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(BBC)   The British and their bizarre view of Americans   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 234
    More: Amusing, Americans, Israel-Palestine, plutocracy, Tom Stoppard, cultural landscape, gramophone record, Will Self  
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25598 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Jan 2013 at 7:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-06 10:39:55 AM
Same as everyone else said... Dbag who just found a thesaurus... But one sentence really struck me as true:

"t follows that what we also do to ourselves is to relentlessly equate America with Americans, and the US government with its electorate - conflations we wouldn't dream of making in the case of the German or Greek peoples."

This! I used to love intl travel, I was like the poster child for the ANTI-Ugly American, doing what everyone claims they wish more Americans did (travel out of the US, be respectful, learn other languages and cultures), but everywhere I went, I got hammered over the intricacies of how the US government runs, and why we do X in our foreign policy (also, why are you Americans so fat?). It was like I was the single embodiment of the US, a focal point for all anti-US harangues.

And then... You know how long it's been since I've lived abroad? Maybe the two might be related? Like the article said, Americans get conflated with our government in a way no other country does, and it's absurd. And (pardon the whine) outright annoying.
 
2013-01-06 10:40:17 AM
www.tech4d.com: too many words
 
2013-01-06 10:44:42 AM
Holy fark that was a boring read
 
2013-01-06 10:49:32 AM
For years, I've heard people from various countries lambasting Americans over issues of "You don't understand such and such because you have no interest in any other cultures," then two sentences later they'll say stereotypical things about some group of people, completely oblivious to the fact they're doing the same thing.

You name a country in Europe I've been to, and I've seen people doing this. There are stupid people everywhere, and everyone to some degree has some level of jingoism in their head.

It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.
 
2013-01-06 10:51:24 AM
 
2013-01-06 10:56:08 AM

bratchaman: I haven't had my coffee yet but this dumb American was put off by the fancy language of the article.

British English almost seems pretenious sometimes. I mean seriously who says "a bewildering and Brobdingnagian phenomenon" and doesn't expect a punch in the face?

And what the eff is "aluminum" anyways?


It's how Americans spell Aluminium. *checks profile* it says you're American, so.... you don't know what it is?
 
2013-01-06 10:57:50 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.


Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...
 
2013-01-06 10:58:34 AM
...their neo-liberal economic policies...

Foreign articles are good for gems of perspective such as this.
 
2013-01-06 11:00:45 AM

spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...


You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?
 
2013-01-06 11:06:03 AM

Agarista: I loved Great Apes

Wonder if it was the same Will Self...


It is. Have you tried The Book of Dave? I loved that too. He once got fired from a newspaper for doing heroin while travelling on the Prime Minister's plane during an election. To be fair, it was John Major's plane, so it must've been farking boring.
 
2013-01-06 11:11:05 AM
Well that was much ado about nothing.
 
2013-01-06 11:11:11 AM
I think it had a lot to do with respect and representation of which taxation was a large factor.
 
2013-01-06 11:11:56 AM

topcon: It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.


I started reading (and commenting) on The Guardian some time ago. I was hoping to get some points of view outside of Fark, and guess what I found out? They farking hate us. It's the weirdest thing--they're completely obsessed with the U.S. (America), but only to put us down. The Brits followed the American elections more closely than most of us did, and they were full of opinions. We all suck, we are bloodthirsty, fat, stupid, only interested in our own country, and ignorant of the rest of the world. (Try looking in the mirror, posters).

So now I spend most of my time on the Guardian blasting ignorant Brits for being ignorant. I'd like to comment on some meaningful things, but it's hard to get past the whole "It's America, so expect the stupid response, followed by a bomb" attitude a lot of them have. Doesn't anything happen in their own country they can be concerned about?

I spend most of my time here ranting about how stupid and farked up the U.S. is, but holy crap---I've never such vitriol about minor subjects that have absolutely no impact on their lives and aren't even taking place in the same country. I might not LOVE America, but I'm not going to let a bunch of pasty wankers tear down my country when they're equally as ignorant as a lot of people here are.
 
