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(Denver Post)   If you leave the keys in the ambulance while on an emergency call, a drunk is bound to go on a joyride   (denverpost.com) divider line 47
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2667 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jan 2013 at 12:15 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-06 09:19:23 PM  
cbsdenver.files.wordpress.com

Two days ago.......

msnbcmedia4.msn.com
 
2013-01-06 09:35:13 PM  
it's just statistics, folks
 
2013-01-06 10:38:37 PM  
Well he just finished the pizza missions!
 
2013-01-06 10:39:08 PM  
I've been REALLY drunk. I've never stolen a cop car, ambulance, or firetruck.

Mind you, I've been drunk enough to do so without considering the legal end. But there's something deeper than that. It's just not done. It's like punching old ladies. I don't care how drunk you get me, I'm not punchin' old ladies. I'm not stealin' emergency vehicles. I'm not shooting myself in the face with a fire extinguisher and then running around yelling "I'm a ghost!"

There's just things you don't do.
 
2013-01-07 12:22:29 AM  
image.gamespotcdn.net
 
2013-01-07 12:26:44 AM  
Man, that sucks for those poor medics, not only did their rig get stolen, but they have to work for AMR.
 
2013-01-07 12:29:52 AM  
Sorry guys. It's in my driveway and I left the keys in it for ya. I thought my brother was driving it to his place but I can tell by the vomit trail that he drove my neighbor's car. Theoretically he drove it to his place but I'm not staking my reputation on it.
 
2013-01-07 12:37:00 AM  
I don't think amusing is the tag for this. Paramedics have enough to worry about without cretins making it worse for them.
 
2013-01-07 12:46:44 AM  
Y'know, I've wondered about this. I'm an EMT student, and have done a fair number of ride-alongs. It seems to be standard practice to leave the thing running and ready to go... I'm surprised this doesn't happen more often.

As Doglover mentioned, it seems to be on most people's "things you don't do" list... but there are always exceptions to "most people."
 
2013-01-07 12:47:21 AM  

doglover: I've been REALLY drunk. I've never stolen a cop car, ambulance, or firetruck.

Mind you, I've been drunk enough to do so without considering the legal end. But there's something deeper than that. It's just not done. It's like punching old ladies. I don't care how drunk you get me, I'm not punchin' old ladies. I'm not stealin' emergency vehicles. I'm not shooting myself in the face with a fire extinguisher and then running around yelling "I'm a ghost!"

There's just things you don't do.


That last one sounds more like PCP than alcohol.
 
2013-01-07 01:03:24 AM  
Breaking News? There's already a movie and even a book about this. Unfortunately, for Robert Taylor, neither of them were very long.

i1097.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-07 01:11:53 AM  
Well, yeah....
 
2013-01-07 01:13:58 AM  
I first read duck not drunk and thought we had an epic story on our hands. Man, just once I want to see a bird steal a large automobile...
 
2013-01-07 01:24:20 AM  
Dear Facebook
"Drivin drunk ... classsic ;) but to whoever's ambulance that was i am sorry. :P"
 
2013-01-07 01:34:06 AM  
paging BronyMedic
 
2013-01-07 01:40:22 AM  

Shadow Blasko: paging BronyMedic


Dagnabbit! Came here to say this.
 
2013-01-07 01:44:26 AM  
I've done some stupid shiat in my life, some of it while drunk, some of it could have easily killed me, but there's doing stupid shiat while drunk and then there's just being stupid.
 
2013-01-07 01:49:10 AM  

Sparky the Fire Dog: Y'know, I've wondered about this. I'm an EMT student, and have done a fair number of ride-alongs. It seems to be standard practice to leave the thing running and ready to go... I'm surprised this doesn't happen more often.

As Doglover mentioned, it seems to be on most people's "things you don't do" list... but there are always exceptions to "most people."


I was always told it wasn't good for the engine, you risked a dead battery which meant not transporting the patient, the rig will get cold, etc. If nothing else keeping things warm for the patient seemed like a good enough reason. At least, that completely made sense in Buffalo where I was trained.
 
2013-01-07 01:54:20 AM  

nigeman: I don't think amusing is the tag for this. Paramedics have enough to worry about without cretins making it worse for them.


This, this, and this.
 
