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(Huffington Post)   CDC says that one in 24 adults admits to nodding off while driving, owning a John Tesh CD   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 80
    More: Scary, John Tesh, U.S. adults, last mile, lack of sleep, Washington State University, drowsy driving, sex drives, reaction times  
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1120 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jan 2013 at 9:56 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-07 11:54:50 AM  
I had a long drive in HS and always drove in the late afternoon sun. That's the worst for me. My eyes are squinted, tired from a day at school , driving a long boring country road. I competly fell a sleep and side swiped a guard rail next to a 15 foot ditch. I told my partents I swurved avoiding a combine.
 
2013-01-07 11:55:46 AM  
i86.photobucket.com

Approves.
 
2013-01-07 12:07:13 PM  

Sybarite: CDC researchers found drowsy driving was more common in men, people ages 25 to 34, those who averaged less than six hours of sleep each night, and - for some unexplained reason - Texans.


Driving In West Texas will cure the worst insomnia in the world.
 
2013-01-07 12:12:38 PM  

Farkbert: Invest in some sunflower seeds (in shells).  If you get drowsy, start popping them in your mouth and breaking the shells apart with your teeth and tongue.  The little bit of concentration this requires does wonders to help keep you alert.  Seriously.


Truth. This works wonders on my wife and myself. Also books on CD.


Oldiron_79: serial_crusher: getting out of your seat and walking around gets your blod flowing in a way that wakes you up a bit.


I really feel alive when my blod is flowing.
 
2013-01-07 12:12:40 PM  
Out here seeing 24 people on the road is good reason to call ICE
 
2013-01-07 12:15:48 PM  
I bet it becomes way more frequent when you start to compare professional drivers (on insane deadlines) instead of just regular joes on the road.
 
2013-01-07 12:16:56 PM  
It's happened to me a couple times before. Once I realize I'm in the danger zone I either stop at a gas station for some coffee or water depending on my mood, or I pull over, get out, and get some blood flowing. If you pass a guy doing jumping jacks beside his car at night, you know why.
 
2013-01-07 12:45:07 PM  
My young and stupid CSB is driving home on the freeway at around 2am. Nodding off to wake up half off the road into the center greenway. Coming up on a bridge, and half groggy, jerking the wheel to the right, sliding across a 3 lane freeway through traffic (nearly getting t-boned by a semi at 60 mph) and ending up conveniently on an off-ramp. To this day, I never take that chance again. I was damn lucky.

Drunk and/or drowsy, two big reasons to not drive.
 
2013-01-07 12:49:01 PM  
My wife has nodded off behind the wheel twice in the past month. The first time scared the shiat out of me. The second time it just pissed me off. Both times were after 9pm after a few hours of driving (we trade off every 2 hours or so). We're in our late 50's so have decided to not drive after 9pm any more. If we haven't reached our destination we'll just find a hotel. It's just not worth it.

Check out this graphic...and how crashes ramp up sharply after 10pm.

www.nhtsa.gov
 
2013-01-07 12:52:00 PM  
I've done it once (and never again, if I have anything to say about it). Made it there alive, though my wife said that only proves that I'm insane.

/she may be right
 
2013-01-07 01:12:42 PM  

nekom: If you've never had it happen to you, let me clue you in:  nodding off behind the wheel is farking SCARY.  I've only had it happen to me once, and it was enough to ensure I never ever do so again.


Same here, and I was in a work vehicle at the time. I don't know how long I was out but when you're on a highway in a construction zone, when you snap too and realize what happened it's not a good feeling. Luckily there weren't any workers around at the time.

I pulled over at the next exit and took a 20 minute nap at a gas station.
 
2013-01-07 02:07:49 PM  
I had a cousin who lost her leg after her husband fell asleep at the wheel. This was 15 years ago or more, and he's still wracked with guilt about it.

This happened to my mom last year - she doesn't remember the accident at all, just coming to and realizing she had glass all over her and blood running down her face. Thankfully, no one else was involved, and she wasn't badly hurt:
(Nissan Murano)
lh4.googleusercontent.com

One nice thing about it was that the x-rays they took as a precaution showed that her cancer was back. So she was able to get it treated early, and is now back in remission.

