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(Washington Post)   "Temporary" Navy Annex building across from the Pentagon to be torn down after only 70 years   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 58
    More: Interesting, Navy Annex, National Building Museum  
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6820 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jan 2013 at 8:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-07 02:59:28 AM
Ahh, the Navy Annex.  I was almost arrested there for trying to make a construction delivery about two years after 9/11.  Our firm was doing some wiring for them to upgrade their network (replacing serial lines with cat5) and I had to drop off about 50 spools of cable.  I had the company truck but I got lost and ended up in a parking lot that was blocked off for construction (there was always construction going on).  Two MPs flagged me down and were plenty irritated that I didn't go exactly where I was supposed to go once I made it through the gate.

It's not like I meant to go wandering - I knew the building I was supposed to go to, but I couldn't find the loading area.
 
2013-01-07 03:13:39 AM
You are forgiven, Lsherm.  Go, and sin no more.
 
2013-01-07 08:41:55 AM
Great location for a strip club....
 
2013-01-07 08:51:00 AM
So the building is even less temporary than temporary taxes.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-07 08:51:26 AM
MIT finally tore down its "temporary" WW2 building in the 1990s. (wikipedia)
 
2013-01-07 08:51:29 AM
the only thing permanent concerning the Pentagon is that their share of the free tax pie will continue to increase every year --already approaching 1 Trillion per year.

now THAT my friends, is permanent.
 
2013-01-07 08:54:05 AM
When I attended the Staff NCO Academy at Quantico they hauled us all down to HQMC to talk to our MOS monitors or as I referred to him: the SOB who sent me to Drill Instructor duty.

We kind of expected the Headquaters of the Marine Corps to be some Ivory palace type structure instead of a temporary building that it shared with some other services.. I heard the Commandant at least had a corner office though.

And I got to listen to my monitor talk to me about needs of the service, good for my career blah, blah blah.-bastard.
 
2013-01-07 08:54:40 AM
Tearing down ugly ass building - WIN
Giving land back to Arlington Nat. Cemetery so we can fill some more graves in - NOT SO WIN.

/not that I have any issue with the Cemetery, just wish those in charge would fill it slower.
 
2013-01-07 08:55:17 AM

Linux_Yes: now THAT my friends, is permanent.


It was a rider on the NASCAR pork loophole in the fiscal cliff bail out blowjob we all got from congress.
 
2013-01-07 08:55:41 AM
In many parts of the world a 70 YO building isn't even broken in yet.
 
2013-01-07 08:56:19 AM
OK but we have to match the cost of demolition with cuts in disaster relief spending.
 
2013-01-07 08:56:33 AM
My old school had "temporary" buildings in the grounds built just after WWII, and still going strong 45 years later.

"Temporary" used to not mean "crap".
 
2013-01-07 08:58:30 AM
I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.
 
2013-01-07 08:59:43 AM
Government at work. Nothing to see here.

/move along.
//you obviously cannot understand the big picture

psst...lack of (fixed) direction
 
2013-01-07 09:00:14 AM

Lsherm: Ahh, the Navy Annex.  I was almost arrested there for trying to make a construction delivery about two years after 9/11.  Our firm was doing some wiring for them to upgrade their network (replacing serial lines with cat5) and I had to drop off about 50 spools of cable.  I had the company truck but I got lost and ended up in a parking lot that was blocked off for construction (there was always construction going on).  Two MPs flagged me down and were plenty irritated that I didn't go exactly where I was supposed to go once I made it through the gate.

It's not like I meant to go wandering - I knew the building I was supposed to go to, but I couldn't find the loading area.


Eh, in the history of the Republic, 70 years isn't that long. Most Federal buildings were (still mostly are) built with the idea that they will not undergo major renovation for 50 years. Which is why most are hideously ugly.

CSB time: My wife was almost arrested after trespassing at Camp David (before 9/11). She got lost and ended up driving up to a gate that was unmanned at the time. She found a phone (which rang) and told to wait patiently until the guards arrived to escort her off the property. She did (and still has the citation).

/In her defense, she thought it was a Jewish summer camp.
//Camp David - sure, why not?
///The pres wasn't there (Clinton) - but since she was younger, the guards must have though she was there for a date and picked the wrong day.
 
