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(The Newspaper)   Courts in Florida split on the most burning question of our time: whether motorists should be subjected to stop-and-search simply because they repainted their car a new color   (thenewspaper.com) divider line 18
    More: Florida, Courts of Florida, Department of Highways, motorists, vehicle registrations, traffic stops  
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5176 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jan 2013 at 11:57 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-01-05 12:05:35 AM
7 votes:
It wasn't the color of the car... it was the color of the driver.
2013-01-05 12:50:54 AM
3 votes:
"So I guess the lesson is check your ownership, and if you paint your car a different colour, get your ownership updated."

How? As the article pointed out the state had no form for an owner to do so.
2013-01-04 09:01:49 PM
3 votes:

Flint Ironstag: From the TFA:
on June 22, 2010 when an Escambia County Deputy Sheriff saw a bright green Chevy. The deputy ran the plate and the record showed the vehicle was registered to a blue Chevy. The deputy initiated a traffic stop, and Kerick Van Teamer, the driver, explained his car had recently been painted. A search turned up drugs leading to Teamer's arrest. Teamer sought to suppress the evidence because he never should have been pulled over in the first place.

A stop I can understand. Questioning the driver about the colour of the car I can understand. But how did this stop lead to a search? Did the cop think he'd find something in the car that would prove it had, or had not, been painted? On what grounds did he ask to search the car, apart from the old "I smell drugs" line?

TFA doesn't explain this, or say whether the guy consented to the search.


Back up even further, why was the cop running the plate at all?  Speeding? Blowing a stop sign? Driving a shiny car while black?
2013-01-04 08:14:22 PM
3 votes:
From the TFA:
on June 22, 2010 when an Escambia County Deputy Sheriff saw a bright green Chevy. The deputy ran the plate and the record showed the vehicle was registered to a blue Chevy. The deputy initiated a traffic stop, and Kerick Van Teamer, the driver, explained his car had recently been painted. A search turned up drugs leading to Teamer's arrest. Teamer sought to suppress the evidence because he never should have been pulled over in the first place.

A stop I can understand. Questioning the driver about the colour of the car I can understand. But how did this stop lead to a search? Did the cop think he'd find something in the car that would prove it had, or had not, been painted? On what grounds did he ask to search the car, apart from the old "I smell drugs" line?

TFA doesn't explain this, or say whether the guy consented to the search.
2013-01-05 10:22:37 AM
1 votes:

Maul555: Its what cops do... All day, every day. If they are not busy pulling you over for a real violation, then they are randomly running the license plates of the vehicles around them, hoping to find something.


How is this significantly different from stopping random people on the street and demanding 'Papers Please', just to be sure there isn't any outstanding warrants, tickets, missed child support payments, etc? Just because it's quicker and can be done surreptitiously doesn't make it any less a 'fishing expedition'.
2013-01-05 02:40:59 AM
1 votes:

HoratioGates: New York State tried for a money grab. Our cops have the automatic plate scanners that scan every car. The state wanted some money so they tried to say that the current license plates were hard for the scanners to read and that everyone, even the people who just got them, would have to pay to get new plates in the new colors. It was pretty close to going through until the police came out and said the scanners worked fine on the old colors and basically said the governor was full of it. So glad Patterson is gone.


Well, in Patterson's defense, he had a very hard time reading the plates.
2013-01-05 02:18:47 AM
1 votes:
I bet that cop was using SCMODS.
2013-01-05 01:48:41 AM
1 votes:

sno man: Flint Ironstag: From the TFA:
on June 22, 2010 when an Escambia County Deputy Sheriff saw a bright green Chevy. The deputy ran the plate and the record showed the vehicle was registered to a blue Chevy. The deputy initiated a traffic stop, and Kerick Van Teamer, the driver, explained his car had recently been painted. A search turned up drugs leading to Teamer's arrest. Teamer sought to suppress the evidence because he never should have been pulled over in the first place.

A stop I can understand. Questioning the driver about the colour of the car I can understand. But how did this stop lead to a search? Did the cop think he'd find something in the car that would prove it had, or had not, been painted? On what grounds did he ask to search the car, apart from the old "I smell drugs" line?

TFA doesn't explain this, or say whether the guy consented to the search.

Back up even further, why was the cop running the plate at all?  Speeding? Blowing a stop sign? Driving a shiny car while black?


It's about 'beyond the stop' and performance objectives.

cop runs plates to come up with excuses for stops which go towards his performance objectives. If he can go 'beyond the stop' to make some sort of bust on some victimless crime that really scores well on his performance objectives. If he scores well for the year he could get promoted, increase in salary, OT, shift preference, etc and so forth.
2013-01-05 01:06:10 AM
1 votes:
After seeing a pic of the dude, I'm okay with this.
2013-01-05 12:36:14 AM
1 votes:

Indypendy: Loaded Six String: Unless you can articulate how the plate being on the same model vehicle yet a different color constitutes probably cause, no. Have a nice day officer.

