If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   Yahoo puts University Professor as their least stressful job for 2013, which would be true if not for the students and their parents   (finance.yahoo.com) divider line 55
    More: Fail  
•       •       •

925 clicks; posted to Business » on 06 Jan 2013 at 7:56 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



55 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-01-06 01:36:56 AM  
FTFA: Plus, they're in total control. They teach as many classes as they want and what they want to teach.

Anyone who has control of how many classes they teach is in a high stress research focused position in which there are many deadlines. If you stop bringing in the money, you stop getting to pick what to teach. Also, are they expecting something like an English PhD would randomly have to teach Accounting some term?

I'm not even going to touch "...is your life at risk, are you responsible for the life of someone else, they rank like 'zero' on pretty much all of them!"
 
2013-01-06 02:42:53 AM  
Never heard of grant writing huh, Yahoo?
 
2013-01-06 03:54:18 AM  

Baloney.


Being a University professor can be a real biatch.


If you want to succeed, you try to work well over 40 hours a week, deal with a research workforce made partly from students who can be understandably incompetent, rely on often-fickle niche technology,  and hope to coax data from stubborn reality while avoiding the pervasive Murphy's Law. On top of that, find money to do that work by applying to an unforgiving panel of experts who may as soon score your grant proposal on the low side rather than try to understand it in the hour  they spend reviewing it. Then publish, ditto for reviewers understanding the content you're trying to publish.  Then there's the committee assignments, teaching large classrooms full of panicky undergrads, and the academic requirements of course design. And then, there's showing in all of this that you are worthy of keeping your job.



No....it's not welding in subzero temps, like my Dad had to do, but it's its own special brand of stress.

I could go on, but now I'm less stressed than depressed.
 
2013-01-06 04:04:39 AM  
As a sessional prof at 2 universities... everything the article says is true. I only have my Master's so I mostly teach 1st year's (though I've taught some 4th year courses in a pinch) and don't do research. Last semester I taught 4 classes, this semester it'll be 6 -- enough so that I can take the summer off to spend a few weeks in Africa.

It was a bit stressful having to grade exams over the Christmas break, but nobody enforces the deadlines at one of my two schools, so I finally finished grading one class two days ago. I heard they'll be tightening this up soon, as over 700 courses were late with their grades. The biggest stress I guess is keeping the 100+ student classes focused. Thankfully I mostly teach 30-student classes.

The only real stress is the idea that I've plateaued at age 28. I'm now tempted to apply to PhD programs for some bizarre reason. Econ schools are pretty competitive though, so I'll probably just do this for the forseable future.

/csb
 
2013-01-06 06:32:12 AM  
As long as you ignore grant writing, "publish or perish," committee work.... and WTF was this?

They teach as many classes as they want and what they want to teach. They tell the students what to do and reign over the classroom.

This sounds like a college freshman's perception of a professor does.
 
2013-01-06 06:33:32 AM  
Even though all the students are over 18 and therefore bangable without fear of legal repercussions?
 
2013-01-06 07:06:35 AM  
Its not usually the teaching thats stressful its the politics. University politics are more cut throat then medieval Italy.
 
2013-01-06 08:06:05 AM  
Most stressful: Yahoo employee.
 
2013-01-06 08:13:04 AM  
This is not surprising, just take a stroll though any University campus and 9/10 anyone in an office will be surfing the internet.
 
2013-01-06 08:20:22 AM  
I wish I had tenure at my job.
 
2013-01-06 08:32:22 AM  
I'd say once you got tenure and quit caring about advancing it's pretty sweet.

As for teaching that's what TA's are for.

// Was a TA
 
2013-01-06 08:37:25 AM  
I'm not so sure University Professor should rank #1; Bullshiat Listmaker for an employer like CareerCast looks like an awfully low-stress job.
 
2013-01-06 08:43:43 AM  
If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

Don't fool yourselves about stress.
For most of you, stress is something that you create in your mind because your life is so easy.
 
2013-01-06 08:56:38 AM  
As others have the teaching aspect is pretty easy. The publish or perish mentality and departmental politics are far more difficult.
 
2013-01-06 09:03:42 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

Don't fool yourselves about stress.
For most of you, stress is something that you create in your mind because your life is so easy.


