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(BBC)   The British and their bizarre view of Americans   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 234
    More: Amusing, Americans, Israel-Palestine, plutocracy, Tom Stoppard, cultural landscape, gramophone record, Will Self  
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25598 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Jan 2013 at 7:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-06 03:28:57 AM
Written for a British audience.
 
2013-01-06 03:42:46 AM
That author was trying way, way, way too hard.
 
2013-01-06 03:45:59 AM
I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

/Does the House of Lords still make the House of Commons come in and grovel before the Queen every year?
 
2013-01-06 07:06:18 AM
I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer -- especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one so how about that ice cold Budweiser NOW!
 
2013-01-06 07:10:04 AM
I think we just found the British Dennis Miller.
 
2013-01-06 07:28:31 AM
just tried to read it, and frankly couldn't be bothered
 
2013-01-06 07:30:12 AM
I imagine we Americans probably aren't as wry and witty as those Brits because we've burned out our brain cells shooting novocaine into our gums and stuffing aluminum salts under our arm pits.
 
2013-01-06 07:30:50 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer . . . .


That's interesting. My own experience has been that Londoners are right up there with Philadelphia residents when it comes to rudeness.
 
2013-01-06 07:33:21 AM

letrole: just tried to read it, and frankly couldn't be bothered


Couldn't read it with that freaky picture of the author staring at me from the middle of the page.
 
2013-01-06 07:34:10 AM
Do the British tell lies about the American Healthcare system like their for-profit cousins across the pond do about them?
 
2013-01-06 07:34:39 AM
Once I learned of The Royal Bun Toss I lost what little respect I still had left for my British cousins, it also provided me with a vivid modern day reminder of why we took up arms to fight for human dignity and freedom. Link
 
2013-01-06 07:34:49 AM

letrole: just tried to read it, and frankly couldn't be bothered


Good choice. Article goes nowhere.
 
2013-01-06 07:37:18 AM
"The spectacle of US democracy in action is at once ridiculed and revered over here. Looked at one way it is an unholy combination of demagoguery and plutocracy, what with its pork-barrelling politicians soliciting corporate donations for prime time television advertising."

Never has a truer sentence ever been spoken.
 
2013-01-06 07:41:38 AM
TL:DR version of TFA: I got a dictionary for Christmas.
 
2013-01-06 07:45:55 AM
Faded empires a prone to introspection. The current top dog prone to extroversion. The first half of the 21st century will be a period of American introspection and Chinese extroversion, just as the latter half of the 20th was American extroversion and British introspection.
 
2013-01-06 07:46:25 AM

simplicimus: letrole: just tried to read it, and frankly couldn't be bothered

Good choice. Article goes nowhere.


"We British are foppish and self-conscious to the point of neurosis because of our intrinsic character not Empire Envy," in what felt like 10,000 words describing the masturbaition habbits of an old man.
 
2013-01-06 07:46:36 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer -- especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one so how about that ice cold Budweiser NOW!


I'm sure they were more than happy to pee in a cup for you...
/jk
 
2013-01-06 07:56:23 AM
www.global-air.com

It took the genius of America to recognize that with a little extra hammering and spannering the motor car could be converted into the motor home. But, the Brits think we're a bit odd for doing it. (new window)
 
2013-01-06 07:57:08 AM

narkor: Faded empires a prone to introspection. The current top dog prone to extroversion. The first half of the 21st century will be a period of American introspection and Chinese extroversion, just as the latter half of the 20th was American extroversion and British introspection.


Asian, maybe, but I'm not sure about the Chinese. They're on a fast pace to get old before they get rich.
 
2013-01-06 08:05:12 AM

tshauk: I think we just found the British Dennis Miller.


I couldn't put my finger on what was bugging me about the article, but I think you nailed it.

It's the same annoying style that Tycho from penny-arcade developed. I used to enjoy the articles, but it now reads like a writer who fell in love with his own writing style and forgot how to communicate.
 
2013-01-06 08:06:26 AM
Will Self is a pretentious arsehole.
 
2013-01-06 08:07:03 AM
You know what the Americans think of the British?

"Keep pouring out your Potter and Who, we love that shiat."

/Of course, they also produced Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock, so they're not all bad.
 
2013-01-06 08:09:05 AM

BronyMedic: Do the British tell lies about the American Healthcare system like their for-profit cousins across the pond do about them?


It took someone from England to explained to me what Obama Care was all about. "They are regulating your medical insurance industry." Great. We couldn't our own media explain it so clearly.
 
2013-01-06 08:10:04 AM
I do love a nice cup of Earl Grey, and love Fish and Chips. I do thank the British for these two delightful things in my life. Oh, and I almost forgot, "Top Gear".
 
2013-01-06 08:11:45 AM
Let me know if somebody translates that into English.
 
2013-01-06 08:13:46 AM
What a horribly written article. Seems like he was actively trying to be as heavy handed as humanly possible for what should've been a fluff piece. I'd have happily read this as a light hearted piece. Ths just shows up the British as stuffy, anally retentive morons who see no fun in anything.

/British
//Bring on the overplayed dental jokes
 
2013-01-06 08:15:35 AM

reillan: You know what the Americans think of the British?

"Keep pouring out your Potter and Who, we love that shiat."

/Of course, they also produced Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock, so they're not all bad.


I started reading it in Snape's voice but about a third of the way through it transformed into a Professor Binns' lecture.
 
2013-01-06 08:15:36 AM
I imagine that the thought process, prior to writing that 'article', went something like 'I need to write something where I can show off my amazing new dictionary, and use words like conniptions and tmesis'
 
2013-01-06 08:16:22 AM

Triumph: /Does the House of Lords still make the House of Commons come in and grovel before the Queen every year?


At the opening of Parliament the representative of the Queen has the door slammand in his face and has to knock before the Commons allow him in.
 
2013-01-06 08:16:55 AM
Cheeseburger
 
2013-01-06 08:20:57 AM

BronyMedic: Do the British tell lies about the American Healthcare system like their for-profit cousins across the pond do about them?


Normally, they're the same lies that the left bandits about regarding ours: the idea that our hospitals are largely for-profit or that the US isn't one of the top countries in per capita government spending on healthcare.
 
2013-01-06 08:24:11 AM

planes: [www.global-air.com image 150x195]

It took the genius of America to recognize that with a little extra hammering and spannering the motor car could be converted into the motor home. But, the Brits think we're a bit odd for doing it. (new window)


Probably because they live on an overbuilt island. Not a whole swath of a major continent with miles and miles of uninhabited country.
 
2013-01-06 08:27:40 AM

meanmutton: BronyMedic: Do the British tell lies about the American Healthcare system like their for-profit cousins across the pond do about them?

Normally, they're the same lies that the left bandits about regarding ours: the idea that our hospitals are largely for-profit or that the US isn't one of the top countries in per capita government spending on healthcare.


citation please.

Liberals say we spend too much per capita on healthcare because of price fixing between the for profit insurance agency and the pharmaceutical companies. Nothing to do with hospitals.

But you knew that and if I wasnt bored out of my mind I wouldnt have bothered to respond.
 
2013-01-06 08:28:24 AM

BronyMedic: Do the British tell lies about the American Healthcare system like their for-profit cousins across the pond do about them?


Basically, yes. Here it is a common belief that if you get run over by a car in the USA the ambulance paramedics check your wallet for a health insurance card and if you don't have one they move you out of the middle of the road and leave you there to die.
 
2013-01-06 08:29:10 AM

furterfan: I imagine that the thought process, prior to writing that 'article', went something like 'I need to write something where I can show off my amazing new dictionary, and use words like conniptions and tmesis'


It comes off like a sophomore journalism major trying to shoehorn in big words and sound self important.
 
2013-01-06 08:29:47 AM
The British view of Americans is probably more accurate than the American view of the British.
 
2013-01-06 08:29:59 AM
Elasticated jeans. That's all you need to know.
 
2013-01-06 08:31:19 AM
"Bronies" - WTF, America? The richest, most powerful and most technologically advanced nation in the world and you have grown men proclaiming their affection for little girls' toys. How many seats over there do you need?
 
2013-01-06 08:31:21 AM
Mr. Self, would you please GET TO THE BLOODY POINT.
 
2013-01-06 08:31:34 AM
Got a few paragraphs in before I realized that I don't much care what the English think about anything.
 
2013-01-06 08:33:51 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer -- especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one so how about that ice cold Budweiser NOW!


But they're going to save our asses in World War 3.

/too obscure?
 
2013-01-06 08:34:24 AM

ScudEast: Basically, yes. Here it is a common belief that if you get run over by a car in the USA the ambulance paramedics check your wallet for a health insurance card and if you don't have one they move you out of the middle of the road and leave you there to die.


Damn. I knew they forgot to teach me something in Paramedic school!
 
2013-01-06 08:34:26 AM
I tried really really hard to read this.

I cannot.
 
2013-01-06 08:35:46 AM

kenchie: Will Self is a pretentious arsehole.


Land Ark: Mr. Self, would you please GET TO THE BLOODY POINT.


All of the above.

Also:

i149.photobucket.com
i149.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-06 08:37:21 AM
Will Self is much better to listen to (which you can with this, it's a radio piece). He's started impersonating Clive James, with is like aural honey.
 
2013-01-06 08:37:34 AM

letrole: just tried to read it, and frankly couldn't be bothered


I saw this article on the Beeb a few hours ago and was going to submit it, until I started reading it and also lost interest after two or three paragraphs.
 
2013-01-06 08:37:59 AM
 
2013-01-06 08:40:43 AM
Well, that was a really fancy article about nothing. Sounded like the writer just discovered he can find synonyms by right clicking on the word document.
 
2013-01-06 08:41:21 AM

oukewldave: Well, that was a really fancy article about nothing. Sounded like the writer just discovered he can find synonyms by right clicking on the word document.


You can do that?!?!?!?!
 
2013-01-06 08:42:40 AM
British people are largely exposed to American people through what's exported (good TV, bad beer) and trips to Florida.

No wonder their impressions are so farked up.
 
2013-01-06 08:43:49 AM

planes: [www.global-air.com image 150x195]

It took the genius of America to recognize that with a little extra hammering and spannering the motor car could be converted into the motor home. But, the Brits think we're a bit odd for doing it. (new window)



But they adore caravans. I think the bafflement is more along the line of "Once you're in that lovely Welsh ocean bay, you want to be able to detach your car to go to the shops, rather than take your entire house to Sainsburys for milk".
 
2013-01-06 08:47:16 AM
YAAAAWN, stretch...oh is the article over?

No way is tmesis a word. That's gotta be a typo.
 
2013-01-06 08:48:37 AM

Relatively Obscure: That author was trying way, way, way too hard.



gettingdownwithjesus.com

The word, he was paid by
 
2013-01-06 08:49:01 AM
i911.photobucket.com
 
2013-01-06 08:49:02 AM
Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?
 
2013-01-06 08:49:11 AM

LDM90: YAAAAWN, stretch...oh is the article over?

No way is tmesis a word. That's gotta be a typo.


It's not only a word, it's a pretty common one in the UK (because Stephen Fry loves it, and has banged on about it for years).

Abso-bloody-lutely.
 
2013-01-06 08:50:16 AM

miss diminutive: Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?



Give it a few decades, my young American padawan, and you'll understand.
 
2013-01-06 08:51:23 AM
"And it follows that what we also do to ourselves is to relentlessly equate America with Americans, and the US government with its electorate - conflations we wouldn't dream of making in the case of the German or Greek peoples."

I am glad to hear someone finally say this. It persists even after the W years. About half of the people from foreign countries that I meet assume I'm a racist, Christian cowboy. It is even more annoying now that Obama has won in a landslide TWICE.

I also in some ways feel like I have a relationship with my country that is similar to one with a sibling. I give America lots of crap for loving ignorance and bigotry and rampant consumerism, but I live here, I know the score. It infuriates me when people who have never set foot here presume to tell me about all of my flaws by association.

