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(Sun Sentinel)   More than 400 hunters have signed up to find and kill Burmese Pythons in the Everglades. Surely nothing can go wrong with this plan   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 143
    More: Followup, Burmese, Everglades, Lake Worth, University of Tulsa, Pembroke Pines, Burmese pythons, hunters  
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7027 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Jan 2013 at 4:01 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



143 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-06 07:46:23 PM  

Keizer_Ghidorah: douchebag/hater: Thunderbox: By all means, keep destroying the balance of nature, until there's no nature left.

Stupid comment.
1) Burmese pythons are not native to the Everglades
2) Burmese pythons are currently destroying the eco-system; one example is that the white tail deer population is down 90%(!!!!) due to the pythons eating them. Many other species are experiencing similar declines.
3) Burmese pythons have no natural predators in the Everglades so bring on the harvesting
4) Next time RTFA, ya ignorant tree-hugger.

Yeah, I'm having a hard time believing that part. And the "no natural predators" thing, everything that eats eggs and young snakes eats the pythons' eggs and young as well, and alligators munch on the adults.


Since you don't believe that a python can eat a deer here is a picture of a python that tried to eat an alligator.

www.usgs.gov

An American alligator and a Burmese python locked in a struggle to prevail in Everglades National Park. This python appears to be losing, but snakes in similar situations have apparently escaped unharmed, and in other situations pythons have eaten alligators. Photo by Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service.

or this one

1.bp.blogspot.com

or this one

media.mmgcommunity.topscms.com

he should have made sure the gator was dead before trying to swallow it.
 
2013-01-06 07:52:08 PM  

Stone Meadow: bmr68: Pythons, nutria, and feral hogs are invasive species, which is why they are killed/captured on site>.

And whenever we see them, too! :^)


Thanks Adolph
 
2013-01-06 08:09:37 PM  

bmr68: Stone Meadow: bmr68: Pythons, nutria, and feral hogs are invasive species, which is why they are killed/captured on site>.

And whenever we see them, too! :^)

Thanks Adolph


You must'a missed the smiley face... :^)
 
2013-01-06 08:17:19 PM  
I'm so excited. I hope EVERYTHING goes wrong!
 
2013-01-06 08:30:31 PM  
I'm tired of these motherfarking snakes in this motherfarking Everglades.

/obligatory
 
2013-01-06 08:44:00 PM  

ParaHandy: As you may infer from the careful wording, I am British and thus opposed to dog pack hunting of foxes, due to the foxes' suffering. And also to raising animals for food and treating them inhumanely.

/ free range organically raised animals taste better too
// everybody wins


I fail to see the connection with the article.

But hey, this is Fark and I guess there doesn't really have to be one. Carry on.
 
2013-01-06 09:02:31 PM  
This will only kill the stupid pythons. In a few years, the Everglades will be re-infested except now the snakes will be super-intelligent and have a vendetta against man.
 
2013-01-06 09:08:50 PM  

JeffreyScott: Gov. Scott, you and your "market-force" approach win this round, but don't get me started on private prisons!


Isn't this exactly the opposite of a market force? The state is investing money to stimulate the economy, before the state money the market did not give a fark.
 
2013-01-06 09:10:11 PM  

Oldiron_79: I'm pulling for the pythons. Ignorant fracking mouth breathers killing them because they aren't cute and cuddly


They are wrecking the ecosystem, it has nothing to do with their cuteness you stupid fark.
 
2013-01-06 09:10:19 PM  

JesusJuice: This will only kill the stupid pythons. In a few years, the Everglades will be re-infested except now the snakes will be super-intelligent and have a vendetta against man.


Paging The Asylum, your writers are needed in the Everglades.
 
2013-01-06 09:14:05 PM  
Couldn't they just use a machete?
 
2013-01-06 09:21:16 PM  

Stone Meadow: I saw a short video a last year where a guy used two black Labs to sniff out pythons in a test in the Everglades. It was awesome...they'd scoot up to a hummock out in the swamp, the dogs would hop off the airboat and check for snakes. They cleared the hummocks in just a few seconds...or found snakes and barked to attract the handler, who shot the snake. It looked pretty farking foolproof. The guy said he'd trained the dogs to only alert on pythons, so they ignored all other animals.

Anyway, I trust the hunt rules permit dogs and I wish the hunters all the best. Go get em!


Maybe they should hide in the hammocks instead.

/snark
 
2013-01-06 09:22:35 PM  

Lt_Ryan: Is trapping not an option? Can't a trap be designed to catch Python's over a certain size, to minimize killing native snakes. The bigger snakes would be the ones taking down big game and having the most offspring. It's not a permanent fix but may help to at least control the population.