Last year was weird.
 
2013-01-07 02:41:53 PM  

Stone Meadow: My wife has nodded off behind the wheel twice in the past month. The first time scared the shiat out of me. The second time it just pissed me off. Both times were after 9pm after a few hours of driving (we trade off every 2 hours or so). We're in our late 50's so have decided to not drive after 9pm any more. If we haven't reached our destination we'll just find a hotel. It's just not worth it.

Check out this graphic...and how crashes ramp up sharply after 10pm.

[www.nhtsa.gov image 571x367]


Am I missing something, or are those charts missing a label?  They all have the same axes and X values.  Why is Y different in each panel?
 
2013-01-07 02:48:00 PM  
th05.deviantart.netimg.youtube.com

Anvilaniaaaaaaaaa
 
2013-01-07 02:53:40 PM  

SwiftFox: , not screaming in terror like the passengers in his car.


came to post this.
 
2013-01-07 03:21:01 PM  

Holocaust Agnostic: Waking up in the wrong lane is scary as hell.

/glad that road was empty.


I did this on the way home from College on a luckily empty stretch of road, they had been doing construction on the shoulder of the opposite side of the road, I was woken up while going 60mph by hitting one of the orange barrels on the shoulder of the opposite side of the road.... After I finished having a heart attack I pulled over and slept for a few hours.
 
2013-01-07 03:28:57 PM  

GhostfacedFiddlah: Stone Meadow: My wife has nodded off behind the wheel twice in the past month. The first time scared the shiat out of me. The second time it just pissed me off. Both times were after 9pm after a few hours of driving (we trade off every 2 hours or so). We're in our late 50's so have decided to not drive after 9pm any more. If we haven't reached our destination we'll just find a hotel. It's just not worth it.

Check out this graphic...and how crashes ramp up sharply after 10pm.

[www.nhtsa.gov image 571x367]

Am I missing something, or are those charts missing a label?  They all have the same axes and X values.  Why is Y different in each panel?


Sorry...I should have guessed someone would wish to read the actual source. Here's a link to the NTSB article: Drowsy Driving and Automobile Crashes.
 
2013-01-07 03:33:58 PM  
I've done it, and that fact horrifies me.  I've never fallen completely asleep, just hit that point where my eyes start to close and my head droops.  The tricky thing is figuring out what to do when it happens in the middle of a long, relatively empty stretch of highway.  As a young(ish) female, pulling over to the side of the road isn't always the smartest thing to do.

My CSB (CSS?) for the day: I went to traffic court (husband didn't update his registration, and of course I was the one who got pulled over) and came away with some great stories.  My favorite was this one:


Guy: "See, what happened is, I fell asleep behind the wheel, and I remember seeing his car, but then I fell asleep..."

Judge: "You fell ASLEEP?"

Guy: "Um, yes. But-"

Judge: "But what?"

Guy: "Well, this says I was following him too closely. But I didn't know what was going on - how could I have been following him?"

Needless to say, judge was unimpressed.
 
2013-01-07 04:41:13 PM  
Interesting about it happening more often in people ages 25 to 34. As a young adult, I found myself almost nodding off every time I drove more than a few hundred miles -- but now that I'm 50 it never happens.

/who else listens to Punk, Ska and Beastie Boys while driving?
 
2013-01-07 05:04:01 PM  
Driving back from Vegas and having been up for 30 some hours, I had a really bizarre hallucination involving an old lady in a Buick trying to race me and then giving me a look reminiscent of "Large Marge" from PeeWee's Big Adventure.

I woke up everyone else when I started screaming.
 
2013-01-07 05:35:52 PM  
Thanks to this headline I now know what a "John Tesh" is.
 
2013-01-07 05:56:07 PM  

IC Stars: Interesting about it happening more often in people ages 25 to 34. As a young adult, I found myself almost nodding off every time I drove more than a few hundred miles -- but now that I'm 50 it never happens.

