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(Washington Post)   "Temporary" Navy Annex building across from the Pentagon to be torn down after only 70 years   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 16
    More: Interesting, Navy Annex, National Building Museum  
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6820 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jan 2013 at 8:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-07 08:54:40 AM
3 votes:
Tearing down ugly ass building - WIN
Giving land back to Arlington Nat. Cemetery so we can fill some more graves in - NOT SO WIN.

/not that I have any issue with the Cemetery, just wish those in charge would fill it slower.
2013-01-07 08:55:41 AM
2 votes:
In many parts of the world a 70 YO building isn't even broken in yet.
2013-01-07 03:38:42 PM
1 votes:
Occupants at the annex dismissed warnings to prepare to vacate the property by the end of 2011. But those warnings became heeded after food service was cut off.

WTF! Exactly how does our government operate? You had to starve them out?
2013-01-07 11:33:17 AM
1 votes:
DeathCipris:
Yea. I caught that too. Nice they are finally getting rid of post-WWII relics, but sad they are going to expand a military cemetery because they need the room.

I hate to break it to you, but once people die, they tend to not get any better.

/most of the people interred at Arlington in the last half-century or so died of old age
2013-01-07 10:44:25 AM
1 votes:
Brings to mind what I was told is an old English saying:

In America, 100 years is a long time and in England, 100 miles is a long distance.
2013-01-07 10:08:34 AM
1 votes:

destrip: I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.


I'm not sure what's "disturbing" about it. Many of the tactics employed by specialized units involve causing damage to buildings. This can be hard to practice realistically. They can't go around breaking doors and windows in an in-use building. A building owned by the feds and about to be torn down is perfect for that kind of training.
2013-01-07 09:33:42 AM
1 votes:

destrip: I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.


Blame the War on Drugs - it's lead to an over-militarization of the police. 9/11, and over sensationalized mass shootings just accelerated it as DHS provided grants so every small town police dept could buy military grade weapons and vehicles. Somewhere during the start of the drug war police moved from "peace officers" to "law enforcement officers".
2013-01-07 09:23:43 AM
1 votes:
ZAZ: Oldiron_79

The "Spanish American War phone tax" story is complicated. The short version is you're not likely to be paying any such tax. The tax was repealed after the war ended. Then a similar tax was enacted around WW1, repealed, reinstated, altered, and almost but not quite phased out.

It may still be true that you would have to pay a tax on long distance calls that are billed based on distance called. However, your long distance plan doesn't work that way (it's "minutes", not "mile-minutes"). And it's more of a WW2 tax than a Spanish-American War tax, because it has only been continuously in effect for about 80 years.


Well S.A.W. phone tax may not be the best example but the Civil war beer tax and the revolutionary war liquor taxes are good examples. I've done my part to make sure we have funds to fight the redcoats.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-07 09:14:04 AM
1 votes:
Oldiron_79

The "Spanish American War phone tax" story is complicated. The short version is you're not likely to be paying any such tax. The tax was repealed after the war ended. Then a similar tax was enacted around WW1, repealed, reinstated, altered, and almost but not quite phased out.

It may still be true that you would have to pay a tax on long distance calls that are billed based on distance called. However, your long distance plan doesn't work that way (it's "minutes", not "mile-minutes"). And it's more of a WW2 tax than a Spanish-American War tax, because it has only been continuously in effect for about 80 years.
2013-01-07 09:08:48 AM
1 votes:
On the fourth floor, an enormous, V-shaped wood-laminated table that once hosted top-secret video conferences was abandoned by the Missile Defense Agency.

"This conference table - everybody in the world wants it," Dangerfield said. But no one wanted to pay $1,500 to restore power for the elevator needed to remove the table.


Why restore the power to the elevator?

Knock hole in closest exterior wall.

Take table to hole.

Put table on portable lift.

Lower to the ground.
2013-01-07 08:58:30 AM
1 votes:
I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.
2013-01-07 08:56:33 AM
1 votes:
My old school had "temporary" buildings in the grounds built just after WWII, and still going strong 45 years later.

"Temporary" used to not mean "crap".
2013-01-07 08:56:19 AM
1 votes:
OK but we have to match the cost of demolition with cuts in disaster relief spending.
2013-01-07 08:51:29 AM
1 votes:
the only thing permanent concerning the Pentagon is that their share of the free tax pie will continue to increase every year --already approaching 1 Trillion per year.

now THAT my friends, is permanent.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-07 08:51:26 AM
1 votes:
MIT finally tore down its "temporary" WW2 building in the 1990s. (wikipedia)
2013-01-07 08:51:00 AM
1 votes:
So the building is even less temporary than temporary taxes.
 
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