2013-01-07 09:00:27 AM

hasty ambush: When I attended the Staff NCO Academy at Quantico they hauled us all down to HQMC to talk to our MOS monitors or as I referred to him: the SOB who sent me to Drill Instructor duty.

We kind of expected the Headquaters of the Marine Corps to be some Ivory palace type structure instead of a temporary building that it shared with some other services.. I heard the Commandant at least had a corner office though.

And I got to listen to my monitor talk to me about needs of the service, good for my career blah, blah blah.-bastard.


Myth is that everyone volunteers and enjoys being a drill instructor (or whatever your branch calls it). Yes, there are volunteers, but I've known a few guys that were "voluntold." It's a miserable time if it's not what you wanted to do (or even if you thought you wanted to do it). Longer hours than the trainees and now, at least in the Air Force, they have the magnifying glass on them because of the fark ups of other TIs (training instructors).
 
2013-01-07 09:01:22 AM
"temporary" stuff from WWII isn't that old. You're still paying a "temporary" phone tax to pay for the Spanish-American war, and a "temporary" beer tax to fund the Union army for the civil war, and a "temporary" distilled spirit tax to fund the Continental army for the Revolutionary war.
 
2013-01-07 09:03:35 AM
The Pentagon is scheduled to become a warehouse, when WWII ends.
 
2013-01-07 09:04:16 AM
"There wasn't a piece of glass that the police didn't like blowing up," Dangerfield said.

There's just something metaphorical there about police just wanting to break things.
 
2013-01-07 09:08:48 AM
On the fourth floor, an enormous, V-shaped wood-laminated table that once hosted top-secret video conferences was abandoned by the Missile Defense Agency.

"This conference table - everybody in the world wants it," Dangerfield said. But no one wanted to pay $1,500 to restore power for the elevator needed to remove the table.


Why restore the power to the elevator?

Knock hole in closest exterior wall.

Take table to hole.

Put table on portable lift.

Lower to the ground.
 
2013-01-07 09:11:02 AM
www.nps.gov

Army Basic Training in June 1979 in a World War II 'temp' building. Not as nice as the one pictured. Supposedly, they could burn down in two minutes. There were a lot of war stories about them doing so. I remember one about two trainees melting shoe polish and accidentally flipping the tin. The burning shoe polish hit the side of the building at the place went up.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-01-07 09:14:04 AM
Oldiron_79

The "Spanish American War phone tax" story is complicated. The short version is you're not likely to be paying any such tax. The tax was repealed after the war ended. Then a similar tax was enacted around WW1, repealed, reinstated, altered, and almost but not quite phased out.

It may still be true that you would have to pay a tax on long distance calls that are billed based on distance called. However, your long distance plan doesn't work that way (it's "minutes", not "mile-minutes"). And it's more of a WW2 tax than a Spanish-American War tax, because it has only been continuously in effect for about 80 years.
 
2013-01-07 09:19:23 AM
yay, more grave sites
 
2013-01-07 09:23:43 AM
ZAZ: Oldiron_79

The "Spanish American War phone tax" story is complicated. The short version is you're not likely to be paying any such tax. The tax was repealed after the war ended. Then a similar tax was enacted around WW1, repealed, reinstated, altered, and almost but not quite phased out.

It may still be true that you would have to pay a tax on long distance calls that are billed based on distance called. However, your long distance plan doesn't work that way (it's "minutes", not "mile-minutes"). And it's more of a WW2 tax than a Spanish-American War tax, because it has only been continuously in effect for about 80 years.


Well S.A.W. phone tax may not be the best example but the Civil war beer tax and the revolutionary war liquor taxes are good examples. I've done my part to make sure we have funds to fight the redcoats.
 
2013-01-07 09:30:33 AM
Workers overheard saying things like, "I'm going to turn a military building into a graveyard!" may or may not have been sent to a secret prison.
 
2013-01-07 09:33:37 AM
"The old joke is there's nothing in Washington as permanent as a temporary building," said G. Martin Moeller Jr., senior curator at the National Building Museum.

There is a "National Building Museum"! How the Fark do they get the buildings in the museum?
 