2013-01-06 11:14:19 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.


It might not be accurate to say it was a war over taxes but it most certainly isn't wrong.

One of the stated reasons for going to war was that they really didn't like the idea of being taxed without representation in Parliament.

And if you really want to tie it to current events: It's why Puerto Rico, despite being part of the US, doesn't pay federal income tax (and conversely why they're iffy on petitioning for statehood).

Next time you want to flop your dick out on the table about misconceptions of the American Revolutionary War, I'd suggest trying "There was nothing revolutionary about it."
 
2013-01-06 11:14:25 AM

alwaysjaded: Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer -- especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one so how about that ice cold Budweiser NOW!

For extra obnoxious points when they tell you to pay, you yell "I already paid for this beer sir! It was called the Marshall Plan."


I can't stop giggling. Thanks for this.
 
2013-01-06 11:14:52 AM
BBC News normal articles are always part of my daily regimen.

The Features and Analysis section - very last thing I'll read. Their Chinese fellatio tendencies are starting to wear a bit thin.
 
2013-01-06 11:15:08 AM
Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.
 
2013-01-06 11:18:20 AM

Bungles: miss diminutive: Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?
Give it a few decades, my young American padawan, and you'll understand.


Yes, they are, and I have a feeling that has something to do with some of OUR problems right now too. We've haven't adapted to the idea that we are not the center of the universe anymore.

Also, the Brits are still really, really, pissed about that whole Tony Blair thing.
 
2013-01-06 11:18:52 AM

Spiralmonkey: bratchaman: I haven't had my coffee yet but this dumb American was put off by the fancy language of the article.

British English almost seems pretenious sometimes. I mean seriously who says "a bewildering and Brobdingnagian phenomenon" and doesn't expect a punch in the face?

And what the eff is "aluminum" anyways?

It's how Americans spell Aluminium. *checks profile* it says you're American, so.... you don't know what it is?



Congratulations, sir. You have created a new element.

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-01-06 11:20:50 AM

the ha ha guy: I really wish that were an exaggeration, but that happened to someone in my town a few years ago when he lost his hand. He was insured, but he mentioned that it was a workplace accident, so the insurance was automatically denied, and they wouldn't start the surgery until his wife brought them a down payment.

Last I heard he is suing the hospital, but it's not going well, since legally he was only entitled to a bandage to stop the blood loss.


If it was a workplace accident, his care should be covered by workers' comp. I understand that that triggers a whole other raft of paperwork, and probably would have caused a delay in his treatment since his condition wasn't life-threatening (at that point, anyway), but something about this story of being required to bring a down payment to the hospital before surgery doesn't sound right.


tentaculistic: Same as everyone else said... Dbag who just found a thesaurus... But one sentence really struck me as true:

"t follows that what we also do to ourselves is to relentlessly equate America with Americans, and the US government with its electorate - conflations we wouldn't dream of making in the case of the German or Greek peoples."

This! I used to love intl travel, I was like the poster child for the ANTI-Ugly American, doing what everyone claims they wish more Americans did (travel out of the US, be respectful, learn other languages and cultures), but everywhere I went, I got hammered over the intricacies of how the US government runs, and why we do X in our foreign policy (also, why are you Americans so fat?). It was like I was the single embodiment of the US, a focal point for all anti-US harangues.

And then... You know how long it's been since I've lived abroad? Maybe the two might be related? Like the article said, Americans get conflated with our government in a way no other country does, and it's absurd. And (pardon the whine) outright annoying.


THIS. And I'm sorry to say, as much as I loved Australia when I was there, some of the Aussies I met were the absolute worst about this - both quizzing me to find out "what an American thinks about ___," as if there were only one viewpoint possible, and also to give me endless crap about stuff not under my control. College students were the worst with the in-your-face complaints about the American government, but boy did I get it from everybody in March 2001... and I know that some were ribbing me because you're supposed to give your friends grief, but damn that got old really quick. Hey, it's not *my* fault that the Electoral College exists.
 
