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(BusinessWeek)   Old: "You suck at irrelevant interview questions and I don't like you." New: "You're just not a cultural fit for us"   (businessweek.com) divider line 379
    More: Asinine, interview question, American Sociological Review, Ernst & Young, job hunting, melting pot, marketing executives, Starship Enterprise, NWS  
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20796 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Jan 2013 at 9:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-06 10:53:28 PM

Oldiron_79: Ive had issues with "zomfg you was laid off, laid off people must have been dead wood" um no I was laid off because i was bottom of the totem pole douche. I have lots of verifiable experiance and a provable good work record.


Are you saying you were the douche, or did you call the interviewer a douche?
 
KIA
2013-01-06 10:55:05 PM

FormlessOne: I can't imagine anyone becoming upset at doing what's considered the absolute minimum for an expected absence...


I am of a similar mindset. Here's the followup: the employee was so upset that they tried the "I'm not speaking to you" thing. Then they went to top HR with a complaint and... I could almost weep with joy here, need a moment *sniffle* HR came back to them with a letter - and I shiat you not - that not only told them (in corporatespeak) to STFU and GBTW, but also quoted the dictionary definition of "insubordination" and cited chapter and verse from the manual what happens to insubordinate employees.

/ Love the current HR rep
// As a completely socially and politically appropriate expression of appreciation and figure of speech, not to be taken literally
 
2013-01-06 10:55:09 PM
GilRuiz1
2013-01-06 09:37:37 PM

Someone in HR once told me that the purpose of all the candidate screening was intended to discover two things:

1) can this person do the job?

2) do we like this person enough to spend 8 hours a day, every day, for years in the same room with them?


Yes, very much THIS.

/ HR drone
// kill me . . .
 
2013-01-06 10:55:32 PM

xsarien: BokerBill: What's your favorite movie? What's your favorite website? What's the last book you read for fun? What makes you uncomfortable?

- None of your business
- None of your business
- None of your business
- A rock in my shoe

/Not a good cultural fit with any company that thinks these are important questions to ask in a job interview.

Do you give douchy answers to those questions when they're asked in a casual setting? Because what's being measured here is your ability to have a normal conversation that doesn't involve "talking shop."

It's a little jarring and their purpose is pretty transparent these days, but they can also serve as a bit of an ice breaker in a normally tense situation, like, say, a job interview.


On the other hand, discovering the folks carrying the "YER NOT THE BOSS A' ME!" chip on their shoulders in four questions or less makes a job interview go that much faster.
 
2013-01-06 10:56:12 PM
Oh, great. So the First Date Fart Hold™ applies to work now?
 
2013-01-06 10:56:20 PM

Sygonus: whatshisname: What's asinine about it? Fitting into a workplace is just as important as skills.

A hundred times this.

...

Between two equally qualified candidates, I'm going to pick the outgoing, energetic individual who has similar interests to the rest of the team - they're going to jive better in the department then someone who is equally qualified but has no interest in contributing to the org culture.


Which is why the people who were bullies in high school continue in that role in the corporate world.

Because "social skills" trump "knowledge" and "competence" every time.

Sad.
 
2013-01-06 10:57:18 PM

GilRuiz1: Someone in HR once told me that the purpose of all the candidate screening was intended to discover two things:1) can this person do the job?2) do we like this person enough to spend 8 hours a day, every day, for years in the same room with them?


Exactly, but look at it from the other side. As a prospective job seeker I seriously wonder if I could stand to spend 40+ hours a week with fellow employees of a prospective employer, but what chance do I have to find that out? Short of having overwhelming qualifications, being a job seeker feels like being a desperate groveler.

"Star Trek or Star Wars?"
"Which one fits in better here?"

/Had one job that worked out for five+ years, temp to perm until regionalization brought my layoff. I can hardly imagine where to start out again.

//I like to think I'm reasonably smart, hard-working and competent, but I feel like my chances of being a stunning cultural fit anywhere are negligible, so this article depresses me.
 
2013-01-06 10:57:19 PM
Back when I was on the job market, I was just happy if they even got back to me to tell I didn't have the job. If I had a dollar for every time I was told something to the effect of, "we'll be making a decision very soon and I'll definitely let you know one way or the other whether you got the position", I wouldn't need the job I have.

