Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(YouTube)   Pilot loses control of his aircraft and goes into a flat spin. Handles the situation better than Maverick   ( youtube.com) divider line
    More: Scary  
•       •       •

8742 clicks; posted to Video » on 05 Jan 2013 at 10:27 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



54 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2013-01-05 01:08:40 AM  
Sweet mother of God, that was scary.  As if the spin wasn't enough, he couldn't start the engine again after it quit and he had a bona-fide crash landing.

I would have crapped myself.
 
2013-01-05 02:08:15 AM  
Wow. I would have pooped myself. Awesome landing.
 
2013-01-05 06:58:43 AM  
I don't really know anything about planes, so forgive me if this is a dumb idea... but you might want to invest in an electric starter.
 
2013-01-05 08:31:26 AM  
Get that man a beer!
 
2013-01-05 08:45:01 AM  
media.tumblr.com
 
2013-01-05 09:23:32 AM  

Honest Bender: I don't really know anything about planes, so forgive me if this is a dumb idea... but you might want to invest in an electric starter.


The centripetal force on the gas tank was forcing all the gasoline out of the fuel lines and away from the intake tube. There was no gas to even start electrically, even after he managed to pull out of that spin.

/farking incredible
 
2013-01-05 10:46:10 AM  
*BARF*

That must have looked cool from the ground though.
 
2013-01-05 10:56:32 AM  
I think we've discussed this before. I was under the mistaken impression that you kicked the rudder all the way over and widened the spin. I'm told that's not what you do, because there's not enough air moving over the control surfaces. How exactly do you get out of a flat spin?
 
2013-01-05 11:11:01 AM  

indarwinsshadow: I think we've discussed this before. I was under the mistaken impression that you kicked the rudder all the way over and widened the spin. I'm told that's not what you do, because there's not enough air moving over the control surfaces. How exactly do you get out of a flat spin?


Hitting the ground generally stops it.
 
2013-01-05 11:12:22 AM  
Actually, my question is, unless you are some kind of stunt pilot, why would you intentionally go into a spin anyway?
 
2013-01-05 11:12:58 AM  

indarwinsshadow: I think we've discussed this before. I was under the mistaken impression that you kicked the rudder all the way over and widened the spin. I'm told that's not what you do, because there's not enough air moving over the control surfaces. How exactly do you get out of a flat spin?


Slide the seat forward, etc. Get as much weight forward as possible.
 
2013-01-05 11:16:35 AM  

Minimum: Actually, my question is, unless you are some kind of stunt pilot, why would you intentionally go into a spin anyway?


To practice spin recovery.

Also, in the days before instrument flying, pilots would induce a spin to get through a low cloud deck in a controlled manner.
 
2013-01-05 11:21:06 AM  

Charlie Freak: Minimum: Actually, my question is, unless you are some kind of stunt pilot, why would you intentionally go into a spin anyway?

To practice spin recovery.

Also, in the days before instrument flying, pilots would induce a spin to get through a low cloud deck in a controlled manner.


Well, I guess he passed his practice test...

I have my license, and I never purposely spun an aircraft. Not that I am an expert.
 
2013-01-05 11:21:36 AM  

indarwinsshadow: I think we've discussed this before. I was under the mistaken impression that you kicked the rudder all the way over and widened the spin. I'm told that's not what you do, because there's not enough air moving over the control surfaces. How exactly do you get out of a flat spin?


Gotta get the nose to go down somehow (so that the rudder regains some airflow). That can be very difficult if there's not a ton of elevator authority.
 
2013-01-05 11:24:50 AM  
Where do I send the underwear? Sure he needs another pair.
 
2013-01-05 11:26:43 AM  

Charlie Freak: indarwinsshadow: I think we've discussed this before. I was under the mistaken impression that you kicked the rudder all the way over and widened the spin. I'm told that's not what you do, because there's not enough air moving over the control surfaces. How exactly do you get out of a flat spin?

