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(Today)   Now that the term "Asperger's Syndrome" will soon cease to exist, some who claim to have the disease fear the hours of internet research they'll have to do to self-diagnose a new disorder to explain the fact that they're just social misfits   (today.com) divider line 37
    More: Interesting, internet research, Asperger syndrome, Temple Grandin, American Psychiatric Association, diseases, autism spectrum  
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10407 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jan 2013 at 7:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-05 08:22:24 AM  
5 votes:

bulldg4life: Most of them were just your standard geek/nerd, but one or two were off the wall.


...and that's why it's called a "spectrum disorder". By the way, is everybody on Fark aware that a great many mental health professionals think that DSM-5 is a crock of shiat? It medicalizes a lot of perfectly normal behavior (like grieving the death of somebody close) while discarding established, valid diagnoses like Asperger's.

Pretty soon, the psychiatric profession is going to look even more stupid than it does now as its diagnoses increasingly get overtaken by real science, replacing the subjective nonsense and grand theories with the actual neurological, physical and chemical correlates of mental disorders. It's going to turn out that in a lot of cases, distinct diagnoses turn out to be different manifestations of a single underlying problem; while other common diagnoses turn out to be several different disorders that happen to have similar external manifestations.

And in the future we're going to look back on the last half-century of psychiatric diagnosis and practice with the same disdain that many people regard the half-century before that.
2013-01-05 07:45:43 AM  
5 votes:
No no no... EVERYTHING is a syndrome or condition and needs to be treated with Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Welbutrin, Geodon, Seroquel, Depakote, etc - and if those don't work, start at the top of the list only this time add Ambilify.

They MUST have medical credibility - I mean, whenever I'm in the waiting room at the Drs. there's ALWAYS some very well dressed suit coming through the door, trinkets for the staff & sampled in the box security in hand - most of them even know the pass codes to get back into the exam rooms and drs offices.
2013-01-05 08:07:01 AM  
4 votes:

reillan: As someone who would have been diagnosed with Aspergers and who had to figure out how to participate in society anyway, I approve of the headline


This.  Not that it's remotely the same mind you, but my brother, sister and I all are children of a SpEd teacher who are, at the very least, totally ADD (with a little OCD thrown in for fun).  None of us were ever "diagnosed" as such, but we're all very much aware that we need to do things differently than other people.

\Henry Winkler was considered a goof-off and a class clown in school...because he had dyslexia.
\\Our need for reason has got us to the world of diagnosis of everything, yet no one has bothered to mention we still have to live with said diagnoses.
2013-01-05 07:47:09 AM  
4 votes:
FTA: "Possessing an IQ of 140..."

I spent my childhood in gifted student programs. There were more than a few "oddballs" who probably had some form of Asperger's.

FTA: "I don't call it disabled. I call it differently-abled."

Someone needs to punch her in the head. Real hard.
2013-01-05 07:38:59 AM  
4 votes:
Is "social misfits" what we're calling assholes now?
2013-01-05 11:46:25 AM  
3 votes:
I am picking up faint whiffs of Scientology in this thread.
2013-01-05 07:58:17 AM  
3 votes:
As someone who would have been diagnosed with Aspergers and who had to figure out how to participate in society anyway, I approve of the headline
2013-01-05 09:39:01 AM  
2 votes:
I have an official diagnosis. For me it is the understanding of my quirkiness not an excuse to go ignore social rules. I got the label early around age 6 before it was the dx of the week. Normally i am quiet about having it and will have to know someone pretty well before i discuss having Aspeger's. In school i had the fun time of both being in gifted class and being label special ed. For the most part i am the quirky guy that is working on learning all the silly social rules.
2013-01-05 09:24:01 AM  
2 votes:

dready zim: Nobody with a high IQ wants to be bunched up with the window lickers, happy rocking people and nappy wearing wheelchair cases. Its just insulting.


Even though it may not be PC, I agree wholeheartedly.
2013-01-05 09:20:12 AM  
2 votes:
"You hear people say things like, 'I don't want to be associated with people who can't talk or need attendant care or wear diapers.' I find that attitude despicable."

Said the carer of the nappy wearing doctor whilst he drooled and crapped himself.

Nobody with a high IQ wants to be bunched up with the window lickers, happy rocking people and nappy wearing wheelchair cases. Its just insulting.
2013-01-05 08:55:22 AM  
2 votes:

FirstNationalBastard: However, it's also the Kim Kardashian of psychiatric disorders... everyone has it, and it's all over the place, especially if you go on the internet looking for it.


