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(Today)   Now that the term "Asperger's Syndrome" will soon cease to exist, some who claim to have the disease fear the hours of internet research they'll have to do to self-diagnose a new disorder to explain the fact that they're just social misfits   (today.com) divider line 170
    More: Interesting, internet research, Asperger syndrome, Temple Grandin, American Psychiatric Association, diseases, autism spectrum  
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10400 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jan 2013 at 7:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-05 05:12:20 PM
The DSM IV and DSM 5 criteria for autism and Aspergers are very well defined. The diagnostic process for autism spectrum disorders is lengthy and multidisciplinary, including parent interviews, family history, developmental history, teacher questionnaire, sensory questionnaire, developmental pediatricans, occupational therapists, and speech language pathologists. Believe me, it's not a quick and easy diagnosis!
 
2013-01-05 05:51:41 PM

torusXL: PsiChick: So the empathy problem of AS is more of an issue with reacting to feelings of empathy, or maybe an issue with planning out actions related to feelings of empathy?

No, the empathy problem is more in the literal sense. We can't face-read, specifically, and some of us can't read tone or body language. We care about what you're thinking and feeling, but we don't know what you're thinking and feeling.

For other people, it's the other way around: They know what people are thinking and feeling, but they don't care.

/That might be simpler...I is wordy today. :p

I see, thanks for describing it.

Uranus Is Huge!: Awww, need a tissue?

To summarize:

I cracked jokes. You didn't like the jokes. You responded with an insult. I tried to stay playful. You continued to be insulting. I quit being playful.

You're a guy on the internet that for some reason thinks he's used his rapier wit to hurt my feelings. Congratulations for failing so well.

Sorry dude, I'm out of tissues here.


Are these posts supposed how you display your symptoms?
 
2013-01-05 06:04:36 PM

PsiChick: torusXL: PsiChick: /But to be a nerd for a minute: Empathy is a word with a clinical and connotative definition. Clinically, empathy means to understand what another person feels, not whether or not you care. Connotatively, it means 'I understand what you feel and care'. That confused me for a while, too, because I wondered if maybe I wasn't AS at all...and then I read a few of the better sites and realized that people with AS actually are veryempathetic in the connotative sense. Once we know what's going on, we care deeply. Not everyone does; actually, some psychologists think it's a pretty vital 'filter' for people to not care about anything but themselves. It's just a question of when it turns on. For a lot of people, it almost never does. That's why you get those stories about, say, homophobes becoming gay-rights activists when their children come out of the closet, or people becoming champions of horrifying problems when it affects them. That's a pretty normal behavior. It just sort of 'sticks on' like a bad light switch sometimes, especially when you discuss something scary like illness of any type.
//Just because that one always confused me, too. :p

So the empathy problem of AS is more of an issue with reacting to feelings of empathy, or maybe an issue with planning out actions related to feelings of empathy?

No, the empathy problem is more in the literal sense. We can't face-read, specifically, and some of us can't read tone or body language. We  care about what you're thinking and feeling, but we don't  know what you're thinking and feeling.

For other people, it's the other way around: They  know what people are thinking and feeling, but they don't  care.

/That might be simpler...I is wordy today. :p


This former is my son. He has empathy he just doesn't get the cues unless obvious.
 
2013-01-05 06:54:17 PM

torusXL: theedgeofoblivious: It's not a disease. It's a disorder.

Huh? Do you have Derp Disorder or just Pedant Disorder?

Labels are just labels until a verifiable base cause is discovered, and there could be one, multiple, or even countless causes for a disorder/disease/syndrome/etc. For example....with autism, one potential cause is Fragile X Syndrome, which is for sure a disease. Maybe not curable yet, but a disease nonetheless.


You seem to have Derp Disorder.

Autism, Asperger's, whatever you want to call it isn't a disease.

It's not even clear whether a majority of people with fragile x syndrome have autism, and it's estimated that less than 10% of people with autism have fragile x syndrome.

The fact that something may in a tiny percentage of cases be caused by a disease does not make said something itself a disease.
 
2013-01-05 07:51:07 PM

RandomAxe: thamike: Yeah, remember when absolutely nobodystopped calling homosexuality a mental disorder? It's almost as if the DSM isn't highly influential and important or something.

