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(News One)   Samuel L. Jackson isn't having any of your shiat today, Jake Hamilton   (newsone.com) divider line 107
    More: Hero, Samuel L Jackson, Jake Hamilton, Katt Williams, Spike Lee, Jamie Foxx, Quentin Tarantino, Steven Spielberg  
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12040 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 03 Jan 2013 at 12:21 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-02 08:56:37 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com
"SAY IT, MOTHERFARKER! You know you want to! Speak the fark up!"
 
2013-01-02 09:03:02 PM
What?
 
2013-01-02 09:11:26 PM
Who?
 
2013-01-02 09:28:16 PM
chinadivide.com


i.imgur.com
 
2013-01-02 09:28:26 PM
When?
 
2013-01-02 09:45:52 PM

SilentStrider: Who?


Emmy Award-winner Jake Hamilton.

No, not that Emmy, the other one.

/never heard of the guy before, either
 
2013-01-02 10:18:37 PM
Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep
 
2013-01-02 10:37:31 PM

Makh: What?


SilentStrider: Who?


Wiki-wiki Slim Shady.
 
2013-01-02 11:10:27 PM
I wonder what would have happened if the guy actually said it.  At some point we're all going to have to acknowledge the word is still out there, but that context matters.

And for the "There are black people and there are n******(**()**)(*rs" crowd - please prove my point.
 
2013-01-02 11:21:41 PM

Lsherm: I wonder what would have happened if the guy actually said it.


I think Sam would have been cool with it and answered his question. The rest of the MSM would have freaked the f*ck out, Spike Lee would have complained about it and said he was going to boycott Jake's Takes, and the rest of the country would actually know Jake Hamilton's name from all the breathless "OMG did you hear about what Jake Hamilton said!?" articles that would pop up overnight.
 
2013-01-03 12:23:26 AM

Lsherm: I wonder what would have happened if the guy actually said it.  At some point we're all going to have to acknowledge the word is still out there, but that context matters.

And for the "There are black people and there are n******(**()**)(*rs" crowd - please prove my point.


Black people:

www.barackobama.net

N**gger:
media.comicvine.com

/troll it like it's hot, troll it like it's hot...
 
2013-01-03 12:25:42 AM
Maybe Sam was just tired of answering the same question for the 100th time.
 
2013-01-03 12:26:35 AM
Samuel L. Jackson is awesome.
 
2013-01-03 12:36:05 AM

Irving Maimway: Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep


You like people who have no manners? You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons? The interviewer was nice enough to give publicity to his movie and that's how he treats him? Fark Samuel Jackson. Yeah, I said it. Fark him. His ego has grown way too big.
 
2013-01-03 12:36:22 AM
Jackson kind of pussed out on that one. Should have stuck to your word and ended the conversation.
 
2013-01-03 12:36:48 AM
I don't see how you could get away with not saying it in that particular movie. Do people really think you can just whitewash the racism in this country, as easily as you would wash down some fried chicken with grape soda?
 
2013-01-03 12:39:34 AM
He got the only purple lightsaber. He can act however the f*ck he wants ;)
 
2013-01-03 12:53:43 AM
thisrecording.com
/everybody...lol
 
2013-01-03 12:58:36 AM

B.L.Z. Bub: Irving Maimway: Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep

You like people who have no manners? You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons? The interviewer was nice enough to give publicity to his movie and that's how he treats him? Fark Samuel Jackson. Yeah, I said it. Fark him. His ego has grown way too big.




Really though, he did the interviewer a huge favor. LOTS of people who had never heard his name now know who he is, and it's actually for a positive reason. The reporter seems to be just fine with what happened, he's now much more well known, and people respect him for what he did that made him more well known. Happily ever after!
 
2013-01-03 01:03:43 AM
Since Jackson only voted for Fartbongo based on skin color, fark that racist.
 
2013-01-03 01:05:49 AM
tvmedia.ign.com
 
2013-01-03 01:19:09 AM
Enough is enough! I've had it with these motherfarking n-word questions in this motherfarking interview!
 
2013-01-03 01:22:01 AM
I saw the video a few days ago and had a good laugh. Hamilton actually does fantastic interviews, but it was funny to see him squirm and to watch Jackson cracking up in response.
 
2013-01-03 01:22:21 AM

stoli n coke: Maybe Sam was just tired of answering the same question for the 100th time.


300th time. I remember him being grilled for this exact question for both Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown.