I actually really like Tim Minchin, but it's stuff like this that really annoys me. I've got the ridicule of these people under control Tim, you deal with your own.
 
2013-01-06 08:54:11 AM
Oh, and that above post has NSFW audio. Sorry.
 
2013-01-06 08:54:48 AM
Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so
 
2013-01-06 08:58:44 AM

Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so


You can drive anywhere in the lower 48 in three days, so they were close.
 
2013-01-06 09:03:13 AM

Haliburton Cummings: especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one

Hahahahahahahaha...


I love the British for their role in WWII. They got hammered hard and repeatedly. They were dealt more punishment than we've ever felt in the U.S. and they refused to roll over. They fought like farking heroes from beginning to end.

I also love that they had our back all the way through the whole Iraq thing. Granted, I think we made a terrible mistake but they showed their support while we were at our worst. That's what they mean when they say "through thick and thin".
 
2013-01-06 09:04:09 AM

miss diminutive: Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?


Yet the City of London, with its dangerously extreme financial deregulation, has again become the financial capital of the world.
 
2013-01-06 09:04:21 AM

david_gaithersburg: Once I learned of The Royal Bun Toss I lost what little respect I still had left for my British cousins, it also provided me with a vivid modern day reminder of why we took up arms to fight for human dignity and freedom. Link


Link

I raise you this.
 
2013-01-06 09:05:36 AM

Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so


Mutual understanding: Hey, Americans, 100 years is not old; hey, Europeans, 100 miles is not far.
 
2013-01-06 09:09:45 AM
"I'm an American."

"DON'T SHOOT!"
 
2013-01-06 09:11:30 AM
I'm betting he rapes his thesaurus on a regular basis.
 
2013-01-06 09:16:17 AM

Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.


david_gaithersburg: Once I learned of The Royal Bun Toss I lost what little respect I still had left for my British cousins, it also provided me with a vivid modern day reminder of why we took up arms to fight for human dignity and freedom.


Do people come up with this way of thinking themselves or is it fed to them in schools? USA and Britain have been friends and allies for 198 years. In the 19th century American trade was made possible by the British fleet's protection. Even the War of Independence had many supporters in Britain.
 
2013-01-06 09:17:30 AM

simplicimus: Mutual understanding: Hey, Americans, 100 years is not old; hey, Europeans, 100 miles is not far.


It is when fuel is as expensive as over here, though.
 
2013-01-06 09:17:53 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer -- especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one so how about that ice cold Budweiser NOW!


For extra obnoxious points when they tell you to pay, you yell "I already paid for this beer sir! It was called the Marshall Plan."
 
2013-01-06 09:20:45 AM

orbister: "Bronies" - WTF, America? The richest, most powerful and most technologically advanced nation in the world and you have grown men proclaiming their affection for little girls' toys. How many seats over there do you need?


Mr. Hands started another trend from Washington State. It'll pass.
 
2013-01-06 09:22:49 AM

Land Ark: Mr. Self, would you please GET TO THE BLOODY POINT.


m2.mattters.com

"GET ON WITH IT!"
 
2013-01-06 09:25:43 AM
Remember this comes from the BBC which these days is nothing more than socialist propaganda. And only socialists here hate America. The rest of us love you.

/Not in a gay way
 
2013-01-06 09:26:16 AM

Ilmarinen: simplicimus: Mutual understanding: Hey, Americans, 100 years is not old; hey, Europeans, 100 miles is not far.

It is when fuel is as expensive as over here, though.


Well, you drive those tiny cars, so it probably balances out compared to our land yachts.
 
2013-01-06 09:26:21 AM

Bungles: miss diminutive: Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?

Give it a few decades, my young American padawan, and you'll understand.


I'm Canadian....the Monopoly boot of the geopolitical chess-board. We always understand.
 
2013-01-06 09:29:03 AM
My vocabulary, let me show you it with no point whatsoever.
 
2013-01-06 09:29:47 AM

Ilmarinen: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

david_gaithersburg: Once I learned of The Royal Bun Toss I lost what little respect I still had left for my British cousins, it also provided me with a vivid modern day reminder of why we took up arms to fight for human dignity and freedom.

Do people come up with this way of thinking themselves or is it fed to them in schools? USA and Britain have been friends and allies for 198 years. In the 19th century American trade was made possible by the British fleet's protection. Even the War of Independence had many supporters in Britain.


.
What way of thinking? Of not wanting to be a part of a monarchy literally throwing bread crumbs to their subjects?
 
2013-01-06 09:32:16 AM

Mentalpatient87: david_gaithersburg: Once I learned of The Royal Bun Toss I lost what little respect I still had left for my British cousins, it also provided me with a vivid modern day reminder of why we took up arms to fight for human dignity and freedom. Link

Link

I raise you this.


.
Huh? I'm very proud of our right to bear arms, even air powered pumpkin cannons. If your royal ruling family wants to get into a food fight, come at us bro!
 
2013-01-06 09:35:27 AM
I haven't had my coffee yet but this dumb American was put off by the fancy language of the article.

British English almost seems pretenious sometimes. I mean seriously who says "a bewildering and Brobdingnagian phenomenon" and doesn't expect a punch in the face?

And what the eff is "aluminum" anyways?
 
2013-01-06 09:40:21 AM
Lots of $25 words there... can't help but think the author uses them to make himself feel more authoritative.
 
2013-01-06 09:42:32 AM
I assume the author was paid by the word.

indoxservices.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-01-06 09:43:03 AM
You think that international relationship is complicated and ambivalent? Try living in Canada.
 
2013-01-06 09:47:37 AM

Mael99: letrole: just tried to read it, and frankly couldn't be bothered

Couldn't read it with that freaky picture of the author staring at me from the middle of the page.


He has that "please don't punch me" look to him, doesn't he?
 
2013-01-06 09:51:40 AM

miss diminutive: Bungles: miss diminutive: Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?

Give it a few decades, my young American padawan, and you'll understand.

I'm Canadian....the Monopoly boot of the geopolitical chess-board. We always understand.


It seems to me that we Canadians are very much the middle ground in this issue. We have american and british pop culture, our political system is somewhere between the two as well, plus we have our own little subcultures that reflect other things going on in the world too.

Where you from miss diminutive? I'm in NB
 
2013-01-06 09:54:53 AM
I loved Great Apes

Wonder if it was the same Will Self...
 
2013-01-06 09:55:10 AM

Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.


No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.
 
2013-01-06 09:56:57 AM

spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.


Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.
 
2013-01-06 09:58:08 AM
 
2013-01-06 09:58:53 AM
I found the article very twee.
 
2013-01-06 09:59:53 AM

markfara: Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer . . . .

That's interesting. My own experience has been that Londoners are right up there with Philadelphia residents when it comes to rilludeness.


I grew up in the Philadelphia region. Now I have the displeasure of living in the Atlanta area. I too was in London in 2012. I absolutely loved London and its people - because they reminded me of Philly/New York/Boston. I felt very at home there and did not want to go back to Atlanta. Philadelphians are not rude, just brutally honest. In my travels, I've come to find that people don't want the honest truth, just some sugar coated, PC, BS version. This is especially true in the South. In Philly, I am just telling you like it is. In Atlanta, I am intimidating people.

/Bless your heart
 
2013-01-06 10:00:51 AM

bratchaman: I haven't had my coffee yet but this dumb American was put off by the fancy language of the article.

British English almost seems pretenious sometimes. I mean seriously who says "a bewildering and Brobdingnagian phenomenon" and doesn't expect a punch in the face?

And what the eff is "aluminum" anyways?



I see you're unfamiliar with WIll Self. The pretentiousness is post-post-ironic.
 
2013-01-06 10:02:09 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.


Might be right. Check out Mercantilism and taxation without representation.
 
2013-01-06 10:03:23 AM
Will Self is a dick, that's all you need to know.
 
2013-01-06 10:09:34 AM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: I love the British for their role in WWII. They got hammered hard and repeatedly. They were dealt more punishment than we've ever felt in the U.S. and they refused to roll over. They fought like farking heroes from beginning to end.


They did, but it's nothing compared to what the Russians went through.
 
2013-01-06 10:20:35 AM
 
2013-01-06 10:21:18 AM

chuckufarlie: cloud_van_dame: Louisiana_Sitar_Club: I love the British for their role in WWII. They got hammered hard and repeatedly. They were dealt more punishment than we've ever felt in the U.S. and they refused to roll over. They fought like farking heroes from beginning to end.

They did, but it's nothing compared to what the Russians went through.

why does somebody always feel the need to bring up the Russians in any comment about WWII. We are all aware of the great contribution that the Russians made. What is your point?


Noble Savages argument I presume
 
2013-01-06 10:24:40 AM
FOPPISH WANKERY !=PITHY OBSERVATIONAL HUMOR


/For the article's author
//and pretty much any Englishmen I've ever heard do the "British people are like this, but Americans are like THIS" routine
 
2013-01-06 10:29:20 AM
Summary of the article: " America, I wish I could quit you!"
 
2013-01-06 10:36:10 AM
Do shut up!
 
2013-01-06 10:37:41 AM

ScudEast: BronyMedic: Do the British tell lies about the American Healthcare system like their for-profit cousins across the pond do about them?

Basically, yes. Here it is a common belief that if you get run over by a car in the USA the ambulance paramedics check your wallet for a health insurance card and if you don't have one they move you out of the middle of the road and leave you there to die.



I think you're confusing paramedics with hospitals.

Now that hospitals are essentially run by the insurance companies, the uninsured are shoved out the door as soon as they're stabilized (read: not within hours of death). Lose a limb? "Sorry, your card was denied. Oh well, you've got three spare limbs, you'll live."

I really wish that were an exaggeration, but that happened to someone in my town a few years ago when he lost his hand. He was insured, but he mentioned that it was a workplace accident, so the insurance was automatically denied, and they wouldn't start the surgery until his wife brought them a down payment.

Last I heard he is suing the hospital, but it's not going well, since legally he was only entitled to a bandage to stop the blood loss.
 
2013-01-06 10:39:55 AM
Same as everyone else said... Dbag who just found a thesaurus... But one sentence really struck me as true:

"t follows that what we also do to ourselves is to relentlessly equate America with Americans, and the US government with its electorate - conflations we wouldn't dream of making in the case of the German or Greek peoples."

This! I used to love intl travel, I was like the poster child for the ANTI-Ugly American, doing what everyone claims they wish more Americans did (travel out of the US, be respectful, learn other languages and cultures), but everywhere I went, I got hammered over the intricacies of how the US government runs, and why we do X in our foreign policy (also, why are you Americans so fat?). It was like I was the single embodiment of the US, a focal point for all anti-US harangues.

And then... You know how long it's been since I've lived abroad? Maybe the two might be related? Like the article said, Americans get conflated with our government in a way no other country does, and it's absurd. And (pardon the whine) outright annoying.
 
2013-01-06 10:40:17 AM
www.tech4d.com: too many words
 
2013-01-06 10:44:42 AM
Holy fark that was a boring read
 
2013-01-06 10:49:32 AM
For years, I've heard people from various countries lambasting Americans over issues of "You don't understand such and such because you have no interest in any other cultures," then two sentences later they'll say stereotypical things about some group of people, completely oblivious to the fact they're doing the same thing.

You name a country in Europe I've been to, and I've seen people doing this. There are stupid people everywhere, and everyone to some degree has some level of jingoism in their head.

It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.
 
2013-01-06 10:51:24 AM
 
2013-01-06 10:56:08 AM

bratchaman: I haven't had my coffee yet but this dumb American was put off by the fancy language of the article.

British English almost seems pretenious sometimes. I mean seriously who says "a bewildering and Brobdingnagian phenomenon" and doesn't expect a punch in the face?

And what the eff is "aluminum" anyways?


It's how Americans spell Aluminium. *checks profile* it says you're American, so.... you don't know what it is?
 
2013-01-06 10:57:50 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.


Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...
 
2013-01-06 10:58:34 AM
...their neo-liberal economic policies...

Foreign articles are good for gems of perspective such as this.
 
2013-01-06 11:00:45 AM

spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...


