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(News One)   Samuel L. Jackson isn't having any of your shiat today, Jake Hamilton   (newsone.com) divider line 22
    More: Hero, Samuel L Jackson, Jake Hamilton, Katt Williams, Spike Lee, Jamie Foxx, Quentin Tarantino, Steven Spielberg  
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12040 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 03 Jan 2013 at 12:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-01-03 06:53:19 AM  
3 votes:
A word is a word. Words by themselves have no power. They are words. What empowers a word is the context, and meaning behind the word. If you're having an interview with Samuel L. Jackson, and you're bringing up the topic of ethnic slurs in a Tarantino movie he's in -- don't be surprised if this is how Mr. Jackson responds. This question has been answered repeatedly by Mr. Jackson over the years of working on various projects with Tarantino.

Tarantino doesn't use that word in his movies because he wants to 'be black'. He doesn't use that word in his movies to be 'historically accurate'. He uses that word because he makes movies that bring back the cinematic nostalgia of his childhood. He uses it based on artistic merit. And it's his right to use it. Just as it's Spike Lee's right, and the right of everyone else to criticisize him about it.

And Katt Williams only proves Sammy's point by using the 'No True Scotsman' argument when it comes to using that ethnic slur.

The films that Tarantino grew up with used ethnic slurs repeatedly, and Tarantino loves Blaxploitation films. He also loves Kung Fu films, which were equally as racist -- but I don't see him catch nearly enough flak for the racism in the Kill Bill movies as he does for his use of the word n*gger in his other films.

Tarantino makes films to bring back senses of nostalgia of old films he grew up with. You can't whitewash racism from our history. But you can be a mature adult and look at it in context. You do more damage to race relations by pretending that era of Hollywood didn't exist and refuse to acknowledge it in retrospect. You demean the progress culture has made since then by refusing to be an adult and sticking fingers in your ears when the topic comes up and going "Lalala". If you want to end racism, then it's easier to own our history and recognize we were wrong for what we did and move on, and when looking back in time, being able to look back and recognize it for what it is.

Tarantino may not be a Spielberg, and I don't think he's ever said he's tried to be Spielberg. I think of him more like Kevin Smith. His films aren't to send messages, they're made for target audiences who recognize elements in his films for what they are, and if you aren't part of that target audience, then you'll consider him a hack who needs to stop making films.

Tarantino does nostalgia, plain and simple. It never ceases to amaze me that people don't get that.
2013-01-03 02:48:09 AM  
3 votes:

The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: LectertheChef: I don't see how you could get away with not saying it in that particular movie. Do people really think you can just whitewash the racism in this country, as easily as you would wash down some fried chicken with grape soda?

I love fried chicken and Welch's grape soda.


/pretty damn white


Anyone who doesn't love fried chicken and grape soda has something wrong with them.
2013-01-03 01:05:49 AM  
3 votes:
tvmedia.ign.com
2013-01-03 07:28:07 AM  
2 votes:

Weatherkiss: His audience is also (or should also) consist of adults who recognize his style as nostalgic. In his childhood, it was perfectly normal for such racism to be in films, and it was prevalent everywhere. This isn't that time though. Tarantino's films are a drop of water in an ocean of modern-day cinema that rejects and takes the correct views of racism. I'd even go as far as to say the people who watch Tarantino's films are probably movie lovers themselves and can perfectly tell the difference between the right and wrong ways to go about racism.


Should also is a funny phrase for the subject. Think of the people that saw Basterds. Lots of folks, and I don't mean our friends who may have gotten other messages, remember the violence. Not the nostalgia of the violence, but the actual action. Tarantino may be a drop in an expanding pool, but a metric fark ton of people know who he is and pay to see his movies.

Think of how smart in terms of common sense the average person is. 49% of people are worse judges. And a boatload of them pay to see Tarantino movies because of previous expectations of violence that he has built himself on. Straight up dumb people those movies. I look forward to seeing what their nostalgia brings for us when they want to refer back to Tarantino. Not an exploration of his own nostalgia, but a re-imagining of overtones that stuck with them. And I'll be there, stuck in the middle with you.
2013-01-03 12:36:05 AM  
2 votes:

Irving Maimway: Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep


You like people who have no manners? You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons? The interviewer was nice enough to give publicity to his movie and that's how he treats him? Fark Samuel Jackson. Yeah, I said it. Fark him. His ego has grown way too big.
2013-01-03 12:26:35 AM  
2 votes:
Samuel L. Jackson is awesome.
2013-01-03 11:47:41 PM  
1 votes:

Second Try: 37,000 white women raped by black men in the USA each year.
Media silent.


i248.photobucket.com
sorry
2013-01-03 05:39:15 PM  
1 votes:

Shocho: This is an amazing discussion on a website that censors words like fark and shiat. Sam is laughing at you too, Fark.