2013-01-07 02:03:54 AM  
I was going to post that this would be the most unfathomably incredible opportunity to experience total chaos in a semi-orgasmic setting, but I see the Fark Realism Frown Brigade is in full force.
 
2013-01-07 02:20:11 AM  

Sparky the Fire Dog: Y'know, I've wondered about this. I'm an EMT student, and have done a fair number of ride-alongs. It seems to be standard practice to leave the thing running and ready to go... I'm surprised this doesn't happen more often.

As Doglover mentioned, it seems to be on most people's "things you don't do" list... but there are always exceptions to "most people."


I did my EMT training 20 years ago in Aurora, CO and back then we were taught not to leave the rig running and to make sure we locked it while we were out lest some junkie try to steal all the drugs on-board. Maybe times have changed?
 
2013-01-07 02:21:30 AM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Well he just finished the pizza missions!


That was so much fun.
 
2013-01-07 03:41:58 AM  
Just be glad he left the tape deck and the creedence!
 
2013-01-07 03:49:50 AM  

Sparky the Fire Dog: Y'know, I've wondered about this. I'm an EMT student, and have done a fair number of ride-alongs. It seems to be standard practice to leave the thing running and ready to go... I'm surprised this doesn't happen more often.

As Doglover mentioned, it seems to be on most people's "things you don't do" list... but there are always exceptions to "most people."


Are you talking between calls, or while on scene during the call? If you're talking between calls, then the medics you are running with are kind of stupid. The newer style turbo diesel vehicles really only require a moment or two to fire up, and just sitting there wasting fuel is just bad economics. I'll make some allowances for if you are positioned out in the middle of nowhere and need to keep warm, but if you work in a moderate sized city where you could just as easily park at a Denny's and go in for an up of coffee between calls, do that.

That said, during a call you are absolutely right. Engine running, climate controls for the back set to make it comfortable for the elderly person you are surely picking up (it's always an old person) and ready to go in a hurry if need be. Not to mention the equipment in the back needs juice that the ambulances battery bank just can't supply.

This is, unfortunately, a risk that happens. It's also why the good class II narcotics are usually locked in a tough to crack box in it's own locked cabinet. Sure, they can still get to them, but it's going to take them a bit.
 
2013-01-07 03:52:53 AM  

Krikkitbot: Sparky the Fire Dog: Y'know, I've wondered about this. I'm an EMT student, and have done a fair number of ride-alongs. It seems to be standard practice to leave the thing running and ready to go... I'm surprised this doesn't happen more often.

As Doglover mentioned, it seems to be on most people's "things you don't do" list... but there are always exceptions to "most people."

I did my EMT training 20 years ago in Aurora, CO and back then we were taught not to leave the rig running and to make sure we locked it while we were out lest some junkie try to steal all the drugs on-board. Maybe times have changed?


Well, it depends on the part of town. There was one trailer park that we didn't go to after dark without a police escort. Even then, we took a spare set of keys and kept the engine running, just locked it up tight with the remote lock.
 
2013-01-07 03:56:41 AM  

Shadow Blasko: paging BronyMedic


BronyMedic has been dealing with a kidney stone for the last 12 hours, and is heavily medicated at the moment (WEEEEEEE! Better living through pharmacology). This is the first time I've been out of bed today.

That said, many areas will leave the rig running because of the risk of not getting it to restart, or because they need to keep the back heat or airconditioning running on a bad weather day. They'll almost never shut it off in an ER bay. (We're actually prohibited from turning our trucks off unless we have it plugged into a shore line because we have bookoos of IV pumps and the Cardiac Monitor and Ventilator plugged in, but we have remote locks on ours.)

Rural/Metro got tired of all of their ambulances being stolen while on calls because they were left running, and installed keyless run systems in them a few years ago. You flip the toggle and it bypasses the ignition, allowing you to remove the keys. Anyone touches the brake or the gas, and it kills the engine.

Shadowknight: This is, unfortunately, a risk that happens. It's also why the good class II narcotics are usually locked in a tough to crack box in it's own locked cabinet. Sure, they can still get to them, but it's going to take them a bit.


Tennessee makes you keep them behind three locks, so you have them in a locked compartment or fridge, in a locked box or bag, with a seal or seals on the box so that if it's opened, everyone knows it.