You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?
 
2013-01-06 11:06:03 AM

Agarista: I loved Great Apes

Wonder if it was the same Will Self...


It is. Have you tried The Book of Dave? I loved that too. He once got fired from a newspaper for doing heroin while travelling on the Prime Minister's plane during an election. To be fair, it was John Major's plane, so it must've been farking boring.
 
2013-01-06 11:11:05 AM
Well that was much ado about nothing.
 
2013-01-06 11:11:11 AM
I think it had a lot to do with respect and representation of which taxation was a large factor.
 
2013-01-06 11:11:56 AM

topcon: It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.


I started reading (and commenting) on The Guardian some time ago. I was hoping to get some points of view outside of Fark, and guess what I found out? They farking hate us. It's the weirdest thing--they're completely obsessed with the U.S. (America), but only to put us down. The Brits followed the American elections more closely than most of us did, and they were full of opinions. We all suck, we are bloodthirsty, fat, stupid, only interested in our own country, and ignorant of the rest of the world. (Try looking in the mirror, posters).

So now I spend most of my time on the Guardian blasting ignorant Brits for being ignorant. I'd like to comment on some meaningful things, but it's hard to get past the whole "It's America, so expect the stupid response, followed by a bomb" attitude a lot of them have. Doesn't anything happen in their own country they can be concerned about?

I spend most of my time here ranting about how stupid and farked up the U.S. is, but holy crap---I've never such vitriol about minor subjects that have absolutely no impact on their lives and aren't even taking place in the same country. I might not LOVE America, but I'm not going to let a bunch of pasty wankers tear down my country when they're equally as ignorant as a lot of people here are.
 
2013-01-06 11:14:19 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.


It might not be accurate to say it was a war over taxes but it most certainly isn't wrong.

One of the stated reasons for going to war was that they really didn't like the idea of being taxed without representation in Parliament.

And if you really want to tie it to current events: It's why Puerto Rico, despite being part of the US, doesn't pay federal income tax (and conversely why they're iffy on petitioning for statehood).

Next time you want to flop your dick out on the table about misconceptions of the American Revolutionary War, I'd suggest trying "There was nothing revolutionary about it."
 
2013-01-06 11:14:25 AM

alwaysjaded: Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer -- especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one so how about that ice cold Budweiser NOW!

For extra obnoxious points when they tell you to pay, you yell "I already paid for this beer sir! It was called the Marshall Plan."


I can't stop giggling. Thanks for this.
 
2013-01-06 11:14:52 AM
BBC News normal articles are always part of my daily regimen.

The Features and Analysis section - very last thing I'll read. Their Chinese fellatio tendencies are starting to wear a bit thin.
 
2013-01-06 11:15:08 AM
Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.
 
2013-01-06 11:18:20 AM

Bungles: miss diminutive: Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?
Give it a few decades, my young American padawan, and you'll understand.


Yes, they are, and I have a feeling that has something to do with some of OUR problems right now too. We've haven't adapted to the idea that we are not the center of the universe anymore.

Also, the Brits are still really, really, pissed about that whole Tony Blair thing.
 
2013-01-06 11:18:52 AM

Spiralmonkey: bratchaman: I haven't had my coffee yet but this dumb American was put off by the fancy language of the article.

British English almost seems pretenious sometimes. I mean seriously who says "a bewildering and Brobdingnagian phenomenon" and doesn't expect a punch in the face?

And what the eff is "aluminum" anyways?

It's how Americans spell Aluminium. *checks profile* it says you're American, so.... you don't know what it is?



Congratulations, sir. You have created a new element.

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-01-06 11:20:50 AM

the ha ha guy: I really wish that were an exaggeration, but that happened to someone in my town a few years ago when he lost his hand. He was insured, but he mentioned that it was a workplace accident, so the insurance was automatically denied, and they wouldn't start the surgery until his wife brought them a down payment.

Last I heard he is suing the hospital, but it's not going well, since legally he was only entitled to a bandage to stop the blood loss.


If it was a workplace accident, his care should be covered by workers' comp. I understand that that triggers a whole other raft of paperwork, and probably would have caused a delay in his treatment since his condition wasn't life-threatening (at that point, anyway), but something about this story of being required to bring a down payment to the hospital before surgery doesn't sound right.


tentaculistic: Same as everyone else said... Dbag who just found a thesaurus... But one sentence really struck me as true:

"t follows that what we also do to ourselves is to relentlessly equate America with Americans, and the US government with its electorate - conflations we wouldn't dream of making in the case of the German or Greek peoples."

This! I used to love intl travel, I was like the poster child for the ANTI-Ugly American, doing what everyone claims they wish more Americans did (travel out of the US, be respectful, learn other languages and cultures), but everywhere I went, I got hammered over the intricacies of how the US government runs, and why we do X in our foreign policy (also, why are you Americans so fat?). It was like I was the single embodiment of the US, a focal point for all anti-US harangues.

And then... You know how long it's been since I've lived abroad? Maybe the two might be related? Like the article said, Americans get conflated with our government in a way no other country does, and it's absurd. And (pardon the whine) outright annoying.


THIS. And I'm sorry to say, as much as I loved Australia when I was there, some of the Aussies I met were the absolute worst about this - both quizzing me to find out "what an American thinks about ___," as if there were only one viewpoint possible, and also to give me endless crap about stuff not under my control. College students were the worst with the in-your-face complaints about the American government, but boy did I get it from everybody in March 2001... and I know that some were ribbing me because you're supposed to give your friends grief, but damn that got old really quick. Hey, it's not *my* fault that the Electoral College exists.
 
2013-01-06 11:25:14 AM

david_gaithersburg: Once I learned of The Royal Bun Toss I lost what little respect I still had left for my British cousins, it also provided me with a vivid modern day reminder of why we took up arms to fight for human dignity and freedom. Link


That it absolutely pitiful.
 
2013-01-06 11:28:54 AM

itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.


Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.
 
2013-01-06 11:33:26 AM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

It might not be accurate to say it was a war over taxes but it most certainly isn't wrong.

One of the stated reasons for going to war was that they really didn't like the idea of being taxed without representation in Parliament.

And if you really want to tie it to current events: It's why Puerto Rico, despite being part of the US, doesn't pay federal income tax (and conversely why they're iffy on petitioning for statehood).

Next time you want to flop your dick out on the table about misconceptions of the American Revolutionary War, I'd suggest trying "There was nothing revolutionary about it."


It also isn't accurate to say the Civil War was about states rights though perhaps not technically wrong. The significant difference being that pretending that Americans just didn't want to pay taxes makes them look like a bunch of lazy, greedy freeloaders and pretending that the South was just trying to uphold state's rights lets them ignore the racism

cryinoutloud: topcon: It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.

I started reading (and commenting) on The Guardian some time ago. I was hoping to get some points of view outside of Fark, and guess what I found out? They farking hate us. It's the weirdest thing--they're completely obsessed with the U.S. (America), but only to put us down. The Brits followed the American elections more closely than most of us did, and they were full of opinions. We all suck, we are bloodthirsty, fat, stupid, only interested in our own country, and ignorant of the rest of the world. (Try looking in the mirror, posters).

So now I spend most of my time on the Guardian blasting ignorant Brits for being ignorant. I'd like to comment on some meaningful things, but it's hard to get past the whole "It's America, so expect the stupid response, followed by a bomb" attitude a lot of them have. Doesn't anything happen in their own country they can be concerned about?

I spend most of my time here ranting about how stupid and farked up the U.S. is, but holy crap---I've never such vitriol about minor subjects that have absolutely no impact on their lives and aren't even taking place in the same country. I might not LOVE America, but I'm not going to let a bunch of pasty wankers tear down my country when they're equally as ignorant as a lot of people here are.


To be completely fair, those of us in. say. Texas receive this same treatment from other Americans. A bit different in the lyrics perhaps but the second verse is the same as the first. As disgusting as the "Real America" shiat is, it is at least partially an (admittedly delayed) reaction to the fact that anyone who happens to not be in the South assumes everyone down here is an ignorant racist who is lucky they can tie their shoes, or is at best a copy of Rick Perry or W. Yes, there is racism and ignorance down here, but to pretend it isn't everywhere is just asinine.

/obviously not everyone has these assumptions or vocalizes them
 
2013-01-06 11:36:14 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?


Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.
 
2013-01-06 11:36:55 AM
Someone was in love with his own prose...
 
2013-01-06 11:36:59 AM

lilistonic: itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.

Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.


You do realize that you and itsfullofstars are countering stereotypes with stereotypes?

I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the world than Europeans.
 
2013-01-06 11:45:05 AM

Lydia_C: If it was a workplace accident, his care should be covered by workers' comp.


Workers comp can't be used for medical expenses until after the report is filed and you have a claim number (at least that's how it worked when I was on workers comp). And since the hospital wasn't required to do anything more than stop the bleeding, it's practically a miracle they even gave him the option to pay out of pocket at all.
 
2013-01-06 11:46:08 AM

vwarb: It is even more annoying now that Obama has won in a landslide TWICE ONCE.


FTFY. The first election was a landslide. The last election wasn't a landslide unless you measure it by electoral votes, which don't give you a good measure of actual *SUPPORT* among the population because of its "all or nothing" nature at the state level. Barack Obama won with just 51% of the popular vote this last November, hardly a landslide. Even in 2008, he only won 52.9% of the popular vote.

A real landslide would be the 1984 presidential election, when Ronald Reagan got 58.77% of the vote. That shows a groundswell of popular support.

Hell, even George H. W. Bush beat both of Obama's percentages with a 53.4% of the popular vote.

Would you characterize Dumbya's reelection in 2004 as a landslide? He got 50.7% of the popular vote, a bare 0.3% less than Barack Obama's reelection.

No, Barack Obama had a healthy margin of the popular vote in 2008, and he *LOST* almost 2% of that in the last election, so no, not a landslide.
 
2013-01-06 11:46:42 AM

spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.


Taxes are related, but that wasn't the central reason.

As others have highlighted, they didn't protest because of the taxes themselves, they protested because they didn't like the idea of being taxed but having no say in government affairs (kind of like DC which used the motto "Taxation Without Representation" on their license plates.

Saying that they didn't like being taxed only highlights part of it.
 
2013-01-06 11:48:09 AM

itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.



I think it's you that's missing the facts here.

90% of Australians live in 6 metropolitan areas that collectively are smaller than greater London... arguments about scale and somesuch service reaching an entire population are virtually identical as in the UK with the Outer Hebrides, because the vast bulk of the people are not spread across the continent.

It's the same in the US, only to a slightly lesser degree. There only a set number of urban hubs, which account for the vast bulk of people.

The sheer geography is largely an irrelevance, because people are not evenly spread.
 
2013-01-06 11:55:21 AM
From the article: "Only America and the Americans have this ability to derange us with their capacity to reflect our own image. Not that they do this intentionally, really."

Dead wrong.

Suck it, monarchy boy. We've been trolling the entire farking world for over 200 years. And, God willing, we'll be doing it for centuries to come.
 
2013-01-06 11:55:49 AM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.

Taxes are related, but that wasn't the central reason.

As others have highlighted, they didn't protest because of the taxes themselves, they protested because they didn't like the idea of being taxed but having no say in government affairs (kind of like DC which used the motto "Taxation Without Representation" on their license plates.

Saying that they didn't like being taxed only highlights part of it.


Have you seen "How Booze Built America"? They highlight the Boston tea party as a complaint with taxation (without representation) on alcohol and the ingredients to make booze, but since they didn't want to waste booze, they decided to destroy tea instead.
 
2013-01-06 11:57:59 AM
They hate us for our freedoms.
 
2013-01-06 11:58:51 AM

spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.


Actually, while the main heartburn among the colonists was about taxation, the spark that lit off the Revolution was an attempt at gun control. Something to keep in mind.
 