/ended up working for a place part time more or less interning, eventually was made full time after several months
//love the place I work for, even if upper management makes decisions like they have minimal brain damage sometimes
 
2013-01-06 10:57:32 PM

Ishidan: Oldiron_79: Ive had issues with "zomfg you was laid off, laid off people must have been dead wood" um no I was laid off because i was bottom of the totem pole douche. I have lots of verifiable experiance and a provable good work record.

Are you saying you were the douche, or did you call the interviewer a douche?


I had assumed he was referring to a specialized device called a "totem pole douche", used by indigenous Americans to clean beetle infestations from totem poles, and that the guy stuck with the bottom of that specialized device has, traditionally, the least seniority on the team that deploys that particular device.
 
2013-01-06 10:57:45 PM

Nemo's Brother: Lsherm: When I was in college I was a manager for the engineering school's "tech crew" - students who fixed computers on campus.  They were cushy jobs, and there were 10 slots to hire for every year.  The first year I got to hire students I was informed by another employee that it was a "Pakistani year."  Turns out for years the Indian students and the Pakistani students had been swapping out the tech crew jobs because they refused to work with one another.  So on an Indian year, only Indian students would apply, and on a Pakistani year, only Pakistani students would apply.

I asked the employee what would happen if I hired a white or black employee, and he assured me that wouldn't happen.  I asked him why.  "Because I throw those resumes out," he said.

Few places are more racist than in the Mecca of liberal thought.


This has nothing to do with liberals, dumbass. This is racism practiced by certain ethnic groups who would scream bloody blue murder if anybody discriminated against them.
 
2013-01-06 10:58:57 PM

AloysiusSnuffleupagus: Sygonus: whatshisname: What's asinine about it? Fitting into a workplace is just as important as skills.

A hundred times this.

...

Between two equally qualified candidates, I'm going to pick the outgoing, energetic individual who has similar interests to the rest of the team - they're going to jive better in the department then someone who is equally qualified but has no interest in contributing to the org culture.

Which is why the people who were bullies in high school continue in that role in the corporate world.

Because "social skills" trump "knowledge" and "competence" every time.

Sad.


I think you either missed the bolded part, or you're too stupid to know the difference.
 
2013-01-06 10:59:22 PM
It must be nice to be in an industry where you can afford to bypass the most skilled workers because they were not cool enough for you.
 
2013-01-06 11:00:00 PM
Glad my job interview was more technical questions that actually pertained to the position I was applying for and not bullshiat social ones. Feels good working a job where my ability to fix stuff is more important than what I did over the weekend.
 
2013-01-06 11:00:00 PM

Notabunny: fta As a result, Rivera argues, "employers don't necessarily hire the most skilled candidates."

Filling your office with less competent clones is sure to please your competition


It's working wonders here. It's amazing we're still open.
 
2013-01-06 11:00:34 PM

AloysiusSnuffleupagus: Which is why the people who were bullies in high school continue in that role in the corporate world.

Because "social skills" trump "knowledge" and "competence" every time.


Did you even read the post you're responding to?

I ask because your response seems to have no bearing on what he/she said.
 
2013-01-06 11:02:20 PM

Aces and Eights: Weirdest question anyone asked me in a job interview: "What would you do if you were on a bus and someone was drunk and threw up in the aisle?"

Somehow I must have given the right answer. I was offered the job, and accepted it. Didn't stay long. The place was stranger than the interview.


I would get off the bus as soon as possible. Last thing I need is the bus driver yelling at me to clean up my mess.
 
2013-01-06 11:03:07 PM
"What are things I have said to prospective employers at an interview, Alex?"
 
2013-01-06 11:03:30 PM
Also "cultural fit" is not the same things as "communication skills".  I know some frat boy in a cushy job is going to get butthurt at me for implying that cold hard technical skills are the only important thing, which I didn't do.
 
2013-01-06 11:03:51 PM

Ishidan: CthulhuCalling: i've interviewed at zappos many times for multiple positions. they usually decide that i'm not a 'cultural fit', sometime around the time i say ' hey if maybe you took a break from the cube wars and telling everyone how wacky you guys are and hired real security guys like me, you maybe you wouldn't have had that security breach back in January'. really, they're not interested in people that WANT to get shiat done, they want people who spend 2 hours a day writing haikus in Klingon. It's been a year since their breach, they still don't have an infosec program put together. Like I told their "ZISO" the last time I talked with him "culture is fine. culture is fun, but at some point you have the let the serious guys roll up their shirtsleeves and do serious things. It's not cool, it's not hip, but it's how you keep your data".

