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(Boston Herald)   National Grid charged $270,000 late payment penalty   (bostonherald.com) divider line 3
    More: Followup, National Grid, electrical grid, Bay State  
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9025 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jan 2013 at 3:42 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-07 04:11:38 PM  
1 votes:
I wonder where the $270k in penalty money goes. Let's look at the story:

1. Workers get penalized by banks/alimony/child payment requirements when the company doesn't pay them.
2. Government steps up to help the workers and issues $270k in penalties.
3. Workers are excited because they... oh wait... where did that money go?
4. Government smiles and adds 270k to coffers.
5. Workers still are behind on banks/alimony/child payment. Get penalized more.
6. National Grid increases rates because of $270k penalties.

End game:
Government: 1
National Grid: 0 (no net loss or gain; they paid money and then increased charges)
Worker Bee: -1 (penalty fees from banks, etc.)
Customers: -1 (higher rates)

Does anyone else think there's a problem?
2013-01-07 03:55:50 PM  
1 votes:

jayphat: Good. I understand, shiat happens. But when you drag crap like this on because a "glitch" won't let you pay, well as a government regulated company, you're gonna get your ass spanked. Although, if I was the AG and they just told me they were using Kronos, I would have let them off with a "oh well that figures"


It's the 21st century, there is no good reason why a company can't figure out how to pay its employees. Blaming "the computer system" is BS; the system is in place to support policy decisions made by management. They either had a very poor business requirements process, and/or were too worried about putting in measures to prevent employees from being overpaid. Backend operations are always overlooked because it's hard to present an ROI calculation until one day you wake up faced with a fine ten times what it would have cost to just do it right the first time. I think many of the "hardship" cases are also BS, but I have no problem with the fines simply being for sheer incompetence.
2013-01-07 03:45:47 PM  
1 votes:
Good. I understand, shiat happens. But when you drag crap like this on because a "glitch" won't let you pay, well as a government regulated company, you're gonna get your ass spanked. Although, if I was the AG and they just told me they were using Kronos, I would have let them off with a "oh well that figures"
 
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