Slide the seat forward, etc. Get as much weight forward as possible.


yeah, looks like he got it nose heavy and broke the spin. Once he did that he was able to get it into a glide and recover.
Nicely done. and all without screaming like a little girl.

/would have screamed like a little girl.
 
2013-01-05 11:27:10 AM  

Minimum: I have my license, and I never purposely spun an aircraft.


Well, I hope you've never been in a spun an aircraft at all then, because the intentional ones tend to be a fair bit safer. I think it's absolutely crazy that the introduction point for spins in the FAA licensing system is at the CFI level.
 
2013-01-05 11:40:17 AM  
To be fair, planes hadn't been invented when Maverick was alive.
legendsrevealed.com
/hot
 
2013-01-05 11:42:27 AM  
Inexperienced pilot does something stupid, cocks up the recovery, and then crashes upside down in some guy's field; where's the hero tag?
 
2013-01-05 11:49:47 AM  

Charlie Freak: indarwinsshadow: I think we've discussed this before. I was under the mistaken impression that you kicked the rudder all the way over and widened the spin. I'm told that's not what you do, because there's not enough air moving over the control surfaces. How exactly do you get out of a flat spin?

Slide the seat forward, etc. Get as much weight forward as possible.


Is that possible in a small craft like a Czech built CZAW SportCruiser?
 
2013-01-05 12:10:29 PM  
I think that's what happens when you fly an aircraft that's drunk....
 
2013-01-05 12:14:06 PM  
They would have had to bring shovels to dig me out of all the poop in the cockpit.
 
2013-01-05 12:16:16 PM  
does he say "well this is it niel?" 1:03 mark
 
2013-01-05 12:32:44 PM  
It's normally very difficult to induce a flat spin in most properly balanced aircraft. A more common danger is getting into a inverted spin and not realizing it.
I've never heard of an Tipsy Nipper and after looking up a picture of one it's appears to be a very short coupled, mid-wing design that would be pretty easy to flat spin with a neutral CG.
In any case, that was a crazy ,scary video - a dead-stick flat spin would scare the !@#$ out of any pilot.
 
2013-01-05 12:58:13 PM  

Minimum: Actually, my question is, unless you are some kind of stunt pilot, why would you intentionally go into a spin anyway?


Training to get out of them. I did spin training in a 152 and it was very valuable.
 
2013-01-05 01:06:57 PM  

Knight of the Woeful Countenance: Honest Bender: I don't really know anything about planes, so forgive me if this is a dumb idea... but you might want to invest in an electric starter.

The centripetal force on the gas tank was forcing all the gasoline out of the fuel lines and away from the intake tube. There was no gas to even start electrically, even after he managed to pull out of that spin.

/farking incredible


Why don't they make fuel tanks with bladders inside, so there is zero chance of air getting in the fuel lines. Then, the fuel pump ensures enough pressure to push the fuel from tank to line to engine regardless of centripetal force. Someone somewhere is going to owe me many millions of dollars for this idea. You saw it here Fark!
 
2013-01-05 01:52:40 PM  
My instructor was old school and believed in teaching spin recovery. His thought was: how can you possibly know what to do in that situation if you have never experienced it? I loved spins from the very first time, and did it way too much. I know the company I rented from hated me, because the 152/172s I trained in did not have cageable gyros, and I'm sure I sent a few to an early failure.

I still love to spin. Its like a carnival ride.
 
2013-01-05 02:27:14 PM  
Funny I always hear about Irans centrifuges but never hear anything about there centripets.
 
2013-01-05 03:15:11 PM  
Practicing spins starting at only 3500 feet? As the saying goes, altitude above you and runway behind you doesn't do any good.

Spin recovery: opposite rudder, stabilize in dive once rotation stops, pull out. If that doesn't work, letting go of the controls usually does.

Old, non-bold pilot.
 
2013-01-05 03:16:31 PM  

Knight of the Woeful Countenance: Honest Bender: I don't really know anything about planes, so forgive me if this is a dumb idea... but you might want to invest in an electric starter.

The centripetal force on the gas tank was forcing all the gasoline out of the fuel lines and away from the intake tube. There was no gas to even start electrically, even after he managed to pull out of that spin.

