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(Daily Mail)   New study says that the stress-relieving benefits of nicotine are a myth. Oh, really? Is that so? Then how come I feel like strangling people with an extension cord when I go without nicotine?   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 159
    More: Ironic, extension cords  
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4217 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Jan 2013 at 1:16 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-05 02:13:33 AM
I'm going to go ahead and say that a large part of the stress relief or calming effect probably has something to do with spending 3-5 minutes taking long, deep breaths and letting them out slowly.

Smoked for almost 20 years. Going to hit the 2 year smoke free mark next month.
 
2013-01-05 02:16:05 AM

Warrener: aagrajag: Quitting is almost *all* psychological. That's the challenge; not the nicotine addiction that clears after a few (murderous) days.

I quit after 8 years, and it was downright easy. And I'm no paragon of self-discipline and willpower. The trick is simple:

While your resolve and self-discipline are at their strongest, and you've made that hard decision, deliberately expose yourself to *everything* that makes you reach for a cigarette. Get drunk, fark like a rabbit, visit your mother-in-law, every stressor or trigger you can think of. That temporary, but all-important surge of willpower will get you through it.

And when you're done? Nothing short of WW3 will push you to start again.

Also, tasting food is nice.

I'm not going to argue with you about that assertion, but where do you get that spike of resolve and self-discipline from?


I've also never understood the sentiment of "tasting food" again that I've heard from so many people. Personally, I tasted food as well when I smoked a pack+ per day as I do now. The only real difference is more sensitivity to capsacin and a bit less to horseradish (and those are related to dietary choices from the last several months.)


That? Everyone's different. Whatever motivates you to even attempt to quit. You find you can take a flight of stairs, you fall asleep with a cigarette and nearly burn down the house, you watch a loved one die of lung cancer... doesn't matter.

What does matter is whatever first motivates you *will* wane with time. So strike while you're strongest, fresh from whatever revelation finally causes you to crumple up that last, half-finished pack in disgust.

For me? I had enough money for cigarettes, or calling my girlfriend who was 4 hours away. I chose her. She's now my wife. I chose well.
 
2013-01-05 02:17:46 AM
Ed Grubermann:Nice to see your stupidity level is still in the kilopalin range. You know you are full of shiat and you know why. It's been explained to you numerous times.

I am going to use that kilopalin stupidity bit somewhere in the next few days, that is awesome. still giggling.
 
2013-01-05 02:18:25 AM
There's a difference between something relieving stress from the beginning, and having an addiction raise its ugly head and refuse to go away until you feed it.
 
2013-01-05 02:19:34 AM
I've never been de-stressed from a cigarette. Well, any more than just stepping outside for a moment and contemplating the world would de-stress me, anyway.

But IDK, I've never been addicted to cigarettes either, I smoke for a month or few and then quit for a month or few, largely at random.
/ quitting again, for a while, today, actually
// out to smoke my last one 'till spring or summer
 
2013-01-05 02:20:37 AM

aagrajag: steerforth: aagrajag: Quitting is almost *all* psychological. That's the challenge; not the nicotine addiction that clears after a few (murderous) days.

I quit after 8 years, and it was downright easy. And I'm no paragon of self-discipline and willpower. The trick is simple:

While your resolve and self-discipline are at their strongest, and you've made that hard decision, deliberately expose yourself to *everything* that makes you reach for a cigarette. Get drunk, fark like a rabbit, visit your mother-in-law, every stressor or trigger you can think of. That temporary, but all-important surge of willpower will get you through it.

And when you're done? Nothing short of WW3 will push you to start again.

Also, tasting food is nice.

That's your experience - everyone is different. Copious amounts of alcohol are helping me just fine.

Hah. Now, if only the same method worked with alcohol...

Seriously though, everyone's willpower wanes with time, so confronting your triggers while at your strongest just makes sense. It's also the very opposite of what most people do, so I imagine not too many have tried it. Most people avoid stress when they're quitting. You know, they pick a long weekend, board themselves up with a bunch of shiatty movies, and pointedly avoid stress of any sort.

Yes, this is simply my experience. But when I say I ain't Mr. Self Discipline, I mean it. I must have done something right.


Having tried the lozenge, gum, and the patch, I've found that straight up cold turkey, combined with a cellphone app that marks achievements plus Allan Carr philosophy seems to be working best for me. Once past the initial physical period that's over pretty quick, it appears to be a psychological long game.
 
