If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Global TV BC)   Excavator gets stolen. Police kinda give up looking for it for lack of leads. Owner asks 'associates'(buddies) about possible locations and directions. Hops in a plane and oh there it is   (globaltvbc.com) divider line 51
    More: Cool, job site, Simon Fraser University  
•       •       •

12637 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jan 2013 at 9:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



51 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-01-09 09:48:25 AM
Looks like the owner of the excavator... *sunglasses on* did some digging of his own.
 
2013-01-09 09:50:00 AM
"It shows there's some really smart people out there," he said.

Now if we can just get some of them to work for the RCMP!
 
2013-01-09 09:52:27 AM
"When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere." - RCMP Sgt. Cam Kowalski.

Those damned 27,000kg excavators hide in the craziest places. I found one under my couch the other day.
 
2013-01-09 09:52:45 AM
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2013-01-09 09:53:59 AM
Never makes sense to steal something like that and keep it locally. Steal and ship overseas, sure. But keeping it in town/state/country? Even if you have a good diesel mechanic, EVENTUALLY you're going to need a major part or outside service and they will check the serial number.
 
2013-01-09 09:54:13 AM
 
2013-01-09 09:56:19 AM
Basically he took advantage of the fact he can nose without a warrant and of course laid out the cash to rent a plane based on some rumors.

/I always assumed contractors would just install a locator on devices that expensive and use that that
 
2013-01-09 10:02:16 AM
Did the police say "sorry for the convenience?"
 
2013-01-09 10:03:29 AM
Unless he bought it used, that machine cost a hell of a lot more than $125,000....with that said, good on him for taking care of his business....
 
2013-01-09 10:04:15 AM

WarszawaScream: Looks like the owner of the excavator... *sunglasses on* did some digging of his own.


Over in 1?

abhorrent1: EON GPS Asset Tracker


Extra points in overtime
 
2013-01-09 10:05:34 AM
Same thing happened to me. Kinda. I had five guitars stolen from me and the cops
were less than enthusiastic about finding them. So I went to every pawn shop I could
think of, showing them pictures of the guitars that I have on my phone. Sure enough, later
that afternoon I got a phone call from one of the pawn shop owners. Turns out I knew the
POS that had robbed me.
 
2013-01-09 10:07:38 AM
Well who's truck was it being transported in? Where did it end up? Whoever got it can't just say he bought it from some guy off the street, it's not like it's an IPhone.
 
2013-01-09 10:09:38 AM
Back in the late 80's I worked for a hydraulics company that built attachments for these. The buckets and thumbs and cylinders and such. Most of the used machines we worked on were "grey market" machines, purchased used (or often stolen) from across the border and brought into the country to have the work done. It was a standing joke that these machines often had no title and no traceable ownership. We'd repaint them and put on new cabs and cab risers and such, and these machines would then be shipped back across the border with new serial plates and foreign model numbers and resold overseas or just disappear into the forest to be beat on until they wore out and then abandoned. My boss made a lot of money on these machines.

Never, ever buy a used excavator, especially one with foreign model numbers. I would say there is about a 95% chance that the hours meters have been replaced at least once, and the thing has been repainted and the serial numbers changed. The machine comes in for work with 6000-10,000 hours on it, and goes back out with 500 hours or less and it's nice and pretty. But it's still beat to hell, and it could very well be stolen.
 
2013-01-09 10:11:16 AM

Satanic_Hamster: Never makes sense to steal something like that and keep it locally. Steal and ship overseas, sure. But keeping it in town/state/country? Even if you have a good diesel mechanic, EVENTUALLY you're going to need a major part or outside service and they will check the serial number.


The parts house might check the serial number, but that doesn't mean it's going to come as stolen on their computer....
 
2013-01-09 10:15:21 AM

chevydeuce: Unless he bought it used, that machine cost a hell of a lot more than $125,000....with that said, good on him for taking care of his business....


