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(Forbes)   Subby shocked - SHOCKED - to learn that liberal arts colleges could go bankrupt   (forbes.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, liberal arts colleges, bankruptcy, computer networks, online courses  
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1854 clicks; posted to Business » on 05 Jan 2013 at 4:32 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-01-05 03:29:42 PM  
At the other end, elite institutions like Princeton will carry on for a few more centuries.

ROFL
Really??? you can predict things that far in the future?
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
 
2013-01-05 04:44:44 PM  

namatad: At the other end, elite institutions like Princeton will carry on for a few more centuries.

ROFL
Really??? you can predict things that far in the future?
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA


It's not nice to laugh at liberal arts majors. Counting to potato isn't easy for some people.
 
2013-01-05 04:52:53 PM  
Every day I punch in for my job that pays me a very mediocre salary, I rue the day I decided to go for a liberal arts degree.
 
2013-01-05 04:53:02 PM  
LOL. I wrote a term paper for an MBA class on the likely impact of internet-based colleges on bricks & ivy versions...in 1994.
 
2013-01-05 04:55:35 PM  

Stone Meadow: LOL. I wrote a term paper for an MBA class on the likely impact of internet-based colleges on bricks & ivy versions...in 1994.


Does your alma mater offer online degrees today?
 
2013-01-05 04:56:55 PM  
Is there a link to an article in there somewhere that I'm missing, or is this little blurb it?
 
2013-01-05 05:00:44 PM  

Bonzo_1116: Stone Meadow: LOL. I wrote a term paper for an MBA class on the likely impact of internet-based colleges on bricks & ivy versions...in 1994.

Does your alma mater offer online degrees today?


Yes...or at least online classes. I don't know of any accredited schools offering purely online degrees. Classes yes, but not complete degrees.

/I've been retired for some years now, so things may have changed
 
2013-01-05 05:07:35 PM  
I wonder if the government is going to bail them out.
 
2013-01-05 05:18:05 PM  

fisker: I wonder if the government is going to bail them out.


Since the vast majority of state schools are liberal arts colleges, I would guess yes.
 
2013-01-05 05:20:14 PM  

Stone Meadow: Bonzo_1116: Stone Meadow: LOL. I wrote a term paper for an MBA class on the likely impact of internet-based colleges on bricks & ivy versions...in 1994.

Does your alma mater offer online degrees today?

Yes...or at least online classes. I don't know of any accredited schools offering purely online degrees. Classes yes, but not complete degrees.

/I've been retired for some years now, so things may have changed


There are quite a few regionally accredited (1) schools with full online degrees. American Public University uses the same accreditation agency the small liberal arts college that I work at does, for example. (Middle States)

(1) Regional accreditation is the standard- national accreditation often implies diploma mill
 
2013-01-05 05:24:05 PM  
I have a general studies liberal arts degree.

But I also have my CRA which is a high level certified appraiser, not the highest but high enough to I guess be the exception to the liberal arts degrees are stupid arguement.

/exception that proves the rule
//MBA's make fun of me then ask me for a job
 
2013-01-05 05:25:47 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: Stone Meadow: Bonzo_1116: Stone Meadow: LOL. I wrote a term paper for an MBA class on the likely impact of internet-based colleges on bricks & ivy versions...in 1994.

Does your alma mater offer online degrees today?

Yes...or at least online classes. I don't know of any accredited schools offering purely online degrees. Classes yes, but not complete degrees.

/I've been retired for some years now, so things may have changed

There are quite a few regionally accredited (1) schools with full online degrees. American Public University uses the same accreditation agency the small liberal arts college that I work at does, for example. (Middle States)

(1) Regional accreditation is the standard- national accreditation often implies diploma mill


I think university of Alaska allows this too, because that's a fark all big state
 
2013-01-05 05:42:09 PM  
t1.gstatic.com
 
2013-01-05 06:06:56 PM  

Xythero: fisker: I wonder if the government is going to bail them out.

Since the vast majority of state schools are liberal arts colleges, I would guess yes.


Part of the problem is that states cut funding then wonder why tuition keeps going up.
 
2013-01-05 06:10:03 PM  
My nephew was just accepted to a college that was founded the same year I started college.
 
2013-01-05 06:33:07 PM  

Stone Meadow: Bonzo_1116: Stone Meadow: LOL. I wrote a term paper for an MBA class on the likely impact of internet-based colleges on bricks & ivy versions...in 1994.

Does your alma mater offer online degrees today?

Yes...or at least online classes. I don't know of any accredited schools offering purely online degrees. Classes yes, but not complete degrees.

/I've been retired for some years now, so things may have changed


Boston University and DePaul both do.
 