2013-01-05 02:22:13 AM

aagrajag: steerforth: aagrajag: Quitting is almost *all* psychological. That's the challenge; not the nicotine addiction that clears after a few (murderous) days.

I quit after 8 years, and it was downright easy. And I'm no paragon of self-discipline and willpower. The trick is simple:

While your resolve and self-discipline are at their strongest, and you've made that hard decision, deliberately expose yourself to *everything* that makes you reach for a cigarette. Get drunk, fark like a rabbit, visit your mother-in-law, every stressor or trigger you can think of. That temporary, but all-important surge of willpower will get you through it.

And when you're done? Nothing short of WW3 will push you to start again.

Also, tasting food is nice.

That's your experience - everyone is different. Copious amounts of alcohol are helping me just fine.

Hah. Now, if only the same method worked with alcohol...

Seriously though, everyone's willpower wanes with time, so confronting your triggers while at your strongest just makes sense. It's also the very opposite of what most people do, so I imagine not too many have tried it. Most people avoid stress when they're quitting. You know, they pick a long weekend, board themselves up with a bunch of shiatty movies, and pointedly avoid stress of any sort.

Yes, this is simply my experience. But when I say I ain't Mr. Self Discipline, I mean it. I must have done something right.


My alcoholic dad used to test his willpower by going to the pub and ordering coffee. Didn't work out for him in the end but if it's working for you, well done.

I'm not doing anything that much different, just not smoking, chewing gum and allowing myself more alcohol than usual. I am finding myself following smokers down the street and snorting up their noxious fumes, however. I look forward to the day when I no longer like the smell. In the meantime, people think I'm some weirdo mugger with a sinus problem.
 
2013-01-05 02:22:38 AM
I had a brief flirtation with smoking when I was a teenager and I am so thankful that unlike some of my peers I didn't get addicted. I remember the effects of nicotine were powerful. First time I had a cigarette I nearly fell over from the head rush. On subsequent occasions a smoke was a moment to pause and reflect - an almost meditative experience - you don't really just take the opportunity to sit and chill when you're in public.

Of course, that was nothing compared to the mellowing effects of weed, but the times I had that were more social and in not so public locations.
 
2013-01-05 02:24:19 AM
A decade ago when I was a smoker I had read studies showing that the physiological evidence of stress went up in smokers immediately following a cig.

This study may be new, but the concept that a stimulant doesn't actually lower stress is nothing new.

It feels like it helps when you are a smoker because you both quell your desire for one and are generally having one while on a break or drinking.

I doubt smoking had one positive effect on my life, tbh. Well, that isn't true. I still enjoy a few if I'm drinking.
 
2013-01-05 02:24:37 AM
I just lit up after spending 10 hours on a plane, so fark you.
 
2013-01-05 02:27:53 AM
Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?
 
2013-01-05 02:29:23 AM
a248.e.akamai.net

Master race reporting in.

Quit cigs, but always had that craving. No mas.

/hot.
 
2013-01-05 02:29:28 AM
Subby: You're mistaking increased stress when you quit with decreased stress when you smoke. Not the same thing, sorry. When you are smoking, your stress levels are the same as a nonsmoker; it's just that you increase them above the levels of a nonsmoker by trying to quit.

/sure you already knew all this, but I like to state the obvious
//obviously
///ex-smoker myself
 
2013-01-05 02:32:38 AM

LincolnLogolas: I just lit up after spending 10 hours on a plane, so fark you.


I've been curious why no one has exploited the market of selling patches or nicotine gum in small quantities at airports. Finding a smoking lounge or having to leave the airport are not great options for the feening traveler.
 
2013-01-05 02:33:18 AM

johne3819: If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.


I found the exact opposite; it was easier to quit when I had a few cigs left in the pack. If I finished the pack, the lack of the ability to quickly obtain a cigarette made me feel nervous, and that nervous feeling manifested itself as going out, buying a pack, and smoking one. At least a few cigs in the pack left, and I quit cold turkey on the first try. And yes, I smoked regularly (half to one pack a day for multiple years beforehand.)
 
2013-01-05 02:33:32 AM
Just got over the 100 days no smoking mark (after 30yrs).
NEVER will go back, won't kid ya the first week was the worst.
 
2013-01-05 02:35:01 AM

johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?


My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.
 
2013-01-05 02:35:46 AM

jaytkay: Linkster: jaytkay: Lung cancer makes you calm and un-stressed?

