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(Gizmag)   NASA considers putting asteroid into orbit around the moon, because science   (gizmag.com) divider line 69
    More: Strange, asteroids, orbits, NASA, moons, ion engines, NASA considers, W.M. Keck Observatory, lunar orbit  
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2839 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jan 2013 at 3:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-04 08:29:19 PM
Didn't NASA watch any old Loony Tunes cartoons?

www.crtaci.net

/This should end well...
 
2013-01-04 08:35:26 PM
That a actually makes a lot of sense. Neat!
 
2013-01-04 08:40:36 PM
Yo dawg, we heard you liked moons, so we put a moon around the moon, so you can watch your moon on the moon.
 
2013-01-04 09:16:13 PM

smadge1: Yo dawg, we heard you liked moons, so we put a moon around the moon, so you can watch your moon on the moon.


Nicely done.
 
2013-01-04 09:44:30 PM
blogs.nature.com

What could possibly go wrong?
 
2013-01-04 09:50:20 PM

CigaretteSmokingMan: [blogs.nature.com image 362x274]

What could possibly go wrong?


Nah. More like: "I read in FARK that the meteor NASA pulled into the Earth-Moon Lagrange Point 1 accidentally got out of control and headed right for my house yesterday. Getting a kick, etc."

Distance from Impact: 100.00 meters ( = 328.00 feet )
Projectile diameter: 7.00 meters ( = 23.00 feet )
Projectile Density: 1500 kg/m3
Impact Velocity: 17.00 km per second ( = 10.60 miles per second )
Impact Angle: 45 degrees
Target Density: 2500 kg/m3
Target Type: Sedimentary Rock

Energy:
Energy before atmospheric entry: 3.89 x 1013 Joules = 0.93 x 10-2 MegaTons TNT
The average interval between impacts of this size somewhere on Earth is 3.0 years
Major Global Changes:

The Earth is not strongly disturbed by the impact and loses negligible mass.
The impact does not make a noticeable change in the tilt of Earth's axis (The impact does not shift the Earth's orbit noticeably.

Atmospheric Entry:
The projectile begins to breakup at an altitude of 72500 meters = 238000 ft
The projectile bursts into a cloud of fragments at an altitude of 42700 meters = 140000 ft
The residual velocity of the projectile fragments after the burst is 14.3 km/s = 8.87 miles/s
The energy of the airburst is 1.14 x 1013 Joules = 0.27 x 10-2 MegaTons.
No crater is formed, although large fragments may strike the surface.

Air Blast:
The air blast at this location would not be noticed. (The overpressure is less than 1 Pa)


You might go outside and look for meteorite pieces.
 
2013-01-04 10:29:07 PM

StopLurkListen: The value isn't the price here on Earth; it's how much it would cost to lift the couple hundred tons of it out of Earth's gravity well. Plus the total lift capacity of every nation's space program might not be enough to lift that much material. The stuff is already out there -- just bring it to where we can use it!


I know that, I was just getting an idea for a basic estimate of such a rock's worth in today's commodities prices. It would also be a lot easier to refine that nickel without a bunch of nasty tailings.
 
2013-01-04 11:15:03 PM

StopLurkListen: Air Blast:
The air blast at this location would not be noticed. (The overpressure is less than 1 Pa)


I hate lines like that. There's a goddamn infinity of overpressures that are less than 1Pa, HOW MUCH LESS?

And if they're going to insist, could they at least choose an actual no-effect pressure level? A 1Pa pressure jump is a sound intensity of 93dB, you'd have to be deaf to not hear that.
 
2013-01-04 11:17:18 PM

maniacbastard: Quantum Apostrophe: maniacbastard : What do you expect to find in there to make it worthwile to "mine" an asteroid? With what equipment? How?

What I would find, materials and minerals that formed in low gravity, in conditions that cannot be achieved on a planetary surface that may be novel. Platinum group metals as well. I would expect to find illimite and hydrates that I can use to extract liquid oxygen raw titanium and iron. Since the asteroid in question is carbonaceous, I would be able to extract carbon that with the iron that I already have, I have the ability to make stainless steel. Since I have titanium, if I bring along some vandium and other alloying ingredients, I can make Titanium. Also since I am in zero g I'd bet I I can use a single nucleation site and grow monster single crystal versions of every metal I mentioned.

How would I do it? It is called ISRU equipment and you pay me money and I magically use formulas and magic boxes called 'computers' to 'design engineer' things that do whatever process you want. I've worked on planetary drilling systems and ISRU before. it would be a technology development effort, but it requires no breakthroughs in materials or power or anything else. And the low gravity would be a nice bonus.
Given the fact that the 7 meter asteroid in question weighs 500 tons roughly, that is a lot of material to turn into something. And a great testbed for a wide variety of ISRU methods.