Does intelligent invasive species control have to be limited to what squicky pussies can bear to let themselves think about?
 
2013-01-06 09:24:23 PM  

Fano: Just send amos moses with a mongoose


Good idea. No need for lead pollution from bullets, he'll just knock em in the head with a stomp.
 
2013-01-06 09:33:02 PM  
The only problem I see with this approach is too few hunters. Should have gotten 4,000 people to do it, not 400, if a true impact to the snake population is desired. Or just go ahead and bioengineer an attack vector that destroys python eggs. Whether that's a virus, bacteria or some sort of insect doesn't matter as much as getting to play God. Muwhahhaha! :lightning crash:
 
2013-01-06 09:37:32 PM  
Oh, you mean a MYANMARESE python?

pardonmyblog.co.uk

Also add to your update list.....

us.123rf.com
Myanmarese cats

rlv.zcache.com
Myanmar Shave
 
2013-01-06 09:38:13 PM  
They are wrecking the ecosystem, it has nothing to do with their cuteness you stupid fark.

I fail to see how driving a few mammal/bird megafauna to local extinction = wrecking the ecosystem, ESPECIALLY when said ecosystem already has well over 100 exotic/invasive species present even before the pythons became established. Pythons certainly aren't as effective at wrecking an ecosystem as would be building a modern-day sprawling metropolis over it.

That said, sure, try to kill them. They're too cryptic and it won't work. You'd have to nuke/napalm the glades to get them out of there permanently. They're also full of mercury, so I don't think you want to eat them.
 
2013-01-06 09:46:31 PM  

technofiend: The only problem I see with this approach is too few hunters. Should have gotten 4,000 people to do it, not 400, if a true impact to the snake population is desired. Or just go ahead and bioengineer an attack vector that destroys python eggs. Whether that's a virus, bacteria or some sort of insect doesn't matter as much as getting to play God. Muwhahhaha! :lightning crash:


It's going to have about as much effect as plinking nutria in the bayous is going to have, honestly. They'll only catch the big, easy to spot pythons--the little fast snakes will get left behind to breed for next year. And since they're hunting snakes, not snake nests, it's just not going to impact the population over time. More importantly, every year a few hundred idiots release their pet pythons into the swamps because "one snake can't hurt right?" instead of humanely killing it or selling it. So there's a net increase over time.

The only thing that will work is prohibiting import of pythons into the US, criminalizing the ownership and release, destroying ALL pythons currently in Florida (regardless of ownership) and then killing the feral ones. Like that's going to happen, but that would work.
 
2013-01-06 09:53:12 PM  
: ParaHandy: As you may infer from the careful wording, I am British and thus opposed to dog pack hunting of foxes, due to the foxes' suffering. And also to raising animals for food and treating them inhumanely.

/ free range organically raised animals taste better too
// everybody wins


I love to foxhunt, and we ate one of the chickens we raised tonight. The world is still in balance.
 
2013-01-06 10:05:57 PM  
What could go wrong: Not enough hunters.
 
2013-01-06 10:23:04 PM  

All Latest: [i527.photobucket.com image 622x414]


I'd love to see a battle to the death between a big python and Sy - Vietnam Veteran.
 
2013-01-06 10:25:30 PM  

Massa Damnata: give them all fully automatic 'hunting' weapons


Don't be a dumbass. Everyone knows you hunt pythons with hand grenades.
 
2013-01-06 10:39:54 PM  

skinink: "Participants do not need hunting licenses, unless they're under 18, or have prior experience with snakes. The only required training can be done online. Given those slender requirements, some have questioned the wisdom of encouraging amateurs with firearms, particularly non-hunters, to take on pythons in the wild."
I see it as a win-win situation. We wind up culling both pythons AND gun-loving Floridians and others.


In my experiences talking with fish and game folks this is exactly why they don't like solutions involving the public controlling a invasive species via hunting. It introduces the precedent that if you introduce an invasive species (wild boar, pythons) to an area that the public was not previously allowed to hunt (in this case a National Park) that the public will then be allowed to hunt there.
 
2013-01-06 11:00:54 PM  

StrikitRich: Massa Damnata: give them all fully automatic 'hunting' weapons

Don't be a dumbass. Everyone knows you hunt pythons with hand grenades.


No no no. Pythons hunt rabbits with hand grenades.
 
2013-01-06 11:19:17 PM  
It depresses me that people have such a low opinion of our countrymen. Bounties used to be the way our government took care of undesirable species. The reason there were few predators left in the lower 48 until recently was not government hunters or traps it was the average American with a gun going after a bounty. This is a cheap solution that seems win-win to me. Hunters get to hunt and an invasive species gets slaughtered.
 
