If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(YouTube)   Young Ace: Student pilot lands plane missing a wheel in Australia   (youtube.com) divider line 26
    More: Interesting, Australia  
•       •       •

3505 clicks; posted to Video » on 07 Jan 2013 at 9:04 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-01-07 08:25:36 AM
Pff. That's Aussie for an easy landing. Dodging the crocs and killer koalas getting back to the car is the hard part.
 
2013-01-07 08:36:42 AM
Okay. If he lost the wheel in "mid air," how did he know he lost it?
 
2013-01-07 08:43:34 AM
Actually, the runways are poisonous too.

Everything in Australia will kill you.
 
2013-01-07 09:04:06 AM

Charlie Freak: Okay. If he lost the wheel in "mid air," how did he know he lost it?


It's this amazing new thing called radio.
 
2013-01-07 09:33:03 AM
Ace?

From Wikipedia: "A flying ace or fighter ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down several enemy aircraft during aerial combat. The actual number of aerial victories required to officially qualify as an "ace" has varied, but is usually considered to be five or more."

So how many aircraft did he bring down, besides his own?
 
2013-01-07 10:04:27 AM

LordOfThePings: Charlie Freak: Okay. If he lost the wheel in "mid air," how did he know he lost it?

It's this amazing new thing called radio.



Huh, so someone flew close enough to him that they could see he was missing a wheel?

What I was getting at is that it's nigh impossible to know what your landing gear looks like in a low-wing aircraft. And it's not like the gear on that Cherokee are retractable in which a busted wheel might foul upon operation. If it fell off halfway through a cross-country flight, the first indication he would have had would have been when the right strut dug into the runway.

The more I think about it, it likely happened shortly after takeoff and someone on the ground at the airport saw it come off and got on the radio. Maybe he was doing pattern work. That's the only way he could have been aware.

Unfortunately, not a lot of supporting info to go by.
 
2013-01-07 10:20:25 AM
Ace? Dude, that was a belly flop at the end. Lucky, but Ace? IDTS.
 
2013-01-07 10:35:50 AM

Charlie Freak: LordOfThePings: Charlie Freak: Okay. If he lost the wheel in "mid air," how did he know he lost it?

It's this amazing new thing called radio.


Huh, so someone flew close enough to him that they could see he was missing a wheel?

What I was getting at is that it's nigh impossible to know what your landing gear looks like in a low-wing aircraft. And it's not like the gear on that Cherokee are retractable in which a busted wheel might foul upon operation. If it fell off halfway through a cross-country flight, the first indication he would have had would have been when the right strut dug into the runway.

The more I think about it, it likely happened shortly after takeoff and someone on the ground at the airport saw it come off and got on the radio. Maybe he was doing pattern work. That's the only way he could have been aware.

Unfortunately, not a lot of supporting info to go by.


It is either, as you said, someone at the airport he took off from saw it come off and radioed him, or he did a fly-past of his destination and the tower spotted it.

Another possibility is that, being a fixed gear aircraft, he could feel the difference in balance and drag between sides of the aircraft and did a fly-past to have them look at his aircraft.
 
2013-01-07 10:49:03 AM
Would that kind of aircraft have tire pressure indicator lights on the instrument panel?
 
2013-01-07 10:51:07 AM
Charlie Freak: Okay. If he lost the wheel in "mid air," how did he know he lost it?
It's this amazing new thing called radio

i think it would be harder to take off with one wheel then land on one wheel. why did he want to take off with one wheel anyway?
 
2013-01-07 11:01:57 AM
starlost

why did he want to take off with one wheel anyway?

To avoid extra wheel fees. Shouldn't have cheaped-out and checked 'em all.

As for losing it after takeoff; there'd likely be a bit of unusual noise and vibration as the thing worked loose.
 
2013-01-07 11:14:05 AM

colonel0sanders: Would that kind of aircraft have tire pressure indicator lights on the instrument panel?


No. There aren't any indicators for the landing gear whatsoever.

cgraves67: Charlie Freak: LordOfThePings: Charlie Freak: Okay. If he lost the wheel in "mid air," how did he know he lost it?

It is either, as you said, someone at the airport he took off from saw it come off and radioed him, or he did a fly-past of his destination and the tower spotted it.

Another possibility is that, being a fixed gear aircraft, he could feel the difference in balance and drag between sides of the aircraft and did a fly-past to have them look at his aircraft.