/ Watched a couple of family members die painful deaths
// But, gee, at least they enjoyed their cigs beforehand!

/Troll

Double your daily cigarette intake, please. You deserve it.


Sorry, I'm fine. Lots of things out there can and will kill you. if you live long enough for that second hand smoke, carbon emissions, UV Rays, food poisoning to kill you, well good on you!
 
2013-01-05 02:38:34 AM

steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.


$15.35 for a pack here in Canada
 
2013-01-05 02:41:36 AM

steerforth: aagrajag: steerforth: aagrajag: Quitting is almost *all* psychological. That's the challenge; not the nicotine addiction that clears after a few (murderous) days.

I quit after 8 years, and it was downright easy. And I'm no paragon of self-discipline and willpower. The trick is simple:

While your resolve and self-discipline are at their strongest, and you've made that hard decision, deliberately expose yourself to *everything* that makes you reach for a cigarette. Get drunk, fark like a rabbit, visit your mother-in-law, every stressor or trigger you can think of. That temporary, but all-important surge of willpower will get you through it.

And when you're done? Nothing short of WW3 will push you to start again.

Also, tasting food is nice.

That's your experience - everyone is different. Copious amounts of alcohol are helping me just fine.

Hah. Now, if only the same method worked with alcohol...

Seriously though, everyone's willpower wanes with time, so confronting your triggers while at your strongest just makes sense. It's also the very opposite of what most people do, so I imagine not too many have tried it. Most people avoid stress when they're quitting. You know, they pick a long weekend, board themselves up with a bunch of shiatty movies, and pointedly avoid stress of any sort.

Yes, this is simply my experience. But when I say I ain't Mr. Self Discipline, I mean it. I must have done something right.

My alcoholic dad used to test his willpower by going to the pub and ordering coffee. Didn't work out for him in the end but if it's working for you, well done.

I'm not doing anything that much different, just not smoking, chewing gum and allowing myself more alcohol than usual. I am finding myself following smokers down the street and snorting up their noxious fumes, however. I look forward to the day when I no longer like the smell. In the meantime, people think I'm some weirdo mugger with a sinus problem.


Alcohol has a great deal many more addictive factors than nicotine. I never had another craving after the first week, but I *did* have many, many dreams in which I had started smoking again, and awoke feeling very ashamed.

I still enjoy maybe 2~3 cigars a year, though. No problems.

Now, if I could just lay off the booze...
 
2013-01-05 02:41:36 AM

gweilo8888: johne3819: If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

I found the exact opposite; it was easier to quit when I had a few cigs left in the pack. If I finished the pack, the lack of the ability to quickly obtain a cigarette made me feel nervous, and that nervous feeling manifested itself as going out, buying a pack, and smoking one. At least a few cigs in the pack left, and I quit cold turkey on the first try. And yes, I smoked regularly (half to one pack a day for multiple years beforehand.)


I see the logic, but if I have one, I'm smoking it. Interesting how we each experience it differently.
 
2013-01-05 02:43:33 AM

manitobamadman: steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.

$15.35 for a pack here in Canada


Holy crap! It was about half that when I quit.
 
2013-01-05 02:45:07 AM
" It's easy to quit smoking ... I've done it a thousand times."

-Mark Twain
 
2013-01-05 02:45:20 AM

manitobamadman: steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.

$15.35 for a pack here in Canada


Wow, that is a lot of money. I started when they were just over $1 a pack.

/bait and switch!!
//LOL
 
2013-01-05 02:45:31 AM

Fano: aagrajag: steerforth: aagrajag: Quitting is almost *all* psychological. That's the challenge; not the nicotine addiction that clears after a few (murderous) days.

I quit after 8 years, and it was downright easy. And I'm no paragon of self-discipline and willpower. The trick is simple:

While your resolve and self-discipline are at their strongest, and you've made that hard decision, deliberately expose yourself to *everything* that makes you reach for a cigarette. Get drunk, fark like a rabbit, visit your mother-in-law, every stressor or trigger you can think of. That temporary, but all-important surge of willpower will get you through it.

And when you're done? Nothing short of WW3 will push you to start again.

Also, tasting food is nice.

That's your experience - everyone is different. Copious amounts of alcohol are helping me just fine.

Hah. Now, if only the same method worked with alcohol...