I'd like to ask Jackson what he thinks of the controversial use of "Attractive and Successful African American" in Django. He'd probably lol when told about the filter.
2013-01-03 04:14:21 PM  
1 votes:
This is an amazing discussion on a website that censors words like fark and shiat. Sam is laughing at you too, Fark.
2013-01-03 11:34:10 AM  
1 votes:

B.L.Z. Bub: Irving Maimway: Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep

You like people who have no manners? You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons? The interviewer was nice enough to give publicity to his movie and that's how he treats him? Fark Samuel Jackson. Yeah, I said it. Fark him. His ego has grown way too big.


Not sure if trolling but I'll wade into this one.  It's Hamilton's question that probably (rightfully) annoyed Jackson.  "There's been a lot of controversy surrounding the N-word in this movie..." Hamilton begins. "

The only controversy is the media-generated one.  The word as used in the movie is perfectly fine in context.  It's a movie about slaves and that's how slaves were referred to.  No controversy, no issue, just history.  A sordid, embarrassing history, yes, but denying it happened or trying to whitewash it is ignorant and insulting to any African-American.  So, if Hamilton wants to talk about a pointless, hyped up controversy, then I'm fine with Jackson making him squirm.
2013-01-03 09:40:24 AM  
1 votes:
www.tv-nostalgie.de

"Well I got news for you... today or a hundred years from now don't make a bit of difference - as far as they're concerned, we'll always be ni**ers."
- Jimmy (Jake Sisko)
2013-01-03 07:13:26 AM  
1 votes:

Pronoun: Weatherkiss: A word is a word. Words by themselves have no power. They are words. What empowers a word is the context, and meaning behind the word. If you're having an interview with Samuel L. Jackson, and you're bringing up the topic of ethnic slurs in a Tarantino movie he's in -- don't be surprised if this is how Mr. Jackson responds. This question has been answered repeatedly by Mr. Jackson over the years of working on various projects with Tarantino.

Tarantino doesn't use that word in his movies because he wants to 'be black'. He doesn't use that word in his movies to be 'historically accurate'. He uses that word because he makes movies that bring back the cinematic nostalgia of his childhood. He uses it based on artistic merit. And it's his right to use it. Just as it's Spike Lee's right, and the right of everyone else to criticisize him about it.

And Katt Williams only proves Sammy's point by using the 'No True Scotsman' argument when it comes to using that ethnic slur.

The films that Tarantino grew up with used ethnic slurs repeatedly, and Tarantino loves Blaxploitation films. He also loves Kung Fu films, which were equally as racist -- but I don't see him catch nearly enough flak for the racism in the Kill Bill movies as he does for his use of the word n*gger in his other films.

Tarantino makes films to bring back senses of nostalgia of old films he grew up with. You can't whitewash racism from our history. But you can be a mature adult and look at it in context. You do more damage to race relations by pretending that era of Hollywood didn't exist and refuse to acknowledge it in retrospect. You demean the progress culture has made since then by refusing to be an adult and sticking fingers in your ears when the topic comes up and going "Lalala". If you want to end racism, then it's easier to own our history and recognize we were wrong for what we did and move on, and when looking back in time, being able to look back and recognize it for what it is.

Tara ...


His audience is also (or should also) consist of adults who recognize his style as nostalgic. In his childhood, it was perfectly normal for such racism to be in films, and it was prevalent everywhere. This isn't that time though. Tarantino's films are a drop of water in an ocean of modern-day cinema that rejects and takes the correct views of racism. I'd even go as far as to say the people who watch Tarantino's films are probably movie lovers themselves and can perfectly tell the difference between the right and wrong ways to go about racism.
2013-01-03 07:04:24 AM  
1 votes:

Weatherkiss: A word is a word. Words by themselves have no power. They are words. What empowers a word is the context, and meaning behind the word. If you're having an interview with Samuel L. Jackson, and you're bringing up the topic of ethnic slurs in a Tarantino movie he's in -- don't be surprised if this is how Mr. Jackson responds. This question has been answered repeatedly by Mr. Jackson over the years of working on various projects with Tarantino.

Tarantino doesn't use that word in his movies because he wants to 'be black'. He doesn't use that word in his movies to be 'historically accurate'. He uses that word because he makes movies that bring back the cinematic nostalgia of his childhood. He uses it based on artistic merit. And it's his right to use it. Just as it's Spike Lee's right, and the right of everyone else to criticisize him about it.

And Katt Williams only proves Sammy's point by using the 'No True Scotsman' argument when it comes to using that ethnic slur.