You sound like one of those lower-class people who don't respect any work that doesn't involve manual labour. I have a friend like that, who seems to look down on my work because it's done on a computer rather than with a fork lift or welding torch or hand truck.

Meanwhile, plenty of careers that involve working with your brain can be very stressful. The NASA engineer who can lose equipment worth billions if he screws up his units and ploughs an orbiter into Mars, for instance.
 
2013-01-06 09:09:50 AM  

DemonEater: HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

Don't fool yourselves about stress.
For most of you, stress is something that you create in your mind because your life is so easy.

You sound like one of those lower-class people who don't respect any work that doesn't involve manual labour. I have a friend like that, who seems to look down on my work because it's done on a computer rather than with a fork lift or welding torch or hand truck.

Meanwhile, plenty of careers that involve working with your brain can be very stressful. The NASA engineer who can lose equipment worth billions if he screws up his units and ploughs an orbiter into Mars, for instance.


Or air traffic controllers the people who make sure your plane doesn't smash into another one every time you fly.
 
2013-01-06 09:15:16 AM  
It tends to be a low-stress job because, with on the order of a decade of additional schooling required after getting your bachelors' and a rather low starting salary compared to industry, everyone that ends up doing it really loves doing it. So the one semester that you have to teach that class per year or two years is annoying, but hey, it's only one semester of work every two years! And the rest of the time you get to spend 50 to 80 hours a week doing nothing but SCIENCE and/or writing/talking to other people about how cool science is, how cushy is that job?

If you somehow managed to get through a post-doc and the hiring process without loving your subject, which is possible (just a matter of persistence, but... why?), then it's a terrible, terrible job. Sure, you get a lighter workload one semester every couple of years, but the rest of it is incessant grant writing, consulting grad students about boring shiat, and eternal mind-numbing conferences, sometimes upwards of eighty hours a week of them. You'll barely even see your spouse some months, and even when you're together you'll have nothing to talk about but your damned work. It's hell, and the paycheck doesn't even reflect how much hell it is.

//Basically, don't do it if you're not a nerd.
 
2013-01-06 09:21:32 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.


If you make a post that indicates that you're not aware that most white-collar work isn't hourly and also don't know that a human body burns upwards of 100 kCalories/hour even if you never get out of bed all day, then your education ended before you managed to graduate high school.

//And you're also pretty much terminally stupid, since you're on the internet and five seconds with Google will prevent either or both of those mistakes.
 
2013-01-06 09:23:04 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

Don't fool yourselves about stress.
For most of you, stress is something that you create in your mind because your life is so easy.


Until you've been a cube zombie at a company that's downsized with the duties and responsibilities of the three people you used to work with, you don't know stress. Having to decide which tasks get done, which ones you can put off, and how to appease your third new manager of the year is stress. Having the sword of Damocles hanging over your head because you know you could be fired at any moment because you can't perform every task and job you've been given is stressful. Knowing that even if you can navigate the vicious office politics, and survive the culling that every new manager does that your entire division or location cut at random in another round of downsizing is stressful.
 
2013-01-06 09:25:39 AM  

BigBooper: HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

Don't fool yourselves about stress.
For most of you, stress is something that you create in your mind because your life is so easy.

Until you've been a cube zombie at a company that's downsized with the duties and responsibilities of the three people you used to work with, you don't know stress. Having to decide which tasks get done, which ones you can put off, and how to appease your third new manager of the year is stress. Having the sword of Damocles hanging over your head because you know you could be fired at any moment because you can't perform every task and job you've been given is stressful. Knowing that even if you can navigate the vicious office politics, and survive the culling that every new manager does that your entire division or location cut at random in another round of downsizing is stressful.


/Yeah, I know. been there, done that.
//Nice sharecropper's economy we've got here.
 
2013-01-06 09:32:17 AM  
Meh. I'd cite examples and argue the point that this article is bullshiat...but it's Yahoo news. I feel insulted even just seeing the tag on the screen next to a sentence containing the word "professor".

MarshHawk: As long as you ignore grant writing, "publish or perish," committee work.... and WTF was this?

They teach as many classes as they want and what they want to teach. They tell the students what to do and reign over the classroom.

This sounds like a college freshman's perception of a professor does.


Carth: As others have the teaching aspect is pretty easy. The publish or perish mentality and departmental politics are far more difficult.