2013-01-07 09:33:39 AM

bulldg4life: yay, more grave sites


For all the suicides in the military.
 
2013-01-07 09:33:42 AM

destrip: I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.


Blame the War on Drugs - it's lead to an over-militarization of the police. 9/11, and over sensationalized mass shootings just accelerated it as DHS provided grants so every small town police dept could buy military grade weapons and vehicles. Somewhere during the start of the drug war police moved from "peace officers" to "law enforcement officers".
 
2013-01-07 09:45:18 AM
Worked there for three years. I wish I could see them blow that biatch up...looking for a web cam.
 
2013-01-07 09:46:34 AM
But the police need APCs and predator drones. Why do you hate freedom?
 
2013-01-07 09:46:36 AM
My first 'real' job was there at NMPCC as a contractor.  Good times.
 
2013-01-07 09:49:57 AM

bapess: "The old joke is there's nothing in Washington as permanent as a temporary building," said G. Martin Moeller Jr., senior curator at the National Building Museum.

There is a "National Building Museum"! How the Fark do they get the buildings in the museum?


I suddenly got the image of Zoolander, looking at "his" library, asking how the people were going to get in to read, or something like that...

At least their "Temporary" building was actually built to last throughout the years and weather... My job has "temporary fixes" that are there long after the person who installed the "fix" has left, and temp buildings that are basically tents with structure, AC, and insulation...
 
2013-01-07 09:52:03 AM
Wow, so many trolls cratering on submit.
 
2013-01-07 10:06:30 AM
a 70 y/o temporary building still in good use. Meanwhile, a new 'permanent' building put up today starts falling apart after a decade.
 
2013-01-07 10:08:22 AM
Linux_Yes:
the only thing permanent concerning the Pentagon is that their share of the free tax pie will continue to increase every year --already approaching 1 Trillion per year.

...if by "approaching 1 Trillion," you mean about $700 billion.

You only get $1 trillion by adding in a lot of "defense-related" stuff that isn't very much related to defense, including adding in interest in the national debt from previous years - and the State Department budget. Yeah, you have to include the entire diplomatic corps to get that sort of expenditure...

Defense spending is also on a slight downward trend, both as percentage of the Federal budget and as a percent of GDP.
 
2013-01-07 10:08:34 AM

destrip: I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.


I'm not sure what's "disturbing" about it. Many of the tactics employed by specialized units involve causing damage to buildings. This can be hard to practice realistically. They can't go around breaking doors and windows in an in-use building. A building owned by the feds and about to be torn down is perfect for that kind of training.
 
2013-01-07 10:12:44 AM
for a nation that operates on the scale of decades, 70 years is temporary. the federal gov't is not analagous to your personal experience, dumbmitter.
 
2013-01-07 10:14:21 AM

bapess: "The old joke is there's nothing in Washington as permanent as a temporary building," said G. Martin Moeller Jr., senior curator at the National Building Museum.

There is a "National Building Museum"! How the Fark do they get the buildings in the museum?


There's enough room in the central courtyard:

www.visitingdc.com

I know some people who made a fan-produced STAR WARS movie that used it as a location.  It is quite
nice, actually.  They usually host indoor functions for the Cherry Blossom Festival in there, as well as
other DC civic events.
 
2013-01-07 10:24:54 AM

bapess: There is a "National Building Museum"! How the Fark do they get the buildings in the museum?


You should have seen the lego skyscrapers and other lego buildings they had there a couple of years ago. Pure awesomeness.
 
2013-01-07 10:30:12 AM
Ahh the good ole Navy Annex. I used to have to go there for years while they were constructing the Air Force memorial next door. I got more hassle from the cops there than at the Pentagon.
 
2013-01-07 10:41:46 AM
DoD buildings are always in a state of flux. I know of one with a staircase that goes to a door that hasn't been there for longer than I have been alive. Doorways appear and disappear. And, there is always a water leak. It's a requirement that water must be leaking somewhere.
 
2013-01-07 10:42:11 AM

syberpud: destrip: I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.

Blame the War on Drugs - it's lead to an over-militarization of the police. 9/11, and over sensationalized mass shootings just accelerated it as DHS provided grants so every small town police dept could buy military grade weapons and vehicles. Somewhere during the start of the drug war police moved from "peace officers" to "law enforcement officers".