Seriously though, everyone's willpower wanes with time, so confronting your triggers while at your strongest just makes sense. It's also the very opposite of what most people do, so I imagine not too many have tried it. Most people avoid stress when they're quitting. You know, they pick a long weekend, board themselves up with a bunch of shiatty movies, and pointedly avoid stress of any sort.

Yes, this is simply my experience. But when I say I ain't Mr. Self Discipline, I mean it. I must have done something right.

Having tried the lozenge, gum, and the patch, I've found that straight up cold turkey, combined with a cellphone app that marks achievements plus Allan Carr philosophy seems to be working best for me. Once past the initial physical period that's over pretty quick, it appears to be a psychological long game.


That's the other thing I forgot to mention: cessation aids to alleviate physical cravings are not your friends. They help a tiny bit with the physical withdrawal, but that passes after only days. The psychological undermining however, does lasting damage to your likelihood of success.

Cold turkey. No aids. They are your enemies. Trust me.
 
2013-01-05 02:46:08 AM

sno man: manitobamadman: steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.

$15.35 for a pack here in Canada

Holy crap! It was about half that when I quit.


Half of which $6/$10/$15.35/$17.50)?

;)
 
2013-01-05 02:47:10 AM

manitobamadman: steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.

$15.35 for a pack here in Canada


Yipes. I quit when they were $7.
 
2013-01-05 02:47:43 AM

manitobamadman: steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.

$15.35 for a pack here in Canada


I've been off them a month and now have money in my bank account. One of the best reasons for giving up, but only in retrospect. It really was my health that finally forced the issue. The hacking cough caused by two packs a day is wot done it.
 
2013-01-05 02:47:53 AM

aagrajag: Fano: aagrajag: steerforth: aagrajag: Quitting is almost *all* psychological. That's the challenge; not the nicotine addiction that clears after a few (murderous) days.

I quit after 8 years, and it was downright easy. And I'm no paragon of self-discipline and willpower. The trick is simple:

While your resolve and self-discipline are at their strongest, and you've made that hard decision, deliberately expose yourself to *everything* that makes you reach for a cigarette. Get drunk, fark like a rabbit, visit your mother-in-law, every stressor or trigger you can think of. That temporary, but all-important surge of willpower will get you through it.

And when you're done? Nothing short of WW3 will push you to start again.

Also, tasting food is nice.

That's your experience - everyone is different. Copious amounts of alcohol are helping me just fine.

Hah. Now, if only the same method worked with alcohol...

Seriously though, everyone's willpower wanes with time, so confronting your triggers while at your strongest just makes sense. It's also the very opposite of what most people do, so I imagine not too many have tried it. Most people avoid stress when they're quitting. You know, they pick a long weekend, board themselves up with a bunch of shiatty movies, and pointedly avoid stress of any sort.

Yes, this is simply my experience. But when I say I ain't Mr. Self Discipline, I mean it. I must have done something right.

Having tried the lozenge, gum, and the patch, I've found that straight up cold turkey, combined with a cellphone app that marks achievements plus Allan Carr philosophy seems to be working best for me. Once past the initial physical period that's over pretty quick, it appears to be a psychological long game.

That's the other thing I forgot to mention: cessation aids to alleviate physical cravings are not your friends. They help a tiny bit with the physical withdrawal, but that passes after only days. The psychological undermining however, does lasting d ...


That's why I was interested in a drug that actually make you ill when you smoke. I need more than no carrot, I need a stick too!
 
2013-01-05 02:50:01 AM
I always believed the 3rd something was the worst time, so I quit after starting school again, and I went to the gym every fracking day and used the patch the whole while
hour 3 - I shouldn't have been around people, even with the patch on
day 3 - sucked balls, even with the patch on
week 3 - sucked monkey balls, and I was supposed to downgrade to the level 2 patch, but I stayed on the first level(highest) just because
month 3 - not so bad, as I was really into being in the gym every day, plus summer semester finals were over and the students were coming back from break, so there were plenty of non-smoking women to ogle while in the gym. And you can not be in the gym and smell of smoke, it just doesn't work.

/that was about 9 months ago
//watched grandma die of lung cancer
///Mom is a 2-pack-a-day smoker, so she's next
 
2013-01-05 02:56:33 AM
Ed Grubermann: Yes, yes. You're gonna live on the moon and not go to the hospital. Of course. Lying hypocrite. I'd send you myself if I could. We'll see who is stupid. The good thing, of course, is that none of your space fantasies will ever come true, and we'll keep living longer and longer right here. The more to ponder your silly ways, of course.
 