So I believed, but a quick search found a used one for $60K? Are they POS?
 
2013-01-09 10:15:51 AM

Deathfrogg: Back in the late 80's I worked for a hydraulics company that built attachments for these. The buckets and thumbs and cylinders and such. Most of the used machines we worked on were "grey market" machines, purchased used (or often stolen) from across the border and brought into the country to have the work done. It was a standing joke that these machines often had no title and no traceable ownership. We'd repaint them and put on new cabs and cab risers and such, and these machines would then be shipped back across the border with new serial plates and foreign model numbers and resold overseas or just disappear into the forest to be beat on until they wore out and then abandoned. My boss made a lot of money on these machines.

Never, ever buy a used excavator, especially one with foreign model numbers. I would say there is about a 95% chance that the hours meters have been replaced at least once, and the thing has been repainted and the serial numbers changed. The machine comes in for work with 6000-10,000 hours on it, and goes back out with 500 hours or less and it's nice and pretty. But it's still beat to hell, and it could very well be stolen.


Do tell more chief....what is the name of said hydraulics company? ("
 
2013-01-09 10:18:42 AM

Kristoph57: "When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere." - RCMP Sgt. Cam Kowalski.

Those damned 27,000kg excavators hide in the craziest places. I found one under my couch the other day.


Maybe if you painted them camo,,,
 
2013-01-09 10:20:45 AM
the mounties always get their man.

nothing about excavators, though.
 
2013-01-09 10:30:50 AM
To be fair, he used an airplane to spot it from the air...

I highly doubt the police would have the budget to dispatch a helicopter/plane to look for a stolen excavator
 
2013-01-09 10:31:18 AM
Do you find them much, these, stolen excavators?

/Wouldn't hold out much hope for the tape deck.
//or the Creedence
 
2013-01-09 10:31:44 AM
Im suprised they didnt arrest him for impeding an investigation or something.
 
2013-01-09 10:32:11 AM
I'm proud of my sleuthing. I figured out what RCMP means.
 
2013-01-09 10:33:57 AM

TheOther: chevydeuce: Unless he bought it used, that machine cost a hell of a lot more than $125,000....with that said, good on him for taking care of his business....

So I believed, but a quick search found a used one for $60K? Are they POS?


A $60k unit a POS? quite possible, but generally Hitachi's are actually quite good...very reliable, very quiet and some of the strongest in their respective classes...and, depending on the class or size of the machine, a $60k unit is going to be VERY used (10,000+ hours) or going to need extensive work to get it to usable condition (undercarriage, bucket and stick pins/bushings, hydraulic repairs, etc)...We just bought 3 John Deere units (new) that were $330k each and they were low bid of five dealers, one of which was an Hitachi dealer
 
2013-01-09 10:34:12 AM
When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere.

Actually, reality is pretty much the opposite of your statement. They're large, heavy, and slow. If someone was driving it down the road, you could just follow the torn up asphalt. Since they didn't have a trail of destruction to follow, it was probably hauled away on a low-boy. Talk to the local trucking companies to find out where their low-boys were on the day in question. How many could possibly be rolling in the dead of winter in Canadia?
 
2013-01-09 10:34:44 AM

CyberMan: To be fair, he used an airplane to spot it from the air...



Easier than using a car to spot it from the air.

Also, "associates".


dizzydancer.net
 
2013-01-09 10:38:36 AM

Dear Jerk: I'm proud of my sleuthing. I figured out what RCMP means.


Everybody knows that. Royal Canadian Kilted Yaksmen.
 
2013-01-09 10:38:45 AM
I couldn't GET anyone to steak my 1970 JD Series 500b.  Hell, I'd have helped the thieves.
 
2013-01-09 10:39:28 AM

jtown: When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere.