So why keep applying? Apply to a company that takes security seriously, and let the goofy hippy shoe-retailers do whatever they want. There's plenty of serious companies out there...any one with a military contract would be a good start, I'd think.

Just saying.


I don't apply anymore, and I say "good day, sir" whenever any headhunter calls with a fantastic opportunity in my area working for a high-tech, progressive, Fortune 500 company looking for a security professional. Then I usually have to tell when why Zappos can go fark themselves as far as I'm concerned. Zappos doesn't want professionals, they want guys with big Nerf gun collections, and a lot of pajamas to wear on Hawaiian shirt day.
 
2013-01-06 11:04:17 PM
Would you like to hear my Google interview story?

It's rather amusing. If a little sad.
 
2013-01-06 11:04:24 PM

hdhale: Back when I was on the job market, I was just happy if they even got back to me to tell I didn't have the job. If I had a dollar for every time I was told something to the effect of, "we'll be making a decision very soon and I'll definitely let you know one way or the other whether you got the position", I wouldn't need the job I have.


Ran into a couple of those over the last decade or so. It's easy to handle - mentally give them a time limit, say, 5 days or so, and if they haven't made a decision by then, call them and explain that they can remove you from consideration. Ensure that you've followed up with them at least twice - immediately after the interview, and three days after the interview, if they didn't give you a specific decision timeframe or didn't contact you within that three day window. If they haven't responded within three days of your second contact, then, let's face it, you're not their first pick and they're farming for more candidates. If they've given you a specific decision timeframe, wait until that timeframe has passed for that second follow-up, and then wait three days after that before closing the door.

I've had to tell two different recruiters that very thing, because they couldn't figure out how to operate a telephone or an inbox - an employer that isn't willing to communicate with you during the hiring process, probably won't be communicating with you during the actual job, either. That's a real problem if you're a contractor, as I was, because problems can come up fast and you don't have time to wait a week for a turnaround. Also, I don't want to lose a week's networking time, and I certainly don't want to lose a week's pay, all so some lackadasical recruiter can shine me on. No one's got time for that these days.
 
2013-01-06 11:05:43 PM

bingethinker: Nemo's Brother: Lsherm: When I was in college I was a manager for the engineering school's "tech crew" - students who fixed computers on campus.  They were cushy jobs, and there were 10 slots to hire for every year.  The first year I got to hire students I was informed by another employee that it was a "Pakistani year."  Turns out for years the Indian students and the Pakistani students had been swapping out the tech crew jobs because they refused to work with one another.  So on an Indian year, only Indian students would apply, and on a Pakistani year, only Pakistani students would apply.

I asked the employee what would happen if I hired a white or black employee, and he assured me that wouldn't happen.  I asked him why.  "Because I throw those resumes out," he said.

Few places are more racist than in the Mecca of liberal thought.

This has nothing to do with liberals, dumbass. This is racism practiced by certain ethnic groups who would scream bloody blue murder if anybody discriminated against them.


Non-white racism is actively embraced by the liberal think thank. After all, who are you to judge, Mr. Oppressor?
 
2013-01-06 11:07:43 PM

stiletto_the_wise: This kind of mentality is how likable frat boys get hired over people who studied hard and know their shiat. Feel lucky you don't have a "Google equivalent" in your industry to compete with.


Google seems to be one of the worst companies at this.  I believe they're good at hiring high-quality people but seem to have ridiculous criteria, but I suppose when you have so many people wanting to work for you, you can afford to lose a lot of very good candidates here and there for silly reasons.
 
2013-01-06 11:08:33 PM

Atomic Spunk: AloysiusSnuffleupagus: Sygonus: whatshisname: What's asinine about it? Fitting into a workplace is just as important as skills.

A hundred times this.

...

Between two equally qualified candidates, I'm going to pick the outgoing, energetic individual who has similar interests to the rest of the team - they're going to jive better in the department then someone who is equally qualified but has no interest in contributing to the org culture.

Which is why the people who were bullies in high school continue in that role in the corporate world.

Because "social skills" trump "knowledge" and "competence" every time.

Sad.

I think you either missed the bolded part, or you're too stupid to know the difference.


Yeah I read it, and you and the guy who posted immediately after you seem to be the type of people of whom I speak.