2013-01-05 02:56:42 AM

johne3819: aagrajag: Fano: aagrajag: steerforth: aagrajag: Quitting is almost *all* psychological. That's the challenge; not the nicotine addiction that clears after a few (murderous) days.

I quit after 8 years, and it was downright easy. And I'm no paragon of self-discipline and willpower. The trick is simple:

While your resolve and self-discipline are at their strongest, and you've made that hard decision, deliberately expose yourself to *everything* that makes you reach for a cigarette. Get drunk, fark like a rabbit, visit your mother-in-law, every stressor or trigger you can think of. That temporary, but all-important surge of willpower will get you through it.

And when you're done? Nothing short of WW3 will push you to start again.

Also, tasting food is nice.

That's your experience - everyone is different. Copious amounts of alcohol are helping me just fine.

Hah. Now, if only the same method worked with alcohol...

Seriously though, everyone's willpower wanes with time, so confronting your triggers while at your strongest just makes sense. It's also the very opposite of what most people do, so I imagine not too many have tried it. Most people avoid stress when they're quitting. You know, they pick a long weekend, board themselves up with a bunch of shiatty movies, and pointedly avoid stress of any sort.

Yes, this is simply my experience. But when I say I ain't Mr. Self Discipline, I mean it. I must have done something right.

Having tried the lozenge, gum, and the patch, I've found that straight up cold turkey, combined with a cellphone app that marks achievements plus Allan Carr philosophy seems to be working best for me. Once past the initial physical period that's over pretty quick, it appears to be a psychological long game.

That's the other thing I forgot to mention: cessation aids to alleviate physical cravings are not your friends. They help a tiny bit with the physical withdrawal, but that passes after only days. The psychological undermining however, does lasting d ...

That's why I was interested in a drug that actually make you ill when you smoke. I need more than no carrot, I need a stick too!


For me the patch caused vivid dreams, and if I took it off I could smoke again, just without a rush. No stick there. Past the physical stage, my hardest part is mentally avoiding making deals with myself.
 
2013-01-05 03:00:25 AM
This is exactly what Allen Carr has been telling everyone for years.
 
2013-01-05 03:03:23 AM

Britney Spear's Speculum: From my experience:

I get nothing from cigarettes.
I got a head rush from hookah
I get a biatchin' head rush from dip and nasal snuff.

I haven't had any of the above in over a year and only used the above at most 3 times a month.


The first is probably because what they call "cigarettes" these days are what our grandfathers would have called "girly smokes". What with the filter and the "extra mild tobacco blends".

in fact, you know Marlboros? Cigarettes for surly, burly cowboys?

Nah. By their own early marketing, Cigarettes for ladies.
 
2013-01-05 03:07:14 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Ed Grubermann: Yes, yes. You're gonna live on the moon and not go to the hospital. Of course. Lying hypocrite. I'd send you myself if I could. We'll see who is stupid. The good thing, of course, is that none of your space fantasies will ever come true, and we'll keep living longer and longer right here. The more to ponder your silly ways, of course.


No matter how much you hate every technology not directly tied to life extension, you're still going to die like a dog in the street. This is an odd thread to bring it up though. I'll have to rtfa to see if they experimented on smoking cessation in astronauts to see why you went double regard in this thread. Maybe like a punch drunk boxer, it's all you know how to do now.
 
2013-01-05 03:08:02 AM

aagrajag: manitobamadman: steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.

$15.35 for a pack here in Canada

Yipes. I quit when they were $7.


17.50 AUD = 18.12 CAD and 18.38 USD.

Taxation works! Plus this:

i1126.photobucket.com

After and before plain packaging legislation.

/While it didn't put me off smoking, I think it will put off some kids from starting up in the first place.
 
2013-01-05 03:13:32 AM

BuckTurgidson: Banacek: There is no better drug then nicotine.

Nicotine is just about the most lethal poison known to our species. Short-term-high-dose? Instant death. Long-term-low-dose? Tobacco addiction, cancer, and death. Bonus: your kids are more likely to be non-X-Men mutant failures.

Seriously, you'd be better off addicting yourself to cocaine.


Nicotine is as farking dangerous as caffeine.

It's all the other shiat involved with how we consume it that sucks.
 
2013-01-05 03:15:57 AM
It's Earth, nobody gets out alive
Find someone else to agitate.
 