2013-01-06 11:26:46 PM  
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com

Well, they did a bang-up job on Pluto, so why not?
 
2013-01-06 11:36:26 PM  

Noah_Tall: StrikitRich: Massa Damnata: give them all fully automatic 'hunting' weapons

Don't be a dumbass. Everyone knows you hunt pythons with hand grenades.

No no no. Pythons hunt rabbits with hand grenades.


Are there those who call you Tim?
 
2013-01-06 11:42:40 PM  
Good luck hunters, you'll need it.
Those snakes are sneaky.
 
2013-01-06 11:54:47 PM  

ParaHandy: As you may infer from the careful wording, I am British and thus opposed to dog pack hunting of foxes, due to the foxes' suffering. And also to raising animals for food and treating them inhumanely.

/ free range organically raised animals taste better too
// everybody wins


LOL. That's nice.
 
2013-01-07 12:19:07 AM  

simkatu: jso2897: flak attack: Good. This needed to happen. The python population in Florida has exploded lately.

It's a good idea - but 400 people seems like an awful lot, especially with no training or qualification required - not even a hunting license. That's an awful lot of amateurs to be roaming around the 'glades, blazing away at whatever they take to be a python.

Even if every one of the hunters brought back 100 pythons, they still wouldn't eliminate them from the glades. If you're going to eliminate the python you're going to have to do a lot more than this.


So are you saying they are going to need a bigger boat?
 
2013-01-07 02:46:44 AM  

Thunderbox: By all means, keep destroying the balance of nature, until there's no nature left.


Um ... you do know that Burmese pythons are an invasive species and they are the ones destroying the balance of nature in the Everglades, right? Right?

I love snakes. I've got eight as pets. I used to own a Burm, and wouldn't mind another one, once I've got a place where I can keep a pet that gets bigger than I am. But they have their place, and that place isn't on the loose in the 'Glades.

One of my snakes is an Everglades rat snake. Captive-bred, actually a cull from a breeding program trying to breed back to something that looks like the pure wild type, which has been almost entirely lost to intergrades with the yellow rat snake due to the Everglades being drained. His wild relatives are, or were, the top snake in the Everglades. Their ecological niche has been taken over by the Burmese pythons. Burms lay more eggs, their young hatch larger, and they grow faster (MUCH faster) than the rat snakes, either rossalleni or quatrivittata (and no, I'm not going to take sides in the species/subspecies/morph argument here).

The pythons are out-competing the native snakes. It's because I'm a snake lover that I support the efforts to wipe out the Burmese python in the Everglades.

Owning -- or, more importantly, feeding -- snakes tends to militate against sentimentality. Dog and cat owners can open a can or scoop out some kibble and never have to think about that pet food coming from a real animal. It's not that easy if feeding your pets involves whole rats and mice, even frozen ones. Depending on your point of view, it's cold-bloodedness or realism, but either way, you lose the sentimental attitude fast or you get a different pet.

A big part of the problem is that Burms breed like very, very fecund rabbits, and because they get big, they're appealing to the same kind of people who want "mean" dogs, and for some of the same reasons. That whole subculture of folks sells snakes at flea markets and whatnot, generally to other people like themselves, and when they get bored, they dump their snakes in "the swamp". I feel kind of funny making some of the same arguments people opposing gun control use in reference to live animals, but the fact is, laws against owning or selling large snakes won't bother this crowd; they'll only affect the people who aren't the source of the problem.

Humans are very, very good at wiping out any species we find useful in some way. We need to point that talent in a good direction -- namely, at invasive species. Burmese python skins make beautiful leather. Lionfish are tasty. Hell, I bet you could do something useful with zebra mussels ... maybe they'd be good as bait or something? And there's gotta be something to do with all this kudzu (yes, I'm pretty sure if you stand still too long it will grow over you).

Save an ecosystem -- eat an invasive species.
 
2013-01-07 03:53:13 AM  

ongbok: Keizer_Ghidorah: douchebag/hater: Thunderbox: By all means, keep destroying the balance of nature, until there's no nature left.

Stupid comment.
1) Burmese pythons are not native to the Everglades
2) Burmese pythons are currently destroying the eco-system; one example is that the white tail deer population is down 90%(!!!!) due to the pythons eating them. Many other species are experiencing similar declines.
3) Burmese pythons have no natural predators in the Everglades so bring on the harvesting
4) Next time RTFA, ya ignorant tree-hugger.

Yeah, I'm having a hard time believing that part. And the "no natural predators" thing, everything that eats eggs and young snakes eats the pythons' eggs and young as well, and alligators munch on the adults.