So let's not split hairs about "all things being equal". Because we all know, and the comments and article itself acknowledge, that the less qualified and dumber applicant who is the better sycophant has the leg up on the more qualified and smarter applicant who isn't as skilled in kissing ass.

So go fark yourself.
 
2013-01-06 11:08:45 PM

stiletto_the_wise: "Cultural Fit" is merely a way to disqualify an otherwise qualified candidate without having to disqualify them for one of those illegal reasons.


Bullshiat. I got told I wasn't a good fit just a few weeks ago and I'm a white male. They don't need an excuse to not hire me and I got the not a good fit song and dance anyway.
 
2013-01-06 11:09:08 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: The truckers will get you alive


rantnravewithjohn.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-01-06 11:09:27 PM
I've interviewed candidates for a couple of different outfits I've worked for, and I can say that I did look for the ones that would fit in better than others, all other things being equal.

The one exception to that was when I was interviewing people for a job on a remote atoll that was 1500 miles away from the nearest emergent land. If somebody was an ass on day one, the next flight out was two weeks away...you don't want that guy ever setting foot there if you can help it, so yeah, I did ask 'cultural fit' type questions in that situation, simply because I'd seen the result of NOT asking those kinds of questions in other departments, and those people would make everyone around them miserable 24/7 (remember, isolated island...you live with your co-workers).

Otherwise, though, I find 'cultural fit' questions to be BS for a 8-5 job. If they can do it and not not manage to piss everybody else off, even if they aren't going to be buddies with everyone in the office, that's good.
 
2013-01-06 11:09:51 PM

FormlessOne: I had assumed he was referring to a specialized device called a "totem pole douche", used by indigenous Americans to clean beetle infestations from totem poles, and that the guy stuck with the bottom of that specialized device has, traditionally, the least seniority on the team that deploys that particular device.


HA!
 
2013-01-06 11:09:52 PM
Our crews are together 24/7 for anywhere from 3 weeks to 14 weeks. Trust me, "cultural fit" keeps our homicide rate low. Even still, after about the 35th day, you have shiat to say to each other unless its directly related to the task at hand.....

/work in the oil patch
 
2013-01-06 11:11:17 PM

AloysiusSnuffleupagus: So go fark yourself.


You sound charming. I can't imagine why you appear to be carrying around deep-seated bitterness from your high school days.
 
2013-01-06 11:12:22 PM

zedster: FTFA:""These trends are being driven by millennials because they care about culture," says Dan Schawbel, author of Me: 2.0. "Research shows that millennials typically stay at a job for about two years-and they have different priorities. They'd rather have meaningful work over more pay, or work for a company that gives back or cares about the environment. They want a culture that's less hierarchical, more flexible, and more understanding of difference, because millennials are the most diverse generation."

NO NO NO NO NO NO

WWII Gen: Hey I'll get a job and work at it for 20+ yrs, return you'll give me benefits like a pension
Business: Okay

Baby Boomers: I'd like what my parents had
Business: nope you'll have a 401K that we will raid and no job security

Millennials: If I'm not going to be making great money and have no job security I'd rather work someplace I like and move on when I burn out
Business: Why do you have no loyalty? come back?

If I had the choice between culture or a place that actually took care of it's employees without screwing them over I would take the security. Having fallen into IT I have to say the contractor system is not going to inspire me to do anything less then the bare minimum, what incentive do I have? I have no profit share, no chance of getting hired on (always a false carrot they dangle), and very little security. At best Millennials are just waiting for the huge delayed wave of Baby Boomer to retire and open up the job market for them, at worst you are looking at generation that will have far less opportunity and quality of life then their parents.


Nail on the head. As a gen x member who thinks millenials expect to be rewarded before paying their dues, I realize they are hep to the realization that you don't get rewarded for paying your dues anymore anyway. Company loyalty is a two way street, any every company that asks why they have no loyalty should be asking what they've done to earn loyalty in the last 30 years.
 
2013-01-06 11:12:25 PM

Nemo's Brother: Aces and Eights: Weirdest question anyone asked me in a job interview: "What would you do if you were on a bus and someone was drunk and threw up in the aisle?"

Somehow I must have given the right answer. I was offered the job, and accepted it. Didn't stay long. The place was stranger than the interview.

How did you respond?


After stammering awkwardly for a while, I said I would alert the driver, check to see if the person needed medical attention, and ask for something to help clean up the mess. Then wash my hands thoroughly and see what I could do to make sure the person got home safely.