This. When smart, middle-class parents have a child who, let's be kind, reverts to the mean, they often look for a diagnosis. In my generation it was "dyslexia", which was suddenly rampant. And of course, in exactly the same way, this doesn't diminish the fact that there are people who really do have dyslexia, and that it often goes under-diagnoses. Which brings us neatly to...

filter: No- mental health pros actually READ and understand how the DSM works. If 5 of 7 symptoms need to be present....


...the problem with psychiatric diagnosis right there. It depends on externally-observed symptoms, often vague, often subjective, often required to be present to a certain degree (the words "clinically significant" or "pervasive" turn up a lot, with no objective definitions) and to persist over an extended period of time, sometimes self-reported, to be considered a symptom, and in many cases the weasel get-out clause at the end "and it's not some other equally vaguely defined disorder". Is it any wonder that "mental health pros actually read and understand how the DSM works" and still regularly can't agree on a diagnosis, let alone the most effective form of treatment?

For example, here's the DSM-IV criteria for Asperger's. The very first word is "Qualitative", and the entire diagnosis is subjective. Do some people clearly have Asperger's? Yes. Do a lot more people fall into a grey area where "mental health pros" will reasonably disagree where 2, 3 or more symptoms are present or absent? Also yes.

/I was in therapy for a while. Then I quit and got a proper job.
2013-01-06 01:56:41 AM  
1 votes:
IMHO. Autism doesn't belong in the DSM5. Why? Because its a Neurological disorder and not a mental illness.
2013-01-05 06:54:17 PM  
1 votes:

torusXL: theedgeofoblivious: It's not a disease. It's a disorder.

Huh? Do you have Derp Disorder or just Pedant Disorder?

Labels are just labels until a verifiable base cause is discovered, and there could be one, multiple, or even countless causes for a disorder/disease/syndrome/etc. For example....with autism, one potential cause is Fragile X Syndrome, which is for sure a disease. Maybe not curable yet, but a disease nonetheless.


You seem to have Derp Disorder.

Autism, Asperger's, whatever you want to call it isn't a disease.

It's not even clear whether a majority of people with fragile x syndrome have autism, and it's estimated that less than 10% of people with autism have fragile x syndrome.

The fact that something may in a tiny percentage of cases be caused by a disease does not make said something itself a disease.
2013-01-05 02:21:38 PM  
1 votes:

PsiChick: fisker: Oh.

Because the last school shooter was supposedly diagnosed with this disorder and apparently he didn't even have a Facebook account.

He was all the other things you mentioned, too, so naturally I just put two and two together.

By the way. I stand in front of my niece's school all day in a camouflage outfit protecting all the little guys from these types of people.

Given the last sentence, this is important information for you: Aspergers was  comorbid with whatever went wrong with the shooter. 'Comorbid', a term some people don't know, means a disorder existing in the same person, but pretty much unrelated. People with AS are very likely to be comorbid--I'm probably a steryotype with AS and bipolar, that's a common one--but AS itself is actually a highly antiviolent disorder.

What AS feels like is that your empathy is flicked 'on', but everyone's wearing a mask. You hate hurting people. You hate lying. You want to help people everywhere because everyone is a friend you haven't met yet. There's a bit of slowness in your thought process, and a bit of trouble doing things, but most of it is that you really, really love everyone. So if you meet someone with obvious AS while you're guarding your neice's school (it isn't always), you need to expect that a) they will be  very uncomfortable to talk to, especially since you're in a uniform, and they're either going to think you're the most amazing thing ever, be terrified of you, or both; b) If you get upset, so will they, so even if they're totally freaked out, keep your tone even and body language neutral; and c) they will probably try to talk your ear off about some random topic they find fascinating. Just be very calm and help them get back to wherever they were supposed to go.

/The media did not help in the slightest by harping on Asperger's without mentioning that it was a comorbid disorder, and actually it's a bit amazing he was able to pull the trigger at all given his disability.
//But yeah, this is i ...


Nice description, hopefully it gets through some of these people's thick skulls in this thread. Why are there so many Fark posts where people are just enraged at people with mental disorders? PsiChick here is trying to generate some sympathy, but she shouldn't have to.

So many others in this thread are so stupidly judgmental at those on the Autism Spectrum. They are hilariously expressing one of the traits of autism itself....DIFFICULTY WITH EMPATHY. I need to more often remember that intelligence is on a bell curve. I guess I always assume that people are generally smarter than they deserve credit for (my career gives a pretty strong bias for really smart people). But actually, there are a LOT more dumbasses in the world than I see from my biased day-to-day sample.

Thanks for a smart post, PsiChick, and I mean it.
2013-01-05 11:40:58 AM  
1 votes:

bump: No no no... EVERYTHING is a syndrome or condition and needs to be treated with Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Welbutrin, Geodon, Seroquel, Depakote, etc - and if those don't work, start at the top of the list only this time add Ambilify.