Since you don't believe that a python can eat a deer here is a picture of a python that tried to eat an alligator.

[www.usgs.gov image 300x225]

An American alligator and a Burmese python locked in a struggle to prevail in Everglades National Park. This python appears to be losing, but snakes in similar situations have apparently escaped unharmed, and in other situations pythons have eaten alligators. Photo by Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service.

or this one

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 639x390]

or this one

[media.mmgcommunity.topscms.com image 400x233]

he should have made sure the gator was dead before trying to swallow it.


I never said I don't believe a python can eat a deer. What I said was I don't believe that they've decimated 90% of the deer population. Reading comprehension and critical thinking are your friends.

I have a 17-foot Burmese python. I'm well aware of what they can and can't eat. I've seen the videos and pictures of gators and pythons eating each other. After a python eats something as big as a deer, it's going to find a secluded spot to curl up and digest it for months. To decimate deer, there'd have to be hundreds of thousands of constantly-starving pythons throughout all of Florida. Animals also learn and adapt pretty quickly, by now the coons and weasels and other predators are feasting on python eggs and young, while black bears, cougars, crocodiles and alligators eat and compete with the adults. The Everglades survived foreign frogs, anoles, crickets, nutria, and others, it'll survive the pythons.

Besides, the most humans can do is curb the population. We'll never completely eradicate them, but we can keep them down until the full adjustment is finished.

Worldwalker: and because they get big, they're appealing to the same kind of people who want "mean" dogs, and for some of the same reasons. That whole subculture of folks sells snakes at flea markets and whatnot, generally to other people like themselves, and when they get bored, they dump their snakes in "the swamp".


I own a python because I find them to be beautiful animals with as much personality as many mammals. Many other owners are similar, they don't keep pythons because they're the pit bulls of the snake world. If they wanted tough and dangerous, they'd be keeping venomous snakes like cobras or rattlers. Also, the number of people dumping them in the wild isn't enough for them to establish a population. The likeliest culprit was Hurricane Andrew, it damaged and destroyed a lot of homes and reptile farms, which freed a large number of snakes.
 
2013-01-07 07:13:27 AM  

ParaHandy: As you may infer from the careful wording, I am British and thus opposed to dog pack hunting of foxes, due to the foxes' suffering. And also to raising animals for food and treating them inhumanely.

/ free range organically raised animals taste better too
// everybody wins


Don't know if it's a problem over in the UK, but here in America free-range beef is actually doing a real number on the environment, though you'll hear very few of today's pseudo-hippies admit it.

Much of the beef cattle in America are raised in the west, particularly the southwest. This land is largely ill-suited to raising cattle, so it takes a great deal of area to raise each herd. Ranchers introduced non-native grasses that they thought were "better" for the cattle; these invasive species are now forcing out the native bunch grasses. The cattle are also destroying the cryptobiotic soils all across the southwest: cryptobiotic soil is the primary nitrogen fixer in arid ecosystems, and thus is hugely important to the ecological health of the region. Cryptobiotic soil is extremely fragile, and while the blue-green algae that provides the structure of the soil regrows fairly quickly, the cyanobacteria that are the actual nitrogen fixers take decades to recolonize the algae. Free-range beef is slowly destroying the entire ecosystem of the American southwest. It is not an "everybody wins" scenario.

/love me my deserts and shrub-steppes
//keep the goddamn cows locked up in the barn where they belong
 
2013-01-07 08:21:35 AM  

Igor Jakovsky: I wasnt aware that you had to sign up to shoot invasive species...

/DNRTFA


Would be pointless to do it piecemeal even if that is the case, the only way to have any real chance of having an impact is for a lot of people to do it around the same time. Even then the chances of having anything other than a short term impact is very low.
 
2013-01-07 09:05:32 AM  

Lachwen: ParaHandy: As you may infer from the careful wording, I am British and thus opposed to dog pack hunting of foxes, due to the foxes' suffering. And also to raising animals for food and treating them inhumanely.

/ free range organically raised animals taste better too
// everybody wins

Don't know if it's a problem over in the UK, but here in America free-range beef is actually doing a real number on the environment, though you'll hear very few of today's pseudo-hippies admit it.

Much of the beef cattle in America are raised in the west, particularly the southwest. This land is largely ill-suited to raising cattle, so it takes a great deal of area to raise each herd. Ranchers introduced non-native grasses that they thought were "better" for the cattle; these invasive species are now forcing out the native bunch grasses. The cattle are also destroying the cryptobiotic soils all across the southwest: cryptobiotic soil is the primary nitrogen fixer in arid ecosystems, and thus is hugely important to the ecological health of the region. Cryptobiotic soil is extremely fragile, and while the blue-green algae that provides the structure of the soil regrows fairly quickly, the cyanobacteria that are the actual nitrogen fixers take decades to recolonize the algae. Free-range beef is slowly destroying the entire ecosystem of the American southwest. It is not an "everybody wins" scenario.