2013-01-06 11:25:14 AM

david_gaithersburg: Once I learned of The Royal Bun Toss I lost what little respect I still had left for my British cousins, it also provided me with a vivid modern day reminder of why we took up arms to fight for human dignity and freedom. Link


That it absolutely pitiful.
 
2013-01-06 11:28:54 AM

itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.


Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.
 
2013-01-06 11:33:26 AM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

It might not be accurate to say it was a war over taxes but it most certainly isn't wrong.

One of the stated reasons for going to war was that they really didn't like the idea of being taxed without representation in Parliament.

And if you really want to tie it to current events: It's why Puerto Rico, despite being part of the US, doesn't pay federal income tax (and conversely why they're iffy on petitioning for statehood).

Next time you want to flop your dick out on the table about misconceptions of the American Revolutionary War, I'd suggest trying "There was nothing revolutionary about it."


It also isn't accurate to say the Civil War was about states rights though perhaps not technically wrong. The significant difference being that pretending that Americans just didn't want to pay taxes makes them look like a bunch of lazy, greedy freeloaders and pretending that the South was just trying to uphold state's rights lets them ignore the racism

cryinoutloud: topcon: It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.

I started reading (and commenting) on The Guardian some time ago. I was hoping to get some points of view outside of Fark, and guess what I found out? They farking hate us. It's the weirdest thing--they're completely obsessed with the U.S. (America), but only to put us down. The Brits followed the American elections more closely than most of us did, and they were full of opinions. We all suck, we are bloodthirsty, fat, stupid, only interested in our own country, and ignorant of the rest of the world. (Try looking in the mirror, posters).

So now I spend most of my time on the Guardian blasting ignorant Brits for being ignorant. I'd like to comment on some meaningful things, but it's hard to get past the whole "It's America, so expect the stupid response, followed by a bomb" attitude a lot of them have. Doesn't anything happen in their own country they can be concerned about?

I spend most of my time here ranting about how stupid and farked up the U.S. is, but holy crap---I've never such vitriol about minor subjects that have absolutely no impact on their lives and aren't even taking place in the same country. I might not LOVE America, but I'm not going to let a bunch of pasty wankers tear down my country when they're equally as ignorant as a lot of people here are.


To be completely fair, those of us in. say. Texas receive this same treatment from other Americans. A bit different in the lyrics perhaps but the second verse is the same as the first. As disgusting as the "Real America" shiat is, it is at least partially an (admittedly delayed) reaction to the fact that anyone who happens to not be in the South assumes everyone down here is an ignorant racist who is lucky they can tie their shoes, or is at best a copy of Rick Perry or W. Yes, there is racism and ignorance down here, but to pretend it isn't everywhere is just asinine.

/obviously not everyone has these assumptions or vocalizes them
 
2013-01-06 11:36:14 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?


Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.
 
2013-01-06 11:36:55 AM
Someone was in love with his own prose...
 
2013-01-06 11:36:59 AM

lilistonic: itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.

Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.


You do realize that you and itsfullofstars are countering stereotypes with stereotypes?

I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the world than Europeans.
 
2013-01-06 11:45:05 AM

Lydia_C: If it was a workplace accident, his care should be covered by workers' comp.


Workers comp can't be used for medical expenses until after the report is filed and you have a claim number (at least that's how it worked when I was on workers comp). And since the hospital wasn't required to do anything more than stop the bleeding, it's practically a miracle they even gave him the option to pay out of pocket at all.
 
2013-01-06 11:46:08 AM

vwarb: It is even more annoying now that Obama has won in a landslide TWICE ONCE.