Shadowknight: Are you talking between calls, or while on scene during the call? If you're talking between calls, then the medics you are running with are kind of stupid. The newer style turbo diesel vehicles really only require a moment or two to fire up, and just sitting there wasting fuel is just bad economics. I'll make some allowances for if you are positioned out in the middle of nowhere and need to keep warm, but if you work in a moderate sized city where you could just as easily park at a Denny's and go in for an up of coffee between calls, do that.


If you have a lot of AC dependent equipment or an isolette, the inverter will drain the battery in a matter of minutes. It's why we keep our freightliners running, but remote-lock the box.
 
2013-01-07 04:20:15 AM  
Huh. We have dockside plug ins at all our stations, to keep everything powered up and ready. And when at, say IHOP or something, we just let it power down for the hour we're there.

But then, we don't carry anything that REQUIRES AC or refrigeration. All of our drugs are room temp. The only thing we keep cool are a couple saline bags in an ice cooler in the equipment bay, in case we want to do a hypothermic treatment for spinal injury.

Seems like a terrible waste of fuel and engine wear.
 
2013-01-07 04:20:38 AM  

BronyMedic: BronyMedic has been dealing with a kidney stone for the last 12 hours, and is heavily medicated at the moment (WEEEEEEE! Better living through pharmacology). This is the first time I've been out of bed today.


Ouch. How do you deal with a kidney stone IN BED?

Hang in there, brother. I hope you don't need surgery.
 
2013-01-07 04:26:04 AM  
Oh, and we are also prohibited from running in the ambulance bays at hospitals. ER staff complained about the fumes, and to be fair when you had three or more rigs at the same time it did get a little thick. Even our patients would start complaining.
 
2013-01-07 04:46:30 AM  

Shadowknight: Huh. We have dockside plug ins at all our stations, to keep everything powered up and ready. And when at, say IHOP or something, we just let it power down for the hour we're there.


The hospital we base out of has shore poles for when we're at quarters, but it's not unusual for us to come in at the start of our shift, and immediately have to do a two hundred or so mile transport. The Private Service that I 911 for has the problem of buying as cheap as possible units which the heat and AC don't run unless the engine is on. The front CAD consoles will also drain in a matter of minutes if you don't. The only good thing about it is we base out of Fire Stations, so we can keep them shorelined.  A lot of the rural counties have gone to using Type 1s and 3s which have gasoline generators or a diesel APU powering the box and the heat/ac, so that the engine can be shut off to save on wear and tear.

In the city operation for that private service (non-911 interfacility or MD office response), the trucks are typically second or third line trucks, and you don't shut them off because you'll either freeze, or wont get them started again. The post locations we have tend to be in areas where there's no good place to go in and set down, so they usually go nap in the boxes.

Shadowknight: But then, we don't carry anything that REQUIRES AC or refrigeration. All of our drugs are room temp. The only thing we keep cool are a couple saline bags in an ice cooler in the equipment bay, in case we want to do a hypothermic treatment for spinal injury.


We have a lot of drugs that require refrigeration, like Insulin for mixing drips in DKA, Survanta/Curosurf, Prostaglandin E1, Rectal Tylenol, Ativan, and the like. We also keep two bags of 1000ml saline in our fridges so we can do the therapeutic hypothermia protocol in post-arrests that are adolescent and older.

We also have ReVEL ventilators that we can use in anyone five kilos and up for transport, rather than bagging them the whole way to the hospital with an anesthesia bag like we used to. They get  very, very angry if they don't have electricity.
 
2013-01-07 04:47:44 AM  

doglover: Ouch. How do you deal with a kidney stone IN BED?

Hang in there, brother. I hope you don't need surgery.


You get farked by it hard. :)

I've passed two so far. Need to cut back on the diet pepsi.
 
2013-01-07 05:03:25 AM  

BronyMedic: Shadowknight: Huh. We have dockside plug ins at all our stations, to keep everything powered up and ready. And when at, say IHOP or something, we just let it power down for the hour we're there.