(Did not mention I would secretly gag and later throw away my shoes, although I was thinking that).
 
2013-01-06 11:13:51 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: First question in every interview I conduct: "so, Star Was or Star Trek?"

First it show me how the person reacts to a curve ball if the candidate is off guard and nervous that's bad if it gets them to relax that's good. If they get off guard by such a simple question than they'll never make it in shipping. The truckers will get you alive. Second it keeps all the damn Trekkers away from me.

The last girl I hired answered "Firefly". Best filing clerk we got.


You're a fan of Star Was? That explains a lot.
 
2013-01-06 11:14:07 PM

redmid17: Aces and Eights: Weirdest question anyone asked me in a job interview: "What would you do if you were on a bus and someone was drunk and threw up in the aisle?"

Somehow I must have given the right answer. I was offered the job, and accepted it. Didn't stay long. The place was stranger than the interview.

I would get off the bus as soon as possible. Last thing I need is the bus driver yelling at me to clean up my mess.


Ha!
 
2013-01-06 11:14:36 PM

shoegaze99: texdent: I once got asked 'what was the last movie I saw'.

Most of the time the answers aren't important, it's your ability to answer a question you haven't thought about in advance and how you answer it. They don't give a shiat if you last watched 40 Year Old Virgin, they just want to see how well you react, your personality, etc. The actual answer doesn't matter. The manner in which you answer does.


Ditto for the "gotcha" lateral thinking questions. They are hoping not to hear a canned response or watch you sweat and say fark it, who knows.
 
2013-01-06 11:16:24 PM

zedster: The Stealth Hippopotamus: The truckers will get you alive


Yeah yeah yeah EAT you alive.

Farking from my phone. Give me a break.

What is that picture from?
 
2013-01-06 11:17:03 PM

AloysiusSnuffleupagus:
So let's not split hairs about "all things being equal". Because we all know, and the comments and article itself acknowledge, that the less qualified and dumber applicant who is the better sycophant has the leg up on the more qualified and smarter applicant who isn't as skilled in kissing ass.


Incorrect. You're just using a defense mechanism to help you feel better about not getting a job. "I'm WAY more knowledgeable, but I won't kiss ass, so FARK THEM! WAHHHHH!"

Chances are pretty good that you not only have a crappy personality which doomed you from the start, but you were neither more knowledgeable nor more qualified. They picked someone better. Get over it.
 
2013-01-06 11:17:17 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: What is that picture from?


lead singer of Drive By-Truckers
 
2013-01-06 11:18:04 PM

Bucky Katt: The Stealth Hippopotamus: First question in every interview I conduct: "so, Star Was or Star Trek?"

First it show me how the person reacts to a curve ball if the candidate is off guard and nervous that's bad if it gets them to relax that's good. If they get off guard by such a simple question than they'll never make it in shipping. The truckers will get you alive. Second it keeps all the damn Trekkers away from me.

The last girl I hired answered "Firefly". Best filing clerk we got.

You're a fan of Star Was? That explains a lot.


Damn the English Teacher Brigade is out in force tonight.
 
2013-01-06 11:19:16 PM

zedster: The Stealth Hippopotamus: What is that picture from?

lead singer of Drive By-Truckers


Oh. I'll have to look them up.


Thanks
 
2013-01-06 11:19:27 PM

Atomic Spunk: Are you kidding? For anyone who's ever given their employer a 2 week notice, that may end up being the best 2 weeks that you will ever have on the job.


In my experience, a 2 week notice turns into being wished well 2 days later by HR as they tell you just go ahead and leave early. Many companies are real jumpy about employees that are leaving, even under good terms.
 
2013-01-06 11:21:14 PM
I prefer the Les Nesman approach to co-workers. I tape off my area, and expect people to knock.

/I also show up with a band-aid or bandage on a different part of my body everyday.
 
2013-01-06 11:21:56 PM
Biggest problem in our society: High School never ends.
 
2013-01-06 11:21:57 PM

tripleseven: Would you like to hear my Google interview story?

It's rather amusing. If a little sad.


*pours beer*
*pops popcorn*
*hands em around*

Yes,
 
2013-01-06 11:23:06 PM

FormlessOne: xsarien: BokerBill: What's your favorite movie? What's your favorite website? What's the last book you read for fun? What makes you uncomfortable?