FTFY. The first election was a landslide. The last election wasn't a landslide unless you measure it by electoral votes, which don't give you a good measure of actual *SUPPORT* among the population because of its "all or nothing" nature at the state level. Barack Obama won with just 51% of the popular vote this last November, hardly a landslide. Even in 2008, he only won 52.9% of the popular vote.

A real landslide would be the 1984 presidential election, when Ronald Reagan got 58.77% of the vote. That shows a groundswell of popular support.

Hell, even George H. W. Bush beat both of Obama's percentages with a 53.4% of the popular vote.

Would you characterize Dumbya's reelection in 2004 as a landslide? He got 50.7% of the popular vote, a bare 0.3% less than Barack Obama's reelection.

No, Barack Obama had a healthy margin of the popular vote in 2008, and he *LOST* almost 2% of that in the last election, so no, not a landslide.
 
2013-01-06 11:46:42 AM

spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.


Taxes are related, but that wasn't the central reason.

As others have highlighted, they didn't protest because of the taxes themselves, they protested because they didn't like the idea of being taxed but having no say in government affairs (kind of like DC which used the motto "Taxation Without Representation" on their license plates.

Saying that they didn't like being taxed only highlights part of it.
 
2013-01-06 11:48:09 AM

itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.



I think it's you that's missing the facts here.

90% of Australians live in 6 metropolitan areas that collectively are smaller than greater London... arguments about scale and somesuch service reaching an entire population are virtually identical as in the UK with the Outer Hebrides, because the vast bulk of the people are not spread across the continent.

It's the same in the US, only to a slightly lesser degree. There only a set number of urban hubs, which account for the vast bulk of people.

The sheer geography is largely an irrelevance, because people are not evenly spread.
 
2013-01-06 11:55:21 AM
From the article: "Only America and the Americans have this ability to derange us with their capacity to reflect our own image. Not that they do this intentionally, really."

Dead wrong.

Suck it, monarchy boy. We've been trolling the entire farking world for over 200 years. And, God willing, we'll be doing it for centuries to come.
 
2013-01-06 11:55:49 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.

Taxes are related, but that wasn't the central reason.

As others have highlighted, they didn't protest because of the taxes themselves, they protested because they didn't like the idea of being taxed but having no say in government affairs (kind of like DC which used the motto "Taxation Without Representation" on their license plates.

Saying that they didn't like being taxed only highlights part of it.


Have you seen "How Booze Built America"? They highlight the Boston tea party as a complaint with taxation (without representation) on alcohol and the ingredients to make booze, but since they didn't want to waste booze, they decided to destroy tea instead.
 
2013-01-06 11:57:59 AM
They hate us for our freedoms.
 
2013-01-06 11:58:51 AM

spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.


Actually, while the main heartburn among the colonists was about taxation, the spark that lit off the Revolution was an attempt at gun control. Something to keep in mind.
 
2013-01-06 12:02:34 PM
simplicimus
Good choice. Article goes nowhere.

dangit why didn't I read the comments first
 
2013-01-06 12:05:14 PM

ATRDCI: To be completely fair, those of us in. say. Texas receive this same treatment from other Americans. A bit different in the lyrics perhaps but the second verse is the same as the first. As disgusting as the "Real America" shiat is, it is at least partially an (admittedly delayed) reaction to the fact that anyone who happens to not be in the South assumes everyone down here is an ignorant racist who is lucky they can tie their shoes, or is at best a copy of Rick Perry or W. Yes, there is racism and ignorance down here, but to pretend it isn't everywhere is just asinine.
/obviously not everyone has these assumptions or vocalizes them


That's all true, of course, and the internet brings out the inner asshole in everyone, so if there's one idiot out there saying stupid things, he's the guy with the prolific posting status. People like to generalize and root for "their side," no matter what the subject is, and if there is no "side" they'll just make one up. But there is something weird about the Brits and us, and it's more than just that whole Revolutionary War thing.

whatshisname: I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the world than Europeans.


You ever think that that might have something to with Europe being right over there with "the rest of the world," while Americans are out here by ourselves, with Canada and Mexico as our neighbors?