/farking incredible


Great but you didn't answer the question:WHY doesn't he have an electric starter? And with it a fuel pump?

Isn't this clip from a couple of years ago? I remember this one or one very similar to it.
 
2013-01-05 03:22:50 PM  
AAIB Incident report on this incident.

Very detailed for such a minor incident.

--Carlos V.
 
2013-01-05 03:57:11 PM  
First of all, that was an intentional spin. He cut the engine, pulled up the nose, and when it "broke" or "stalled" he kicked the rudder right and held the yoke back, forcing a spin. This was not an accidental "flat spin" nor was it a "flat spin" at all. A "flat spin" is when you have no effective air movement over the control surfaces, and are dropping like a rock on a more or less horizontal plane. He was nose down, thus not a flat spin. When he released the back pressure on the yoke, and let off rudder pressure, the aircraft came out of the spin naturally. Why he didn't restart, i have no idea. But he waited WAAAYYYYY to long to let his aircraft recover from the spin. He had no altitude to find a suitable landing area, and he auger-ed in. Totally pilot error and bad judgment of when to recover. He didn't even need to cut the engine, just idle it back for the climb to stall. No idea why he would do that.
 
2013-01-05 04:00:02 PM  

indarwinsshadow: I think we've discussed this before. I was under the mistaken impression that you kicked the rudder all the way over and widened the spin. I'm told that's not what you do, because there's not enough air moving over the control surfaces. How exactly do you get out of a flat spin?


/If you release the back pressure on the yoke, and let the ailerons go to a neutral position, and get your foot off the rudder, the plane will recover itself without any input from the pilot.  Assuming you're smart enough to leave yourself enough altitude, which this guy wasn't.
 
2013-01-05 04:00:09 PM  

jjwars1: Knight of the Woeful Countenance: Honest Bender: I don't really know anything about planes, so forgive me if this is a dumb idea... but you might want to invest in an electric starter.

The centripetal force on the gas tank was forcing all the gasoline out of the fuel lines and away from the intake tube. There was no gas to even start electrically, even after he managed to pull out of that spin.

/farking incredible

Why don't they make fuel tanks with bladders inside, so there is zero chance of air getting in the fuel lines. Then, the fuel pump ensures enough pressure to push the fuel from tank to line to engine regardless of centripetal force. Someone somewhere is going to owe me many millions of dollars for this idea. You saw it here Fark!


They do. It costs lots of money for a certified system like that, hence you don't see them on aircraft as cheap as a Tipsy Nipper, which doesn't even have a starter motor.
 
2013-01-05 04:03:41 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: jjwars1: Knight of the Woeful Countenance: Honest Bender: I don't really know anything about planes, so forgive me if this is a dumb idea... but you might want to invest in an electric starter.

The centripetal force on the gas tank was forcing all the gasoline out of the fuel lines and away from the intake tube. There was no gas to even start electrically, even after he managed to pull out of that spin.

/farking incredible

Why don't they make fuel tanks with bladders inside, so there is zero chance of air getting in the fuel lines. Then, the fuel pump ensures enough pressure to push the fuel from tank to line to engine regardless of centripetal force. Someone somewhere is going to owe me many millions of dollars for this idea. You saw it here Fark!

They do. It costs lots of money for a certified system like that, hence you don't see them on aircraft as cheap as a Tipsy Nipper, which doesn't even have a starter motor.


/indeed. I trained on a Cessna 150, 172, 182, and spun them all. Inverted flight is possible, but not generally recommended.
 
2013-01-05 04:07:02 PM  
Dude should go visit my father-in-law. Amazing pilot.
 
2013-01-05 04:23:44 PM  
Better than Maverick? How, did he celebrate getting back home alive by sucking two dicks?
 