2013-01-06 12:02:34 PM
simplicimus
Good choice. Article goes nowhere.

dangit why didn't I read the comments first
 
2013-01-06 12:05:14 PM

ATRDCI: To be completely fair, those of us in. say. Texas receive this same treatment from other Americans. A bit different in the lyrics perhaps but the second verse is the same as the first. As disgusting as the "Real America" shiat is, it is at least partially an (admittedly delayed) reaction to the fact that anyone who happens to not be in the South assumes everyone down here is an ignorant racist who is lucky they can tie their shoes, or is at best a copy of Rick Perry or W. Yes, there is racism and ignorance down here, but to pretend it isn't everywhere is just asinine.
/obviously not everyone has these assumptions or vocalizes them


That's all true, of course, and the internet brings out the inner asshole in everyone, so if there's one idiot out there saying stupid things, he's the guy with the prolific posting status. People like to generalize and root for "their side," no matter what the subject is, and if there is no "side" they'll just make one up. But there is something weird about the Brits and us, and it's more than just that whole Revolutionary War thing.

whatshisname: I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the world than Europeans.


You ever think that that might have something to with Europe being right over there with "the rest of the world," while Americans are out here by ourselves, with Canada and Mexico as our neighbors?

If I lived surrounded by the rest of Europe and many other countries, and was connected to them by a long history as well as geographic positioning, I'd probably know a lot more about "the rest of the world" than most Americans do too. It's not a big thing for Europeans to go to other countries--they can go visit two or three a day. No wonder they know more about their neighbors.
 
2013-01-06 12:06:33 PM
i102.photobucket.com

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?
 
2013-01-06 12:09:18 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: Haliburton Cummings: especially when I let them know that we saved their asses back in the big one

Hahahahahahahaha...

I love the British for their role in WWII. They got hammered hard and repeatedly. They were dealt more punishment than we've ever felt in the U.S. and they refused to roll over. They fought like farking heroes from beginning to end.

I also love that they had our back all the way through the whole Iraq thing. Granted, I think we made a terrible mistake but they showed their support while we were at our worst. That's what they mean when they say "through thick and thin".


THIS x infinity.
 
2013-01-06 12:10:42 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?


No it isn't. What makes you think that?
 
2013-01-06 12:11:32 PM

Bungles: I think it's you that's missing the facts here.

90% of Australians live in 6 metropolitan areas that collectively are smaller than greater London... arguments about scale and somesuch service reaching an entire population are virtually identical as in the UK with the Outer Hebrides, because the vast bulk of the people are not spread across the continent.

It's the same in the US, only to a slightly lesser degree. There only a set number of urban hubs, which account for the vast bulk of people.

The sheer geography is largely an irrelevance, because people are not evenly spread.


People are not evenly spread but services need to get them just the same.

Ausatralia and the US cant really compared. Australia's population is SIGNIFICANTLY more concentrated near the coasts and a handful of major cities. The US's, not so much. Compare:

www.mapofusa.net
all-geo.org
Building out infrastructure to Australians is much easier. Cover Caims to Adelaide and add the population centers around Perth and you cover close to 90% of the population. Yes it's a huge distance but the population density makes it more economical.
 
2013-01-06 12:12:01 PM

whatshisname: lilistonic: itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.

Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.

You do realize that you and itsfullofstars are countering stereotypes with stereotypes?

I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the world than Eu ...


And yet, you miss the point.. For someone in the U.K. to know the political goings on of, say, Romania
is no big deal simply because of geography. People in Nebraska probably know some of what is going
on in North Dakota or Oklahoma..And yet those distances would be no different than that of London
to Bucharest. Just because our states are not differentiated countries with different languages doesn't
mean a person in "insular". How much do you think the average London dweller would know of the
day to day comings and goings in Guinea Bissau? Probably about as much as anyone in the U.S.
or Canada would! It's a false analogy to equate knowledge of happenings in X number of countries to "insulation".
 
2013-01-06 12:12:22 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?



It's on Channel 5. It hasn't even been in the topped the UK Top 250 for the week.
 
2013-01-06 12:13:27 PM

Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Mrtraveler01: spawn73: Triumph: I'm mostly of English descent, and enjoyed my visits to London, but also always mindful that my ancestors fought like dogs to get away from those people.

No they didn't. They were British as well, but they didn't want to pay taxes.

Oh look, you miss the point of the Revolutionary War.

If you think it was a war over taxes...you might be wrong.

Yeah I might, but until someone points me to imformation to it not being that, I think it is. With the Boston Tea Party and all.

Oh look...

You mean the Boston Tea Party which was a protest over an act which actually lowered taxes on tea but only to tea made by one company in London?

That one?

Yeah that one. That sounds tax related tbh.

Taxes are related, but that wasn't the central reason.

As others have highlighted, they didn't protest because of the taxes themselves, they protested because they didn't like the idea of being taxed but having no say in government affairs (kind of like DC which used the motto "Taxation Without Representation" on their license plates.

Saying that they didn't like being taxed only highlights part of it.


I've always had the thought that as well as representation, the colonies wanted to get out from under the British mercantilistic model.
 
2013-01-06 12:15:13 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?


That Distraction should be MUCH more popular than it is?
/fair warning probably nsfw
 
2013-01-06 12:19:32 PM
I see I've stumbled into a thread of people who aren't familiar with Will Self. He is actually capable of being more annoying. Google "Joy Division and vesta curry" and read the piece he wrote for the Independent. You will be nostalgic for when this was the only thing of his you read, and you didn't hate him so much.
 
2013-01-06 12:20:57 PM

Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so


You can,if you keep the gas pedal down, alternate drivers, and pee in a jug along the way.
 
2013-01-06 12:21:00 PM

Mr. Shabooboo: And yet, you miss the point.. For someone in the U.K. to know the political goings on of, say, Romania
is no big deal simply because of geography. People in Nebraska probably know some of what is going
on in North Dakota or Oklahoma..And yet those distances would be no different than that of London
to Bucharest. Just because our states are not differentiated countries with different languages doesn't
mean a person in "insular". How much do you think the average London dweller would know of the
day to day comings and goings in Guinea Bissau? Probably about as much as anyone in the U.S.
or Canada would! It's a false analogy to equate knowledge of happenings in X number of countries to "insulation".


What do you mean "because of geography"? Do you think that someone in London somehow absorbs the political situation in Romania through magic because it's "only" 2500kms away? Or is information somehow harder to absorb the further it is from its origin?

It's nothing to do with geography, it's to do with a specifically American insularism. Just look at Australia. The average Australian has a comparatively very solid understanding of global affairs, and they're close to no-one but dolphins and some uninhabited Japanese islands.
 
2013-01-06 12:28:55 PM

itsfullofstars: Bungles: I think it's you that's missing the facts here.

90% of Australians live in 6 metropolitan areas that collectively are smaller than greater London... arguments about scale and somesuch service reaching an entire population are virtually identical as in the UK with the Outer Hebrides, because the vast bulk of the people are not spread across the continent.

It's the same in the US, only to a slightly lesser degree. There only a set number of urban hubs, which account for the vast bulk of people.

The sheer geography is largely an irrelevance, because people are not evenly spread.

People are not evenly spread but services need to get them just the same.

Ausatralia and the US cant really compared. Australia's population is SIGNIFICANTLY more concentrated near the coasts and a handful of major cities. The US's, not so much. Compare:



Building out infrastructure to Australians is much easier. Cover Caims to Adelaide and add the population centers around Perth and you cover close to 90% of the population. Yes it's a huge distance but the population density makes it more economical.


Also people fail to consider that the US is split into some very different geological and environmental zones. In addition to the vast distances, Australia is practically a plain compared to the US.

Imagine trying to build a new rail system from Washington DC to Chicago. (not even halfway across the US)

You would have to cross countless hills, and figure out how to get through the Appalachian Mountains. The highest peak in our smaller mountain range is about a high as the tallest peak in all of Australia, and the 'as the crow flies' distance would require crossing about 400 miles of those mountains. (I think its about 600 miles total).


So that's just connecting two major regions across the smaller mountains. Imagine trying to deal with the Rockies.
 
2013-01-06 12:32:44 PM

Bungles: Mr. Shabooboo: And yet, you miss the point.. For someone in the U.K. to know the political goings on of, say, Romania
is no big deal simply because of geography. People in Nebraska probably know some of what is going
on in North Dakota or Oklahoma..And yet those distances would be no different than that of London
to Bucharest. Just because our states are not differentiated countries with different languages doesn't
mean a person in "insular". How much do you think the average London dweller would know of the
day to day comings and goings in Guinea Bissau? Probably about as much as anyone in the U.S.
or Canada would! It's a false analogy to equate knowledge of happenings in X number of countries to "insulation".

What do you mean "because of geography"? Do you think that someone in London somehow absorbs the political situation in Romania through magic because it's "only" 2500kms away? Or is information somehow harder to absorb the further it is from its origin?

It's nothing to do with geography, it's to do with a specifically American insularism. Just look at Australia. The average Australian has a comparatively very solid understanding of global affairs, and they're close to no-one but dolphins and some uninhabited Japanese islands.


People naturally care about and look for information that affects them. They are naturally going to know more about the goings on that happen closer to them. A person living in Hastings would know more about the goings on of Hastings then they would about the daily goings on of York. Similarly, a person in England would know more about English events. The distance between the US and France is around 4000 miles. Would you chastise Britons who are ignorant of the inner workings of the various African countries that are about that far way?
 
2013-01-06 12:33:13 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

Learn how to write man!
 
2013-01-06 12:41:25 PM

whatshisname: lilistonic: itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.

Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.

You do realize that you and itsfullofstars are countering stereotypes with stereotypes?

I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the world than Eu ...


Possibly, as people are people. It's dumb all over. But here we are speaking specifically of the article's intent and of people wishing to blanket their wisdom and solutions on others, and (heap ridicule on them for extreme examples) when others live in a very different situation.
 
2013-01-06 12:41:52 PM

ATRDCI: Bungles: Mr. Shabooboo: And yet, you miss the point.. For someone in the U.K. to know the political goings on of, say, Romania
is no big deal simply because of geography. People in Nebraska probably know some of what is going
on in North Dakota or Oklahoma..And yet those distances would be no different than that of London
to Bucharest. Just because our states are not differentiated countries with different languages doesn't
mean a person in "insular". How much do you think the average London dweller would know of the
day to day comings and goings in Guinea Bissau? Probably about as much as anyone in the U.S.
or Canada would! It's a false analogy to equate knowledge of happenings in X number of countries to "insulation".

What do you mean "because of geography"? Do you think that someone in London somehow absorbs the political situation in Romania through magic because it's "only" 2500kms away? Or is information somehow harder to absorb the further it is from its origin?

It's nothing to do with geography, it's to do with a specifically American insularism. Just look at Australia. The average Australian has a comparatively very solid understanding of global affairs, and they're close to no-one but dolphins and some uninhabited Japanese islands.

People naturally care about and look for information that affects them. They are naturally going to know more about the goings on that happen closer to them. A person living in Hastings would know more about the goings on of Hastings then they would about the daily goings on of York. Similarly, a person in England would know more about English events. The distance between the US and France is around 4000 miles. Would you chastise Britons who are ignorant of the inner workings of the various African countries that are about that far way?


Most Westerners are ignorant of African events, because most Westerners don't consider Africa to be important or interesting, as cruel as that sounds.

The difference is that most Western countries generally are reasonably aware of other Western nations in a way that a significantly larger number of Americans just aren't. Most Germans, French, Canadians, Australians, Brits, New Zealanders etc would be able to name each other's leaders (or at least their last one), point them out on a map, and have a vague grasp of their culture. From my experience the same just ins't true to the same degree in the US.
 
2013-01-06 12:43:56 PM

Mr. Shabooboo: whatshisname: lilistonic: itsfullofstars: Brits suffer from the same problem everyone in Europe suffers from in their view of the US. They compare the UK to the US and Germany to the US and France to the US and Luxembourg to the US. It just doesn't scale. Europeans should be comparing Europe to the US.

Europe's landmass is about the size of the southern US states. Europe's population is more than double that of the US. The UK is the size of Oregon and has about the population of California, Texas and New York combined. Germany should compare itself to Montana landwise but can add Pennsylvania and Ohio to the UK's list of US states population wise.

