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(Daily Mail)   Bizarre pictures show 19th Century 'photoshopping'. Pixels Schmixels   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 51
    More: Interesting, Victorians, beheading  
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21284 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Jan 2013 at 9:47 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



51 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-01-02 09:48:42 PM
H-pix-Sixteen.
 
2013-01-02 09:51:34 PM
Ha ha
 
2013-01-02 09:52:10 PM
This looks shooped.  I've seen a lot of remove Trotsky from Russian history in my days, and those pics have a lot of missing Trotsky.
 
2013-01-02 09:53:04 PM
To White-Russian?
 
2013-01-02 09:56:02 PM
What's funnier is that, given how serious people tended to look in photos back then, the beheaded heads look so solemn.
 
2013-01-02 10:01:27 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-02 10:02:26 PM

brap: This looks shooped.  I've seen a lot of remove Trotsky from Russian history in my days, and those pics have a lot of missing Trotsky.


Done in three.
 
2013-01-02 10:03:40 PM
HOLY HELL that last one has a big head
 
2013-01-02 10:03:41 PM
My art teacher used to do this sort of thing during class time. He'd let us take pics at the start of the lesson and develop them during the lesson, sometimes they were ready, sometimes not. He was a pretty good teacher as I recall. Let us bring in our own music to listen to during lessons as well. Stoned most of the time but no-one seemed to care.
 
2013-01-02 10:06:14 PM
My human family...
 
2013-01-02 10:07:19 PM

Indubitably: My human family...


We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.
 
2013-01-02 10:08:14 PM

Indubitably: Indubitably: My human family...

We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.


No secret agent required.

Just us.

Peace.
 
2013-01-02 10:08:44 PM
My dad used to develop pictures as a hobby (darkroom in the basement, the whole nine yards) and occasionally did things like that. Like switch my head with my brother's, stuff like that. I wish I still had a couple of those; maybe he does, who knows.
 
2013-01-02 10:09:16 PM
I guess it was all a lie: victorian folk really liked having fun with a bit of head.
 
2013-01-02 10:16:40 PM
*passes out*
 
2013-01-02 10:16:41 PM
Tis only a flesh wound!
 
2013-01-02 10:21:32 PM
www.executedtoday.com

www.executedtoday.com

Has anyone seen Tovarich Yezhov?
 
2013-01-02 10:27:39 PM
They look like Terry Gilliam cartoons to me.

encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
God sees what you did there.
 
2013-01-02 10:29:13 PM

Indubitably: Indubitably: Indubitably: My human family...

We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.

No secret agent required.

Just us.

Peace.


Do you get a fark new comments email when you respond to yourself?
 
2013-01-02 10:36:23 PM

Mark Ratner: Indubitably: Indubitably: Indubitably: My human family...

We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.

No secret agent required.

Just us.

Peace.

Do you get a fark new comments email when you respond to yourself?


No, but it helps me find my comments when a thread grows. *)
 
2013-01-02 10:37:36 PM

Indubitably: Mark Ratner: Indubitably: Indubitably: Indubitably: My human family...

We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.

No secret agent required.

Just us.

Peace.

Do you get a fark new comments email when you respond to yourself?

No, but it helps me find my comments when a thread grows. *)


P.S. I care more about what I say than what you say, and so do you...
 
2013-01-02 10:46:57 PM

Gyrfalcon: What's funnier is that, given how serious people tended to look in photos back then, the beheaded heads look so solemn.


As opposed to laughing and yucking it up, which is how severed heads SHOULD look.
 
2013-01-02 10:51:56 PM

Zeno-25: brap: This looks shooped.  I've seen a lot of remove Trotsky from Russian history in my days, and those pics have a lot of missing Trotsky.

Done in three.


Cottleston Fairies?
 
2013-01-02 10:54:52 PM

Indubitably: Indubitably: Mark Ratner: Indubitably: Indubitably: Indubitably: My human family...

We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.

No secret agent required.

Just us.

Peace.

Do you get a fark new comments email when you respond to yourself?

No, but it helps me find my comments when a thread grows. *)

P.S. I care more about what I say than what you say, and so do you...


I wouldn't say I care more about what you say to yourself.
 
2013-01-02 11:02:52 PM
Rutherford unperson. Substitute Ogilvy. Ogilvy blog details as follows: war hero, recently killed, Malabar front. Today awarded posthumous secondary order of conspicuous merit second class.
 
