure if you'd need the counter thrust or not.


I'm almost certain you would. It's the same as if you were in space and you threw a baseball. Because, here's the thing: When the magnets are 'pulling' the slug forwards, the slug is 'pulling' the magnets backwards with an equal force. Just as when you fall towards the earth, it's pulling you, but you're also pulling *it* up towards you with the exact same force. (But since F=mass*acceleration, and the earth is FRIGGEN HUGE, its acceleration is absurdly miniscule)
 
2013-01-09 01:02:11 PM
Obviously we should outlaw asteroids.
 
2013-01-09 01:03:46 PM

Felgraf: KingsleyZisou: Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?

If I understand this correctly, the magnetic accelerators are pulling the ballistic. Pretty sure the recoil, at least on a terrestrial version, is negligible to nonexistent. In space, with no gravity well acting on the whole mechanism I'm not sure if you'd need the counter thrust or not.

I'm almost certain you would. It's the same as if you were in space and you threw a baseball. Because, here's the thing: When the magnets are 'pulling' the slug forwards, the slug is 'pulling' the magnets backwards with an equal force. Just as when you fall towards the earth, it's pulling you, but you're also pulling *it* up towards you with the exact same force. (But since F=mass*acceleration, and the earth is FRIGGEN HUGE, its acceleration is absurdly miniscule)


This makes sense to me. Thank you. It's hard to envision the cumulative effect on the weapon as each magnet takes its turn pulling the ballistic. Also, based on the equation, the ratio of m(gun) : m(bullet) comes into play.

/there's only one way to find out! Build it!
//and they will come
 
2013-01-09 01:06:01 PM

Mr.Sharpy: So, what are some of the variables in the 2029 approach that affect the probability of an impact in 2032? Is it a matter of how much its velocity changes as a result of interacting with the Earth/Moon system? Is it a question of if it strikes an unsuspecting "weather satellite?"


There are just a lot of unknowables that could change the orbit just a tiny amount now, that has a big effect later. We regard this as chaotic.  Some examples:

* The actual distribution of mass within the object. We don't know it and model the asteroid as a point.  But, imagine that has an irregular shape (likely for small bodies), and one end has more mass. Depending on the rotation and orientation and rotation speed, that end might be a teeny bit closer to the Sun/Earth/Juipter/Moon and change the orbit just a teeny tiny bit, maybe just a matter of centimeters over billions of miles. Might be enough to make a big change several orbits from now. It could be something as minor as a rock sitting on the surface.

* Solar effects. Sunlight and the Solar wind push on it a teeny tiny amount. How much Sunlight pushes depends on the reflectivity. Now imagine that one side is brighter due to a (comparatively) recent strike or something. That area will receive a teeny bit more push from sunlight as photons bounce off rather than being adsorbed. How that area is oriented and the overall brightness map of the asteroid is unknown and can't be modeled.  Same with the solar wind, that will push on it a bit, but we have no idea what the Sun will be doing in the future except in the most general sense, so these are just reduced to simple terms in the orbital calculation.

We just don't have enough computing power or a good enough model of the object or even the Solar system for that matter to predict chaotic orbits like that far in advance. It is getting better all the time, but when you start taking about the 2036 pass we won't know until we see exactly what happens in 2029, and then it is going to be harder to apply a small change and have it have enough effect.
 
2013-01-09 01:09:14 PM

KingsleyZisou: This makes sense to me. Thank you. It's hard to envision the cumulative effect on the weapon as each magnet takes its turn pulling the ballistic. Also, based on the equation, the ratio of m(gun) : m(bullet) comes into play.

/there's only one way to find out! Build it!
//and they will come


Your welcome! Basically, I'm pretty sure it doesn't really matter WHERE the force comes from. Think "For every reaction, equal and opposite reaction."

/By 'pretty sure' I mean 99% certain, but I don't know if I ever did a clasical mechanics problem on this.
// And my research is more nanoscale stuff. Grad student research seems to be slooowwwllly frying my brain.
///Totally agree though, LET'S BUILD IT.
 