Yeah, but how much longer will it make you live?
 
2013-01-04 11:22:41 PM

erik-k: StopLurkListen: Air Blast:
The air blast at this location would not be noticed. (The overpressure is less than 1 Pa)

I hate lines like that. There's a goddamn infinity of overpressures that are less than 1Pa, HOW MUCH LESS?

And if they're going to insist, could they at least choose an actual no-effect pressure level? A 1Pa pressure jump is a sound intensity of 93dB, you'd have to be deaf to not hear that.


Sorry... The simulator estimates how likely you are to die from X distance, whether from heat pulse or from being buried by ejecta or shattered by a shock wave. If you're not likely to die the answers aren't well tuned. I just posted the results to give a long answer that boiled down to "If you're directly under the meteor, well, not much is going to happen".

http://impact.ese.ic.ac.uk/ImpactEffects/

Here, try it out! It's geeky morbid fun.
 
2013-01-05 12:25:05 AM
Considering NASA's budget has been stripped to the point where getting gas for their Prius has to be put off to every other week now....

/now let's go fund some more drones for the DoD!
//and DHS
///and the EPA
////and NASCAR
 
2013-01-05 03:00:48 AM

StopLurkListen: erik-k: StopLurkListen: Air Blast:
The air blast at this location would not be noticed. (The overpressure is less than 1 Pa)

I hate lines like that. There's a goddamn infinity of overpressures that are less than 1Pa, HOW MUCH LESS?

And if they're going to insist, could they at least choose an actual no-effect pressure level? A 1Pa pressure jump is a sound intensity of 93dB, you'd have to be deaf to not hear that.

Sorry... The simulator estimates how likely you are to die from X distance, whether from heat pulse or from being buried by ejecta or shattered by a shock wave. If you're not likely to die the answers aren't well tuned. I just posted the results to give a long answer that boiled down to "If you're directly under the meteor, well, not much is going to happen".

http://impact.ese.ic.ac.uk/ImpactEffects/

Here, try it out! It's geeky morbid fun.


Oh, I'm not angry at you :P But non-bounded comparisons bug me none the less.

Now I wonder what happens if Mars rams into Earth while in a retrograde orbit...

/planet dust! yay!

maniacbastard: Since I have titanium, if I bring along some vandium and other alloying ingredients, I can make Titanium.


The neat thing is, since these asteroids never lived at the bottom of a gravity well, they'll probably have in relative abundance all kinds of rare-as-shiat elements that are only present in tiny quantities on earth's surface because they all sank to the core when it was molten.
 
2013-01-05 06:47:49 AM
The first rule of Asteroid Moon Club is, you don't talk about Asteroid Moon Club.
 
2013-01-05 07:07:33 AM

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: "We don't need nuclear weapons. We have rocks. In space. We can drop them on your heads."


It worked for the Krogan against the Turians.
 
2013-01-05 09:40:20 AM

p4p3rm4t3: [img22.imageshack.us image 430x242]
Powerful as a nuke, minus the radiation.



And in orbit for around two decades already. The pentagon figured out a loophole in mutally assured destruction. If you enemy makes your county a radioactive wasteland, just kill them and move into theirs.
 
2013-01-05 01:04:15 PM

Jarhead_h: p4p3rm4t3: [img22.imageshack.us image 430x242]
Powerful as a nuke, minus the radiation.


And in orbit for around two decades already. The pentagon figured out a loophole in mutally assured destruction. If you enemy makes your county a radioactive wasteland, just kill them and move into theirs.


What is that?
 
2013-01-05 03:17:15 PM
This sounds like an interesting idea. If this works it could eventually lead to large scale asteroid mining closer to earth. Just need to make sure these bad boys wont hit us eventually.
 
2013-01-06 12:26:05 AM

sawzallz: Jarhead_h: p4p3rm4t3: [img22.imageshack.us image 430x242]
Powerful as a nuke, minus the radiation.


And in orbit for around two decades already. The pentagon figured out a loophole in mutally assured destruction. If you enemy makes your county a radioactive wasteland, just kill them and move into theirs.

What is that?


Rod from god.
 
2013-01-07 09:28:15 AM

Stone Meadow: way south: No links from me, but I do recall some anecdotes about laser guided concrete bombs being used during the gulf wars. Though of as an expensive, but stupidly powerful, battering ram.

I thought...no way...but there it is: Concrete Bombs.


That was a pretty terse article. Scarcely an abstract on concrete.
 
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