2013-01-05 07:24:15 PM  
"Vedder notes that 115,000 janitors have bachelor's degrees."

Now that is a statistic

/holy shiat
 
2013-01-05 07:29:36 PM  
Good. Hopefully there will be fewer victims to the whole con job of "oh, study your passion! Employers pay a premium for the critical thinking skills of a liberal arts degree! Don't just treat this like a trade school!"

I got stung on this one pretty hard. Spent the rest of my life paying for it.
 
2013-01-05 07:45:16 PM  

jehovahs witness protection: namatad: At the other end, elite institutions like Princeton will carry on for a few more centuries.

ROFL
Really??? you can predict things that far in the future?
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

It's not nice to laugh at liberal arts majors. Counting to potato isn't easy for some people.


Gods. I can't wait for an entire thread of morons deriding people who majored in things that weren't Engineering or Computers. Because everything would be awesome if College was dedicated to skinny dweebs studying Engineering or fat assholes studying Computer Science.

Let's see if I can cover all the bases the moron patrol will make:

-Would you like fries with that?
-How would you like your Latte?
-Liberal Arts Majors study things like Art and Underwater Basket Weaving
-Unemployment in exchange for $300k worth of debt. Engineers NEVER have this problem.

Did I cover all the bases?

I bet you voted for Romney to, because you thought he was a "businessman".
 
2013-01-05 07:47:03 PM  
You're supposed to post liberal arts troll threads during normal business hours so all the cubicle jockeys can mock them. Now who is gonna tell me the value of engineering programs, and how everyone should just go to a trade school? Did you know electricians make $35000 an hour and people should want to be plumbers dealing with shiat all day. Underwater basket weaving. English degree holders are all baristas. Community college and living with your parents is cheaper. Not everyone is cut out for college. Student loans make college more expensive. Any more?
 
2013-01-05 07:51:01 PM  
dammit
 
2013-01-05 08:30:34 PM  
You forgot the one about "I don't want to live in a world where a liberal Arts degree has no real value"
 
2013-01-05 09:12:38 PM  

trotsky: jehovahs witness protection: namatad: At the other end, elite institutions like Princeton will carry on for a few more centuries.

ROFL
Really??? you can predict things that far in the future?
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

It's not nice to laugh at liberal arts majors. Counting to potato isn't easy for some people.

Gods. I can't wait for an entire thread of morons deriding people who majored in things that weren't Engineering or Computers.


How are India and [fill in the blank with pretty much any large state university] the same? They both produce thousands of shiatty engineers.
 
2013-01-05 09:22:01 PM  
Less than 200 words?

Is this the entire article or is it just the introduction with the rest behind a pay-wall?
 
2013-01-05 09:30:11 PM  

LeroyB: Less than 200 words?

Is this the entire article or is it just the introduction with the rest behind a pay-wall?


The author is a prof at Ohio University, so that's basically the equivalent of a book for him. He's not exactly Ivy League.
 
2013-01-05 09:42:17 PM  

trotsky: jehovahs witness protection: namatad: At the other end, elite institutions like Princeton will carry on for a few more centuries.

ROFL
Really??? you can predict things that far in the future?
BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

It's not nice to laugh at liberal arts majors. Counting to potato isn't easy for some people.

Gods. I can't wait for an entire thread of morons deriding people who majored in things that weren't Engineering or Computers. Because everything would be awesome if College was dedicated to skinny dweebs studying Engineering or fat assholes studying Computer Science.

Let's see if I can cover all the bases the moron patrol will make:

-Would you like fries with that?
-How would you like your Latte?
-Liberal Arts Majors study things like Art and Underwater Basket Weaving
-Unemployment in exchange for $300k worth of debt. Engineers NEVER have this problem.

Did I cover all the bases?

I bet you voted for Romney to, because you thought he was a "businessman".


I quite enjoyed taking Art History, Micro and Macro Economics and several other "lib ed" classes while getting my BS. That said, I chose a major field of study that required rigor and logic rather than one that only required scholarship. A degree is a tool that should demonstrate you've prepared yourself for some field.

If you don't know why your degree is of value, perhaps you should do a bit of soul searching.
 
2013-01-05 10:03:03 PM  

HMS_Blinkin: LeroyB: Less than 200 words?

Is this the entire article or is it just the introduction with the rest behind a pay-wall?

The author is a prof at Ohio University, so that's basically the equivalent of a book for him. He's not exactly Ivy League.


Yeah, except the author, William Baldwin, actually graduated from Harvard in 1973 and he only interviewed somebody from Ohio University.
 