2013-01-09 01:09:17 PM
About once I year I get to drag this one back out of the dusty closet ...

imageshack.us
 
2013-01-09 01:09:33 PM

durbnpoisn: kvinesknows: say... how come in deep impact and Armageddon they pretty much knew EXACTLY where on earth it would hit but they dont even know IF this one will hit Earth, never mind where. Has forecasting technology gotten worse since 1998?

No. Those were movies.


so you are saying Bruce Willis aint dead?

fark
 
2013-01-09 01:12:15 PM

KingsleyZisou: Felgraf: KingsleyZisou: Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?

If I understand this correctly, the magnetic accelerators are pulling the ballistic. Pretty sure the recoil, at least on a terrestrial version, is negligible to nonexistent. In space, with no gravity well acting on the whole mechanism I'm not sure if you'd need the counter thrust or not.

I'm almost certain you would. It's the same as if you were in space and you threw a baseball. Because, here's the thing: When the magnets are 'pulling' the slug forwards, the slug is 'pulling' the magnets backwards with an equal force. Just as when you fall towards the earth, it's pulling you, but you're also pulling *it* up towards you with the exact same force. (But since F=mass*acceleration, and the earth is FRIGGEN HUGE, its acceleration is absurdly miniscule)

This makes sense to me. Thank you. It's hard to envision the cumulative effect on the weapon as each magnet takes its turn pulling the ballistic. Also, based on the equation, the ratio of m(gun) : m(bullet) comes into play.

/there's only one way to find out! Build it!
//and they will come


Yes exactly. Every individual pull on the projectile to move it forward has the equal and opposite effect on the gun. Now, definitely the projectile's mass is the main thing here, but I'm guessing you'd need a pretty large one for this endeavor. You need to either hit an asteroid with enough force to knock it off course or smash it into small enough pieces that they won't do much damage. Also depends on the size of the asteroid too.

Ok let's build one.
 
2013-01-09 01:14:54 PM
i1214.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-09 01:23:04 PM

Carn: KingsleyZisou: Felgraf: KingsleyZisou: Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?

If I understand this correctly, the magnetic accelerators are pulling the ballistic. Pretty sure the recoil, at least on a terrestrial version, is negligible to nonexistent. In space, with no gravity well acting on the whole mechanism I'm not sure if you'd need the counter thrust or not.

I'm almost certain you would. It's the same as if you were in space and you threw a baseball. Because, here's the thing: When the magnets are 'pulling' the slug forwards, the slug is 'pulling' the magnets backwards with an equal force. Just as when you fall towards the earth, it's pulling you, but you're also pulling *it* up towards you with the exact same force. (But since F=mass*acceleration, and the earth is FRIGGEN HUGE, its acceleration is absurdly miniscule)

This makes sense to me. Thank you. It's hard to envision the cumulative effect on the weapon as each magnet takes its turn pulling the ballistic. Also, based on the equation, the ratio of m(gun) : m(bullet) comes into play.

/there's only one way to find out! Build it!
//and they will come

Yes exactly. Every individual pull on the projectile to move it forward has the equal and opposite effect on the gun. Now, definitely the projectile's mass is the main thing here, but I'm guessing you'd need a pretty large one for this endeavor. You need to either hit an asteroid with enough force to knock it off course or smash it into small enough pieces that they won't do much damage. Also depends on the size of the asteroid too.

Ok let's build one.


Quick thoughts on ballistic size. We can fire more than once. And the other half of the equation, how fast said itemtravels, matters too. So you don't necessarily need to shoot a large caliber bullet. Just one that delivers enough force to alter the trajectory.

In fact at a close enough distance you don't want to smash the asteroid. You'll turn one big event into thousands of smaller ones. Keeping it away is probably better than busting it up.

imagine if we could manipulate them. Mine them for resources, use them as Shields against other asteroids, turn them into space craft! Oh the possibilities.