Point is, Europeans insist on comparing their country to this other country that is so dominate culturally, politically and economically, and its just silly.

These arguments are frequently made during discussions of buildout of public transportation, broadband, public health services. They further demonstrate many Europeans lack of understanding of geography outside their own continent. It's not an anti-American thing. They make the same arguments to Australians, failing to understand how big that place is.

Precisely.

Dear European Countries:


Believing you can apply any one solution that works for a small crowded country of people from mostly the same genetic background to a place as large and diverse as this one is patently absurd. (Was it here I read about studies which show why certain medical treatments can easily be applied to a whole nation of Swedes, but when they're brought here, it all becomes frightfully complex?)


And both countries: really big and really far away from you. Your stereotypes of us should be left on stage with the comedians.

You do realize that you and itsfullofstars are countering stereotypes with stereotypes?

I was born in Europe, live in Canada and have traveled extensively in the US. My experience has always been that Americans are far more insular and uninformed abut the rest of the ...


I didn't miss his point at all. I see several other points, but was not commenting on those, only on what's related to the article and how the poster expressed his view of it.

You all can carry on arguing over tree bark, as you like, as usual. It's a form of philosophy I'm not really into, myself.
 
2013-01-06 12:43:58 PM

Bungles: What do you mean "because of geography"? Do you think that someone in London somehow absorbs the political situation in Romania through magic because it's "only" 2500kms away? Or is information somehow harder to absorb the further it is from its origin?


If I found out that someone had a meth lab next to my house, I'd be a little more concerned about that than I would be about a meth lab on the opposite coast.

It's no different with politics. When your political neighbors are building that proverbial meth lab, you can't just sit idly by and wait for their mistake to cripple your country. Yet those of us who are isolated have nothing to gain or lose when things do head south, so we just don't see it as a priority, especially when we have people building a meth lab in our own basement.
 
2013-01-06 12:55:42 PM

Relatively Obscure: That author was trying way, way, way too hard.


using multiples of "way" does not increase the emphasis, it shows an ignorance of your native language.
 
2013-01-06 01:07:14 PM

Bungles: The difference is that most Western countries generally are reasonably aware of other Western nations in a way that a significantly larger number of Americans just aren't. Most Germans, French, Canadians, Australians, Brits, New Zealanders etc would be able to name each other's leaders (or at least their last one), point them out on a map, and have a vague grasp of their culture. From my experience the same just ins't true to the same degree in the US.


With the exception of US Canada, Australia and New Zealand, all of the "Western Nations" are right next to each other in Europe. Similarly, Texans could talk to you about Louisiana, Oklahoma, etc etc. and New Yorkers know about New Jersey and other northeastern states. The difference between the US and Canada/Australia/New Zealand is historically and culturally. The latter 3 are still a part of the Commonwealth Realm, had relatively good relations with Britain and still recognize the Queen as head of state. Culturally, they are still relatively close to England and would care about much the same information that Britons would care about (like a Finn who moved to Mexico would still care about the EU though a native born Mexican would not care as much)

The US on the other hand violently broke away, fought them again in 1912 and has supported isolationist polices historically, which are back by geography. From Washington's farewell address, to the Monroe Doctrine, to the unwillingness to join both world wars, etc. So it is pretty much geographically and culturally instilled that Americans don't care as much about European countries.
 
2013-01-06 01:08:49 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?


They love the irony that the lead actor is British?
 
2013-01-06 01:09:43 PM
One of the most poorly written articles I've seen in a long time - so thoroughly disjointed and rambling that only someone with serrious mental issues could make any sense of it.

How about we all get back to making fun of how the Brits mangle their language so badly that nobody can understand them?
 
2013-01-06 01:17:16 PM
It is human to covet and resent at the same time...
 
2013-01-06 01:17:53 PM
I spend several weeks in London every year and I find that the best way to deal with Brits is just to act like their royalty. Basically an Englishman lacks any backbone or wit. They are very uncomfortable making choices and aren't particularly good at making their own decisions. The Englishman is happiest when he is under the control of his betters, this is why we as Americans must continue to lead Brittian in world politics.
 
2013-01-06 01:18:05 PM

1000Monkeys: TL:DR version of TFA: I got a dictionary for Christmas.


Winner, Winner. Chicken Dinner. I was having difficulty figuring out whether he was attempting to sound like a stereotypical "English Snob" from the movies or, as you stated, found a thesaurus in his basement.

That being said, I do have a strange, familial sense of our cousins across the pond. Hell, I don't any other country evokes that from other Americans. Do immigrants from other countries feel that way to their motherland? The U.S. and Poland or Uganda as brother nations? I don't think so, but I'm a white, limey lad so perhaps I am biased. Does Australia have a similar feeling towards Great Britain?

The relationship between us makes me think of a child that was taken care of by an older sibling. The sister loved, but still beat up, its younger brother. Eventually the young man grew up enough to beat the older lady's arse. Once the bickering, "I hate you", phase that all siblings go through was over, the younger (and now much stronger) brother began sticking up for his older sister while the sister lauded, praised and supported all that her little brother would do.

/damn, I need to call my sis and tell her I love her.
 
2013-01-06 01:23:06 PM
Hell, "Across the Pond". Do we use that term for any other country? It's like talking about your friend across the street. I don't think we are that familiar with fricking Canada and they share a land border.
 
2013-01-06 01:23:38 PM

Valeriyance: 1000Monkeys: TL:DR version of TFA: I got a dictionary for Christmas.

Winner, Winner. Chicken Dinner. I was having difficulty figuring out whether he was attempting to sound like a stereotypical "English Snob" from the movies or, as you stated, found a thesaurus in his basement.

That being said, I do have a strange, familial sense of our cousins across the pond. Hell, I don't any other country evokes that from other Americans. Do immigrants from other countries feel that way to their motherland? The U.S. and Poland or Uganda as brother nations? I don't think so, but I'm a white, limey lad so perhaps I am biased. Does Australia have a similar feeling towards Great Britain?

The relationship between us makes me think of a child that was taken care of by an older sibling. The sister loved, but still beat up, its younger brother. Eventually the young man grew up enough to beat the older lady's arse. Once the bickering, "I hate you", phase that all siblings go through was over, the younger (and now much stronger) brother began sticking up for his older sister while the sister lauded, praised and supported all that her little brother would do.

/damn, I need to call my sis and tell her I love her.


Will Self, even though a pretentious asshat, knows those words, and far more besides. He's from the Fry or Hitchens school of genuinely linguistically erudite.
 
2013-01-06 01:26:46 PM
Came for pics of hot British chicks.

oh. Right.
 
2013-01-06 01:31:43 PM

KrispyKritter: Relatively Obscure: That author was trying way, way, way too hard.

using multiples of "way" does not increase the emphasis, it shows an ignorance of your native language.


You're trying way, way, way too hard.
 
2013-01-06 01:35:21 PM

dopekitty74: miss diminutive: Bungles: miss diminutive: Are they still sore over losing their empire and being reduced to pawns in the geopolitical game?

Give it a few decades, my young American padawan, and you'll understand.

I'm Canadian....the Monopoly boot of the geopolitical chess-board. We always understand.

It seems to me that we Canadians are very much the middle ground in this issue. We have american and british pop culture, our political system is somewhere between the two as well, plus we have our own little subcultures that reflect other things going on in the world too.

Where you from miss diminutive? I'm in NB


Plus we still have the queen on our money.

/Ontario here.
 
2013-01-06 01:39:33 PM
Is this the thread where we complain?
 
2013-01-06 01:43:13 PM

gameshowhost: Is this the thread where we complain?


You mean there are threads where we don't?
 
2013-01-06 01:48:54 PM

blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?


I'm British and had absolutely no idea of what that represented and had to google it. When I found out what it was... I've seen it on the listings, but I've never watched it and I've never heard anyone of my acquaintance even mention it. There are plenty of shows that I don't watch but they are popular so I'm aware of their presence, but not this. So..... maybe not even in the top 100?
 
2013-01-06 01:51:18 PM

tshauk: I think we just found the British Dennis Miller.


Seriously, is there anyone easier to hate than this asshat.


www.wmeentertainment.com
 
2013-01-06 01:57:12 PM
s3.amazonaws.com
s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-01-06 02:02:11 PM
blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?

No it isn't. What makes you think that?


International Ratings Highlights for The Walking Dead - Season 2

Delivered 16.9 million households within all FIC markets
Delivered 8 million households across all FIC metered markets
Ranked #1 in regions like UK (1.76 rat%), Spain (2.75 rat%), Argentina (0.81 rat%), Colombia (0.94 rat%) and Mexico (1.31 rat%), Italy (1.93 rat%) and Slovenia (0.62 rat%).
Broke ratings records previously held by The Walking Dead's season 1 & season 2 premieres

UK - FX (Key BARB Highlights):

Averaged 737,200 Total Pay Viewers (558,400 in key 18-49 demo) - over performing its lead in by 100% among Pay P18-49 and +31% among Total Pay Viewers
Ranked #1 among all Pay TV channels in key 18-49 demo with a 3.05 rating and Total Viewers with a 1.98 rating.

excepts from 'tvbythenumbers' website
http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2012/02/22/the-walking-deads-much-an t icipated-global-return-sets-new-ratings-records-on-fox-international-c hannels/121311/
 
2013-01-06 02:07:58 PM

blurr_grrl: blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?

No it isn't. What makes you think that?

International Ratings Highlights for The Walking Dead - Season 2

Delivered 16.9 million households within all FIC markets
Delivered 8 million households across all FIC metered markets
Ranked #1 in regions like UK (1.76 rat%), Spain (2.75 rat%), Argentina (0.81 rat%), Colombia (0.94 rat%) and Mexico (1.31 rat%), Italy (1.93 rat%) and Slovenia (0.62 rat%).
Broke ratings records previously held by The Walking Dead's season 1 & season 2 premieres

UK - FX (Key BARB Highlights):

Averaged 737,200 Total Pay Viewers (558,400 in key 18-49 demo) - over performing its lead in by 100% among Pay P18-49 and +31% among Total Pay Viewers
Ranked #1 among all Pay TV channels in key 18-49 demo with a 3.05 rating and Total Viewers with a 1.98 rating.

excepts from 'tvbythenumbers' website
http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2012/02/22/the-walking-deads-much-an t icipated-global-return-sets-new-ratings-records-on-fox-international-c hannels/121311/


I have no idea what "ranked no 1" means. Maybe no 1 on the obscure Sky channel it ran on? It was on " FX" apparently. I haven't even heard of that channel, and I doubt many have.

I can assure you that no program on a channel called FX would even crack the top 250 programs in a week. If it's not on BBC 1, BBC 2, ITV, or Channel 4, it's essentially way, way out the mainstream in the UK.
 
2013-01-06 02:11:17 PM

tonguedepressor: tshauk: I think we just found the British Dennis Miller.

Seriously, is there anyone easier to hate than this asshat.


[www.wmeentertainment.com image 241x347]


It's funny: Back in the 1980's, liberals loved him and conservatives hated him. Now it's reversed. I guess it just matters whose side he is poking fun of.
 
2013-01-06 02:14:34 PM

dittybopper: tonguedepressor: tshauk: I think we just found the British Dennis Miller.

Seriously, is there anyone easier to hate than this asshat.


[www.wmeentertainment.com image 241x347]

It's funny: Back in the 1980's, liberals loved him and conservatives hated him. Now it's reversed. I guess it just matters whose side he is poking fun of.


To be fair, there are few funny conservative comedians. I can't think of one, but there must be a few.
 
2013-01-06 02:31:42 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: I imagine we Americans probably aren't as wry and witty as those Brits because we've burned out our brain cells shooting novocaine into our gums and stuffing aluminum salts under our arm pits.


Aluminium salts.
 
2013-01-06 02:32:53 PM

Serious Black: "The spectacle of US democracy in action is at once ridiculed and revered over here. Looked at one way it is an unholy combination of demagoguery and plutocracy, what with its pork-barrelling politicians soliciting corporate donations for prime time television advertising."