If I lived surrounded by the rest of Europe and many other countries, and was connected to them by a long history as well as geographic positioning, I'd probably know a lot more about "the rest of the world" than most Americans do too. It's not a big thing for Europeans to go to other countries--they can go visit two or three a day. No wonder they know more about their neighbors.
 
2013-01-06 12:06:33 PM
i102.photobucket.com

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?
 
2013-01-06 12:09:18 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Haliburton Cummings: especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one

Hahahahahahahaha...

I love the British for their role in WWII. They got hammered hard and repeatedly. They were dealt more punishment than we've ever felt in the U.S. and they refused to roll over. They fought like farking heroes from beginning to end.

I also love that they had our back all the way through the whole Iraq thing. Granted, I think we made a terrible mistake but they showed their support while we were at our worst. That's what they mean when they say "through thick and thin".


THIS x infinity.
 
2013-01-06 12:10:42 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?


No it isn't. What makes you think that?
 
2013-01-06 12:11:32 PM

Bungles: I think it's you that's missing the facts here.

90% of Australians live in 6 metropolitan areas that collectively are smaller than greater London... arguments about scale and somesuch service reaching an entire population are virtually identical as in the UK with the Outer Hebrides, because the vast bulk of the people are not spread across the continent.

It's the same in the US, only to a slightly lesser degree. There only a set number of urban hubs, which account for the vast bulk of people.

The sheer geography is largely an irrelevance, because people are not evenly spread.


People are not evenly spread but services need to get them just the same.

Ausatralia and the US cant really compared. Australia's population is SIGNIFICANTLY more concentrated near the coasts and a handful of major cities. The US's, not so much. Compare:

www.mapofusa.net
all-geo.org
Building out infrastructure to Australians is much easier. Cover Caims to Adelaide and add the population centers around Perth and you cover close to 90% of the population. Yes it's a huge distance but the population density makes it more economical.
 
2013-01-06 12:12:01 PM

whatshisname: lilistonic: itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.

Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.

You do realize that you and itsfullofstars are countering stereotypes with stereotypes?

I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the world than Eu ...


And yet, you miss the point.. For someone in the U.K. to know the political goings on of, say, Romania
is no big deal simply because of geography. People in Nebraska probably know some of what is going
on in North Dakota or Oklahoma..And yet those distances would be no different than that of London
to Bucharest. Just because our states are not differentiated countries with different languages doesn't
mean a person in "insular". How much do you think the average London dweller would know of the
day to day comings and goings in Guinea Bissau? Probably about as much as anyone in the U.S.
or Canada would! It's a false analogy to equate knowledge of happenings in X number of countries to "insulation".
 
2013-01-06 12:12:22 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?



It's on Channel 5. It hasn't even been in the topped the UK Top 250 for the week.
 
2013-01-06 12:13:27 PM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.

Taxes are related, but that wasn't the central reason.

As others have highlighted, they didn't protest because of the taxes themselves, they protested because they didn't like the idea of being taxed but having no say in government affairs (kind of like DC which used the motto "Taxation Without Representation" on their license plates.

Saying that they didn't like being taxed only highlights part of it.


I've always had the thought that as well as representation, the colonies wanted to get out from under the British mercantilistic model.
 
2013-01-06 12:15:13 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?


That Distraction should be MUCH more popular than it is?
/fair warning probably nsfw
 
2013-01-06 12:19:32 PM
I see I've stumbled into a thread of people who aren't familiar with Will Self. He is actually capable of being more annoying. Google "Joy Division and vesta curry" and read the piece he wrote for the Independent. You will be nostalgic for when this was the only thing of his you read, and you didn't hate him so much.
 
2013-01-06 12:20:57 PM

Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so


You can,if you keep the gas pedal down, alternate drivers, and pee in a jug along the way.
 