2013-01-02 11:04:06 PM

Mark Ratner: Indubitably: Indubitably: Mark Ratner: Indubitably: Indubitably: Indubitably: My human family...

We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.

No secret agent required.

Just us.

Peace.

Do you get a fark new comments email when you respond to yourself?

No, but it helps me find my comments when a thread grows. *)

P.S. I care more about what I say than what you say, and so do you...

I wouldn't say I care more about what you say to yourself.


You just experienced a Mach 1.5 whoosh. Savor it. For it will be brief. *)
 
2013-01-02 11:06:40 PM

Fano: Zeno-25: brap: This looks shooped.  I've seen a lot of remove Trotsky from Russian history in my days, and those pics have a lot of missing Trotsky.

Done in three.

Cottleston Fairies?


Oh you are throwing down a Photoshoop history off?  My Australiopithicus ancestors covered your dad's  cave paintings with ARSE PRINTS!

Of course it was a small ass, as was the fashion in the day.
 
2013-01-02 11:08:44 PM

Petroleum Oligarch: [www.executedtoday.com image 440x296]

[www.executedtoday.com image 440x294]

Has anyone seen Tovarich Yezhov?


[knock, knock, knock]
 
2013-01-02 11:12:43 PM

brap: Fano: Zeno-25: brap: This looks shooped.  I've seen a lot of remove Trotsky from Russian history in my days, and those pics have a lot of missing Trotsky.

Done in three.

Cottleston Fairies?

Oh you are throwing down a Photoshoop history off?  My Australiopithicus ancestors covered your dad's  cave paintings with ARSE PRINTS!

Of course it was a small ass, as was the fashion in the day.


Just staving off premature announcement of thread closure, as I am often wont to do.
 
2013-01-02 11:33:38 PM
indubitably apparently can't ctrl. f. take that self-love to facebook.
 
2013-01-02 11:34:39 PM
Et tu, Terry Gilliam? I expect he got some of his inspiration from this sort of old photograph trickery. But the Victorians were also adept enough to do much more sophisticated fakes.

"Spirit" photographs created by double exposure of films were extremely popular. Another use of trickery was the creation of large group photos not by posing large groups (which is impossible) but by creating a collage of individual photographs. The Victorian period was fond of very large groups and photographs to sell to their members, so they made a fine art out of faking this quickly and cheaply. That's why there are Victorian photographs in which nobody is blinking, sneezing, making a silly face, etc. (Also, photographs were taken seriously--they were considered a formal portrait, not a casual souvenir, so the models tend not to be smiling, but then if you had to pose absolutely motionless for a long exposure, chances are you wouldn't be smiling either.)

Many of the techniques that we associate with Photoshop were developed even before the use of film. Some of them were done working with glass or metal plates using acid etching or physical deformation of the plate. A fine example of what an artist can do with glass is Dali's Moustache book. The artist who took Dali's staged photographs achieved many effects without analog or digittal image manipulation, by melting and shaping the glass plate directly. He was a genius in his own way, worthy perhaps of the surrealism of the Master Himself. I recommend this book to buyers and you can probably find it at a good public library or possibly more information and photos online.
 
2013-01-02 11:38:02 PM
Remember that internet beheadding craze? Yeah, so don't I.
 
2013-01-02 11:47:32 PM
In addition to photographic trickery, you'd be amazed to know how many of the special effects of the movies were invented before 1914. Matte shots (where an object or person is inserted in a scene) and the use of mirrors and reflections on clear glass to insert ghosts into scenes or to make more realistic 3-d backgrounds were all invented back when film cameras were cranked by hand and shot less than 24 frames a second. These techniques were built on the techniques used by artists to compose pictures and collages, as well as to fake early photographs.

A lot of great inventions are much older than you think they are. The photocopier, the fax machine and the digital transmission of pictures, maps and blue prints were all invented before the middle of the nineteenth century and even photography itself has proven older than the ostensible inventors. The first television sets were sold well before the first commercial broadcast was made and radio was demonstrated experimentally well before Marconi. If history had been a little different, some of these inventions could have been developed commercially a half century or a century earlier, while others might not have been invented until much more recently.

There is chance and contingency in all things. The fallacy of necessary and inevitable progress, called the Whig Fallacy by a great Tory historian, is tempting in all ages, but even in this technological age, we have to contemplate how touch and go the best and most important inventions and technologies are.