/science!
 
2013-01-09 01:23:18 PM
Finally, The sweet release of Death...
 
2013-01-09 01:31:35 PM
Some say a comet will fall from the sky
followed by meteor showers and tidal waves
followed by fault lines that cannot sit still
followed by millions of dumbfounded dipshiats


/some say we'll see armageddon soon
//certainly hope will
 
2013-01-09 01:32:34 PM

octopied: I didn't want to live into my 40's. Give me a baby or bring on the death comet.


Challenge accepted.
 
2013-01-09 01:34:15 PM
A "Lucifer's Hammer" scenario, pleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleaseplea se.

Pure. Sweet. Culture.
 
2013-01-09 01:52:14 PM

Bungles: It's listed as peaking at 40 lunar distances. So 13,000 is only off by 730 times.


Must have had Fla Gov Rick Scott do the ciphering on that one.
 
2013-01-09 01:52:37 PM

Guns n' Farkin Roses: HMS_Blinkin: If it does it does. Nothing we can do about it.

[www.mjhsbnn.com image 350x237]

Oh really???


came to not see this. leaving disappointed.
 
2013-01-09 01:57:28 PM

Rev.K: Armageddon is one of the most horrible movies ever made.


It is indeed horrible. Especially if you look at it from the standpoint of, "is this even the slightest bit plausable?!" Its tough for some people to suspend their disbelief for that long.

But despite that, it is a fun movie with some spiffy effects. Just don't get too caught up in it.
 
2013-01-09 02:09:17 PM

neongoats: A "Lucifer's Hammer" scenario, pleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleasepleaseplea se.

Pure. Sweet. Culture.


I just finished that last summer. Great read.
 
2013-01-09 02:12:17 PM

birchman: Ban asteroids!


If you criminalize asteroids, only criminals will have asteroids.
 
2013-01-09 02:13:37 PM

KingsleyZisou: Carn: KingsleyZisou: Felgraf: KingsleyZisou: Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?

If I understand this correctly, the magnetic accelerators are pulling the ballistic. Pretty sure the recoil, at least on a terrestrial version, is negligible to nonexistent. In space, with no gravity well acting on the whole mechanism I'm not sure if you'd need the counter thrust or not.

I'm almost certain you would. It's the same as if you were in space and you threw a baseball. Because, here's the thing: When the magnets are 'pulling' the slug forwards, the slug is 'pulling' the magnets backwards with an equal force. Just as when you fall towards the earth, it's pulling you, but you're also pulling *it* up towards you with the exact same force. (But since F=mass*acceleration, and the earth is FRIGGEN HUGE, its acceleration is absurdly miniscule)

This makes sense to me. Thank you. It's hard to envision the cumulative effect on the weapon as each magnet takes its turn pulling the ballistic. Also, based on the equation, the ratio of m(gun) : m(bullet) comes into play.

/there's only one way to find out! Build it!
//and they will come

Yes exactly. Every individual pull on the projectile to move it forward has the equal and opposite effect on the gun. Now, definitely the projectile's mass is the main thing here, but I'm guessing you'd need a pretty large one for this endeavor. You need to either hit an asteroid with enough force to knock it off course or smash ...


You're on to something. We don't shoot at it, we shoot to it! With our special thruster and science team who install the thrusters and them propel the asteroid into a new stable orbit around the Earth. Then we find the strange inorganic life which threatens to destroy us all but the lady scientist with seizures doesn't notice.
 
2013-01-09 02:14:58 PM

Shakespeare's Monkey: I'm not saying it's aliens.


i290.photobucket.com
Somebody better get to work on Project Orion.
 
2013-01-09 02:19:20 PM

Twilight Farkle: [i.imgur.com image 790x426]

(Original version: Bob the Angry Flower, Asteroid 2030)

The cartoon from 13 years ago was originally in reference to 2000 SG344, but there's still a sliver of hope in the form of 2011 AG5, which will make a keyhole pass in 2023.