Never has a truer sentence ever been spoken.


Yeah, I was looking for more of a...you know..."British food v American food" type of thing, here.

And just because the author made full use of his/her thesaurus, that doesn't mean I have to use equivalent effort to disentangle his doggerel.
 
2013-01-06 02:35:52 PM

dittybopper: tonguedepressor: tshauk: I think we just found the British Dennis Miller.

Seriously, is there anyone easier to hate than this asshat.


[www.wmeentertainment.com image 241x347]

It's funny: Back in the 1980's, liberals loved him and conservatives hated him. Now it's reversed. I guess it just matters whose side he is poking fun of.


You're absolutely right but what made him a massengil product for me was when he was doing Monday nite football. What a pompous unknowledgeable had-no-business-doing color twit he was and still is.
 
2013-01-06 02:47:16 PM

DS1970: Serious Black: "The spectacle of US democracy in action is at once ridiculed and revered over here. Looked at one way it is an unholy combination of demagoguery and plutocracy, what with its pork-barrelling politicians soliciting corporate donations for prime time television advertising."

Never has a truer sentence ever been spoken.

Yeah, I was looking for more of a...you know..."British food v American food" type of thing, here.

And just because the author made full use of his/her thesaurus, that doesn't mean I have to use equivalent effort to disentangle his doggerel.


Will Self is in many ways a tit, but he does not need a thesaurus. Just watch him on a discussion panel. He's been on hundreds.
 
2013-01-06 02:47:52 PM

LordZorch: One of the most poorly written articles I've seen in a long time - so thoroughly disjointed and rambling that only someone with serrious mental issues could make any sense of it.

How about we all get back to making fun of how the Brits mangle their language so badly that nobody can understand them?


Funny you should mention, I was drinking with some British girls whose fathers were Leftist university professors in England. They were quite angrily arguing that unpopular speech should & must be censored, concluding with: "you Yanks mango da Engwish wanguage." Mind you, these girls were both PhD, not council chavs.

It is atrocious how the British drop and add the R, pronounce "th" as "v," "l" as "w," lisp, etc.
 
2013-01-06 02:50:04 PM

Goodfella: Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so

You can drive anywhere in the lower 48 in three days, so they were close.


I wasn't quite sure on that (especially with no explanation of what entailed a "day") so I looked it up.

1. The estimate of the longest distance between two points in the lower 48 is around (there are several around this) 2873 miles, from Neah Bay, WA to Islamorada, FL.

2. Assuming an average speed of 60 mph it would take just shy of 48 hours of total driving (2873/60 = 47.89)

3. and assuming each day of driving entailed 12 hours of solid driving, we have 4 days of driving (47.89/12 ~=4).

So the visitors thought the U.S. lower 48 were one-forth their real size. That's quite a difference.
 
2013-01-06 02:51:37 PM

CoonAce: LordZorch: One of the most poorly written articles I've seen in a long time - so thoroughly disjointed and rambling that only someone with serrious mental issues could make any sense of it.

How about we all get back to making fun of how the Brits mangle their language so badly that nobody can understand them?

Funny you should mention, I was drinking with some British girls whose fathers were Leftist university professors in England. They were quite angrily arguing that unpopular speech should & must be censored, concluding with: "you Yanks mango da Engwish wanguage." Mind you, these girls were both PhD, not council chavs.

It is atrocious how the British drop and add the R, pronounce "th" as "v," "l" as "w," lisp, etc.


Is this were I point out the number grammatical clusterfarks in that paragraph?
 
2013-01-06 02:58:07 PM

DS1970: Goodfella: Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so

You can drive anywhere in the lower 48 in three days, so they were close.

I wasn't quite sure on that (especially with no explanation of what entailed a "day") so I looked it up.

1. The estimate of the longest distance between two points in the lower 48 is around (there are several around this) 2873 miles, from Neah Bay, WA to Islamorada, FL.

2. Assuming an average speed of 60 mph it would take just shy of 48 hours of total driving (2873/60 = 47.89)

3. and assuming each day of driving entailed 12 hours of solid driving, we have 4 days of driving (47.89/12 ~=4).

So the visitors thought the U.S. lower 48 were one-forth their real size. That's quite a difference.


That's only three times the distance between Land's End and John O'Grots in the UK (about 900 or so miles), a country people here seem to be insisting is tiny and would fit on Manhattan. And that's not counting the Scottish isles that go out half that or so again.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land's_End_to_John_o'_Groats
 
2013-01-06 03:02:02 PM
I'm an anglophile been one since before it was cool and even I didn't understand that article.
 
2013-01-06 03:02:35 PM

Bungles: DS1970: Goodfella: Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so

You can drive anywhere in the lower 48 in three days, so they were close.

I wasn't quite sure on that (especially with no explanation of what entailed a "day") so I looked it up.

1. The estimate of the longest distance between two points in the lower 48 is around (there are several around this) 2873 miles, from Neah Bay, WA to Islamorada, FL.

2. Assuming an average speed of 60 mph it would take just shy of 48 hours of total driving (2873/60 = 47.89)

3. and assuming each day of driving entailed 12 hours of solid driving, we have 4 days of driving (47.89/12 ~=4).

So the visitors thought the U.S. lower 48 were one-forth their real size. That's quite a difference.

That's only three times the distance between Land's End and John O'Grots in the UK (about 900 or so miles), a country people here seem to be insisting is tiny and would fit on Manhattan. And that's not counting the Scottish isles that go out half that or so again.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land's_End_to_John_o'_Groats


Meh, 900 or so miles would get you from one side of Texas to the other.
 
2013-01-06 03:08:42 PM

Bungles: Is this were I point out the number grammatical clusterfarks in that paragraph?


Bungles: Is this were


Yeah, do that.
 
2013-01-06 03:11:00 PM

Relatively Obscure: Bungles: Is this were I point out the number grammatical clusterfarks in that paragraph?

Bungles: Is this were

Yeah, do that.



There's a reason why I didn't, you cheeky little monkey.
 
2013-01-06 03:14:12 PM
Um.... complicated British stuff.

I like Iron Maiden, Doctor Who and Bass Ale.
 
2013-01-06 03:15:34 PM

blurr_grrl: blurr_grrl: [i102.photobucket.com image 640x452]

When this is one of Britain's most highest-rated shows - what do you think?

No it isn't. What makes you think that?

International Ratings Highlights for The Walking Dead - Season 2

Delivered 16.9 million households within all FIC markets
Delivered 8 million households across all FIC metered markets
Ranked #1 in regions like UK (1.76 rat%), Spain (2.75 rat%), Argentina (0.81 rat%), Colombia (0.94 rat%) and Mexico (1.31 rat%), Italy (1.93 rat%) and Slovenia (0.62 rat%).
Broke ratings records previously held by The Walking Dead's season 1 & season 2 premieres

UK - FX (Key BARB Highlights):

Averaged 737,200 Total Pay Viewers (558,400 in key 18-49 demo) - over performing its lead in by 100% among Pay P18-49 and +31% among Total Pay Viewers
Ranked #1 among all Pay TV channels in key 18-49 demo with a 3.05 rating and Total Viewers with a 1.98 rating.

excepts from 'tvbythenumbers' website
http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2012/02/22/the-walking-deads-much-an t icipated-global-return-sets-new-ratings-records-on-fox-international-c hannels/121311/


Still not many people watching. By your figures, 737200 average viewers = 1.16% of the population. That's not a top show by any stretch of the imagination. Even Frozen Planet averages about 16% of the population (9717000).
 
2013-01-06 03:26:08 PM
Yanks are all disgustingly stupid, uneducated, savage, ignorant retards that suffer from severe cognitive dissonance!
 
2013-01-06 03:30:40 PM
i593.photobucket.com

Services like BSkyB made 18 billion (US) last year from Brits who (apparently) watch programming beyond the 'telly'.
How 'bout those numbers?
 
2013-01-06 03:33:43 PM

pippi longstocking: Yanks are all disgustingly stupid, uneducated, savage, ignorant retards that suffer from severe cognitive dissonance!


Never been to a soccer (football) match, I gather.
 
2013-01-06 03:36:57 PM

chuckufarlie: vudukungfu: Came for pics of hot British chicks.

oh. Right.

[thisisbirmingham.files.wordpress.com image 604x419]


Blonde w/ MySpace photo... need moar to judge.
 
2013-01-06 03:37:23 PM

blurr_grrl: [i593.photobucket.com image 657x1024]

Services like BSkyB made 18 billion (US) last year from Brits who (apparently) watch programming beyond the 'telly'.
How 'bout those numbers?


How does that relate to your claim about top TV programme? BSkyB is a satellite tv company. They show lots of channels (about 700 I think). BBC, Channel 4 and ITV channels are among them. Don't know what you mean by "programming beyond the 'telly'". Internet TV? What's your point?
 
2013-01-06 03:38:23 PM
Was there a  point somewhere in this article, or did I just happen to miss it?

/Mr. Self, I'd like to remind you that we typically put our thesis statement at the end of the first paragraph.
 
2013-01-06 03:42:13 PM
If I could write drivel like that for a thesis I'd be rich.

/Oh wait...
 
2013-01-06 03:42:23 PM

Bungles: DS1970: Goodfella: Mid_mo_mad_man: Growing up my neighbors hosted exchange students. One thing that none of them realized was the sheer size of the USA. They assumed you could drive anywhere in a day or so

You can drive anywhere in the lower 48 in three days, so they were close.

I wasn't quite sure on that (especially with no explanation of what entailed a "day") so I looked it up.

1. The estimate of the longest distance between two points in the lower 48 is around (there are several around this) 2873 miles, from Neah Bay, WA to Islamorada, FL.

2. Assuming an average speed of 60 mph it would take just shy of 48 hours of total driving (2873/60 = 47.89)

3. and assuming each day of driving entailed 12 hours of solid driving, we have 4 days of driving (47.89/12 ~=4).

So the visitors thought the U.S. lower 48 were one-forth their real size. That's quite a difference.

That's only three times the distance between Land's End and John O'Grots in the UK (about 900 or so miles), a country people here seem to be insisting is tiny and would fit on Manhattan. And that's not counting the Scottish isles that go out half that or so again.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land's_End_to_John_o'_Groats


Try a drive from Halifax, Nova Scotia to Flin Flon, Manitoba. Not too bad until you get to Thunder Bay, then woods, woods and more woods until near the Manitoba border. Lots of fairly low level topography but very little civilization. Nice scenery sometimes. Then you leave the shield country and hit the prairie. No transition, just a straight line through the grain that goes on and on and on and on...to Winnipeg. Hang a right, head north. Straight line through the grain...until you get to the woods. Then, straight line through the woods. I honestly thought I was goin to lose my mind. Canada is serious, hardcore big.
 
2013-01-06 03:49:02 PM
The "Idiocracy" is strong in this thread. It's sad, really. I smh at my compatriots who are put off at the thought of learning a new word or two. Or, the horror; "tl;dr". God forbid that farkers should have the attention span of a gnat. They might learn something useful. Then they would be really dangerous.
 
2013-01-06 03:57:48 PM
Valeriyance
2013-01-06 01:23:06 PM

Hell, "Across the Pond". Do we use that term for any other country? It's like talking about your friend across the street. I don't think we are that familiar with fricking Canada and they share a land border.


This. They are our closest cultural friend yet its a pretty big divide IMHO. I dealt with quite a lot of British folks when I worked overseas in Asia and it was sort of eye opening.

I made friends with a few of them but despite us sharing a lot of institutions with them and a common language, I really found their attitudes and especially the humor (and coming from someone who enjoys a number of their comedy shows - peep show, black adder, young ones, to name a few) often hard to wrap my head around. The attutude was often a kind of mix of snobbery, pure meaness and insecurity. I didn't care much for it. Granted it was just in Asia and maybe if I was in the UK, I'd run into much nicer people. I dunno. I didn't come away with a good impression of many of them.
 