Actually, reality is pretty much the opposite of your statement. They're large, heavy, and slow. If someone was driving it down the road, you could just follow the torn up asphalt. Since they didn't have a trail of destruction to follow, it was probably hauled away on a low-boy. Talk to the local trucking companies to find out where their low-boys were on the day in question. How many could possibly be rolling in the dead of winter in Canadia?


At least 3 or 4.
Man, give the RCMP a break, it was cold out and there were drug abusers to deal with.
 
2013-01-09 10:42:46 AM

jtown: When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere.

Actually, reality is pretty much the opposite of your statement. They're large, heavy, and slow. If someone was driving it down the road, you could just follow the torn up asphalt. Since they didn't have a trail of destruction to follow, it was probably hauled away on a low-boy. Talk to the local trucking companies to find out where their low-boys were on the day in question. How many could possibly be rolling in the dead of winter in Canadia?


Put it on a lowboy and it can go 2000 miles in four days. Swipe a machine in Saskatchewan and you can drive it across the border in Washington or New York without the border patrol giving it a second glance. Drive it to Texas and put it on a ship to Brazil or Columbia and nobody ever sees it again.
 
2013-01-09 10:45:55 AM
Back in 2003 I was flying my hot air balloon in the local area. I had a mostly-novice ground crew chasing me, I was flying into an area where there were few roads and poor air-to-ground visibility due to dense foliage, and the ground crew rapidly lost me. We had extremely poor line-of-sight reception hand-held radios. At the time some of us (not me or my passenger, though) had cell phones, but the coverage was poor and I didn't know my novice ground crew's number anyway (yeah, very poor planning, I haven't made that mistake since). So after we landed I prevailed upon the very obliging landowner to use his phone to track down the ground crew. Somehow I finally reached one of the novices. I told her where we were and she said she'd get to me "as soon as we get back on the ground". When she had lost me she had gone to the nearby tiny airport and convinced one of the local pilots to take her up in his Cessna to do an aerial search for my balloon. She didn't find me that way, but being in the air like that improved her phone reception to the point where I could reach her.

Clearly I was impressed by her resourcefulness and persistence. Enough so that, a little over a year later, we got married.

/csb
 
2013-01-09 10:45:56 AM
Ah, he got every penny's worth out of those taxes.
 
2013-01-09 10:47:24 AM
It's not that the police couldn't find it, it's just that they didn't care to. Too many tickets to write and pot smokers to arrest.
 
2013-01-09 10:52:18 AM

Deathfrogg: jtown: When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere.

Actually, reality is pretty much the opposite of your statement. They're large, heavy, and slow. If someone was driving it down the road, you could just follow the torn up asphalt. Since they didn't have a trail of destruction to follow, it was probably hauled away on a low-boy. Talk to the local trucking companies to find out where their low-boys were on the day in question. How many could possibly be rolling in the dead of winter in Canadia?

Put it on a lowboy and it can go 2000 miles in four days. Swipe a machine in Saskatchewan and you can drive it across the border in Washington or New York without the border patrol giving it a second glance. Drive it to Texas and put it on a ship to Brazil or Columbia and nobody ever sees it again.


I don't know how much cargo you've tried to cross the border with, but your scenario is absolutely NOTHING like what happens when trying to bring things across the US/Mexico border....
 
2013-01-09 10:54:58 AM

Deathfrogg: jtown: When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere.

Actually, reality is pretty much the opposite of your statement. They're large, heavy, and slow. If someone was driving it down the road, you could just follow the torn up asphalt. Since they didn't have a trail of destruction to follow, it was probably hauled away on a low-boy. Talk to the local trucking companies to find out where their low-boys were on the day in question. How many could possibly be rolling in the dead of winter in Canadia?

Put it on a lowboy and it can go 2000 miles in four days. Swipe a machine in Saskatchewan and you can drive it across the border in Washington or New York without the border patrol giving it a second glance. Drive it to Texas and put it on a ship to Brazil or Columbia and nobody ever sees it again.


