If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Boston Herald)   Counter-revolution begins in Concord, Mass   (bostonherald.com) divider line 68
    More: Followup, mess, counter-revolution  
•       •       •

14739 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Jan 2013 at 3:42 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



68 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-01-06 06:38:59 PM
Five cent deposit.
Like the other bottles and cans in MA.
Was that hard?
 
2013-01-06 06:42:05 PM
cirby:
dericwater:
What happens is that the bottling industry, in order to deal with such a law and having to cater to these people, will eventually produce a more environmentally friendly bottle. Maybe out of decomposable material like corn husks or something. It will then become cheaper to produce and use, and then it will then be spread out to other states and countries.

"They did this. There's a whole series of plastic biodegradable bottles made from corn.

The problem is... they suck.

They're porous, and the water evaporates right through the surface of the bottles. I have one in my fridge from a few months ago (well inside the "use by" date), and while it's still sealed, almost 1/3 of the water is gone. It's shrinking from the vacuum. I'm going to keep the thing until it either breaks or is completely empty."

Not to mention, biodegradable is a misnomer, as trash doesn't really break down in dumps.

When these biodegradable bottles are mixed in w other recyclable plastic, it ruins the whole batch, causing a cloudy look to the plastic.
 
2013-01-06 06:52:50 PM

dericwater: I was watching a documentary on the building of the transcontinental railroad in the late 1800s in the United States. There were two main problems with railroads at that time. One was the method to couple trains together and the other was the braking system. Both problems had solutions, but the railroads didn't bother to implement either because the cost (free market) was too great. It was cheaper to pay an engineer $1.50/day and if the guy loses a finger or two when trying to couple two cars together, so be it. Or, if the engineer got blown up trying to slow down a train with unworkable brakes, they'll just bag the guy and send the parts home.

It took Congress to enact laws, basically the 1800s version of OSHA, to forced the railroad companies to comply with better solutions. The funny thing was that by doing so, better coupling and better braking, the railroads earned even more revenue because trains could be more than 2 or 3 cars long. They could now have trains with up to 100 or more cars, all because of better coupling and braking systems, spurred by acts of Congress.

Similarly, once people have enough of plastic bottles, through laws, and not free market, the bottling industry will be forced to look for alternatives. And that will make improvements in the future.


The train coupling issue could have been solved by the free market too if there really was an issue and the free market was given time to work. If you think working for a particular company is too dangerous then you have the option of quiting and working somewhere else. If enough people agree that the company in question is too dangerous then the company will be unable to find workers and will have to change their practices or go out of business.
 
2013-01-06 06:52:59 PM
"It took three years to get the (ban) and I'm going to fight to keep it," said Hill. "I'm 85, but I'm mean."

For how long exactly? Until Thanksgiving?
 
2013-01-06 07:07:37 PM
The tap water in Concord is purer and cleaner than the average bottled water. There is absolutely no reason for bottled water in that town. Its citizens have the right to ban whatever products they wish.

This is the same town that bans any paint color other than white on houses in large zones near the center of town (in order to keep that charming, historic appearance). They have banned movie theaters and will not allow a McDonald's, Burger King, or any other fast food establishment anywhere in town.

The idea that bottled water ban is somehow unique and unheard of is ludicrous.
 
2013-01-06 07:08:57 PM

Ima4nic8or: dericwater: I was watching a documentary on the building of the transcontinental railroad in the late 1800s in the United States. There were two main problems with railroads at that time. One was the method to couple trains together and the other was the braking system. Both problems had solutions, but the railroads didn't bother to implement either because the cost (free market) was too great. It was cheaper to pay an engineer $1.50/day and if the guy loses a finger or two when trying to couple two cars together, so be it. Or, if the engineer got blown up trying to slow down a train with unworkable brakes, they'll just bag the guy and send the parts home.

It took Congress to enact laws, basically the 1800s version of OSHA, to forced the railroad companies to comply with better solutions. The funny thing was that by doing so, better coupling and better braking, the railroads earned even more revenue because trains could be more than 2 or 3 cars long. They could now have trains with up to 100 or more cars, all because of better coupling and braking systems, spurred by acts of Congress.

Similarly, once people have enough of plastic bottles, through laws, and not free market, the bottling industry will be forced to look for alternatives. And that will make improvements in the future.

The train coupling issue could have been solved by the free market too if there really was an issue and the free market was given time to work. If you think working for a particular company is too dangerous then you have the option of quiting and working somewhere else. If enough people agree that the company in question is too dangerous then the company will be unable to find workers and will have to change their practices or go out of business.


The coupling and the brake system were available. But the railroad corporations decided it was cheaper to have people lose a finger or hand or their life than to pay for the capital improvements to the trains. You know, adding hydraulic lines for the brakes, removing the old coupling and putting in new ones. It would never had been done. If it could have been done through free market, then it would have been done, but it wasn't.
 
2013-01-06 07:19:42 PM
Then there were not enough people that thought it was really an issue. At least not enough of an issue to switch jobs for. Free market democracy in action.
 
2013-01-06 07:20:21 PM

dericwater: I was watching a documentary on the building of the transcontinental railroad in the late 1800s in the United States. There were two main problems with railroads at that time. One was the method to couple trains together and the other was the braking system. Both problems had solutions, but the railroads didn't bother to implement either because the cost (free market) was too great. It was cheaper to pay an engineer $1.50/day and if the guy loses a finger or two when trying to couple two cars together, so be it. Or, if the engineer got blown up trying to slow down a train with unworkable brakes, they'll just bag the guy and send the parts home.