2013-01-05 04:25:51 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: First of all, that was an intentional spin. He cut the engine, pulled up the nose, and when it "broke" or "stalled" he kicked the rudder right and held the yoke back, forcing a spin. This was not an accidental "flat spin" nor was it a "flat spin" at all. A "flat spin" is when you have no effective air movement over the control surfaces, and are dropping like a rock on a more or less horizontal plane. He was nose down, thus not a flat spin. When he released the back pressure on the yoke, and let off rudder pressure, the aircraft came out of the spin naturally. Why he didn't restart, i have no idea. But he waited WAAAYYYYY to long to let his aircraft recover from the spin. He had no altitude to find a suitable landing area, and he auger-ed in. Totally pilot error and bad judgment of when to recover. He didn't even need to cut the engine, just idle it back for the climb to stall. No idea why he would do that.


How do I know you didn't watch the video (or read the AAIB report)?

1) It doesn't have to be horizontal to be a flat spin. 30 degrees nose down is well into "flat" by most standards.

2) He did attempt to recover quickly. Anti-spin inputs didn't work when it went flat, pro-spin inputs steepened the spin enough for anti-spin inputs to work again.

3) He didn't cut the engine. Centripetal forces un-ported the fuel pickups in the tanks. No gas = no engine. No electrical system means no-restarting the engine unless you have enough altitude to go into a dive and windmill the engine.

--Carlos V.
 
2013-01-05 04:35:24 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle:
/If you release the back pressure on the yoke, and let the ailerons go to a neutral position, and get your foot off the rudder, the plane will recover itself without any input from the pilot.  Assuming you're smart enough to leave yourself enough altitude, which this guy wasn't.


Only for a subset of airplanes like trainers and the like. And even for stuff with "I don't like to spin" features designed into it, letting go only helps in the incipient phase. Once a spin is fully developed, anti-spin inputs are needed even in the most spin-resistant aircraft.

In most aircraft, if you don't apply positive anti-spin control inputs (as described in the POH), you're not getting out of one.

--Carlos V.
 
2013-01-05 05:02:13 PM  

Lsherm: Sweet mother of God, that was scary.  As if the spin wasn't enough, he couldn't start the engine again after it quit and he had a bona-fide crash landing.

I would have crapped myself.


You glide in. Most planes have an 8-10 to 1 glide ratio, which in a Cessna 172 is about 70mph without flaps, so it's not that scary at all. At landing you'll flare and get it into the 40mph range easily. No, I wonder about two things here:

What kind of engine and prop combo did he have to not have a "windmill" effect to restart the engine? Most planes have a windmill effect so even if you run it out of gas in one wing, switching tanks will let you restart due to "windmilling".

What cheap a$$ camera did this guy buy that let's the prop dominate the image that way. For heaven's sake, if you're going to record flight video, use a good camera like an Nflightcam+ please.

Good recovery from a flat spin, but I think he forgot his "A, B, C's of emergencies" mnemonic.
 
2013-01-05 06:45:14 PM  

unbelver: Bit'O'Gristle: First of all, that was an intentional spin. He cut the engine, pulled up the nose, and when it "broke" or "stalled" he kicked the rudder right and held the yoke back, forcing a spin. This was not an accidental "flat spin" nor was it a "flat spin" at all. A "flat spin" is when you have no effective air movement over the control surfaces, and are dropping like a rock on a more or less horizontal plane. He was nose down, thus not a flat spin. When he released the back pressure on the yoke, and let off rudder pressure, the aircraft came out of the spin naturally. Why he didn't restart, i have no idea. But he waited WAAAYYYYY to long to let his aircraft recover from the spin. He had no altitude to find a suitable landing area, and he auger-ed in. Totally pilot error and bad judgment of when to recover. He didn't even need to cut the engine, just idle it back for the climb to stall. No idea why he would do that.

How do I know you didn't watch the video (or read the AAIB report)?

1) It doesn't have to be horizontal to be a flat spin. 30 degrees nose down is well into "flat" by most standards.

2) He did attempt to recover quickly. Anti-spin inputs didn't work when it went flat, pro-spin inputs steepened the spin enough for anti-spin inputs to work again.