The sad thing is he's right.  Like a obese man who won't diet until he has a heart attack, humanity will do nothing to protect itself against an asteroid strike until we survive one.

The fact that he made the strip 13 years ago and we're still doing nothing is all the proof we need.
 
2013-01-09 02:27:25 PM

Felgraf: KingsleyZisou: Heathen: Mr_Fabulous:

Bottom line: what would we start doing now to fix this, and who would be the people working it out for the next 16 years?

My vote would be a Rail Gun, I don't know why it just sounds cool pelting that big rock with super speed objects to try and knock it off it's course

Now that has me thinking, so this question goes out to all those fark geeks out there (NTTIAWWT). My understanding is a rail gun uses magnets to accelerate an object. So if the rail gun was in space would there be a need for counter thrusters when the gun fires?

If I understand this correctly, the magnetic accelerators are pulling the ballistic. Pretty sure the recoil, at least on a terrestrial version, is negligible to nonexistent. In space, with no gravity well acting on the whole mechanism I'm not sure if you'd need the counter thrust or not.

I'm almost certain you would. It's the same as if you were in space and you threw a baseball. Because, here's the thing: When the magnets are 'pulling' the slug forwards, the slug is 'pulling' the magnets backwards with an equal force. Just as when you fall towards the earth, it's pulling you, but you're also pulling *it* up towards you with the exact same force. (But since F=mass*acceleration, and the earth is FRIGGEN HUGE, its acceleration is absurdly miniscule)


Yes, there would be recoil.  Specifically, unless I'm wrong, conservation of momentum says, for whatever momentum imparted on the projectile, we would see an equal-but-opposite momentum on the gun.
 
2013-01-09 02:35:49 PM

Lt. Cheese Weasel: Did it come from the Arachnid quarantine zone?

/want to know more


I nominate Sky Marshall Tahat Maru to plan the assault. She knows that in order to defeat the bug, we must understand the bug.

/only good bug's a dead bug
//i'm from Buenos Aires and i say kill'em all
 
2013-01-09 02:37:56 PM
i42.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-09 02:47:43 PM
Eh... not so close.

img801.imageshack.us
img836.imageshack.us

Link  (Java needed)
 
2013-01-09 02:53:51 PM
I hear Apophis is also going to make a close pass with Earth in 2029 and 2036.

I think we should take this opportunity to blast it out of the sky.
 
2013-01-09 02:54:26 PM

ciberido: Shakespeare's Monkey: I'm not saying it's aliens.

[i290.photobucket.com image 633x475]
Somebody better get to work on Project Orion.


I kind of hated that book. And I generally love the authors.
 
2013-01-09 03:15:01 PM
This seems a bit more serious

img39.imageshack.us
 
2013-01-09 03:40:51 PM

KarmicDisaster: The real danger is going to be probabilities. People don't understand how they work. They will come out with a probability that it will hit when people want a yes no. This is big enough to possibly kill everyone, even the preppers in their bunkers. What kind of probability is acceptable? It we wait until they are 99% sure, it will be too late to deflect it. If we start early when they are 1/1000 sure, we can still do it, and the earlier we start the cheaper the mission.  Certain elements of society aren't going to want to spend money at the 1/1000 level.  Plus we don't really know enough about how to deflect these things, there are a lot of untested ideas like coating them with paint to cause a very small push by sunlight, but those things have to be applied early.


Much as we don't know how to deflect, honestly the best option if we were pretty damn sure (50%+) would be to just blow it into small chunks so we can watch the pretty meteor shower. It's viable, it requires explosives (which America is  really good at making and appeals to everyone's sense of loving things going boom), and it's got the least possibility of just flat-out not working.

/Paint is probably never going to be a viable option.
//Smashing it into small chunks, though, leads to some nice meteor showers.
 