/love me my deserts and shrub-steppes
//keep the goddamn cows locked up in the barn where they belong


That's environmentaly unsound, which is bad and a different issue outwith the scope of my comment. I do agree with you.

Brazilian ranchers slash and burn virgin rain forest to create more prairie ... very invasive indeed.
 
2013-01-07 10:02:34 AM  

Keizer_Ghidorah: I own a python because I find them to be beautiful animals with as much personality as many mammals. Many other owners are similar, they don't keep pythons because they're the pit bulls of the snake world. If they wanted tough and dangerous, they'd be keeping venomous snakes like cobras or rattlers


I didn't mean that all, or even most, python owners fit that description. Remember, I'm "between Burms" myself. But they are uniquely appealing to that particular category of people. Hot snakes aren't, at least to the same extent, because they require skill, knowledge, specialized care, and, well, a lot more work. Not that that stops some people ("Tony Ferrari" aka Corbett of Stoneham, he of the lost cobra, comes to mind first) but, by and large, these people want a snake that looks scary to other people, not one that can actually hurt them. Retics are nasty, most of the other big snakes are pricey, but Burmese are cheap, easy to come by, and get huge. That's highly attractive for a certain kind of people ... I've met too many of them. And as for their dumping snakes in the Glades ... these are not fragile K-selectors we're talking about. Given their fertility and fecundity, A couple of them ... or one, if it happened to be a gravid female, unlikely but not impossible ... would be sufficient to get a breeding population established.

By the way, for the people who think raccoons, etc., will just snack on snake eggs: The large pythons are known to guard their clutches -- even "shivering" to raise their body temperature above ambient to warm the eggs.
 
2013-01-07 10:13:48 AM  
manimal2878: Oldiron_79: I'm pulling for the pythons. Ignorant fracking mouth breathers killing them because they aren't cute and cuddly

They are wrecking the ecosystem, it has nothing to do with their cuteness you stupid fark.


Burmese Pythons are in IUCN redlist species(endangered) in their native range. If there was a bunch of cute endangered animals breeding in the U.S. somewhere like pandas how many of you would be all "derp hell yeah kill em all they ain't natives, 'murica fark yeah"
 
2013-01-07 10:26:58 AM  
If they are endangered, WWF should offer a larger bounty for trapping and delivering live and unharmed ones. Free market at work.
 
2013-01-07 10:38:12 AM  

Keizer_Ghidorah: I own a python because I find them to be beautiful animals with as much personality as many mammals.i>

You're anthropomorphizing. Pythons (and virtually all other snakes) lack the brain structure to experience emotions or develop personalities. They CAN adapt to a range of environmental conditions, and they CAN be trained to a degree, but NO herpetologist would agree that they have emotions and personalities.

/retired zoologist

 
2013-01-07 01:43:36 PM  

Schmegicky: Oh, you mean a MYANMARESE python?

[pardonmyblog.co.uk image 500x375]

Also add to your update list.....

[us.123rf.com image 425x370]
Myanmarese cats

[rlv.zcache.com image 325x325]
Myanmar Shave



Oh, you may know it as Myanmar, but it will always be Burma to me!
farm6.static.flickr.com
/You there! Old woman! Sell me one of your melons!
 
2013-01-07 04:53:33 PM  
NO herpetologist would agree that they have emotions and personalities.

/retired zoologist


Technically, they do have behavior syndromes, which some ethologists equate to "personality".

/I'll see your retired zoologist and raise you an active biologist
 
2013-01-07 04:56:53 PM  

juvandy: NO herpetologist would agree that they have emotions and personalities.

/retired zoologist

Technically, they do have behavior syndromes, which some ethologists equate to "personality".

/I'll see your retired zoologist and raise you an active biologist


Since I've taken up experimenting with certain medicinally active plant varieties, I guess I should amend the moniker to 'biologist' as well. ;^)
 
2013-01-08 10:09:20 AM  

Stone Meadow: juvandy: NO herpetologist would agree that they have emotions and personalities.

/retired zoologist

Technically, they do have behavior syndromes, which some ethologists equate to "personality".

/I'll see your retired zoologist and raise you an active biologist

Since I've taken up experimenting with certain medicinally active plant varieties, I guess I should amend the moniker to 'biologist' as well. ;^)


or "pothead" Pothead works too.
 
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