3) He didn't cut the engine. Centripetal forces un-ported the fuel pickups in the tanks. No gas = no engine. No electrical system means no-restarting the engine unless you have enough altitude to go into a dive and windmill the engine.

--Carlos V.


Oh Snap!
 
2013-01-05 07:07:07 PM  

unbelver: Bit'O'Gristle: First of all, that was an intentional spin. He cut the engine, pulled up the nose, and when it "broke" or "stalled" he kicked the rudder right and held the yoke back, forcing a spin. This was not an accidental "flat spin" nor was it a "flat spin" at all. A "flat spin" is when you have no effective air movement over the control surfaces, and are dropping like a rock on a more or less horizontal plane. He was nose down, thus not a flat spin. When he released the back pressure on the yoke, and let off rudder pressure, the aircraft came out of the spin naturally. Why he didn't restart, i have no idea. But he waited WAAAYYYYY to long to let his aircraft recover from the spin. He had no altitude to find a suitable landing area, and he auger-ed in. Totally pilot error and bad judgment of when to recover. He didn't even need to cut the engine, just idle it back for the climb to stall. No idea why he would do that.

How do I know you didn't watch the video (or read the AAIB report)?

1) It doesn't have to be horizontal to be a flat spin. 30 degrees nose down is well into "flat" by most standards.

2) He did attempt to recover quickly. Anti-spin inputs didn't work when it went flat, pro-spin inputs steepened the spin enough for anti-spin inputs to work again.

3) He didn't cut the engine. Centripetal forces un-ported the fuel pickups in the tanks. No gas = no engine. No electrical system means no-restarting the engine unless you have enough altitude to go into a dive and windmill the engine.

--Carlos V.


2000' is more than enough to restart most engines. He claimed he only lost 700' in the spin, starting at 3500'. I've windmilled a Cherokee 6 IO-540 in less than that.
 
2013-01-05 08:26:21 PM  
1. no he claimed he dropped from 3,500 feet down to 700'. Not lost 700 ft.
2. yes he intentionally put it into a spin, but the intent was a small spin that he would recover from, unfortunately he misjudged it a little resulting in a flat spin.

Overall he reacted extremely well, and it saved his life.
 
2013-01-05 08:34:48 PM  

inglixthemad: unbelver: Bit'O'Gristle: First of all, that was an intentional spin. He cut the engine, pulled up the nose, and when it "broke" or "stalled" he kicked the rudder right and held the yoke back, forcing a spin. This was not an accidental "flat spin" nor was it a "flat spin" at all. A "flat spin" is when you have no effective air movement over the control surfaces, and are dropping like a rock on a more or less horizontal plane. He was nose down, thus not a flat spin. When he released the back pressure on the yoke, and let off rudder pressure, the aircraft came out of the spin naturally. Why he didn't restart, i have no idea. But he waited WAAAYYYYY to long to let his aircraft recover from the spin. He had no altitude to find a suitable landing area, and he auger-ed in. Totally pilot error and bad judgment of when to recover. He didn't even need to cut the engine, just idle it back for the climb to stall. No idea why he would do that.

How do I know you didn't watch the video (or read the AAIB report)?

1) It doesn't have to be horizontal to be a flat spin. 30 degrees nose down is well into "flat" by most standards.

2) He did attempt to recover quickly. Anti-spin inputs didn't work when it went flat, pro-spin inputs steepened the spin enough for anti-spin inputs to work again.

3) He didn't cut the engine. Centripetal forces un-ported the fuel pickups in the tanks. No gas = no engine. No electrical system means no-restarting the engine unless you have enough altitude to go into a dive and windmill the engine.

--Carlos V.

2000' is more than enough to restart most engines. He claimed he only lost 700' in the spin, starting at 3500'. I've windmilled a Cherokee 6 IO-540 in less than that.


He didn't say he only lost 700 feet, he said he was AT 700' when he recovered. He barely had enough altitude left to get enough airspeed to land much less rotate the prop.
 