And where ya gonna get that lowboy and truck to pull it? That's not the kind of thing cousin Zeke has out in the barn. The RCMP could at least try to investigate instead of sitting on their thumbs. And border crossings aren't as easy as you seem to think they are.
 
2013-01-09 10:58:05 AM
So basically he offered a reward to his crew of people who for one reason or another wanted to stay off police radars.

They tipped him off as they are probably contract workers on multiple sights.

End of story
 
2013-01-09 11:11:39 AM

abhorrent1: EON GPS Asset Tracker



or JDLink Machine Monitoring
 
2013-01-09 11:19:40 AM
If the cops spent half as much time recovering stolen property and returning it to it's owners as they did running around trying to bust victimless crimes the would be a whole hell of a lot more popular.
 
2013-01-09 11:19:56 AM

chevydeuce: The parts house might check the serial number, but that doesn't mean it's going to come as stolen on their computer....


If you had a major piece of equipment stolen, you wouldn't report it to the dealer? For parts for machines like that, you can't just order them from Wal-Mart (well, some filters you can get from NAPA). You're going to have to order them from a dealer and eventually you might have to give up a serial number. Heck, some dealerships require that you give them the serial number to buy *anything* from them.

I work in mining/tunneling/heavy construction. This has come up.
 
2013-01-09 11:30:12 AM
Did he leave the keys in it? WTF?
 
2013-01-09 11:37:51 AM

sleeping martyr: Did he leave the keys in it? WTF?


Typically those type of machines are a "one size fits all" with keys....If you have a "Cat" key, it's going to fit most types of Caterpillar equipment...same with the other mfg's...
 
2013-01-09 11:42:29 AM

Satanic_Hamster: chevydeuce: The parts house might check the serial number, but that doesn't mean it's going to come as stolen on their computer....

If you had a major piece of equipment stolen, you wouldn't report it to the dealer? For parts for machines like that, you can't just order them from Wal-Mart (well, some filters you can get from NAPA). You're going to have to order them from a dealer and eventually you might have to give up a serial number. Heck, some dealerships require that you give them the serial number to buy *anything* from them.

I work in mining/tunneling/heavy construction. This has come up.


I work in construction too....and yeah, sure you could report it to your local dealer, but even still I don't think their computer systems are set up so that a particular serial number is going to be "flagged"...maybe if it stolen and kept local, it might do some good, but I don't think it's a given that it would work...and as somebody else upthread said, they can be transported pretty far in just a short (relatively) time...buy parts from another dealer, or off the internet, serial number is used strictly to determine parts requirement...
 
2013-01-09 11:46:08 AM

WarszawaScream: Looks like the owner of the excavator... *sunglasses on* did some digging of his own.


Finding that.... "sunglasses on".... was on his bucket list.
 
2013-01-09 11:47:34 AM

Pair-o-Dice: Same thing happened to me. Kinda. I had five guitars stolen from me and the cops
were less than enthusiastic about finding them. So I went to every pawn shop I could
think of, showing them pictures of the guitars that I have on my phone. Sure enough, later
that afternoon I got a phone call from one of the pawn shop owners. Turns out I knew the
POS that had robbed me.


And did you tune him up?
 
2013-01-09 12:05:16 PM

chevydeuce: I work in construction too....and yeah, sure you could report it to your local dealer, but even still I don't think their computer systems are set up so that a particular serial number is going to be "flagged"...maybe if it stolen and kept local, it might do some good, but I don't think it's a given that it would work...and as somebody else upthread said, they can be transported pretty far in just a short (relatively) time...buy parts from another dealer, or off the internet, serial number is used strictly to determine parts requirement...


I know for a fact that CAT and Volvo will flag stolen equipment in their databases and if it comes up on a service call or parts order they'll put a hold on it.

Had a rental CAT D8 once that we had to have a CAT mechanic come out to look at. When he entered the serial number into his laptop to fill out the work ticket it came up hot (in this case, there apparently was a mistake in their database).