The hospital we base out of has shore poles for when we're at quarters, but it's not unusual for us to come in at the start of our shift, and immediately have to do a two hundred or so mile transport. The Private Service that I 911 for has the problem of buying as cheap as possible units which the heat and AC don't run unless the engine is on. The front CAD consoles will also drain in a matter of minutes if you don't. The only good thing about it is we base out of Fire Stations, so we can keep them shorelined.  A lot of the rural counties have gone to using Type 1s and 3s which have gasoline generators or a diesel APU powering the box and the heat/ac, so that the engine can be shut off to save on wear and tear.

In the city operation for that private service (non-911 interfacility or MD office response), the trucks are typically second or third line trucks, and you don't shut them off because you'll either freeze, or wont get them started again. The post locations we have tend to be in areas where there's no good place to go in and set down, so they usually go nap in the boxes.

Shadowknight: But then, we don't carry anything that REQUIRES AC or refrigeration. All of our drugs are room temp. The only thing we keep cool are a couple saline bags in an ice cooler in the equipment bay, in case we want to do a hypothermic treatment for spinal injury.

We have a lot of drugs that require refrigeration, like Insulin for mixing drips in DKA, Survanta/Curosurf, Prostaglandin E1, Rectal Tylenol, Ativan, and the like. We also keep two bags of 1000ml saline in our fridges so we can do the therapeutic hypothermia protocol in post-arrests that are adolescent and older.

We also have ReVEL ventilators that we can use in anyone five kilos and up for transport, rather than bagging them the whole way to the hospital with an anesthesia bag like we used to. They get  very, very angry if they don't have electricity.


Well that explains that, then. I worked out in Virginia Beach, and only as part of the emergency rescue squads. We didn't do transports any longer than the next town over (Norfolk, Chesapeake, Portsmouth, maybe Hampton) and even then only rarely. Most of the time they'd call in a transport company to do anything longer than that.

Our trucks were, by and large, fairly new and well equipped, and wired in such a way that all necessary equipment had it's own battery power supply in case something went haywire with our electric. Even med pumps, on the rare occasions we used them, had their own power good for about two or more hours. Though I'll be honest, mostly we used gravity drips, as from most places in VB you were rarely more than 15 minutes from a hospital ED.

We didn't carry insulin or throbolitics, since while on scene we rarely had the full picture of what was going on. I could see those things being needed for a long transport where they've already had the full run up, but for our purposes it was kind of unneeded.

Good luck passing the stone. I've never had, thankfully, but picked up more than a couple patients that pissed themselves from the sudden pain. Enjoy the legal narcs, though.
 
2013-01-07 06:00:12 AM  

BronyMedic: You get farked by it hard. :)


No, I mean seriously, I've been peein' like once an hour or two for the past decade because of fluid intake habits I started when I got my kidney stone.

I don't do it all the time these dyas, but when I hydrate I HYDRATE.
 
2013-01-07 07:02:29 AM  
content.internetvideoarchive.com
 
2013-01-07 07:13:15 AM  

BronyMedic: doglover: Ouch. How do you deal with a kidney stone IN BED?

Hang in there, brother. I hope you don't need surgery.

You get farked by it hard. :)

I've passed two so far. Need to cut back on the diet pepsi.


Your last statement is relevant to my interests (as I chug down the first of many diet pepsi's today.)
 
2013-01-07 07:35:56 AM  
97% of the time I leave the keys in the ambulance when we are at the ED. I'm not usually concerned about the truck being stolen. It's hard to hide that, we'll get it back, hopefully in one piece. However, I'm more worried about losing the $34,000 LifePak-15 cardiac monitor.

Also, I had a co-worker that was taken to the ED, very very VERY drunk.... and he did in fact steal an ambulance and go for a joyride
 
2013-01-07 08:16:19 AM  

simusid: However, I'm more worried about losing the $34,000 LifePak-15 cardiac monitor.


Dear lord, THIS.  I can't believe how many stories I heard where people left them on scene or some such nonsense.  How do you forget something that cost as much as a plot of land?
 
2013-01-07 08:22:44 AM  
We had something like this happen years ago.
Some guy hopped up on drugs stole the rig right out of the parking bay and took it on an hour long joyride. He finally slammed it into a counter at the airport.

It's not unusual for the keys to be inside or the engine on down here.
 
2013-01-07 09:50:18 AM  

Sparky the Fire Dog: Y'know, I've wondered about this. I'm an EMT student, and have done a fair number of ride-alongs. It seems to be standard practice to leave the thing running and ready to go... I'm surprised this doesn't happen more often.