2013-01-05 09:24:54 PM  

Greywar: 1. no he claimed he dropped from 3,500 feet down to 700'. Not lost 700 ft.
2. yes he intentionally put it into a spin, but the intent was a small spin that he would recover from, unfortunately he misjudged it a little resulting in a flat spin.

Overall he reacted extremely well, and it saved his life.


Oops, my error. I read that wrong (smacks self on head)

Yes, very composed at 700'. Disregard everything but the statement to buy a better camera.

(I didn't care about the spin. I've done spin training myself)
 
2013-01-05 11:31:12 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: First of all, that was an intentional spin. He cut the engine, pulled up the nose, and when it "broke" or "stalled" he kicked the rudder right and held the yoke back, forcing a spin. This was not an accidental "flat spin" nor was it a "flat spin" at all. A "flat spin" is when you have no effective air movement over the control surfaces, and are dropping like a rock on a more or less horizontal plane. He was nose down, thus not a flat spin. When he released the back pressure on the yoke, and let off rudder pressure, the aircraft came out of the spin naturally. Why he didn't restart, i have no idea. But he waited WAAAYYYYY to long to let his aircraft recover from the spin. He had no altitude to find a suitable landing area, and he auger-ed in. Totally pilot error and bad judgment of when to recover. He didn't even need to cut the engine, just idle it back for the climb to stall. No idea why he would do that.


Insurance fraud, maybe. He wanted a new plane.
 
2013-01-05 11:55:16 PM  

inglixthemad: Lsherm: Sweet mother of God, that was scary.  As if the spin wasn't enough, he couldn't start the engine again after it quit and he had a bona-fide crash landing.

I would have crapped myself.

You glide in. Most planes have an 8-10 to 1 glide ratio, which in a Cessna 172 is about 70mph without flaps, so it's not that scary at all. At landing you'll flare and get it into the 40mph range easily. No, I wonder about two things here:

What kind of engine and prop combo did he have to not have a "windmill" effect to restart the engine? Most planes have a windmill effect so even if you run it out of gas in one wing, switching tanks will let you restart due to "windmilling".

What cheap a$$ camera did this guy buy that let's the prop dominate the image that way. For heaven's sake, if you're going to record flight video, use a good camera like an Nflightcam+ please.

Good recovery from a flat spin, but I think he forgot his "A, B, C's of emergencies" mnemonic.


i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-06 12:51:40 AM  

DandyDon: My instructor was old school and believed in teaching spin recovery. His thought was: how can you possibly know what to do in that situation if you have never experienced it? I loved spins from the very first time, and did it way too much. I know the company I rented from hated me, because the 152/172s I trained in did not have cageable gyros, and I'm sure I sent a few to an early failure.

I still love to spin. Its like a carnival ride.


Somebody save this guys post for when they find his crash site
 
2013-01-06 12:27:14 PM  

Maul555: DandyDon: My instructor was old school and believed in teaching spin recovery. His thought was: how can you possibly know what to do in that situation if you have never experienced it? I loved spins from the very first time, and did it way too much. I know the company I rented from hated me, because the 152/172s I trained in did not have cageable gyros, and I'm sure I sent a few to an early failure.

I still love to spin. Its like a carnival ride.

Somebody save this guys post for when they find his crash site


Spin recovery is valuable training. No, seriously. When you move past the trainers to higher performance aircraft, a spin is a possibility. Knowing how to handle one is critical knowledge, and that should be taught.

There's a reason I sought out spin training? I took the word of a friend who is an old school pilot, both fixed and rotary, retired military. I also took IFR, Tailwheel (conventional), "Seaplane", complex, high-performance, and high-altitude training for safety. The only one I did for fun was aerobatic training. They all, but especially the spin and Tailwheel training, made me a better pilot.

I know the seaplane rating doesn't make much sense to most, but I live by the Great Lakes. A water ditch is much less intimidating now. I know how to gauge the water. High-altitude also helps when you just don't like the wind or weather lower than 18000'.
 
2013-01-06 12:32:16 PM  
Controlled flight into dumb.
 
Displayed 50 of 54 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





Top Commented
Javascript is required to view headlines in widget.

In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report