2013-01-06 12:21:00 PM

Mr. Shabooboo: And yet, you miss the point.. For someone in the U.K. to know the political goings on of, say, Romania
is no big deal simply because of geography. People in Nebraska probably know some of what is going
on in North Dakota or Oklahoma..And yet those distances would be no different than that of London
to Bucharest. Just because our states are not differentiated countries with different languages doesn't
mean a person in "insular". How much do you think the average London dweller would know of the
day to day comings and goings in Guinea Bissau? Probably about as much as anyone in the U.S.
or Canada would! It's a false analogy to equate knowledge of happenings in X number of countries to "insulation".


What do you mean "because of geography"? Do you think that someone in London somehow absorbs the political situation in Romania through magic because it's "only" 2500kms away? Or is information somehow harder to absorb the further it is from its origin?

It's nothing to do with geography, it's to do with a specifically American insularism. Just look at Australia. The average Australian has a comparatively very solid understanding of global affairs, and they're close to no-one but dolphins and some uninhabited Japanese islands.
 
2013-01-06 12:28:55 PM

itsfullofstars: Bungles: I think it's you that's missing the facts here.

90% of Australians live in 6 metropolitan areas that collectively are smaller than greater London... arguments about scale and somesuch service reaching an entire population are virtually identical as in the UK with the Outer Hebrides, because the vast bulk of the people are not spread across the continent.

It's the same in the US, only to a slightly lesser degree. There only a set number of urban hubs, which account for the vast bulk of people.

The sheer geography is largely an irrelevance, because people are not evenly spread.

People are not evenly spread but services need to get them just the same.

Ausatralia and the US cant really compared. Australia's population is SIGNIFICANTLY more concentrated near the coasts and a handful of major cities. The US's, not so much. Compare:



Building out infrastructure to Australians is much easier. Cover Caims to Adelaide and add the population centers around Perth and you cover close to 90% of the population. Yes it's a huge distance but the population density makes it more economical.


Also people fail to consider that the US is split into some very different geological and environmental zones. In addition to the vast distances, Australia is practically a plain compared to the US.

Imagine trying to build a new rail system from Washington DC to Chicago. (not even halfway across the US)

You would have to cross countless hills, and figure out how to get through the Appalachian Mountains. The highest peak in our smaller mountain range is about a high as the tallest peak in all of Australia, and the 'as the crow flies' distance would require crossing about 400 miles of those mountains. (I think its about 600 miles total).


So that's just connecting two major regions across the smaller mountains. Imagine trying to deal with the Rockies.
 
2013-01-06 12:32:44 PM

Bungles: Mr. Shabooboo: And yet, you miss the point.. For someone in the U.K. to know the political goings on of, say, Romania
is no big deal simply because of geography. People in Nebraska probably know some of what is going
on in North Dakota or Oklahoma..And yet those distances would be no different than that of London
to Bucharest. Just because our states are not differentiated countries with different languages doesn't
mean a person in "insular". How much do you think the average London dweller would know of the
day to day comings and goings in Guinea Bissau? Probably about as much as anyone in the U.S.
or Canada would! It's a false analogy to equate knowledge of happenings in X number of countries to "insulation".

What do you mean "because of geography"? Do you think that someone in London somehow absorbs the political situation in Romania through magic because it's "only" 2500kms away? Or is information somehow harder to absorb the further it is from its origin?

It's nothing to do with geography, it's to do with a specifically American insularism. Just look at Australia. The average Australian has a comparatively very solid understanding of global affairs, and they're close to no-one but dolphins and some uninhabited Japanese islands.


People naturally care about and look for information that affects them. They are naturally going to know more about the goings on that happen closer to them. A person living in Hastings would know more about the goings on of Hastings then they would about the daily goings on of York. Similarly, a person in England would know more about English events. The distance between the US and France is around 4000 miles. Would you chastise Britons who are ignorant of the inner workings of the various African countries that are about that far way?
 
2013-01-06 12:33:13 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

Learn how to write man!
 
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