/As a side note, allowing police to pull over and cite vehicles for having modified exhausts based on an ambiguous noise level (can be heard from a block away) is complete bull for numerous reasons. I would not be surprised if it is in fact a run around anti-profiling measures.

So they pull over a lot of skinny, white kids?

[www.lotustalk.com image 500x277]
/Probably sounds like a revved up weedeater on meth.


They did in my case. You should have seen the look on the deputy's face when he saw a skinny white kid and his ~50 year old father in the vehicle. You could tell we weren't the droids he was looking for.

/Low rumbly sound, more like a 6 cylinder than the 4-banger that's actually under the hood.
//Will be glad to be rid of the car.
///Previous owner installed the exhaust can.
2013-01-05 12:31:14 AM
1 votes:

Loaded Six String: Unless you can articulate how the plate being on the same model vehicle yet a different color constitutes probably cause, no. Have a nice day officer.

/As a side note, allowing police to pull over and cite vehicles for having modified exhausts based on an ambiguous noise level (can be heard from a block away) is complete bull for numerous reasons. I would not be surprised if it is in fact a run around anti-profiling measures.


So they pull over a lot of skinny, white kids?

www.lotustalk.com
/Probably sounds like a revved up weedeater on meth.
2013-01-05 12:19:57 AM
1 votes:

Loaded Six String: Unless you can articulate how the plate being on the same model vehicle yet a different color constitutes probably cause, no.


Odd, I would think "yes". Different color = different vehicle. Kinda the whole point of noting the vehicle's color in the first place.

Seriously, I always thought one would have to report a color change to the DMV. No?
2013-01-05 12:11:02 AM
1 votes:

Kraftwerk Orange: Simple color change? Maybe not.

This on the other hand:

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x454]

Might be considered probable cause.


I despise seeing vehicles like that. A perfectly fine Chevy or Caddilac turned into a garish nightmare with even poorer gas mileage and a speedo that won't work right because of the oversized wheels. Oh well. They want the attention, they can have it.
2013-01-05 12:07:57 AM
1 votes:
Unless you can articulate how the plate being on the same model vehicle yet a different color constitutes probably cause, no. Have a nice day officer.

/As a side note, allowing police to pull over and cite vehicles for having modified exhausts based on an ambiguous noise level (can be heard from a block away) is complete bull for numerous reasons. I would not be surprised if it is in fact a run around anti-profiling measures.
2013-01-05 12:05:34 AM
1 votes:

CruiserTwelve: sno man: Back up even further, why was the cop running the plate at all?  Speeding? Blowing a stop sign? Driving a shiny car while black?

Cops run plates at random all the time. Checking to see if the car is stolen, the plates are being misused, warrants for the registered owner, etc.


Our local cops have plate scanners to do that automatically. They don't even have to lift a finger - the system scans every plate of every car, and checks for tickets or other pertinent info. They're getting ready to connect that system to our street cameras as well.
2013-01-05 12:03:48 AM
1 votes:

sno man: jaylectricity: Every one knows that cops run random plates just for something to do. That's why I always turn off the road when a cop pulls in behind me. I don't want him getting any ideas.
CruiserTwelve: Cops run plates at random all the time. Checking to see if the car is stolen, the plates are being misused, warrants for the registered owner, etc.

Fair enough...
How's that whole "Land of the Free" thing working out?


??

Police have always been allowed to run your plates. Just like they can follow you for 50 miles down the road for no reason at all to see if you do something. "Land of the free" doesn't mean "Land where cops don't exist till YOU want them."

You're not one of those ones who always post "When seconds count, the police are minutes away!" crap, are you? Cuz this is what's known as "proactive policing"--checking to see if a car is stolen BEFORE someone reports it stolen, you know? Would you prefer the cop wait till the car gets reported, or would you be the one whining that "The cop saw that car driving down the road and didn't do anything! What a lazy pig!"
2013-01-04 11:59:36 PM
1 votes:
userserve-ak.last.fm
2013-01-04 11:10:35 PM
1 votes:
jaylectricity: Every one knows that cops run random plates just for something to do. That's why I always turn off the road when a cop pulls in behind me. I don't want him getting any ideas.
CruiserTwelve: Cops run plates at random all the time. Checking to see if the car is stolen, the plates are being misused, warrants for the registered owner, etc.

Fair enough...
How's that whole "Land of the Free" thing working out?
 
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