The study of old technology like this is very educational and teaches you to respect our ancestors (who were no dummies) and to be a bit more skeptical about our contempories (who are no brighter than our ancestors, but sometimes merely lucky to have the right materials and tools to hand at last).
 
2013-01-02 11:49:29 PM
No ha ha guy?
 
2013-01-02 11:59:21 PM

brantgoose: In addition to photographic trickery, you'd be amazed to know how many of the special effects of the movies were invented before 1914. Matte shots (where an object or person is inserted in a scene) and the use of mirrors and reflections on clear glass to insert ghosts into scenes or to make more realistic 3-d backgrounds were all invented back when film cameras were cranked by hand and shot less than 24 frames a second. These techniques were built on the techniques used by artists to compose pictures and collages, as well as to fake early photographs.

A lot of great inventions are much older than you think they are. The photocopier, the fax machine and the digital transmission of pictures, maps and blue prints were all invented before the middle of the nineteenth century and even photography itself has proven older than the ostensible inventors. The first television sets were sold well before the first commercial broadcast was made and radio was demonstrated experimentally well before Marconi. If history had been a little different, some of these inventions could have been developed commercially a half century or a century earlier, while others might not have been invented until much more recently.

There is chance and contingency in all things. The fallacy of necessary and inevitable progress, called the Whig Fallacy by a great Tory historian, is tempting in all ages, but even in this technological age, we have to contemplate how touch and go the best and most important inventions and technologies are.

The study of old technology like this is very educational and teaches you to respect our ancestors (who were no dummies) and to be a bit more skeptical about our contempories (who are no brighter than our ancestors, but sometimes merely lucky to have the right materials and tools to hand at last).


Excellent post. I'm always interested to see technologies and concepts that are older than people think. It's amazing what can be done with ingenuity.

Off to tvtropes to read the "older than they think" page.
 
2013-01-03 12:07:24 AM

NuttierThanEver: Rutherford unperson. Substitute Ogilvy. Ogilvy blog details as follows: war hero, recently killed, Malabar front. Today awarded posthumous secondary order of conspicuous merit second class.


img.tfd.com

"Excellent work, Brother."
 
2013-01-03 12:16:31 AM

brantgoose: Et tu, Terry Gilliam? I expect he got some of his inspiration from this sort of old photograph trickery. But the Victorians were also adept enough to do much more sophisticated fakes.

 The Victorian period was fond of very large groups and photographs to sell to their members, so they made a fine art out of faking this quickly and cheaply. That's why there are Victorian photographs in which nobody is blinking, sneezing, making a silly face, etc. (Also, photographs were taken seriously--they were considered a formal portrait, not a casual souvenir, so the models tend not to be smiling, but then if you had to pose absolutely motionless for a long exposure, chances are you wouldn't be smiling either.)


The real reason everybody is so serious is that Photography was a very expensive enterprise, with the photographer more of a chemist, mixing his own bath solutions and plate coatings (many times to his own demise, breathing toxic fumes in his wagon), than pro poser and mood setter. It took minutes for a photograph to emerge on the plate and ANY movement could be fatal to the shot.  That's why they were always holding a post, sitting down, back to a wall. They thought it was an improvement to the hours of sitting for a portrait, but still was a solemn, expensive occasion. These after-shot alterations were a part of a photographer's bag of tricks to correct those motion-smears in portraiture.
 
2013-01-03 01:08:46 AM
Ugh. "...decapitated head..." Actually, the heads are disembodied. It's the bodies that are decapitated.
 
2013-01-03 01:54:49 AM
Those were indeed heady times.
 
2013-01-03 02:30:18 AM

Petroleum Oligarch: [www.executedtoday.com image 440x296]

[www.executedtoday.com image 440x294]

Has anyone seen Tovarich Yezhov?


That's the toadiest looking toad I've ever seen. Don't even need to look him up to know that he committed atrocities. I can just imagine his little weasel laugh. Would probably sound something like this:
i45.tinypic.com
 
2013-01-03 03:25:52 AM

DrGunsforHands: Petroleum Oligarch: [www.executedtoday.com image 440x296]

[www.executedtoday.com image 440x294]

Has anyone seen Tovarich Yezhov?

That's the toadiest looking toad I've ever seen. Don't even need to look him up to know that he committed atrocities. I can just imagine his little weasel laugh. Would probably sound something like this:
[i45.tinypic.com image 484x326]


[knock, knock, knock]
Sergei! Keep engine running! Another person referencing former comrade who no longer exists!
 