2013-01-05 10:18:41 PM  

Donnchadha: HMS_Blinkin: LeroyB: Less than 200 words?

Is this the entire article or is it just the introduction with the rest behind a pay-wall?

The author is a prof at Ohio University, so that's basically the equivalent of a book for him. He's not exactly Ivy League.

Yeah, except the author, William Baldwin, actually graduated from Harvard in 1973 and he only interviewed somebody from Ohio University.


Then Harvard isn't exactly Ivy League, or something.

/you damn kids with your "facts"
 
2013-01-05 11:08:17 PM  
But, but if they put up one more new gym and brand new state of the art dorms, students will rush to them, right, right? Idiots.
 
2013-01-06 12:40:34 AM  
Of course they are going bankrupt. They are being run by liberals. Look at Detroit. Look at Greece and all of Europe. Look at California or GM pre-bailout
 
2013-01-06 01:11:44 AM  
I wouldn't be at all surprised to see more small, private liberal arts colleges that don't have endowments to keep them afloat go Tango Uniform in the next few years. There just doesn't seem to be much point in attending one, when you can go to University of for half the cost.

Small colleges have been dying off for years. Here's two from towns I used to live in. I'm sure there are many more.
Parsons College closed in 1973
Hardin College closed in 1931
 
2013-01-06 02:07:56 AM  

HMS_Blinkin: Donnchadha: HMS_Blinkin: LeroyB: Less than 200 words?

Is this the entire article or is it just the introduction with the rest behind a pay-wall?

The author is a prof at Ohio University, so that's basically the equivalent of a book for him. He's not exactly Ivy League.

Yeah, except the author, William Baldwin, actually graduated from Harvard in 1973 and he only interviewed somebody from Ohio University.

Then Harvard isn't exactly Ivy League, or something.

/you damn kids with your "facts"


t0.gstatic.com

Turns out you can get into Harvard with only a 2.0 GPA.
 
2013-01-06 02:20:28 AM  

El Pachuco: HMS_Blinkin: Donnchadha: HMS_Blinkin: LeroyB: Less than 200 words?

Is this the entire article or is it just the introduction with the rest behind a pay-wall?

The author is a prof at Ohio University, so that's basically the equivalent of a book for him. He's not exactly Ivy League.

Yeah, except the author, William Baldwin, actually graduated from Harvard in 1973 and he only interviewed somebody from Ohio University.

Then Harvard isn't exactly Ivy League, or something.

/you damn kids with your "facts"

[t0.gstatic.com image 288x175]

Turns out you can get into Harvard with only a 2.0 GPA.


2.bp.blogspot.com
You can have even worse grades than G.W., flunk out of divinity school and law school and still be taken seriously.
 
2013-01-06 12:43:40 PM  

Mr. Eugenides:

I quite enjoyed taking Art History, Micro and Macro Economics and several other "lib ed" classes while getting my BS. That said, I chose a major field of study that required rigor and logic rather than one that only required scholarship. A degree is a tool that should demonstrate you've prepared yourself for some field.

If you don't know why your degree is of value, perhaps you should do a bit of soul searching.


Before you go patting yourself on the back too much - while I was at university (pre-global economic clusterfark) we regularly had careers fairs/events attended/sponsored by major global companies where almost without fail they would all proclaim the value of liberal arts graduates and how they were looking for people with skillsets learned from liberal arts degrees. When kids have major high end employers telling them to study liberal arts subjects then a lot of kids are going to study them.

/Engineer.
 
2013-01-06 01:13:28 PM  
People talk like it's either STEM or the humanities, and it can't be both. I thought the point of any mainstream "liberal arts" education was to train you in something that can become a career (which could even be in the humanities, albeit with stiffer odds), while also giving you a well-rounded education.

The key phrase is "all other things being equal." AOTBE, a STEM/business-only education is more employable than a humanities-only one. AOTBE, a STEM education at a liberal-arts school is more employable than a STEM-only degree from a technical school. But AOTBE, prestige and connections trump all. A Harvard philosophy major will probably do fine in most industries and fields (except maybe straight-up engineering), not just because he has the connections but because he probably is smart enough to adapt and learn wherever he is.
 
2013-01-06 02:16:57 PM  

The Evil That Lies In The Hearts Of Men: Mr. Eugenides:

I quite enjoyed taking Art History, Micro and Macro Economics and several other "lib ed" classes while getting my BS. That said, I chose a major field of study that required rigor and logic rather than one that only required scholarship. A degree is a tool that should demonstrate you've prepared yourself for some field.

If you don't know why your degree is of value, perhaps you should do a bit of soul searching.