2013-01-05 03:24:41 AM

sloshed_again: It's Earth, nobody gets out alive
Find someone else to agitate.


Inhale deeply. Hold it in, that's it.... let it seep into every crevice.... and just nestle there, filling you with the satisfying freedom-loving satisfaction of cancer.

Feel good? GOOD!

We want you to feel good.

But for some reason, we also feel obligated to pay a bunch of people to very expensively extend your life while you inevitably die of the f*cking CANCER we f*cking PRINTED on the candy wrappers of the CANCER sticks we for some goddamned reason we allowed THE EVILEST PEOPLE IN HUMAN HISTORY to sell to you.
 
2013-01-05 03:32:13 AM

steerforth: aagrajag: manitobamadman: steerforth: johne3819: Great method to quit (if you can do it).

Step 1:

Quit, duh.

Step 2:

If you have the craving that makes you cave and buy a pack, as soon as you light up, toss the rest of the pack. It will cost you $6+ dollars (almost $10 here in Chi) for each cig.

Step 3:

Profit?

My last pack of Peter Stuyvesant 25s cost $17.50 here in Australia.

$15.35 for a pack here in Canada

Yipes. I quit when they were $7.

17.50 AUD = 18.12 CAD and 18.38 USD.

Taxation works! Plus this:

[i1126.photobucket.com image 850x508]

After and before plain packaging legislation.

/While it didn't put me off smoking, I think it will put off some kids from starting up in the first place.


Even if it helps like 10%, it's better than not.
 
2013-01-05 03:37:58 AM

Gyrfalcon: That sounds like the worst study ever done.

The researchers are less sure why stress levels rose in those who failed to quit. But it may be that their failure - and thoughts of the damage their habit was doing to their health - made them worry more.
This increase in stress levels was particularly high in those with depression and other psychiatric problems and the researchers said doctors should be aware of this.


If you have a lot of people in your study with psychiatric problems, then OF COURSE they're going to have high stress levels--before, during and after attempting to quit--and OF COURSE it's going to be unclear what caused the change. And it seems pretty clear that if one of the reasons they were trying to quit is fear for their health, then knowing they failed is going to make things worse.

These guys are pretty bad researchers.



In a sizable sample, unless for some weird reason researchers make sure to only test people with no psychiatric problems (and "psychiatric problems" is a very broad umbrella -- it doesn't mean "all raving loonies" -- you might be amazed how many of your friends and acquaintances are treated for this or that), there will be people with psychiatric problems of some sort or another. They noted who those were, and noted to what extent those ones had a tendency to react somewhat differently than the others. Then you go on to restate their own speculation, when you mentioned feeling failure being a possible stressor. Who do you think just suggested that? The Daily Mail author on her own? She was paraphrasing them, obviously.


"These guys are pretty bad researchers." Is that indeed your professional opinion, based on a Daily Mail article? Someone alert the NHS, this info needs to get out.
 
2013-01-05 03:46:30 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Ed Grubermann: Yes, yes. You're gonna live on the moon and not go to the hospital. Of course. Lying hypocrite. I'd send you myself if I could. We'll see who is stupid. The good thing, of course, is that none of your space fantasies will ever come true, and we'll keep living longer and longer right here. The more to ponder your silly ways, of course.


Calm down, troll. Your spittle is ruining your monitor.
 
2013-01-05 04:06:06 AM

steerforth:
After and before plain packaging legislation.
/While it didn't put me off smoking, I think it will put off some kids from starting up in the first place.


Know why liquor manufacturers aren't required to wrap their bottles in pictures of DUI tickets, cirrhosed livers, and beer bellies?

Cause legislators like drinking...
 
2013-01-05 04:15:16 AM

BuckTurgidson: We want you to feel good.


I hope you feel good and bietchie and die in a horrible crash.
 
2013-01-05 04:28:11 AM

Ishidan: steerforth:
After and before plain packaging legislation.
/While it didn't put me off smoking, I think it will put off some kids from starting up in the first place.

Know why liquor manufacturers aren't required to wrap their bottles in pictures of DUI tickets, cirrhosed livers, and beer bellies?

Cause legislators like drinking...


That's coming next. Australia is discussing putting warning labels on booze bottles. There are already labels on boxed wine reminding drinkers of the actual, as opposed to perceived, amount in a standard drink.

Next up, the true evils: food companies.
 