2013-01-03 07:14:49 AM
Images like this were the precursor to picture manipulation software like Photoshop and Instagram

So Instagram is now one of the standards for photo manipulation? Wait until china and Iran find out.

/That looks instagramed
//I can tell by the Sepia tone
///Having seen a lot of instagrams in my day
 
2013-01-03 07:17:51 AM

brantgoose: In addition to photographic trickery, you'd be amazed to know how many of the special effects of the movies were invented before 1914. Matte shots (where an object or person is inserted in a scene) and the use of mirrors and reflections on clear glass to insert ghosts into scenes or to make more realistic 3-d backgrounds were all invented back when film cameras were cranked by hand and shot less than 24 frames a second. These techniques were built on the techniques used by artists to compose pictures and collages, as well as to fake early photographs.

A lot of great inventions are much older than you think they are. The photocopier, the fax machine and the digital transmission of pictures, maps and blue prints were all invented before the middle of the nineteenth century and even photography itself has proven older than the ostensible inventors. The first television sets were sold well before the first commercial broadcast was made and radio was demonstrated experimentally well before Marconi. If history had been a little different, some of these inventions could have been developed commercially a half century or a century earlier, while others might not have been invented until much more recently.

There is chance and contingency in all things. The fallacy of necessary and inevitable progress, called the Whig Fallacy by a great Tory historian, is tempting in all ages, but even in this technological age, we have to contemplate how touch and go the best and most important inventions and technologies are.

The study of old technology like this is very educational and teaches you to respect our ancestors (who were no dummies) and to be a bit more skeptical about our contempories (who are no brighter than our ancestors, but sometimes merely lucky to have the right materials and tools to hand at last).


And those old effects still look better than CGI Hulk
 
2013-01-03 07:23:27 AM
This is presently an exhibit at the Met (NY)
 
2013-01-03 08:37:00 AM

DrGunsforHands: That's the toadiest looking toad I've ever seen. Don't even need to look him up to know that he committed atrocities. I can just imagine his little weasel laugh. Would probably sound something like this


I found a picture of him as a kid:
vinylmationkingdom.com
 
2013-01-03 08:54:41 AM
Well, this is one way - though certainly not the best - to get a little head.
 
2013-01-03 10:23:33 AM

abhorrent1: Images like this were the precursor to picture manipulation software like Photoshop and Instagram

So Instagram is now one of the standards for photo manipulation? Wait until china and Iran find out.

/That looks instagramed
//I can tell by the Sepia tone
///Having seen a lot of instagrams in my day


Yes, it is, sadly. Over the weekend, I was watching some Photoshop "how to" vids on youtube, seeing if there was anything new or interesting. Some woman was showing you how to download and use the Instagram inspired borders and filters she created for Photoshop. It was like passing a car wreck, I could not stop watching, as bad and wrong as it was. WTF? I am not taking the latest and most powerful photo editing software to recreate the look of 126 film cameras of the 70s. I don't get it.
 
2013-01-03 12:10:15 PM
You see kids, cutting and pasting were things people actually did with razor blades and glue. And quite well.
 
2013-01-03 12:44:47 PM

Rickenbacker:

Yes, it is, sadly. Over the weekend, I was watching some Photoshop "how to" vids on youtube, seeing if there was anything new or interesting. Some woman was showing you how to download and use the Instagram inspired borders and filters she created for Photoshop. It was like passing a car wreck, I could not stop watching, as bad and wrong as it was. WTF? I am not taking the latest and most powerful photo editing software to recreate the look of 126 film cameras of the 70s. I don't get it.


Eh, it's no different from those "old timey" photos you can have taken at various "pioneer days" themed parks in the US. You know the ones where you can dress up like an 1800s whore for "nostalgic amusement."
 
2013-01-03 02:29:57 PM

Indubitably: Indubitably: Mark Ratner: Indubitably: Indubitably: Indubitably: My human family...

We teach each other, we learn from each other, we bond.

No secret agent required.

Just us.

Peace.

Do you get a fark new comments email when you respond to yourself?

No, but it helps me find my comments when a thread grows. *)

P.S. I care more about what I say than what you say, and so do you...


Dude... Just favorite yourself and give yourself a unique color, and all your posts will stand out! No need for this multiple-replies-to-yourself bullshiat...
 
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