As Doglover mentioned, it seems to be on most people's "things you don't do" list... but there are always exceptions to "most people."


It happened at one of the hospitals I work at 6 months ago. Crazy lady incited a police chase until she crashed the thing at a Walgreen's.
 
2013-01-07 10:09:55 AM  

TeddyRooseveltsMustache: [image.gamespotcdn.net image 572x322]


Ms. Paramedic? What happens when she gets married?
 
2013-01-07 10:49:26 AM  
This is particularly amusing to me, I work at an ambulance company. I just wonder if they charged the patient or the thief with the extra miles that were put on the run.

/$15 a mile gets pricey...
//don't use an ambulance. limo is cheaper, more stylish
 
2013-01-07 11:03:07 AM  

JFarker131: This is particularly amusing to me, I work at an ambulance company. I just wonder if they charged the patient or the thief with the extra miles that were put on the run.

/$15 a mile gets pricey...
//don't use an ambulance. limo is cheaper, more stylish


Though I doubt your driver is really trained to restart your heart should the need arise, or take proper c-spine/backboard precautions in the case of spinal trauma.  

That said, my service has never charged for treatment or transport.  The only charge they have ever done isn't even technically through us.  The hospital resupplies everything we use (nasal cannula, BVM, meds) and they tack that price onto your total hospital bill.  Most calls result in maybe $0-$20 in used equipment.  

This leads to annoying calls, of course.  People that think calling an ambulance will get you ahead of the line at the ER (it doesn't, we just have to wait in triage with you now).  Old folks that are lonely and know that the code words of "chest pain" and "difficultly breathing" will get an ambulance out there really fast so they have someone to chat with about their children who never call.  And of course the hypochondriac that believes they have whatever horrible virus is currently causing a panic on the local new (westnilesarsmonkeypoxswinefluitus!).

But I'd rather have that than the person who is experiencing chest pain but isn't sure decide to wait it out until Monday.  I'd rather we come out and make the call that "yeah, it's probably heart burn" or "Wow, this ECG looks like a lie detector attached to Dick Cheney.  Let's get you to the ER."  The last thing I want to enter on their decision to call us is the cost.

/idealist
 
2013-01-07 01:32:28 PM  

BronyMedic: If you have a lot of AC dependent equipment or an isolette, the inverter will drain the battery in a matter of minutes. It's why we keep our freightliners running, but remote-lock the box.


This. Nothing's worse than having to get a jump at the hospital because you took too long writing a report (Although they have equipment *at* our system's hospital to jump start a rig since it's not unheard of). Having said that, a lot of ambulances allow you to lock/unlock the doors from the outside via something like a keypad or such. The only problem is diesel fumes wafting into the ED, so one hospital installed vacuum hoses (that don't fit our rig, and were torn off when people forgot to disconnect them), another put in over-sized parking spaces away from the ED doors.
 
2013-01-07 01:58:35 PM  

mllawso: This. Nothing's worse than having to get a jump at the hospital because you took too long writing a report (Although they have equipment *at* our system's hospital to jump start a rig since it's not unheard of).


Ours had a manual battery shutoff.  Kill that, all power goes down.  Lights and all.  That way you don't have to worry about dead batteries no matter how long you sat there.
 
2013-01-07 04:55:35 PM  
We just have two sets of keys. We keep it running, but have a second set of keys that we can lock it once we get out. That way the interior is ready for patient care, but people can't steal it. Seems to work just fine.
 
2013-01-07 06:29:52 PM  

davidphogan: I was always told it wasn't good for the engine, you risked a dead battery which meant not transporting the patient, the rig will get cold, etc. If nothing else keeping things warm for the patient seemed like a good enough reason.


Not arguing that there aren't plenty of good reasons to leave it on - heat, etc, and from what I've seen emergency vehicles take enough of a beating that it's better not to risk it not starting on scene.

Shadowknight: ...we took a spare set of keys and kept the engine running, just locked it up tight with the remote lock.


Now THAT seems like a good solution (if slightly less than convenient). Never seen it done... but fortunately I live where things are usually pretty safe.
 
2013-01-08 07:59:29 AM  
www.supercheats.com

How many lives did he save? Did he get to mission 12?
 
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