A) Not comparable. You can bring up as many orthogonal examples as you like, but it doesn't have any bearing on my point, which

B) You're intentionally missing.

If you think I'm honestly wrong, and magically now "the term 'Asperger's Syndrome' will soon cease to exist", fine, stand up and say so.

Personally, while I think a change in the official view of dopa / focus issues is a good idea, I don't think the new ranking, which intrinsically suggests that they're essentially differences of degree even though it's been established that neurologically they are not, is a good one. But that wasn't my point, either. As I'm sure you could tell.


The word appeared in the collective consciousness because it appeared in the DSM. It will disappear the same way, and be replaced by ASD before you even realize it. Soon, you'll have people telling your they're ASD/ADD, instead of just ADD. Won't that be wonderful?
 
2013-01-05 08:12:37 PM

TheHappyCanadian: me: "I have an innatentive form of ADHD, makes it hard to concentrate and though I'm on medication it only hides the symptoms"
person1: "omg you mean like hyper and stuff? you're not hyper or anything, I think it's over-diagnosed and your parents didn't hit you enough"
me: "no it's a non-hyper form of ADHD, In fact nowadays it has a separate diagnosis criteria"
person1: "But the internet said it's fake?"
me: "I also have OCD, depression, and Social Anxiety Disorder, all professionally diagnosed"
person1: "LOL it must be awesome to have OCD, I feel like I have it too because I wash my hands a lot and can't stand things not in order"
me:*facepalm*

/ASDs are real, but everyone who proclaims to have one without getting a professional diagnosis and/or prescription can eat a bag of dicks


Isn't ADID (I know, that's not a real abbreviation... yet) when you constantly get so single-mindedly into things that you block out the outside world completely? I've met a couple of kids and a few adults who are like that. They get all kinds of things done, but will argue and deny when you mention that you spoke to them while they were shutting out the world, too.

ADHD, on the other hand, I always thought manifested itself in the exact opposite way. People who look up at the slightest distraction or stray thought and can't get back to work, without amphetamines or caffeine. Great drivers, great gamers, love trivia... not good at completion, followup, or paying bills, unless they get in the habit of doing it immediately. Two opposite issues lumped under the same ADD umbrella.

/Very ADHD. Grew up ADID. Kind of wish I could get back to that, but I also like having a social life now.
 
2013-01-05 08:25:05 PM
i was diagnosed inattentive/hyperactive ADHD, but nobody believes i have it cause i always abuse the amphetamine medication they give me
 
2013-01-05 09:25:34 PM
> What AS feels like is that your empathy is flicked 'on', but everyone's wearing a mask. You hate hurting people. You hate lying. You want to help people everywhere because everyone is a friend you haven't met yet.

That just makes bullying them and calling them sociopaths even funnier. It's no fun torturing something that can't feel pain, amirite?
 
2013-01-05 11:16:26 PM
So, basically AS is what they call people who have met enough people outside their tiny little echo chamber to realize that not all people have the same non-verbal cues, and that we shouldn't make assumptions about what complete strangers are thinking and feeling. Suddenly the correlation between "aspie" and "nerd" makes a lot more sense.
 
2013-01-05 11:19:06 PM

Uranus Is Huge!: fisker: Uranus Is Huge!: Don't call me a pothead! It has negative connotations. I'd prefer to be called a bongoloid.

Pot's legal here.

It's funny when people who live in primitive states think they are insulting others who live in a more advanced society.

I'm not insulting anyone. I love weed. I live in Colorado. I thought 'bongoloid' was kind of funny.


I did, too. I'm stealing it. I already used it in a text to a friend of mine, informing him that his DSM status has changed.
 
2013-01-05 11:46:24 PM

sleeps in trees: PsiChick: torusXL: PsiChick: /But to be a nerd for a minute: Empathy is a word with a clinical and connotative definition. Clinically, empathy means to understand what another person feels, not whether or not you care. Connotatively, it means 'I understand what you feel and care'. That confused me for a while, too, because I wondered if maybe I wasn't AS at all...and then I read a few of the better sites and realized that people with AS actually are veryempathetic in the connotative sense. Once we know what's going on, we care deeply. Not everyone does; actually, some psychologists think it's a pretty vital 'filter' for people to not care about anything but themselves. It's just a question of when it turns on. For a lot of people, it almost never does. That's why you get those stories about, say, homophobes becoming gay-rights activists when their children come out of the closet, or people becoming champions of horrifying problems when it affects them. That's a pretty normal behavior. It just sort of 'sticks on' like a bad light switch sometimes, especially when you discuss something scary like illness of any type.
//Just because that one always confused me, too. :p

So the empathy problem of AS is more of an issue with reacting to feelings of empathy, or maybe an issue with planning out actions related to feelings of empathy?