2013-01-06 04:06:14 PM

glennizen: The "Idiocracy" is strong in this thread. It's sad, really. I smh at my compatriots who are put off at the thought of learning a new word or two. Or, the horror; "tl;dr". God forbid that farkers should have the attention span of a gnat. They might learn something useful. Then they would be really dangerous.


Well, we smh at you.
 
2013-01-06 04:20:10 PM
The only thing in common I have with this dude is my mom also took me to see 2 movies in the 70's, MASH and Patton.
 
2013-01-06 04:23:30 PM

blurr_grrl: [i593.photobucket.com image 657x1024]

Services like BSkyB made 18 billion (US) last year from Brits who (apparently) watch programming beyond the 'telly'.
How 'bout those numbers?


Ummm, SKY is on the "telly". Individual channels on SKY are generally very small audiences, but there are a lot of them (news and sports aside).

If it isn't on BBC1, BBC2, ITV, or Channel 4, it's not going to crack the top few hundred of most watched programs in the UK in a given week, and that's just a fact.
 
2013-01-06 04:28:14 PM

SirEattonHogg: Valeriyance
2013-01-06 01:23:06 PM

Hell, "Across the Pond". Do we use that term for any other country? It's like talking about your friend across the street. I don't think we are that familiar with fricking Canada and they share a land border.

This. They are our closest cultural friend yet its a pretty big divide IMHO. I dealt with quite a lot of British folks when I worked overseas in Asia and it was sort of eye opening.

I made friends with a few of them but despite us sharing a lot of institutions with them and a common language, I really found their attitudes and especially the humor (and coming from someone who enjoys a number of their comedy shows - peep show, black adder, young ones, to name a few) often hard to wrap my head around. The attutude was often a kind of mix of snobbery, pure meaness and insecurity. I didn't care much for it. Granted it was just in Asia and maybe if I was in the UK, I'd run into much nicer people. I dunno. I didn't come away with a good impression of many of them.


And they probably thought you intellectually shallow, humourless, and having a massively over-inflated opinion of yourself to the point of delusion.

What you said about the British is common how Americans feel, and what I said about Americans is common how British people feel.

The Japanese, however, think us both monsters.
 
2013-01-06 04:36:49 PM
Somewhere in the troubling intersection between the American dream and the nightmarish patriotism engendered by Manifest Destiny, we sense their collective self-belief. What they do in the privacy of the voting booth genuinely matters, both to them and us.

[HA_HA_O_WOW.jpg]
 
2013-01-06 04:56:51 PM

Sgygus: Written for a British audience.


You mean the big words?
 
2013-01-06 05:06:02 PM
Actually, fightingnewfoundlander, I was referring to the subject matter.

/the prose style is a bit off-putting to all nationalities.
 
2013-01-06 05:08:34 PM
Rest easy, Brits: it's perfectly normal to have a bizarre view of the bizarre.
 
2013-01-06 05:09:07 PM
Bungles

2013-01-06 04:28:14 PM
SirEattonHogg: Valeriyance
2013-01-06 01:23:06 PM

Hell, "Across the Pond". Do we use that term for any other country? It's like talking about your friend across the street. I don't think we are that familiar with fricking Canada and they share a land border.

This. They are our closest cultural friend yet its a pretty big divide IMHO. I dealt with quite a lot of British folks when I worked overseas in Asia and it was sort of eye opening.

I made friends with a few of them but despite us sharing a lot of institutions with them and a common language, I really found their attitudes and especially the humor (and coming from someone who enjoys a number of their comedy shows - peep show, black adder, young ones, to name a few) often hard to wrap my head around. The attutude was often a kind of mix of snobbery, pure meaness and insecurity. I didn't care much for it. Granted it was just in Asia and maybe if I was in the UK, I'd run into much nicer people. I dunno. I didn't come away with a good impression of many of them.

And they probably thought you intellectually shallow, humourless, and having a massively over-inflated opinion of yourself to the point of delusion.

What you said about the British is common how Americans feel, and what I said about Americans is common how British people feel.

The Japanese, however, think us both monsters.


Quite true, I'm sure. You also forgot Yanks being crass and bumbling. As for the Japanese, I wouldn't know. While I wouldn't be surprised its quite negative, my own experience is they will go to great lengths not to say what they think, particurly if its negative.
 
2013-01-06 05:10:51 PM

SirEattonHogg: Bungles

2013-01-06 04:28:14 PM
SirEattonHogg: Valeriyance
2013-01-06 01:23:06 PM

Hell, "Across the Pond". Do we use that term for any other country? It's like talking about your friend across the street. I don't think we are that familiar with fricking Canada and they share a land border.

This. They are our closest cultural friend yet its a pretty big divide IMHO. I dealt with quite a lot of British folks when I worked overseas in Asia and it was sort of eye opening.

I made friends with a few of them but despite us sharing a lot of institutions with them and a common language, I really found their attitudes and especially the humor (and coming from someone who enjoys a number of their comedy shows - peep show, black adder, young ones, to name a few) often hard to wrap my head around. The attutude was often a kind of mix of snobbery, pure meaness and insecurity. I didn't care much for it. Granted it was just in Asia and maybe if I was in the UK, I'd run into much nicer people. I dunno. I didn't come away with a good impression of many of them.

And they probably thought you intellectually shallow, humourless, and having a massively over-inflated opinion of yourself to the point of delusion.

What you said about the British is common how Americans feel, and what I said about Americans is common how British people feel.

The Japanese, however, think us both monsters.


Quite true, I'm sure. You also forgot Yanks being crass and bumbling. As for the Japanese, I wouldn't know. While I wouldn't be surprised its quite negative, my own experience is they will go to great lengths not to say what they think, particurly if its negative.


Of course they wouldn't when there was a Gaijin around.
 
2013-01-06 05:16:49 PM
FTA:  "The dilatory nature of the UK's relationship with the European Union often seems like the behaviour of someone stood up on a date, who cannot summon the willpower to walk away from the failed rendezvous and into the arms of the girl next door."

Veronica or Betty? Betty or Veronica? Archie is such a confused lad, but get real. We all know that he's going to end up gay-marrying Jughead, his first true love. Veronica will marry Reggie and Betty will marry Moose when Milton and Midge run off together, and she'll raise a super-race of little blond Mooses and Mooselettes.

Who the Hell is Jughead to the UK's Archie? Australia? Canada? Norway? Scotland? The Republic of Eire?
 
2013-01-06 05:23:11 PM

brantgoose: FTA:  "The dilatory nature of the UK's relationship with the European Union often seems like the behaviour of someone stood up on a date, who cannot summon the willpower to walk away from the failed rendezvous and into the arms of the girl next door."

Veronica or Betty? Betty or Veronica? Archie is such a confused lad, but get real. We all know that he's going to end up gay-marrying Jughead, his first true love. Veronica will marry Reggie and Betty will marry Moose when Milton and Midge run off together, and she'll raise a super-race of little blond Mooses and Mooselettes.

Who the Hell is Jughead to the UK's Archie? Australia? Canada? Norway? Scotland? The Republic of Eire?


You know that Scotland is part of the UK, yes?
 
2013-01-06 05:25:27 PM

Spiralmonkey: brantgoose: FTA:  "The dilatory nature of the UK's relationship with the European Union often seems like the behaviour of someone stood up on a date, who cannot summon the willpower to walk away from the failed rendezvous and into the arms of the girl next door."

Veronica or Betty? Betty or Veronica? Archie is such a confused lad, but get real. We all know that he's going to end up gay-marrying Jughead, his first true love. Veronica will marry Reggie and Betty will marry Moose when Milton and Midge run off together, and she'll raise a super-race of little blond Mooses and Mooselettes.

Who the Hell is Jughead to the UK's Archie? Australia? Canada? Norway? Scotland? The Republic of Eire?

You know that Scotland is part of the UK, yes?


I thought Scotland was trying to leave.
 
2013-01-06 05:25:58 PM

planes: [www.global-air.com image 150x195]

It took the genius of America to recognize that with a little extra hammering and spannering the motor car could be converted into the motor home. But, the Brits think we're a bit odd for doing it. (new window)


To paraphrase Dr. Samuel Johnson on the subject of ships, yachting is just camping with a chance of being drowned. If I were a rich man and somebody yelled "Get a bus!" at me, I would! Why futz around with tiny televisions and mini-bars in the back seat of a limousine when you can have the full-sized version in the back of a customized bus?

Meh. Maybe not. It's hard to tell how foolish you would be if you won the lotto. But it seems to me that a land yacht is a lot more fun and a lot more useful than the ordinary sort of yacht that the merely rich buy, at a much lower cost. I'm sure I would get much more use out of a bus or an airplane than a yacht, unless we are talking one of those mega-rich monsters that are basically a floating island.
 
2013-01-06 05:31:48 PM

Spiralmonkey: brantgoose: FTA:  "The dilatory nature of the UK's relationship with the European Union often seems like the behaviour of someone stood up on a date, who cannot summon the willpower to walk away from the failed rendezvous and into the arms of the girl next door."

Veronica or Betty? Betty or Veronica? Archie is such a confused lad, but get real. We all know that he's going to end up gay-marrying Jughead, his first true love. Veronica will marry Reggie and Betty will marry Moose when Milton and Midge run off together, and she'll raise a super-race of little blond Mooses and Mooselettes.

Who the Hell is Jughead to the UK's Archie? Australia? Canada? Norway? Scotland? The Republic of Eire?

You know that Scotland is part of the UK, yes?


Well, sort of. I think it is still eligible for Mr. and Mr. UK some day. A lot of its complaints and demands sound very familiar to an English Canadian. It's England's Quebec. It wants equality plus. The biatch.

It already has as much or more than Quebec has: its own Parliament, its own banknotes, a big chunk of whatever is left of the North Sea oil, its own weird customs, costumes, and its own established church, the Kirk of Scotland, which rivals the Church of England in snobbishness and pietism. That's why I included it with equal plausibility as Ireland and the other free Dominions.
 
2013-01-06 05:44:56 PM
The United States is a lot like other giant countires (Canada, Russia, China, Brazil, Australia):  nobody ever gets to see the Real America because there is too Goddam much of it.

The British think a trip of sixty miles is an expedition and will happily spend hours debating how to best get from point A to point B, even though they have actually travelled a shorter distance than many of us Big Country people travel to buy groceries or to see our dentist.

I come from a place heavily settled by the British as well as Americans and it still amazes me how happy Americans are to hop in their cars and drive sixty miles for the sole purpose of buying McDo. And they'll drive three times that to visit a shoe outlet in Maine or a giant shopping Mall in the middle of nowhere.

Bill Bryson, an American from Iowa who has spend half a lifetime in the UK, is a good source of understanding and intelligent commentary on geography and Americans and Brits and other interesting critters. He also writes on the English language, Shakespeare, science and popular culture. He has the rare advantage of having lived in the UK for so long that he can see both the US and the UK as an outsider-insider. I recommend him if you like that sort of comparative anthropology. I wish he would visit Canada and write a book. He has done books on the US, the UK, Continental Europe, Africa and Australia, but he has missed Canada, which is a shame because Canadians love books about our national duality and are interested in everybody's crazy views about everybody else.
 
2013-01-06 05:47:49 PM

simplicimus: Spiralmonkey: brantgoose: FTA:  "The dilatory nature of the UK's relationship with the European Union often seems like the behaviour of someone stood up on a date, who cannot summon the willpower to walk away from the failed rendezvous and into the arms of the girl next door."

Veronica or Betty? Betty or Veronica? Archie is such a confused lad, but get real. We all know that he's going to end up gay-marrying Jughead, his first true love. Veronica will marry Reggie and Betty will marry Moose when Milton and Midge run off together, and she'll raise a super-race of little blond Mooses and Mooselettes.

Who the Hell is Jughead to the UK's Archie? Australia? Canada? Norway? Scotland? The Republic of Eire?

You know that Scotland is part of the UK, yes?

I thought Scotland was trying to leave.