Assuming there is a tower. And if I'm going into an uncontrolled field I'll only overfly it if there is no traffic in the pattern and most folks on the ground wouldn't be paying close enough attention to notice a missing wheel, at least not in any sort of time to be able to do anything about it.

It's gotta be someone saw it come off at takeoff - or like someone above said, it vibrated so much as it worked loose that  he knew something was up. Although, I would not think most student pilots would give much attention to that unless it was severe vibration.
 
2013-01-07 11:58:21 AM
good landing - any landing you can walk away from
great landing - any landing where you can use the plane again.

A little buffing, and that becomes a great landing.
 
2013-01-07 01:33:19 PM
It fell off shortly after takeoff. Here's a better article
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/small-aircraft-preparing-to-make-e m ergency-landing-at-mangalore-north-of-melbourne/story-e6frfq80-1226548 780973
 
2013-01-07 03:52:28 PM
 
2013-01-07 05:00:37 PM
I would have pulled up the other two and belly landed it, screw the prop. Landing on partial gear is way more dangerous, great way to ground loop.
 
2013-01-07 05:05:19 PM

vossiewulf: I would have pulled up the other two and belly landed it, screw the prop. Landing on partial gear is way more dangerous, great way to ground loop.


A superlative suggestion, sir, with just two minor flaws......

--Carlos V.

/Warrior is a fixed gear aircraft.
//Warrior is a fixed gear aircraft
///Big enough to mention twice
 
2013-01-07 05:38:58 PM

SurelyShirley: So how many aircraft did he bring down, besides his own?


It's Australia. Everything's trying to kill you. The wheel probably got torn off by a squadron of Plumed Whistling-Ducks. If he hadn't been such a hotshot ace, he'd likely have ended up on blocks up there.

upload.wikimedia.org
/ What the squadron in question might have looked like.
 
2013-01-07 05:54:04 PM

unbelver: /Warrior is a fixed gear aircraft.


I would have climbed out holding the required tools in my teeth, disassembled the remaining two gear, THEN belly landed it.

/reminder to RTFA a little closer
 
2013-01-07 05:59:31 PM

vossiewulf: I would have climbed out holding the required tools in my teeth, disassembled the remaining two gear, THEN belly landed it.


Those birds are equipped with sidewinder feathers and cluster poop. You'd have never made it.
 
2013-01-07 07:28:47 PM

cgraves67: Another possibility is that, being a fixed gear aircraft, he could feel the difference in balance and drag between sides of the aircraft and did a fly-past to have them look at his aircraft.


This is what was reported. He detected the lack of symmetrical drag causing unexpected yaw. He then did a low pass to have someone verify it visually.

I think he did a great jorb doing a single main gear landing for a beginner.
 
2013-01-07 08:18:14 PM

Larva Lump: starlost

why did he want to take off with one wheel anyway?

To avoid extra wheel fees. Shouldn't have cheaped-out and checked 'em all.

As for losing it after takeoff; there'd likely be a bit of unusual noise and vibration as the thing worked loose.


That's how the airlines get ya, those hidden wheel fees!
 
2013-01-07 10:02:02 PM
userserve-ak.last.fm

Picture was taken in 1974
 
2013-01-07 11:12:41 PM

unbelver: vossiewulf: I would have pulled up the other two and belly landed it, screw the prop. Landing on partial gear is way more dangerous, great way to ground loop.

A superlative suggestion, sir, with just two minor flaws......

--Carlos V.

/Warrior is a fixed gear aircraft.
//Warrior is a fixed gear aircraft
///Big enough to mention twice


And a pretty dang good landing considering. He didn't nose it in at all, and that control was spot on for a student.
 
2013-01-07 11:28:48 PM
Loved that 'chink' sound when the wing hit the runway
 
2013-01-08 09:45:44 PM

colonel0sanders: Would that kind of aircraft have tire pressure indicator lights on the instrument panel?


Nope. I own one of similar vintage, the landing gear checklist is 'down and welded.' Nothing on the panel relating to gear, barely enough instruments for flight.

Had the right main brakes fall off a Cessna during landing when I was a student. Fortunately, I had an instructor with me. Sparks and all, used the grass next to the runway to slow down.

/good landing, especially for a student
 
Displayed 26 of 26 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report