 
2013-01-06 09:36:11 AM  
Has the article's author even been to a university? University professors don't have to worry about working under deadlines? They teach whatever they want as much as they want? Seriously???

The only person being quoted is the "publisher" for the web site that created the list to begin with, who apparently puts an exclamation point at the end of everything he says! Also, they managed to use the same stock photo twice in the first five items. I'm thinking "writing for CNBC's online content" should be on this list. Apparently there are no standards.
 
2013-01-06 09:40:29 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Has the article's author even been to a university? University professors don't have to worry about working under deadlines? They teach whatever they want as much as they want? Seriously???

The only person being quoted is the "publisher" for the web site that created the list to begin with, who apparently puts an exclamation point at the end of everything he says! Also, they managed to use the same stock photo twice in the first five items. I'm thinking "writing for CNBC's online content" should be on this list. Apparently there are no standards.


I'm thinking that they were writing this geared to a particular audience. What do you think the average person that gets their news from Yahoo thinks about dem dare high-falootin' college professors? Let's check the comments for their erudite evaluation of the rankings...
 
2013-01-06 09:42:38 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

Don't fool yourselves about stress.
For most of you, stress is something that you create in your mind because your life is so easy.


My job produces a negative amount of stress.
 
2013-01-06 09:48:42 AM  

Jim_Callahan: HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.

If you make a post that indicates that you're not aware that most white-collar work isn't hourly and also don't know that a human body burns upwards of 100 kCalories/hour even if you never get out of bed all day, then your education ended before you managed to graduate high school.

//And you're also pretty much terminally stupid, since you're on the internet and five seconds with Google will prevent either or both of those mistakes.


Hey Jim, Google "hyperbole." Quit being "terminally stupid."
 
2013-01-06 09:52:51 AM  

Jim_Callahan: If you make a post that indicates that you're not aware that most white-collar work isn't hourly and also don't know that a human body burns upwards of 100 kCalories/hour even if you never get out of bed all day, then your education ended before you managed to graduate high school.


Not really.
Every paid job can be averaged into hourly rates of compensation and every job requires task-specific calories over and above those required for a body to merely stay alive, that is, sustain basal metabolic functions. Also, 100 kCal = 100 calories for the purposes of this discussion; 100kCals/hour is body subsistence level, not work-levels of calorie expenditure, which would, or course, exceed basal levels. [Except in your case, where basal levels are seldom exceeded, inhibiting the ability of the brain to function properly.]

An Appalachian Trail hiker will burn between four and six thousand calories per day.
A truck loader will burn around 6,000 calories stacking 35,000 pounds of boxes on a trailer van.
Your typical government health authority (take your pick) recommends around 2,500 calories per day for the average male and around 2,200 calories per day for the average female to stay alive, healthy and functional.

I realize Asperger's is falling out of favor as a diagnosable condition. Be that as it may, the level and depth of inflexibility of thought that you display in your attempt to invalidate my comment belies a wasted effort at any kind of practical education combined with a definitive lack of nonlinear cognitive ability plus lack of any substantive life experience. But you probably know all about not getting out of bed all day, so at least you've got that going for you. It gets better, I promise.

/Oh, I forgot. This is Fark. You probably need me to draw you a picture with crayons.
 
2013-01-06 09:59:48 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: Has the article's author even been to a university? University professors don't have to worry about working under deadlines? They teach whatever they want as much as they want? Seriously???

The only person being quoted is the "publisher" for the web site that created the list to begin with, who apparently puts an exclamation point at the end of everything he says! Also, they managed to use the same stock photo twice in the first five items. I'm thinking "writing for CNBC's online content" should be on this list. Apparently there are no standards.


"Content" now means the crap they put in around the advertisements.
Anything to bring the revenue and clicks.
When I worked in the newspaper business, articles were the things we used to fill in the blanks around the advertisements on the page. That's even truer now on the intarwebs.
Crap is king and this is crap.
 
2013-01-06 10:18:16 AM  
Parents?
 
2013-01-06 10:19:20 AM  

BigBooper: Knowing that even if you can navigate the vicious office politics, and survive the culling that every new manager does, that your entire division or location could be cut at random in another round of downsizing is stressful.


FTFM

FYI: I had all those new managers because they were given impossible jobs too. Trying to get 100 people's worth of work out of 30 people just isn't possible. A smart company would realize that, a large publicly traded company on the other hand churns through people when those impossible goals are not met.
 