No, blame the North Hollywood Shootout(see Heat for inspiration).

From wiki(which is accurate and appropriately referenced in this case):
The ineffectiveness of the pistol rounds and shotgun pellets in penetrating the robbers' body armor led to a trend in the United States toward arming selected police patrol officers with semi-automatic 5.56 mm AR-15 type rifles. Seven months after the incident, the Department of Defense gave 600 surplus M16s to the LAPD, which were issued to each patrol sergeant; other cities, such as Miami, also moved to supply patrol officers, not just SWAT teams, with heavier firepower. LAPD patrol vehicles now carry AR-15s as standard issue, with bullet-resistant Kevlar plating in their doors as well. Also as a result of this incident LAPD authorized its officers to carry .45 ACP caliber semiautomatic pistols as duty sidearms, specifically the Smith and Wesson Models 4506 and 4566. Prior to 1997, only LAPD SWAT officers were authorized to carry .45 ACP caliber pistols, specifically the Model 1911A1 .45 ACP semiautomatic pistol.
 
2013-01-07 10:44:25 AM
Brings to mind what I was told is an old English saying:

In America, 100 years is a long time and in England, 100 miles is a long distance.
 
2013-01-07 10:46:52 AM
Talking to my Dad, I find that his uncle, him, my older brother, and I all had worked there at one time or another.

My Gunnery Sergeant brother and I were there at the same time for a while. I (as a 1LT, then Captain) used to get the secretary at his office to call me when he went out for lunch, so I could bump into him and get a salute from my big brother.

Kinda sad, kinda glad to see it go.
 
2013-01-07 10:53:09 AM

LoneDoggie: Tearing down ugly ass building - WIN
Giving land back to Arlington Nat. Cemetery so we can fill some more graves in - NOT SO WIN.

/not that I have any issue with the Cemetery, just wish those in charge would fill it slower.


Yea. I caught that too. Nice they are finally getting rid of post-WWII relics, but sad they are going to expand a military cemetery because they need the room.
 
2013-01-07 11:07:39 AM
Purdue University laughs at the Navy for getting rid of "temporary" buildings.
 
2013-01-07 11:33:17 AM
DeathCipris:
Yea. I caught that too. Nice they are finally getting rid of post-WWII relics, but sad they are going to expand a military cemetery because they need the room.

I hate to break it to you, but once people die, they tend to not get any better.

/most of the people interred at Arlington in the last half-century or so died of old age
 
2013-01-07 11:58:27 AM
My last year of grad school I lived in a building that had been erected as "temporary" officers' housing while pilots were trained for the Army Air Corps there during World War II. I was the very last resident of that building as it was being torn down to make way for new, modern dorms...in 2006.
 
2013-01-07 12:25:03 PM
I was stationed at Henderson Hall when it still belonged to the Marine Corps (97-00) and spent a lot of time inside the Navy Annex. Now HH belongs to the Army and the Annex is no more?
 
2013-01-07 12:37:30 PM

lizyrd: destrip: I found the part about the police to be the most disturbing. They're one of the few people allowed to carry deadly force among civilians and use it in their duties, yet they are openly encouraged in training exercises to smash everything that doesn't move, and kill anything that moves.

Perhaps an over-generalization, but do we really need an army of Eugene Tackleberrys protecting and serving the public? It seems that the last several years there's been a lot of police over-zealotry in high profile situations that has left suspects that should have been wounded or tazed, stone dead.

I'm not sure what's "disturbing" about it. Many of the tactics employed by specialized units involve causing damage to buildings. This can be hard to practice realistically. They can't go around breaking doors and windows in an in-use building. A building owned by the feds and about to be torn down is perfect for that kind of training.


Only tangentially related, but that reminds me of back when I was at the University of Central Florida. There were some dated old apartments across the campus that were going to get torn down to make room for fancier (likely more expensive) apartments. I remember one week, they apparently let the Orlando Fire Department use the old apartments for training. I thought that was a pretty good use of resources. If it's going to get torn down anyway, may as well let some people use it to train and hone their skills they might one day use to save a life.
 
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