This. This this this. Everything's a syndrome now. Every feeling is a clinical diagnosis. Get nervous taking tests? Here's a tranquilizer. Occasional insomnia? Sleeping pill. Lots of energy? ADD. Like to keep things tidy? OCD. Sad sometimes? Depression. Here's a pill for that. Here's a couple of pills for that. The damn society we live in today wants a quick fix for everything. They want to go to the doctor and leave with a pill to fix their problems, when frequently-- as with someone I know who claims to have an autism spectrum disorder-- you're just an asshole, and your "disorder" is a convenient excuse to just treat people like shiat and get away with it. "But I have a disorder" no, you told your doctor you have three of the five symptoms of X and he wrote you a prescription just to get your whiny ass out of his office.
2013-01-05 10:47:43 AM  
1 votes:
My son has Aspergers. I really wouldn't give a shiat about diagnosing him but the school needed it just to allow the kid some leeway in the very rigid schedule in class. He just needed the option of sitting and reading at his desk sometimes when class gets too much. Almost took an order of Congress to do it. I don't think if the self-diagnosed people were ever around actual Aspergers people they would still think its about being an asshole. Socially akward sure but its nit assholish its not knowing any better.

He's declared himself a Ravens fan and hates the Redskins. So he says before they play each other, " I'm going to initiate a hostile take over of the Redskins. Once I am a majority owner I'm going borrow money and sell off assets to lower their stock value until they have to declare chapter 11. They'll be a defunct organization and Ill sell the franchise rights to some other state. I won't have to see then play anymore." This kid is 7.

"You know you can just say you don't like them and yell loud for the Ravens. Right?"

"No. That's not good enough." He also runs out of e room holding his ears when Empire Carpet commercials come on.
2013-01-05 10:44:24 AM  
1 votes:
It's comical how many here have replied that they have this, but have not been formally diagnosed. It pretty much just proves every "self-diagnosed asshole" comment true.
2013-01-05 09:57:21 AM  
1 votes:

TheHappyCanadian: I go through the same thing when I have to tell my boss or new girlfriends about my disorder.

me: "I have an innatentive form of ADHD, makes it hard to concentrate and though I'm on medication it only hides the symptoms"
person1: "omg you mean like hyper and stuff? you're not hyper or anything, I think it's over-diagnosed and your parents didn't hit you enough"
me: "no it's a non-hyper form of ADHD, In fact nowadays it has a separate diagnosis criteria"
person1: "But the internet said it's fake?"
me: "I also have OCD, depression, and Social Anxiety Disorder, all professionally diagnosed"
person1: "LOL it must be awesome to have OCD, I feel like I have it too because I wash my hands a lot and can't stand things not in order"
me:*facepalm*

/ASDs are real, but everyone who proclaims to have one without getting a professional diagnosis and/or prescription can eat a bag of dicks


Anyone can get diagnosed with those things if they know the symptoms. Read the symptoms, go to the doctor, tell him you have those symptoms, done. Diagnosed.
2013-01-05 09:39:32 AM  
1 votes:

MarshWoman: I can understand why they wouldn't want to be lumped together. My son has a neurological disorder that has caused partial paralysis on his left side, occasional seizures, and some learning difficulties. Most people with this disorder are wheelchair-bound, have constant seizures, and are profoundly retarded. Guess who gets all the support groups, valuable information, etc.?

Yes, I know my son is extremely lucky- all things considered. However, by lumping together an entire spectrum, he doesn't receive the benefits of research and support that more serious cases receive.


I go through the same thing when I have to tell my boss or new girlfriends about my disorder.

me: "I have an innatentive form of ADHD, makes it hard to concentrate and though I'm on medication it only hides the symptoms"
person1: "omg you mean like hyper and stuff? you're not hyper or anything, I think it's over-diagnosed and your parents didn't hit you enough"
me: "no it's a non-hyper form of ADHD, In fact nowadays it has a separate diagnosis criteria"
person1: "But the internet said it's fake?"
me: "I also have OCD, depression, and Social Anxiety Disorder, all professionally diagnosed"
person1: "LOL it must be awesome to have OCD, I feel like I have it too because I wash my hands a lot and can't stand things not in order"
me:*facepalm*

/ASDs are real, but everyone who proclaims to have one without getting a professional diagnosis and/or prescription can eat a bag of dicks
2013-01-05 09:20:56 AM  
1 votes:

Jon iz teh kewl: there's probably a reason why no girls want to talk to me. but i'm betting it has more to do with the fact i smell like semen


Switching to a color safe, non-chlorine bleach may help.
2013-01-05 09:20:26 AM  
1 votes:

czetie: bulldg4life: Most of them were just your standard geek/nerd, but one or two were off the wall.