2013-01-09 03:54:02 PM

PsiChick: KarmicDisaster: ...Much as we don't know how to deflect, honestly the best option if we were pretty damn sure (50%+) would be to just blow it into small chunks so we can watch the pretty meteor shower. It's viable, it requires explosives (which America is  really good at making and appeals to everyone's sense of loving things going boom), and it's got the least possibility of just flat-out not working.

Bad idea.
You'd never be able to blast it into small enough chunks to burn up in the atmosphere.
Earth would get nailed with a shotgun instead of a rifle.
Don't you watch the Science Channel?

 
2013-01-09 03:55:42 PM
Wow... did I ever fark that quote up.
 
2013-01-09 04:13:11 PM

stu1-1: Wow... did I ever fark that quote up.


Eh, I do it all the time, don't feel bad.

And no, not usually, but I fail to see how we can blow up large chunks of rock normally into small shards (because even something a  mile across is going to burn up to a reasonable size in-atmosphere) and can't  possibly do that with any other scenario. I mean, it wouldn't be 'launch the nukes' like in a movie, it would require controlled and shaped detonations, but still, it doesn't exactly sound implausible.

/And remember, we aren't going for dust here. We're looking for just large chunks.
 
2013-01-09 04:19:53 PM
I just read that the 2036 fly-by is also going to just miss the moon.
SInce the moon is a smaller body, it seems possible it's own orbit around Earth could be affected.
This would be extremely bad for everyone.
I think that even though this asteroid is no immediate threat, the possibility exists that it could be the one that eventually ends us, one way or another.
Something should be done about it now....like altering it's orbit so it no longer intersects with Earth's.
 
2013-01-09 04:39:09 PM
smc.temple.edu
 
2013-01-09 04:45:52 PM
PsiChick:
And no, not usually, but I fail to see how we can blow up large chunks of rock normally into small shards (because even something a  mile across is going to burn up to a reasonable size in-atmosphere) and can't  possibly do that with any other scenario. I mean, it wouldn't be 'launch the nukes' like in a movie, it would require controlled and shaped detonations, but still, it doesn't exactly sound implausible.

/And remember, we aren't going for dust here. We're looking for just large chunks.


Your assumption that a mile-sized rock would burn up is incorrect.
The meteor crater in Arizona was created by a rock only 130 feet wide.
Nukes are not an option unless you like your meteor showers to be radio-active.
 
2013-01-09 05:01:50 PM

kvinesknows: and this article says 15 million kms away today


http://ca.news.yahoo.com/asteroid-extremely-remote-possibility-striki n g-earth-2036-makes-090011942.html


Thank you. Was about to mention that today is more of a prolog for the 2036.
 
2013-01-09 05:35:29 PM
img96.imageshack.us

We should attach a rocket to it and send it to Detroit!
 
2013-01-09 05:52:57 PM

stu1-1: Nukes are not an option unless you like your meteor showers to be radio-active.


Doesn't everyone?
 
2013-01-09 06:23:46 PM
Good thing I farted. Disaster averted. You're welcome.
 
2013-01-09 08:08:12 PM

Need_MindBleach: I hear Apophis is also going to make a close pass with Earth in 2029 and 2036.

I think we should take this opportunity to blast it out of the sky.


That's why all the talk about doing so
 
2013-01-09 11:00:18 PM

ciberido: Twilight Farkle: [i.imgur.com image 790x426]

(Original version: Bob the Angry Flower, Asteroid 2030)

The cartoon from 13 years ago was originally in reference to 2000 SG344, but there's still a sliver of hope in the form of 2011 AG5, which will make a keyhole pass in 2023.

The sad thing is he's right.  Like a obese man who won't diet until he has a heart attack, humanity will do nothing to protect itself against an asteroid strike until we survive one.

The fact that he made the strip 13 years ago and we're still doing nothing is all the proof we need.


Eeyup.

The real disappointment about Apophis (and SG344, and probably 2011 AG5 by the time of its 2023 keyhole pass) is that the keyhole pass is a double opportunity.