No. They said they are trying to blaive. Which is to bluff.
 
2013-01-06 05:49:47 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: simplicimus: Spiralmonkey: brantgoose: FTA:  "The dilatory nature of the UK's relationship with the European Union often seems like the behaviour of someone stood up on a date, who cannot summon the willpower to walk away from the failed rendezvous and into the arms of the girl next door."

Veronica or Betty? Betty or Veronica? Archie is such a confused lad, but get real. We all know that he's going to end up gay-marrying Jughead, his first true love. Veronica will marry Reggie and Betty will marry Moose when Milton and Midge run off together, and she'll raise a super-race of little blond Mooses and Mooselettes.

Who the Hell is Jughead to the UK's Archie? Australia? Canada? Norway? Scotland? The Republic of Eire?

You know that Scotland is part of the UK, yes?

I thought Scotland was trying to leave.

No. They said they are trying to blaive. Which is to bluff.


Hard to tell with their accents.
 
2013-01-06 05:57:37 PM

brantgoose: Spiralmonkey: brantgoose: FTA:  "The dilatory nature of the UK's relationship with the European Union often seems like the behaviour of someone stood up on a date, who cannot summon the willpower to walk away from the failed rendezvous and into the arms of the girl next door."

Veronica or Betty? Betty or Veronica? Archie is such a confused lad, but get real. We all know that he's going to end up gay-marrying Jughead, his first true love. Veronica will marry Reggie and Betty will marry Moose when Milton and Midge run off together, and she'll raise a super-race of little blond Mooses and Mooselettes.

Who the Hell is Jughead to the UK's Archie? Australia? Canada? Norway? Scotland? The Republic of Eire?

You know that Scotland is part of the UK, yes?

Well, sort of. I think it is still eligible for Mr. and Mr. UK some day. A lot of its complaints and demands sound very familiar to an English Canadian. It's England's Quebec. It wants equality plus. The biatch.

It already has as much or more than Quebec has: its own Parliament, its own banknotes, a big chunk of whatever is left of the North Sea oil, its own weird customs, costumes, and its own established church, the Kirk of Scotland, which rivals the Church of England in snobbishness and pietism. That's why I included it with equal plausibility as Ireland and the other free Dominions.


No "sort of" about it. Part of the UK. I know, I live there. I've noticed many times that it's part of the UK. Also, Church of Scotland is fark all like Church of England. A CoS minister is a servant of the congregation, a CoE vicar is seen to be above the congregation. Farking huge fundamental difference. And what's this "plus" nonsense? Citation please. You know next to nothing about Scotland, so I'm guessing you've never been there.
 
2013-01-06 06:11:52 PM

markfara: Mr. Coffee Nerves: I was in London in 2012 and the people there couldn't have been nicer . . . .

That's interesting. My own experience has been that Londoners are right up there with Philadelphia residents when it comes to rudeness.


Probably comes from the fact that their dad's father (born say in 1945) wasn't necessarily all British...though grandma swore it was true. ;-)

American G.I.s - "oversexed, overpaid and over here"

/the American retort: the British were "underpaid, undersexed and under Eisenhower"
 
2013-01-06 06:57:16 PM
It has been an interesting three years as a Midwestern small town kid living with his family and working in East London. I think I could have summed this all up a bit more concisely than TFA.
It really is true that we Americans do not realize that something a 100 years old isn't that old. And that a lot of Europeans do not understand that 100 miles isn't that far. People don't understand why we have not yet visited New York City, even though it is 1200 miles away from our home town.
I was hurt by the amount of anti-American abuse my children received in school. Thanks George W., who really damaged our relationships with other nations. Also, my kids are teased about being fat and stupid. Neither of them are stupid (per the WISC-R, not just parental pride). And the youngest's weight is totally normal.
If "American" is all that people know about you, they make assumptions based on media such as the Simpsons and Family Guy. I'm not dissing the shows, just stating that caricatures are not real life. (although stereotypes are a real time-saver!). Anyway, I am also stating that what is reported in the news and media tends to be the extremes of American culture. Interesting, but not accurate for viewing the 'mostly harmless' people trying to live, thrive, and survive.
It has been difficult to explain why laws cannot just be passed to control what is seen as a gun problem. Or why people are against Obamacare. Frankly, I have had to use the NHS and have found it to work pretty much the same as medical care in the States. Except I could be a private contractor here with insurance and I am having trouble getting a job back in the USA cause I need health insurance for my family.
So, Brits are interested in Americans cause of the entertainment and our apparent police of the world role - as well as our economic influence. They get stereotypes that are applied too liberally, just as we do to them. The vast size and variety of American population is difficult for most to comprehend.
 
2013-01-06 07:07:04 PM
A discussion of normality by Will Self? Good luck with that.
 
2013-01-06 07:08:33 PM

letrole: just tried to read it, and frankly couldn't be bothered


Can stuff the largest number of words stuffed into the smallest ideas of any writer I know.
 
2013-01-06 07:40:28 PM
I work in an office with roughly 30% Brits who are mostly upper management types. The word "sorted" as in "lets get this sorted" or "sort this out" or "are you sorted" are catching on among (maybe amongst to sound even more British) the Americans. Yet...they love the US, they love having huge apartments and homes, cheap food, nice restaurants, but do nothing but complain about it.
 
2013-01-06 08:02:38 PM

Iron Felix: I work in an office with roughly 30% Brits who are mostly upper management types. The word "sorted" as in "lets get this sorted" or "sort this out" or "are you sorted" are catching on among (maybe amongst to sound even more British) the Americans. Yet...they love the US, they love having huge apartments and homes, cheap food, nice restaurants, but do nothing but complain about it.



Complaining to a Brit is half the fun of anything. Never mistake complaining for "not enjoying". To not moan about at least something that was supposed to be good (ie a holiday) will be met with a great deal of suspicion. To not say how something also went a bit wrong is the height of arrogance.

Even someone who aced their finals at Cambridge will say "Well, it wasn't too bad" coming out the exam. There must always be an implied note of semi-failure (it's one of the reasons British people often take Americans to be arrogant, because if something went well they will say exactly that, with no sense they need to varnish that for an audience. They'll even lie to say things went better than they did, which is madness if trying to get on with a British audience. British people always underplay their hand.
 
2013-01-06 08:32:08 PM

cryinoutloud: topcon: It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.

I started reading (and commenting) on The Guardian some time ago. I was hoping to get some points of view outside of Fark, and guess what I found out? They farking hate us. It's the weirdest thing--they're completely obsessed with the U.S. (America), but only to put us down. The Brits followed the American elections more closely than most of us did, and they were full of opinions. We all suck, we are bloodthirsty, fat, stupid, only interested in our own country, and ignorant of the rest of the world. (Try looking in the mirror, posters).

So now I spend most of my time on the Guardian blasting ignorant Brits for being ignorant.


I don't post much on the Guardian these days. As you say, it is filled with pretentious asshats. Check out one of their music threads sometime, for example. Every asshole there thinks they have more songwriting talent than Bob Dylan and John Lennon combined. Your favourite band sucks....

But farked if they don't have every right to take issue with the Americans who post there about political matters.

I say that as someone who saw the vile far right-wing crap that American trolls used to post on the Guardian blogs.

Remember the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami? That was the first time I ever visited a news blog. As a quarter of a million people were dying around the world the liveblog got hijacked by some right-wing American coont called "Gotham" who spent around 12 hours biatching about the Liberals and "Euroweenies".

Every thread about Iraq was invaded by human scum from the US who masturbated over the way that Bush was ignoring international opinion.

Sorry if your feelings get offended by the things you read below the line at the Guardian, but the posters there have long memories, and every bit of "hatred" towards America you see there has been well and truly earned.

I despise the trolls you see here on the Fark politics tab, but they are nothing compared to the US filth that used to infest the Guardian threads.

And it still happens. Every now and then there'll be a Guardian thread that has clearly been linked to on Drudge or Free Republic. The trolls pour in en masse and the whole thing becomes a complete clusterfark of uniquely American derp.

Sorry, but I have no sympathy.
 
2013-01-06 08:38:50 PM

Trapper439: cryinoutloud: topcon: It's just "a thing" to bash Americans, because everyone in the rest of the world is so commonly blasted with American pop culture.

I started reading (and commenting) on The Guardian some time ago. I was hoping to get some points of view outside of Fark, and guess what I found out? They farking hate us. It's the weirdest thing--they're completely obsessed with the U.S. (America), but only to put us down. The Brits followed the American elections more closely than most of us did, and they were full of opinions. We all suck, we are bloodthirsty, fat, stupid, only interested in our own country, and ignorant of the rest of the world. (Try looking in the mirror, posters).

So now I spend most of my time on the Guardian blasting ignorant Brits for being ignorant.

I don't post much on the Guardian these days. As you say, it is filled with pretentious asshats. Check out one of their music threads sometime, for example. Every asshole there thinks they have more songwriting talent than Bob Dylan and John Lennon combined. Your favourite band sucks....

But farked if they don't have every right to take issue with the Americans who post there about political matters.

I say that as someone who saw the vile far right-wing crap that American trolls used to post on the Guardian blogs.

Remember the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami? That was the first time I ever visited a news blog. As a quarter of a million people were dying around the world the liveblog got hijacked by some right-wing American coont called "Gotham" who spent around 12 hours biatching about the Liberals and "Euroweenies".

Every thread about Iraq was invaded by human scum from the US who masturbated over the way that Bush was ignoring international opinion.

Sorry if your feelings get offended by the things you read below the line at the Guardian, but the posters there have long memories, and every bit of "hatred" towards America you see there has been well and truly earned.

I despise the trolls you ...


Oddly enough, the same is now true for The Daily Mail. The imported US derp is so off the scale, it makes the usual middle-England Mail bigots actually seem quite reasonable. Check out any gay related article. The US hatespew is so thick and acidic, it ends up with pro-gay posts being thumbs-up by people, for a British standard, are far right.
 
2013-01-06 09:04:12 PM
What twaddle...
 
2013-01-06 09:21:00 PM
It didn't
 
2013-01-06 10:38:32 PM
i14.photobucket.com

I say ... jolly good SMASHING yarn, old bean - DO tell it again, pip-pip cheerio! What what?
 
2013-01-06 10:53:36 PM
Looking at the pic of the author I do believe that he handles well on corners
 
2013-01-07 04:59:35 AM
I love the helpful picture of what a hamburger might look like.
/mmm, burgers!
 
2013-01-07 09:10:49 AM
No everyone from the south is NOT just like honey boo boo. Although everyone from the north is JUST LIKE jersey shore
 
mjl
2013-01-07 09:22:10 AM

Triumph: /Does the House of Lords still make the House of Commons come in and grovel before the Queen every year?


They do... but the slam the door in their face and make them knock politely
 
2013-01-07 10:59:33 PM

Bungles: Iron Felix: I work in an office with roughly 30% Brits who are mostly upper management types. The word "sorted" as in "lets get this sorted" or "sort this out" or "are you sorted" are catching on among (maybe amongst to sound even more British) the Americans. Yet...they love the US, they love having huge apartments and homes, cheap food, nice restaurants, but do nothing but complain about it.


Complaining to a Brit is half the fun of anything. Never mistake complaining for "not enjoying". To not moan about at least something that was supposed to be good (ie a holiday) will be met with a great deal of suspicion. To not say how something also went a bit wrong is the height of arrogance.

Even someone who aced their finals at Cambridge will say "Well, it wasn't too bad" coming out the exam. There must always be an implied note of semi-failure (it's one of the reasons British people often take Americans to be arrogant, because if something went well they will say exactly that, with no sense they need to varnish that for an audience. They'll even lie to say things went better than they did, which is madness if trying to get on with a British audience. British people always underplay their hand.


This is the perfect way to put what I've felt for a while. I have many friends in Britain and nothing seems like it's good enough but they make no effort to make any changes. It's mind-boggling for a while if you're used to dealing with Americans who complain about intangibles like traffic or family/relationship problems. British people complain about what they ate for breakfast. 3 days later.
 
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