...and that's why it's called a "spectrum disorder". By the way, is everybody on Fark aware that a great many mental health professionals think that DSM-5 is a crock of shiat? It medicalizes a lot of perfectly normal behavior (like grieving the death of somebody close) while discarding established, valid diagnoses like Asperger's.

Pretty soon, the psychiatric profession is going to look even more stupid than it does now as its diagnoses increasingly get overtaken by real science, replacing the subjective nonsense and grand theories with the actual neurological, physical and chemical correlates of mental disorders. It's going to turn out that in a lot of cases, distinct diagnoses turn out to be different manifestations of a single underlying problem; while other common diagnoses turn out to be several different disorders that happen to have similar external manifestations.

And in the future we're going to look back on the last half-century of psychiatric diagnosis and practice with the same disdain that many people regard the half-century before that.


Let's play "Guess who's the Scientologist."
2013-01-05 08:49:01 AM  
1 votes:
My mother's stepson has the Asperger's. The very first time I heard her say the term, I was like, "wait, what is this need to assign a name to the fact that he's awkward teenager?"

I've always disliked the term. Especially since I've seen the evidence of his using "his social shortcomings" as an excuse to expect special treatment.

I swear, his parents coddle him too much. And my mother does too. The dude is 21 now. He acts like he's 17. He hasn't even gotten his driver's license yet. How do they ever expect him to be able to take care of himself if they are always holding his hand?
2013-01-05 08:22:19 AM  
1 votes:

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Yeah, the APA really know what they're doing with this crap.

/Actually diagnosed formally.


Hey, I'd trust Ron Simmons and Bradshaw with my Psychiatric diagnoses any day.

24.media.tumblr.com
2013-01-05 08:22:11 AM  
1 votes:
Cool- worked in mental health when this was this disease of the week. Had never heard of it, then suddenly everyone had it.


It is the planking/teebowing/gangnam-shiat of psychiatry.
2013-01-05 08:15:48 AM  
1 votes:
As a social misfit who's also a bit of an asshole, I find this very depressing news.
2013-01-05 08:14:58 AM  
1 votes:
Assigning a mental diagnoses to dead people is like baptizing dead people.
2013-01-05 08:11:54 AM  
1 votes:
I was diagnosed with asperger's syndrome when I was only around 6 years old. I've met some people in my life who fit the stereotype perfectly. In fact, oddly enough, there was an ARTHUR episode about aspeger's: youtube link

There are people who completely lack social skills and need to learn them manually. And there's those who actually go out and socialize. I personally never understood the connection to autism at all. In some cases, sure, I can sort of get where they're coming from, but the diagnosis itself seems incomplete.
2013-01-05 08:07:28 AM  
1 votes:

RandomAxe: For christ's sake, people will still call it Asperger's. The farking psychiatric diagnostic manual doesn't control reality. You'd have to be crazy to think it does.


Yeah, remember when absolutely  nobodystopped calling homosexuality a mental disorder?  It's almost as if the DSM isn't highly influential and important or something.
2013-01-05 08:03:54 AM  
1 votes:
.

RandomAxe: For christ's sake, people will still call it Asperger's. The farking psychiatric diagnostic manual doesn't control reality. You'd have to be crazy to think it does.


Seriously crazy considering that I control reality.
2013-01-05 08:01:18 AM  
1 votes:
Wow. Deborah Knutesen sounds like a bitter old shrew. Sorry your kid's a retard, lady. Doesn't give you an excuse to be a b*tch.
2013-01-05 07:53:30 AM  
1 votes:
For christ's sake, people will still call it Asperger's. The farking psychiatric diagnostic manual doesn't control reality. You'd have to be crazy to think it does.
2013-01-05 07:52:46 AM  
1 votes:

DrPainMD: I spent my childhood in gifted student programs. There were more than a few "oddballs" who probably had some form of Asperger's.


Do they avoid Facebook and hate movies like Twilight and The Avengers?

Let me guess. They are odd and they don't fit in because they don't have an iPhone.
2013-01-05 07:50:48 AM  
1 votes:
It's not a disease. It's a disorder.
2013-01-05 07:50:07 AM  
1 votes:
Damn... should *be* explored more.
2013-01-05 07:49:27 AM  
1 votes:
When I hear the term "Aspergers Syndrome", why do I think of the burger I ate the night before and the poor pocessabilty the next morning?
2013-01-05 07:47:27 AM  
1 votes:
I feel this method should explored more to see if it can be applied to other "conditions."

southparkstudios-intl.mtvnimages.com
2013-01-05 07:44:31 AM  
1 votes:
Well, ASD-Level 1 doesn't have the same ring to it but I think they'll live. Or just call themselves mildly autistic, imagine that.

/never diagnosed
//so I will go on with social misfit and asshole
 
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