The films that Tarantino grew up with used ethnic slurs repeatedly, and Tarantino loves Blaxploitation films. He also loves Kung Fu films, which were equally as racist -- but I don't see him catch nearly enough flak for the racism in the Kill Bill movies as he does for his use of the word n*gger in his other films.

Tarantino makes films to bring back senses of nostalgia of old films he grew up with. You can't whitewash racism from our history. But you can be a mature adult and look at it in context. You do more damage to race relations by pretending that era of Hollywood didn't exist and refuse to acknowledge it in retrospect. You demean the progress culture has made since then by refusing to be an adult and sticking fingers in your ears when the topic comes up and going "Lalala". If you want to end racism, then it's easier to own our history and recognize we were wrong for what we did and move on, and when looking back in time, being able to look back and recognize it for what it is.

Tarantino may not ...


You could say that Tarantino doing nostalgia is repeating mistakes of the past. It may not be whitewashing history, the movement of language in film may be attempting to evolve away from a dark and ugly past. Tarantino rekindling the fire for his attempts at remembering his youth only makes a new generation of people that could, in turn, want to recreate their own past. That is a terrible cycle that he is propagating. His nostalgia can be, at times, toxic due to a new generation who lack the context of his nostalgia.

He could retain the feel of those old films. He certainly copies shots and moments that are highly reminiscent of previous films. That is pretty cool. Does he need to inject vitriol into the system as well that may influence a new generation of film studies that merely regurgitates his success when they yearn for nostalgia? Nobody is remaking Birth of A Nation in theme. Groundbreaking as it was in development of movement of shots, nobody is attempting to recreate the nostalgia of that film. It is something to be learned about in history so that we do not repeat it.
2013-01-03 06:30:17 AM  
1 votes:

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Pronoun: I see both sides of it to an extent. I understand that the word has power and to be able to speak of it in a frank manner devalues its power. On the other hand, there is a level of training that people may receive to reject such a vile word. As a child, you may have tattled on somebody using the "F-Word". You may have grown out of that phase and use fark on a daily basis. Sometimes the lesson on a particularly hurtful and terrible word remains with you. Such is the impact of racial slurs to people that do not wish to offend. Its not unreasonable not to say it. It is conditioning to be aware of context of a word that is absolutely repulsive for what it has meant and still means today.

Again, Spike Lee's point is made for him. And the interviewer squirming so much that he finally has to blurt out a request for Jackson to say it instead... makes Spike Lee's point for him. Jackson tried to prove the point that words only have the power you give them, and was not going to let the interviewer continue to dance around it. The interviewer (and everyone who identifies with the interviewer) lost the moment he started sweating and begged Jackson to say it instead.

Tarantino was playing a child's game with this movie -- and won (unfortunately). Isn't it amusing to hear a 'bad word'? repeatedly? Tarantino wasn't being historically accurate, he was being juvenile. Spike Lee knew what was up.


What a smartly wrapped bunch of bullshiat!
2013-01-03 06:25:21 AM  
1 votes:

Nem Wan: [tvmedia.ign.com image 460x307]


Best SNL skit ever.
2013-01-03 05:15:25 AM  
1 votes:

vrax: TheJoe03: I gotta side with Sam Jackson on this, people that say "the N-word" are annoying as fark.

That's like the type of thing you do around young children so they don't run around mindlessly saying a word. Amongst adults who are actually discussing the word itself, it sounds dumb as fark. Again, it all comes back to context. If you walk up to some black dude and say "Fark you, N-word!" (verbatim) they aren't going to say, "Oh, well you said 'N-word', so...hehe...that's OK." It may be better for TV censors, but it isn't any better.


Exactly, plus it also seems like a way for some people to avoid the negative aspects of our history. Seems the same kind of people are the type to want to remove Huck Finn from schools, but now I'm just ranting.
2013-01-03 05:08:17 AM  
1 votes:

B.L.Z. Bub: You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons?


If the interviewer can't act like a grown up, he should perhaps seek other forms of employment.
2013-01-03 03:22:53 AM  
1 votes:
I gotta side with Sam Jackson on this, people that say "the N-word" are annoying as fark.
2013-01-03 01:22:21 AM  
1 votes:

stoli n coke: Maybe Sam was just tired of answering the same question for the 100th time.


300th time. I remember him being grilled for this exact question for both Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown.

He's having fun this go round. What's he got to lose? He's got money. He's just out to have fun anymore.
2013-01-03 12:53:43 AM  
1 votes:
thisrecording.com
/everybody...lol
2013-01-02 10:37:31 PM  
1 votes:

Makh: What?


SilentStrider: Who?


Wiki-wiki Slim Shady.
2013-01-02 10:18:37 PM  
1 votes:
Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep
 
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