It took Congress to enact laws, basically the 1800s version of OSHA, to forced the railroad companies to comply with better solutions. The funny thing was that by doing so, better coupling and better braking, the railroads earned even more revenue because trains could be more than 2 or 3 cars long. They could now have trains with up to 100 or more cars, all because of better coupling and braking systems, spurred by acts of Congress.

Similarly, once people have enough of plastic bottles, through laws, and not free market, the bottling industry will be forced to look for alternatives. And that will make improvements in the future.


do you remember the title? any other identifying info?
 
2013-01-06 07:24:00 PM
You guys love to act like the individual has no options. Any of the workers could have switched jobs at any time. There is no lack of opportunity here. If it were really that big a safety issue all, or most of the workers, would have just gone an gotten other jobs and the company would be forced to act. That option was there but they chose not to take it. They chose their working conditions.
 
2013-01-06 07:41:15 PM

calbert: dericwater: I was watching a documentary on the building of the transcontinental railroad in the late 1800s in the United States. There were two main problems with railroads at that time. One was the method to couple trains together and the other was the braking system. Both problems had solutions, but the railroads didn't bother to implement either because the cost (free market) was too great. It was cheaper to pay an engineer $1.50/day and if the guy loses a finger or two when trying to couple two cars together, so be it. Or, if the engineer got blown up trying to slow down a train with unworkable brakes, they'll just bag the guy and send the parts home.

It took Congress to enact laws, basically the 1800s version of OSHA, to forced the railroad companies to comply with better solutions. The funny thing was that by doing so, better coupling and better braking, the railroads earned even more revenue because trains could be more than 2 or 3 cars long. They could now have trains with up to 100 or more cars, all because of better coupling and braking systems, spurred by acts of Congress.

Similarly, once people have enough of plastic bottles, through laws, and not free market, the bottling industry will be forced to look for alternatives. And that will make improvements in the future.

do you remember the title? any other identifying info?


Watched it on Netflix streaming. Modern Marvels: The Railroads That Tamed The West
 
2013-01-06 07:42:55 PM

Ima4nic8or: Then there were not enough people that thought it was really an issue. At least not enough of an issue to switch jobs for. Free market democracy in action.


Right. And slavery was just fine and dandy too. Child labor, 16 hour work days, company stores. Yup, all perfectly fine.
 
2013-01-06 07:47:04 PM
making a law like that is useless. However, I think she's 100% correct that the people who bellow on and on about their "rights" tend to be the same people who have absolutely no sense of their responsibility and obligations to society. They also tend to be clueless about what their rights actually are, and the limitations/exceptions of those rights. Bottled water is not a right.

That being said, I remember the days when people threw fast food bags and other litter out their car windows on the highways without a second thought. Fines changed that a little (and the same types of people mentioned above predictably bellowed about their "right" to litter up the highways because their tax dollars paid for them). But what REALLY reduced highway littering was ad campaigns. The crying Indian, the polar bear at the trash can, etc. It became socially unacceptable. That social stigma strategy is probably more responsible for people quitting smoking than rising prices, too.

Sometimes legislation is the way to go, and sometimes its not. This time its not. Organize/lobby to get ad campaigns out there about the absurd numbes of small water bottles we buy and throw away. Insitiute a bottle deposit or raise existing ones, etc.

Also... 

ModernLuddite: "I find tap water disgusting! So I'm going to buy bottled water at a premium! And absolutely, under no circumstances take the issue up with my municipality that I pay taxes to and who appears to not be using that money!"


... AN OCEAN OF THIS
 
2013-01-06 07:52:58 PM
"People should have the freedom to buy a legal product in the town they live in..."


Like, guns?
 
2013-01-06 07:55:21 PM

dericwater: Watched it on Netflix streaming. Modern Marvels: The Railroads That Tamed The West


thx.
:)
 
2013-01-06 08:32:52 PM
Here's what you do: drive to Acton and buy your bottle of water. Or buy a soda in Concord and drink the soda and then fill the bottle with water.
 
2013-01-06 09:32:51 PM

8Fingers: YouSirAreAMaroon: chumboobler: It looks like they are targeting water specifically. I saw no mention of Coke\Pepsi and other carbonated soft drinks being banned. If you're going to ban a plastic bottle for being a plastic bottle, the previous contents should be irrelevant and all the bottles should be banned. On the other hand, the whole thing is stupid. Recycle and it will be fine.

Soda bottles are not a problem because they require a deposit and are thus recycled.

Not everywhere. But maybe that does help a bit. I could see a portion of people returning them for deposit like most everyone used to do with glass soda and beer bottles. But I think now people just absord the cost. But then, I don't live where deposits are collected so I am just throwin bs.

I switched to a water filter at home years ago. It did take some adjusting. I had bought cases at a time weekly. Now I just reuse the ones I buy occasionally for awhile, until they start to get yucky. But will then make sure they are thrown away in a recycle bin.
Still, if they were completly banned that would be a headache. To convienient to just grab a water when you're out and about.


I was only speaking for MA, the subject of the article.

I don't know about Concord, but I live in the city and while I don't recycle my cans and bottles, I'm certain someone does.

/heroin ain't free
 
2013-01-07 06:51:19 AM
FTA: The International Bottled Water Association

The fact that there is a Bottled Water Lobby should surprise no one, I suppose.
 
2013-01-07 10:25:44 AM
"It took three years to get the (ban) and I'm going to fight to keep it," said Hill. "I'm 85, but I'm mean. a joyless dried up old coont with nothing better to do as i await the cold hand of death"


fixed.
 
Displayed 18 of 68 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report