I'd be very surprised if Hitachi / John Deere / Kamatsu / whomever didn't do something similar.
 
2013-01-09 12:24:44 PM
Yeah, the cops are super lazy. They didn't rent a plane and fly a search pattern over the whole of Canada to find this guys excavator. These things are never dumped in the woods and reported stolen to get the insurance money. Just lazy stupid cops who were arresting pot smokers instead. The population is 104k, so they definitely have the resources to investigate this kinda shiat. And being near an international border, they'd have the ability to fly into a different jurisdiction to look for it too.

/Generally hates cops, but what the hell do you want them to do?
 
2013-01-09 12:24:57 PM

Satanic_Hamster: chevydeuce: I work in construction too....and yeah, sure you could report it to your local dealer, but even still I don't think their computer systems are set up so that a particular serial number is going to be "flagged"...maybe if it stolen and kept local, it might do some good, but I don't think it's a given that it would work...and as somebody else upthread said, they can be transported pretty far in just a short (relatively) time...buy parts from another dealer, or off the internet, serial number is used strictly to determine parts requirement...

I know for a fact that CAT and Volvo will flag stolen equipment in their databases and if it comes up on a service call or parts order they'll put a hold on it.

Had a rental CAT D8 once that we had to have a CAT mechanic come out to look at. When he entered the serial number into his laptop to fill out the work ticket it came up hot (in this case, there apparently was a mistake in their database).

I'd be very surprised if Hitachi / John Deere / Kamatsu / whomever didn't do something similar.


I did not know that....good info to have though and I'll keep it in mind...Thanks
 
2013-01-09 12:53:05 PM

Satanic_Hamster: chevydeuce: The parts house might check the serial number, but that doesn't mean it's going to come as stolen on their computer....

If you had a major piece of equipment stolen, you wouldn't report it to the dealer? For parts for machines like that, you can't just order them from Wal-Mart (well, some filters you can get from NAPA). You're going to have to order them from a dealer and eventually you might have to give up a serial number. Heck, some dealerships require that you give them the serial number to buy *anything* from them.

I work in mining/tunneling/heavy construction. This has come up.


I'd imagine the next step will be mating the parts. So for the replacement part to work, the dealer or manufacturer has to flash the part with a key based on the serial number. As in you call them up, give them the serial number, and they flash it. Without that flash it won't work on the vehicle since it won't be able to connect to the on board network. Of course I bet a lot of the machinery is still mostly mechanical and doesn't have an on board network yet.

On future designs it would be trivial to have the vehicle display its serial number (to prevent physical alteration of it) and for CAT to have a website where you punch the serial number and it tells you if it is stolen or not.

/it's how we're making chop shop operations less attractive for cars, you need the VIN and an additional code for the part to work
//cuts down on autotheft which is good for the consumer, but increases repair costs
 
2013-01-09 01:51:34 PM

ha-ha-guy: Basically he took advantage of the fact he can nose without a warrant and of course laid out the cash to rent a plane based on some rumors.

/I always assumed contractors would just install a locator on devices that expensive and use that that


Since when do they need a warrant to fly around the area looking for large yellow objects?
 
2013-01-09 03:13:04 PM

ha-ha-guy: /I always assumed contractors would just install a locator on devices that expensive and use that that


Exactly. WTF?

The guy has $125K machines that are continually left in unguarded work sites and doesn't use GPS locators? If I owned his company, every machine would have two or three hidden GPS trackers. Professional trackers can cost a few hundred along with fees, but DIY version can be put together for tens of dollars.

/Hide one of them in an obvious location, rely on the other two.
 
2013-01-09 08:16:33 PM

snocone: Kristoph57: "When these things are taken, they can go almost anywhere." - RCMP Sgt. Cam Kowalski.

Those damned 27,000kg excavators hide in the craziest places. I found one under my couch the other day.

Maybe if you painted them camo,,,


www.womansday.com
 
Displayed 50 of 51 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report