2013-01-06 10:48:30 AM  
I know this article is accurate because I've seen "The Paper Chase" too.
 
2013-01-06 12:18:43 PM  

quickdraw: Its not usually the teaching thats stressful its the politics. University politics are more cut throat then medieval Italy.


Amen. With no money or respect at stake in higher education it's all about the power.
 
2013-01-06 01:06:37 PM  
"..is your life at risk, are you responsible for the life of someone else, they rank like 'zero' on pretty much all of them!"

Um.

I take it these people have never done chemistry or physics research? (Or, physics research USING large ammounts of chemistry. Yay nanophysics).

Because holy shiat the number of ways I could cause serious bodily injury to myself with a careless mistake are mind-numbing.

Like, say, pouring pirhana solution into a beaker that I (or, perhaps worse, another lab student) have recently rinsed with acetone (Without knowing there's a little acetone left). Cue flying glass shards and massive splattering of an acid solution that's *intensely* agressive against organics.

Or, say, working in a lab area where other people who you don't know (and who don't look like THEY'RE BEING CAREFUL) have been working with hydroflouric acid: An odorless, colorless, clear acid that does *not* burn when come into contact with it: it painlessly seeps through your skin (killing everything along the way) until it reaches your bones and starts reacting with the calcium. THEN it starts hurting. Oh, and it can also stop your heart.

/Thank god I only had to do the latter once. Was working in a cleanroom, look over to see an engineering student with a massive glass bucket thing full of the stuff at the acid bench. And moving it while uncovered.
//I scooted about 30 feet away.
 
2013-01-06 01:41:22 PM  

Felgraf: "..is your life at risk, are you responsible for the life of someone else, they rank like 'zero' on pretty much all of them!"



Or perhaps teaching at a school where there is an extremely high level of violence and students being killed, arrested, etc it the norm. Teaching? Not stressful. Grant writing, worrying about students, dealing with politics, wondering if that student that got angry is going to jump you? All stressful
 
2013-01-06 01:43:11 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.


You're right. Heart surgeons and air traffic controllers have no stress. Good point.
 
2013-01-06 01:44:48 PM  
The professors coming in here to defend their jobs are missing the point. It's not that being a professor has zero stress, it's that the job has less stress when compared to others.

I'm sure it depends where you teach and what you teach.

The tenured law professors I saw a lot of had it as easy as a job can get. They teach the same class over and over with material that seldom changes all that much. There is no work to grade except for one exam at the end of a semester. Sure they had to publish something every now and then, but legal academic writing is mostly well-cited plagiarism with students doing all of the real research work. To make it simpler, there are so many legal journals out there that no professor ever struggles to have their articles published.
 
2013-01-06 01:50:55 PM  

Troy McClure: The professors coming in here to defend their jobs are missing the point. It's not that being a professor has zero stress, it's that the job has less stress when compared to others.


Well, I'm not a professor, just a grad student. I'm more taking issue with their "No Danger" argument.

/And then there's working with nanoparticles, most of whose long-term health effects, should you get exposed, consist of the legal equivalent to "Fark it, we have no f*cking clue" on their MSDS sheets....
 
2013-01-06 02:23:59 PM  

Troy McClure: The professors coming in here to defend their jobs are missing the point. It's not that being a professor has zero stress, it's that the job has less stress when compared to others.


When did it become a contest?  Are we going to start declaring which jobs are "Real American" next?
 
2013-01-06 02:29:37 PM  

Mentat: Troy McClure: The professors coming in here to defend their jobs are missing the point. It's not that being a professor has zero stress, it's that the job has less stress when compared to others.

When did it become a contest?  Are we going to start declaring which jobs are "Real American" next?


It became a contest when someone decided to make a list.
 
2013-01-06 04:58:12 PM  

imagonyx123: quickdraw: Its not usually the teaching thats stressful its the politics. University politics are more cut throat then medieval Italy.

Amen. With no money or respect at stake in higher education it's all about the power.


Aww, you're cute.

/pats on head
 
2013-01-06 04:59:14 PM  
What part of "publish or perish" sounds stress-free?
 
2013-01-06 05:01:33 PM  
I just awoke from a nap. I'm not too stressed right now. Maybe they're right?