He's having fun this go round. What's he got to lose? He's got money. He's just out to have fun anymore.
 
2013-01-03 01:26:06 AM
Not only is it ok to say the word in that context, but it's pathetically puerile to not say the word in that context. I hate the word too, because I think we have an even better word for a black asshole (it's "asshole"), but how much of a child do you have to be to be unable to say it when speaking about it?

I feel silly saying that here on fark.
 
2013-01-03 01:30:28 AM

sorebones: Not only is it ok to say the word in that context, but it's pathetically puerile to not say the word in that context. I hate the word too, because I think we have an even better word for a black asshole (it's "asshole"), but how much of a child do you have to be to be unable to say it when speaking about it?

I feel silly saying that here on fark.


Eh, I get it. I've said the word while discussing it or quoting someone, but never in front of a black person. Perhaps if they wanted me to, like Jackson did, but it's like saying "c*nt" in front of a woman. Regardless of the context, there are all sorts of "DANGER! DANGER!" warnings going off in one's head.
 
2013-01-03 01:47:09 AM
Yeah, white people can't ever say that word these days.

Which is pretty awesome.
 
2013-01-03 01:56:48 AM
Samual L. Jackson is one uppity n*gger.
 
2013-01-03 02:04:01 AM
that interview proves Spike Lee's point for him.
and Samuel Jackson refusing to let the interviewer have it both ways also proves a point.
 
2013-01-03 02:16:56 AM

LectertheChef: I don't see how you could get away with not saying it in that particular movie. Do people really think you can just whitewash the racism in this country, as easily as you would wash down some fried chicken with grape soda?


I love fried chicken and Welch's grape soda.


/pretty damn white
 
2013-01-03 02:48:09 AM

The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: LectertheChef: I don't see how you could get away with not saying it in that particular movie. Do people really think you can just whitewash the racism in this country, as easily as you would wash down some fried chicken with grape soda?

I love fried chicken and Welch's grape soda.


/pretty damn white


Anyone who doesn't love fried chicken and grape soda has something wrong with them.
 
2013-01-03 03:08:09 AM

ExperianScaresCthulhu: that interview proves Spike Lee's point for him.
and Samuel Jackson refusing to let the interviewer have it both ways also proves a point.


I wasn't aware that Spike Lee had a point.
 
2013-01-03 03:16:50 AM
yeah boyee

/oblig
//awesome song as well
 
2013-01-03 03:22:53 AM
I gotta side with Sam Jackson on this, people that say "the N-word" are annoying as fark.
 
2013-01-03 03:42:44 AM

TheJoe03: I gotta side with Sam Jackson on this, people that say "the N-word" are annoying as fark.


That's like the type of thing you do around young children so they don't run around mindlessly saying a word. Amongst adults who are actually discussing the word itself, it sounds dumb as fark. Again, it all comes back to context. If you walk up to some black dude and say "Fark you, N-word!" (verbatim) they aren't going to say, "Oh, well you said 'N-word', so...hehe...that's OK." It may be better for TV censors, but it isn't any better.
 
2013-01-03 03:54:06 AM

rynthetyn: The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: LectertheChef: I don't see how you could get away with not saying it in that particular movie. Do people really think you can just whitewash the racism in this country, as easily as you would wash down some fried chicken with grape soda?

I love fried chicken and Welch's grape soda.


/pretty damn white

Anyone who doesn't love fried chicken and grape soda has something wrong with them.


Do you have to like them together?  Or does liking them on separate occasions count?
 
2013-01-03 03:57:40 AM

B.L.Z. Bub: Irving Maimway: Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep

You like people who have no manners? You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons? The interviewer was nice enough to give publicity to his movie and that's how he treats him? Fark Samuel Jackson. Yeah, I said it. Fark him. His ego has grown way too big.


Yup. Idiot thinks he's the next James Earl Jones. Problem is, he doesn't have the wit to go with it.
 
2013-01-03 05:08:17 AM

B.L.Z. Bub: You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons?


If the interviewer can't act like a grown up, he should perhaps seek other forms of employment.
 
2013-01-03 05:15:25 AM

vrax: TheJoe03: I gotta side with Sam Jackson on this, people that say "the N-word" are annoying as fark.

That's like the type of thing you do around young children so they don't run around mindlessly saying a word. Amongst adults who are actually discussing the word itself, it sounds dumb as fark. Again, it all comes back to context. If you walk up to some black dude and say "Fark you, N-word!" (verbatim) they aren't going to say, "Oh, well you said 'N-word', so...hehe...that's OK." It may be better for TV censors, but it isn't any better.