- None of your business
- None of your business
- None of your business
- A rock in my shoe

/Not a good cultural fit with any company that thinks these are important questions to ask in a job interview.

Do you give douchy answers to those questions when they're asked in a casual setting? Because what's being measured here is your ability to have a normal conversation that doesn't involve "talking shop."

It's a little jarring and their purpose is pretty transparent these days, but they can also serve as a bit of an ice breaker in a normally tense situation, like, say, a job interview.

On the other hand, discovering the folks carrying the "YER NOT THE BOSS A' ME!" chip on their shoulders in four questions or less makes a job interview go that much faster.


Oh, you're getting favorites for that onr
 
2013-01-06 11:23:08 PM
Some of us are grown ups and really tire of games. Both in relationships and at work.

The last time I interviewed for a job, one place had me run the gauntlet interviewing with 10 different people (for a half hour, each) culminating with the big boss who asked me some "WTF" questions. As in, "Seriously, I have no idea what you're talking about and I'm not sure what the appropriate response is." In the back of my mind was "what was the point of that?".

I might add, I have a doctoral-level degree and the question was about being replaced by technology which doesn't exist and won't during my lifetime.

So yeah, I really tire of the stupid questions.
 
2013-01-06 11:23:22 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: zedster: The Stealth Hippopotamus: What is that picture from?

lead singer of Drive By-Truckers

Oh. I'll have to look them up.


Thanks


Alt Country/Southern Rock Band

I suggest giving Southern Rock Opera a listen. It's a double disk concept album that tells the story of the South in the 50s-70s and Lynyrd Skynyrd. They have a lot of history in their songs for example they have a song about Sun records called Carl Perkin's Cadillac. The song is about the owner of Sun Records, Sam Philliups promising the first person to get a hit on his label would get a Caddie. Carl Perkin's had his one hit a month before Elvis and before Cash who was also on the label, thus winning the Caddie.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Rock_Opera
 
2013-01-06 11:24:46 PM
When I was a recruiter, along w/the normal interview questions, I would give a "general knowledge test":  Name 5 European capitols, how many inches in a yard, name 1 of the 7 wonders of the world, what is the equator...real 5th grade stuff, 10 questions in total.  And it would appall me how many applicants couldn't answer more than 2 or 3.  I found that test to be a far better indicator of an applicant's qualifications than any job history or stupid "where do you see yourself in 5 years" questions.

I have no problem with ascertaining a "cultural fit" or very basic personality.  You could be the most brilliant coder in the world but, if you're not going to fit in well with the rest of the coding team, you're not going to stay at that job.

/Strangest question I ever got on a job interview:  "What is the meaning of life?"
//It was for an IT company and I answered, "42".
///Interviewer (Director of sales) paused for a split second, cracked up, and said, "You just got yourself into the second round of interviews!"
 
2013-01-06 11:25:04 PM

Atomic Spunk: AloysiusSnuffleupagus:
So let's not split hairs about "all things being equal". Because we all know, and the comments and article itself acknowledge, that the less qualified and dumber applicant who is the better sycophant has the leg up on the more qualified and smarter applicant who isn't as skilled in kissing ass.


Incorrect. You're just using a defense mechanism to help you feel better about not getting a job. "I'm WAY more knowledgeable, but I won't kiss ass, so FARK THEM! WAHHHHH!"

Chances are pretty good that you not only have a crappy personality which doomed you from the start, but you were neither more knowledgeable nor more qualified. They picked someone better. Get over it.


I have a job, asshole.
 
2013-01-06 11:26:40 PM

Sygonus: whatshisname: What's asinine about it? Fitting into a workplace is just as important as skills.

A hundred times this.

The company I work for has a fantastic organizational culture, in part because we hire people who mesh well together. Collaboration in small teams is critical for the work we do (research/analysis), so having someone who doesn't fit with the culture is a potential buzzkill to the quality of our outputs.

I often get called on to conduct peer interviews of potential recruits, and you're damn right I'm looking to make sure the individual fits well with the org culture. By the time people get the peer interview stage, we know they have the skills to do the job. The question is: will we like spending time for over 40 hours a week with this person? Between two equally qualified candidates, I'm going to pick the outgoing, energetic individual who has similar interests to the rest of the team - they're going to jive better in the department then someone who is equally qualified but has no interest in contributing to the org culture.


Sounds like a good way to practice age discrimination, but not worry about those pesky lawsuits.
 
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