As a University professor who has had many, many jobs in his lifetime I will say that it is a very good job. I have worked construction, worked at a Department Store, worked on a farm, bailed hay, and worked in banking (was a VP). The things that make being a professor are 1) working with intelligent colleagues (and I am lucky enough to work with genuinely good people), and 2) not having an insane/incompetent boss. Also, not being held to a strict 8-5:00 schedule is nice.

It is, however, the work take far longer than a standard 8-5:00 job does and it is stressful, but the transitions between semesters and summers to focus on research help ease that burden.
 
2013-01-06 05:01:49 PM  
Jesus. It's got to be the most stressful job I've ever seen, at least until you get tenure.
 
2013-01-06 06:10:34 PM  
A rebuttal.

They teach as many classes as they want and what they want to teach.

Totally untrue. You might get to design one of your own classes, eventually, but you don't get to pick how many classes you teach. What the hell?

"If you look at the criteria for stressful jobs, things like working under deadlines, physical demands of the job, environmental conditions hazards, is your life at risk, are you responsible for the life of someone else, they rank like 'zero' on pretty much all of them!" Lee said.

More crap. There are deadlines galore. Grant deadlines (you don't get enough grants, you don't get tenure, or you don't get students, or you don't get paid in the summer), grading deadlines, you obviously need to have your lectures ready by class time, deadlines for your students' theses, etc. And while you're not responsible for the life of someone else, you are responsible to a large extent for the careers of your students and post-docs.

Of course, reading the rest of the jobs on that list, it's pretty clear that the writer is the one with the least stressful job. You can just write whatever random crap pops in your head!

/Seriously, read the seamstress / tailor one. How many of you small business owners consider your job low stress?
 
2013-01-06 06:24:37 PM  
And this is actually the second place I've seen this article regurgitated. Here's a Forbes "writer" being ripped to shreds in the comments of her "article". The irony here is that regurgitating other people's work is one of the things that will get even a tenured professor fired.
 
2013-01-06 07:02:19 PM  

HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

Don't fool yourselves about stress.
For most of you, stress is something that you create in your mind because your life is so easy.


What does how many calories you burn an hour (or how much you earn an hour) have to do with a job's stress?

I'm seriously honest, I don't see the correlation.

The person with the most stressful job in the world flies first class everywhere, works at a desk all day and burns no more calories than an average university professor. Do you think his job is stressful because he has a security detail?

Do you think "danger" and "stress" are synonyms?
 
2013-01-06 07:05:22 PM  

thurstonxhowell: HotIgneous Intruder: If you burn fewer calories per hour than you make in dollars per hour, your job has no stress.
If you get to sit inside a climate-controlled building all day and stare at a computer screen and you call that "work," your job has no stress.
If your job doesn't involve the possibility of being killed or crushed by heavy and/or sharp objects, your job has no stress.

You're right. Heart surgeons and air traffic controllers have no stress. Good point.


Heart Surgeons don't work with things that can crush them, ergo, their job is low stress.

A plane could go off course and smash into an air traffic controller tower, therefore air traffic controllers have stressful jobs.

It's that simple.
 
2013-01-06 08:08:34 PM  
To echo someone above - parents?? As an undergrad I would never dream of getting my parents involved in my school life (excluding areas that necessitate their input like getting info for the FAFSA of course).

shiat... ignoring the professor part of the equation for a second that would be more stress on ME. "hey, dad, I know I'm 21 and I moved out but... would you fight my battles for me please?" Sounds humiliating... Maybe if I had rich parents with connections they would be useful?
 
2013-01-07 01:17:39 AM  
I wouldn't want the stress of never knowing which "young minds" I can reach and influence vs. which "young minds" are quite a bit sharper than my own, and thus not paying a lot of attention to anything I say.

I therefore salute most all college/university professors, at least of the tweed-jacket variety who wake up to give 8 a.m. lectures when it's snowing outside.

/a toast to you, Mr. Browning.
 
2013-01-07 01:33:14 AM  

Moopy Mac: What does how many calories you burn an hour (or how much you earn an hour) have to do with a job's stress?

I'm seriously honest, I don't see the correlation.


I'm pretty sure he was just trolling.
 
2013-01-07 03:15:13 AM  
Wait, University Professors teach classes?  I thought that's what the job of the TA who barely speaks any English.
 
Displayed 50 of 55 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report