Before you go patting yourself on the back too much - while I was at university (pre-global economic clusterfark) we regularly had careers fairs/events attended/sponsored by major global companies where almost without fail they would all proclaim the value of liberal arts graduates and how they were looking for people with skillsets learned from liberal arts degrees. When kids have major high end employers telling them to study liberal arts subjects then a lot of kids are going to study them.

/Engineer.


What most employers want is an employee with strong skills specific to the job, but also a broad base of knowledge. Yeah, a liberal education is great, but it's up to the student to realize that in order to be a valuable employee, you have to bring something, specific that a potential employer will value, to the table.
 
2013-01-06 05:12:14 PM  

HMS_Blinkin: LeroyB: Less than 200 words?

Is this the entire article or is it just the introduction with the rest behind a pay-wall?

The author is a prof at Ohio University, so that's basically the equivalent of a book for him. He's not exactly Ivy League.


The author of the article is on Forbes' staff. The article is about research conducted by Richard Vedder, a well-respected economist at Ohio University.

I see from your profile that you are in college now, please be sure to take remedial critical reading skills before you graduate.
 
2013-01-06 10:41:20 PM  
Gawd this gets so much mileage on fark lately:
s7.postimage.org
 
2013-01-08 12:05:47 AM  

Mr. Eugenides: What most employers want is an employee with strong skills specific to the job, but also a broad base of knowledge. Yeah, a liberal education is great, but it's up to the student to realize that in order to be a valuable employee, you have to bring something, specific that a potential employer will value, to the table.


Employers want a replaceable cog working as cheaply as possible. Yeah, specific skills will get you a job, but that's no guarantee that job won't be ripped out from under you with no notice and replaced with an intern or contractor, or shipped off to India, leaving your specific skills potentially not specific enough for getting another job.
Employers aren't interested in putting in the work to create and maintain a skilled workforce with a broad knowledge base. It's no one's fault but their own when they can't find it.
 
2013-01-08 08:46:02 AM  

Sergeant Grumbles: Mr. Eugenides: What most employers want is an employee with strong skills specific to the job, but also a broad base of knowledge. Yeah, a liberal education is great, but it's up to the student to realize that in order to be a valuable employee, you have to bring something, specific that a potential employer will value, to the table.

Employers want a replaceable cog working as cheaply as possible. Yeah, specific skills will get you a job, but that's no guarantee that job won't be ripped out from under you with no notice and replaced with an intern or contractor, or shipped off to India, leaving your specific skills potentially not specific enough for getting another job.
Employers aren't interested in putting in the work to create and maintain a skilled workforce with a broad knowledge base. It's no one's fault but their own when they can't find it.


Actually what employers want is a motivated team player who doesn't see himself as a special snowflake and doesn't bring the enire department's morale down with his attitude.

I suggest you look in the mirror Sgt. Grumbles, your little outburst here suggests that you are exactly the sort of negative employee I just described.
 
2013-01-08 11:04:21 AM  

Mr. Eugenides: Actually what employers want is a motivated team player who doesn't see himself as a special snowflake and doesn't bring the enire department's morale down with his attitude.

I suggest you look in the mirror Sgt. Grumbles, your little outburst here suggests that you are exactly the sort of negative employee I just described.


Employers want replaceable cogs. Individual departments want motivated team players, but employers don't care. They eliminate that department full of team players because they take one look at a balance sheet and think they can get it done cheaper overseas.

Exactly like I farking said, employers aren't interested in putting in the work to create and maintain a skilled, motivated workforce with a broad knowledge base. It's no one's fault but their own when they can't find it.

This isn't special snowflake bullshiat. I'm not worried they don't like me for me. This is the very real observation that employers hoot and holler about what kind of candidates they're looking for, skilled, knowledgeable, educated, trained, motivated, sociable, and able to hit the ground running, and then do absolutely nothing to enable their employees to actually be so.
Jobs that pay less than the college education they require? Entry level positions requiring 1-3 years of experience? No training?
One the one hand wanting a highly specialized skillset and then on the other wanting well-rounded education, pissed when the result is something in between?
Needing motivated employees but working them 70 hours a week, and oh, they're salaried, so only get paid for 40? Really motivating.
And social, of course. That 70 hour workweek leaves you lots of time to hang out with friends and always leaves you in a good mood.
And to top it all off, you know your job, your entire department might disappear if some VP doesn't like what he sees on a balance sheet.

I can see where the situation in this article is going. No one is shocked when liberal arts colleges go out of business because all they teach is useless fluff. Then employers wonder why the next collection of graduates are completely dysfunctional at anything they didn't study, in exactly the same tone as they currently say graduates don't have specific enough skills.
 
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