No, the empathy problem is more in the literal sense. We can't face-read, specifically, and some of us can't read tone or body language. We  care about what you're thinking and feeling, but we don't  know what you're thinking and feeling.

For other people, it's the other way around: They  know what people are thinking and feeling, but they don't  care.

/That might be simpler...I is wordy today. :p

This former is my son. He has empathy he just doesn't get the cues unless obvious.


I was like that for most of my life. Then I discovered that there are six basic facial expressions and started studying. Have him watch Xena; Lucy Lawless has  amazing emotive skills. Results may vary, but it's worth a shot. :)
 
2013-01-06 12:23:30 AM
1. Intelligence has dimensions. There are multiple intelligences, and some of them are social, or have social impact.
2. Such intelligence has a "normal distribution" of sort. It may not be a true bell curve, but the bell curve is a reasonable approximation.
3. Some folks are "socially retarded". I am, to some degree, and my son somewhat more so.
Does it really matter what label you use? What matters is how you cope with your limitations. That's true for anyone. Compensatory effort, additional social education, medication, whatever works. That formula applies to virtually anyone, adapted to their particular weakness or strength.

What matters is that a moral and ethical framework provide a framework for the Asperger's Syndrome person, so that he can function in some appropriate niche in society.
 
2013-01-06 01:17:28 AM

gregscott: What matters is that a moral and ethical framework provide a framework for the Asperger's Syndrome person, so that he can function in some appropriate niche in society.


That's a weird thing to say; for most people, functioning appropriately in society is INVERSELY related to your moral and ethical framework.
 
2013-01-06 01:56:41 AM
IMHO. Autism doesn't belong in the DSM5. Why? Because its a Neurological disorder and not a mental illness.
 
2013-01-06 03:04:43 AM

Anthracite: IMHO. Autism doesn't belong in the DSM5. Why? Because its a Neurological disorder and not a mental illness.


You've gotta be trolling because....what the shiat????
The point of the DSM is to collect a "bestiary" of mental problems commonly afflicting people, whatever the cause. The causes could be genetic, environmental, neurological, experience based (the collective experiences that shape memories and in turn change brain patterns), or any combination of two or all of those.

What in the world do you mean by this. Please tell me before I finally decide that most people are as derptastic as Uranus Is Huge!.
 
2013-01-06 04:24:18 AM
The term won't cease to exist, people. It's more like they're cleaning house and putting things back where they need to go. Think of it like putting something in the wrong directory at first, pointing everything at it, then moving it to the right place. It's kind of like moving the Asperger's diagnosis into autism where it should be, then adding a symlink that points to the new entry when Aspergers is mentioned.
 
2013-01-06 12:47:46 PM

ialdabaoth: gregscott: What matters is that a moral and ethical framework provide a framework for the Asperger's Syndrome person, so that he can function in some appropriate niche in society.

That's a weird thing to say; for most people, functioning appropriately in society is INVERSELY related to your moral and ethical framework.


I'm impressed by your corrosive cynicism. I used to be like you until I began to face facts that it was farking up my life and that of everyone around me.
 
2013-01-06 06:41:16 PM

Pichu0102: The term won't cease to exist, people. It's more like they're cleaning house and putting things back where they need to go. Think of it like putting something in the wrong directory at first, pointing everything at it, then moving it to the right place. It's kind of like moving the Asperger's diagnosis into autism where it should be, then adding a symlink that points to the new entry when Aspergers is mentioned.


ln -s /dev/stupid /dev/retard
 
2013-01-06 11:09:15 PM

filter: Cool- worked in mental health when this was this disease of the week. Had never heard of it, then suddenly everyone had it.


It is the planking/teebowing/gangnam-shiat of psychiatry.


like ADD and Bipolar before
 
2013-01-07 09:55:23 AM
There's a simple test. If the child can speak, it's not autism. Aspbergers doesn't exist, and is just an excuse doctors give to bad parents.
 
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