2013-01-05 04:31:25 AM

twistofsin: BuckTurgidson: Banacek: There is no better drug then nicotine.

Nicotine is just about the most lethal poison known to our species. Short-term-high-dose? Instant death. Long-term-low-dose? Tobacco addiction, cancer, and death. Bonus: your kids are more likely to be non-X-Men mutant failures.

Seriously, you'd be better off addicting yourself to cocaine.

Nicotine is as farking dangerous as caffeine.

It's all the other shiat involved with how we consume it that sucks.


As someone who gave up smoking years ago, and has been on nicotine gum ever since, I concur. It's bad for the heart if you overdo it but so is Monster, and has such minimal side effects otherwise I never had a reason to try quitting. Expense maybe but, eh, it's no worse than going to starbucks daily.
I'd likely have smacked a few hundred coworkers without some form of stress relief. Maybe the study's correct and it's a placebo, but an effective one
 
2013-01-05 04:36:33 AM

Gyrfalcon: That sounds like the worst study ever done.

The researchers are less sure why stress levels rose in those who failed to quit. But it may be that their failure - and thoughts of the damage their habit was doing to their health - made them worry more.
This increase in stress levels was particularly high in those with depression and other psychiatric problems and the researchers said doctors should be aware of this.


If you have a lot of people in your study with psychiatric problems, then OF COURSE they're going to have high stress levels--before, during and after attempting to quit--and OF COURSE it's going to be unclear what caused the change. And it seems pretty clear that if one of the reasons they were trying to quit is fear for their health, then knowing they failed is going to make things worse.

These guys are pretty bad researchers.


I am a psychology major, and their comments about those with depression and psychiatric disorders is unequivocal proof that they are a bunch of nimrods. Why? Because nicotine helps tremendously with said disorders. It all has to do with brain chemistry. For whatever reason nicotine effects people with psychological disorders differently than other people. It is a common theme amongst disorders. As a matter of fact whether or not a person smokes and what it does for theme is a high indicator that something is knocking a little differently in their heads. Everything from schizophrenia to ADHD is affected by nicotine. Doesn't mean you're nuts. It just means that the benefits are more than people realize. So, yeah, if they try and quit a drug that helps them unfathomably there is going to be a greater buildup of stress and an increase in negative psychological symptoms if they quit. I could write an entire paper about this, but I'm not going to bore you guys.

I will admit that I do feel a lot better if I go without nicotine. The tingling in my head, the tiredness, and the irritability are there, but if I can deal with that the entire three days it takes to get out of my system I am happier. Thing is, it isn't always that simple. It doesn't make stressful situations go away. I only use snus (stopped smoking for months now, and I can honestly say if I never smoke another cigarette I will not miss it), and I cannot imagine how difficult it would be for a heavy nicotine user.

Nicotine itself is a very useful drug. It's the tobacco plant that kills people. The smoking aspect. Nicotine itself is harmless except for the insanely high addiction rate that creeps up on you.
 
2013-01-05 04:40:47 AM

ParagonComplex: I am a psychology major, and their comments about those with depression and psychiatric disorders is unequivocal proof that they are a bunch of nimrods. Why? Because nicotine helps tremendously with said disorders. It all has to do with brain chemistry. For whatever reason nicotine effects people with psychological disorders differently than other people. It is a common theme amongst disorders. As a matter of fact whether or not a person smokes and what it does for theme is a high indicator that something is knocking a little differently in their heads. Everything from schizophrenia to ADHD is affected by nicotine. Doesn't mean you're nuts. It just means that the benefits are more than people realize.


Is that so? I was diagnosed BPD (treated with a lithium variant ~5 years ago) Now I'm on nothing but the occasional nicotine, no symptoms of anything. Self-medicated I suppose?
 
2013-01-05 04:41:03 AM

Warrener: I've also never understood the sentiment of "tasting food" again that I've heard from so many people. Personally, I tasted food as well when I smoked a pack+ per day as I do now.


Same here.  I never noticed a difference in the taste of food.
 
2013-01-05 04:45:07 AM

Relatively Obscure: Warrener: I've also never understood the sentiment of "tasting food" again that I've heard from so many people. Personally, I tasted food as well when I smoked a pack+ per day as I do now.

Same here.  I never noticed a difference in the taste of food.


Did anyone ever do a study on whether smokers really are better tippers or not? If it's an acquired habit, I still don't worry about percentages and give a nice amount to any server that does their job with a bit of effort
 
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