/who else listens to Punk, Ska and Beastie Boys while driving?


For me it's System of a Down, full blast. Windows down if weather permits it. No one can sleep through that.
 
2013-01-07 06:57:45 PM  

not_an_indigo: IC Stars: Interesting about it happening more often in people ages 25 to 34. As a young adult, I found myself almost nodding off every time I drove more than a few hundred miles -- but now that I'm 50 it never happens.

/who else listens to Punk, Ska and Beastie Boys while driving?

For me it's System of a Down, full blast. Windows down if weather permits it. No one can sleep through that.


For me its having Sirius and blasting either 90's on 9 or Lithium. Worst case scenario 80's on 8. But i'm singing to every song to survive till the next rest stop to walk around for 5-10min
 
2013-01-07 07:15:09 PM  

Primum:

Are people that dumb they don't realize what can happen if you nod off and cross the center line or go into the ditch?


It's not so much "Oh, I'm gonna tough this out" as it is microsleep attacks, at least for me.

I would bet a meta-analysis of the snoozees would show that a lot of them are night shifters or ex-military. I have this damned left-over thing where I'll go to sleep anytime I'm still and comfortable.

If I'm driving and the least bit tired, I have to get out of the car every hour or so and do calisthenics on the side of the road for a minute. If not, I'll end up with slices of time I can't recall. I don't go off the road, but it's worrisome. If it's challenging driving, no problems. It's those long-ass all-alike boring stretches of pines or desert that do me in.
 
2013-01-07 07:18:09 PM  

brigid_fitch: No, you won't. No matter how loud you have the radio, how much gum you chew, or how hard you slap yourself, you're still going to be tired. Pull over.


I'll let you in on the secret: dip.

A lip full of Copenhagen and I'm good to drive for hours. However, I quit years ago and it was the hardest thing I've ever done, so I'm hesitant to let the dip out of the can very often.
 
2013-01-08 05:28:06 AM  

nekom: If you've never had it happen to you, let me clue you in:  nodding off behind the wheel is farking SCARY.  I've only had it happen to me once, and it was enough to ensure I never ever do so again.


I was driving back from University (commuter) at 2am when I was about 19. New England back roads all the way. No place to stop, no place to get coffee.

I was so tired. It was winter, I had the windows open, the music cranked up, and my eyes wide open.

I whited out. First and only time in my life I've ever fallen asleep with my eyes open. Thankfully it was a second or two at most or a straight part of the road.
 
2013-01-08 05:32:45 AM  

thisone: or on a straight part of the road.


or works to though
 
2013-01-08 05:01:44 PM  

serial_crusher: We need self-driving cars ASAP.


ask and ye shall receive... 2013 Lincoln MKZ
 
2013-01-09 07:23:34 AM  
There is a massive overlap between drunk driving accidents and sleeping at the wheel but the MADD crowd is blaming just one cause so we don't have decent stats on the other.

I was a guinea pig for some new sleep study equipment and the researcher said I was ripe for sleep apnea in the next decade or so.  I used loaner cpap machine and found my allergies nearly went away so I ended up getting one.  Its freaky when you look at the machine's stats and see just how many days you get less than 6 hrs sleep.  What is scary is what the EEG gear shows for a 6 hr night can result in about 1 hour of useful sleep.

/ex gf's fatehr died of sleep apnea related car crash
//grandfather died of heart related issues of sleep apnea.
 
2013-01-09 07:30:55 AM  

IC Stars: Interesting about it happening more often in people ages 25 to 34. As a young adult, I found myself almost nodding off every time I drove more than a few hundred miles -- but now that I'm 50 it never happens.


I wonder if that has more to deal with the fact that under 25's will tend to hallucinate rather than doze off when serious sleep deprived.
I was driving away from college after finals and I could have sworn there was a rabbit running along the car for miles.  I pulled over and had a nap.
An ex-gf was hallucinating after finals and they pumped her full of the drugs if she was psycho and it took two years to recover from that once a doctor found out she was sleep deprived.
 
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