In the overwhelmingly-likely scenario in which it misses the keyhole, you have a chance to send a probe that hitches a ride on an asteroid. This probe should have the usual array of scientific instruments, because hey, free asteroid! It should also have a bit of silver spray paint, or a container of soot. Maybe even a small conventional warhead.

In the astonishingly-horrifying scenario in which it hits the keyhole, you now have a probe with some shiny spray paint to make one side light, and some carbon black to make the other side dark, and a small conventional warhead/rocket engine with which to perturb its path almost a decade before impact. The size of warhead/rocket required to do this at perigee could be very small indeed. The amount of white paint/soot required to brighten/darken the rock might be minimal, if solar radiation and differential heating (the Yarkovsky effect) have nearly a full decade to slowly nudge the rock out of the way, instead of just a few months.

If we do nothing, and there's a 624-in-625 chance that there's a picture of a streak in some guy's telescope, and a 1-in-625 chance that the headlines in 2023 that says 2011 AG5 will hit in seven years. We're a society that can barely design a rocket in 7 years, let alone design and launch an asteroid-deflecting probe on it.

If we build such a probe now, there's a 624-in-625 chance that we have some neat pictures of a dusty rock in 2023, and a 1-in-625 chance that the headlines in 2023 read "2011 AG5 deflected by soft-landing half probe into the rock face-first and firing its engine until it ran out of fuel, and if that wasn't enough, we have 7 years to see how well the second half of the probe, which contained a paintball gun is gonna work."

But we'll do nothing. And after a few dozen times of doing nothing, we'll either lose a billion-dollar city for want of a hundred-million-dollar probe and 7 years of lag time, or we'll spend ten billion dollars building a probe in a matter of months to save a billion-dollar city. Neither of those options is particularly appealing, but nobody ever said humans were good at estimating risk.
 
2013-01-10 12:18:41 AM

digitalrain: FTA: "...but its probably not a planet killer."

Good to know!


It just makes the planet wish it were dead.
 
2013-01-10 01:27:22 AM

neongoats: ciberido: Shakespeare's Monkey: I'm not saying it's aliens.

[i290.photobucket.com image 633x475]
Somebody better get to work on Project Orion.

I kind of hated that book. And I generally love the authors.


Try Moonfall by Jack McDevitt.  It's actually more relevant to this thread as the story is about an impending asteroid collision that could wipe out humanity if people do nothing to prevent it.
 
2013-01-10 03:04:17 AM
The pass in 2029 will be much closer and is expected to take out a few satellites.

img.gawkerassets.com
 
2013-01-10 04:07:40 AM
Here's the next one we should worry about:

2012 DA14
Closest approach:
Feb 15, 2013
239,000 miles = less than a 10th of the distance between the Earth and Moon
Size: 115 to 246 feet across
Relative Speed: 17,400 miles per hour = 4.8 miles per second
 
2013-01-10 04:12:39 AM
Correction:
distance should be 23,900 miles (damn decimal points)
 
2013-01-10 04:18:44 AM

stu1-1: Correction:
distance should be 23,900 miles (damn decimal points)


I recalculated it and the actual distance is 21,500 miles.
 
2013-01-10 11:08:43 AM

stu1-1: stu1-1: Correction:
distance should be 23,900 miles (damn decimal points)

I recalculated it and the actual distance is 21,500 miles.


You should go outside more
 
2013-01-10 11:27:42 AM

Crewmannumber6: stu1-1: stu1-1: Correction:
distance should be 23,900 miles (damn decimal points)

I recalculated it and the actual distance is 21,500 miles.

You should go outside more


You wouldn't say that if we had an edit button
 
2013-01-10 11:56:40 AM

The Bestest: I might have a foursome with Mila Kunis, Scarlett Johansen and Zoe Seldana today. Just saying.


fortunately for you, the odds of that happening are still better than getting hit by this particular rock
 
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