Exactly, plus it also seems like a way for some people to avoid the negative aspects of our history. Seems the same kind of people are the type to want to remove Huck Finn from schools, but now I'm just ranting.
 
2013-01-03 05:15:27 AM

WhyteRaven74: B.L.Z. Bub: You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons?

If the interviewer can't act like a grown up, he should perhaps seek other forms of employment.


Or maybe the interviewer doesn't want to suffer a potential career backlash by the hollywood PC police just to please Sam.

I'm sick of all the drama about this word being used even when in neutral context
 
2013-01-03 05:16:16 AM
Shocked I say. No blazing saddles refrence? I can say the forbiden word, voldemort.
 
2013-01-03 05:17:31 AM
I see both sides of it to an extent. I understand that the word has power and to be able to speak of it in a frank manner devalues its power. On the other hand, there is a level of training that people may receive to reject such a vile word. As a child, you may have tattled on somebody using the "F-Word". You may have grown out of that phase and use fark on a daily basis. Sometimes the lesson on a particularly hurtful and terrible word remains with you. Such is the impact of racial slurs to people that do not wish to offend. Its not unreasonable not to say it. It is conditioning to be aware of context of a word that is absolutely repulsive for what it has meant and still means today.
 
2013-01-03 05:19:53 AM
I don't recall using the word, unless saying it as part of the name of a comedy routine by Richard Pryor or Chris Rock. But if Sam Jackson asked me to, I would, provided that I made sure no one took me out of context.
 
2013-01-03 05:36:32 AM

cabritosaurio: Or maybe the interviewer doesn't want to suffer a potential career backlash by the hollywood PC police just to please Sam.


Hollywood PC police? Yeah, 1998 called to let you know you can keep your crazy.
 
2013-01-03 05:54:27 AM
Highly relevant. (New Window)
 
2013-01-03 06:19:48 AM

Pronoun: I see both sides of it to an extent. I understand that the word has power and to be able to speak of it in a frank manner devalues its power. On the other hand, there is a level of training that people may receive to reject such a vile word. As a child, you may have tattled on somebody using the "F-Word". You may have grown out of that phase and use fark on a daily basis. Sometimes the lesson on a particularly hurtful and terrible word remains with you. Such is the impact of racial slurs to people that do not wish to offend. Its not unreasonable not to say it. It is conditioning to be aware of context of a word that is absolutely repulsive for what it has meant and still means today.


Again, Spike Lee's point is made for him. And the interviewer squirming so much that he finally has to blurt out a request for Jackson to say it instead... makes Spike Lee's point for him. Jackson tried to prove the point that words only have the power you give them, and was not going to let the interviewer continue to dance around it. The interviewer (and everyone who identifies with the interviewer) lost the moment he started sweating and begged Jackson to say it instead.

Tarantino was playing a child's game with this movie -- and won (unfortunately). Isn't it amusing to hear a 'bad word'? repeatedly? Tarantino wasn't being historically accurate, he was being juvenile. Spike Lee knew what was up.
 
2013-01-03 06:25:21 AM

Nem Wan: [tvmedia.ign.com image 460x307]


Best SNL skit ever.
 
2013-01-03 06:30:17 AM

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Pronoun: I see both sides of it to an extent. I understand that the word has power and to be able to speak of it in a frank manner devalues its power. On the other hand, there is a level of training that people may receive to reject such a vile word. As a child, you may have tattled on somebody using the "F-Word". You may have grown out of that phase and use fark on a daily basis. Sometimes the lesson on a particularly hurtful and terrible word remains with you. Such is the impact of racial slurs to people that do not wish to offend. Its not unreasonable not to say it. It is conditioning to be aware of context of a word that is absolutely repulsive for what it has meant and still means today.

Again, Spike Lee's point is made for him. And the interviewer squirming so much that he finally has to blurt out a request for Jackson to say it instead... makes Spike Lee's point for him. Jackson tried to prove the point that words only have the power you give them, and was not going to let the interviewer continue to dance around it. The interviewer (and everyone who identifies with the interviewer) lost the moment he started sweating and begged Jackson to say it instead.

Tarantino was playing a child's game with this movie -- and won (unfortunately). Isn't it amusing to hear a 'bad word'? repeatedly? Tarantino wasn't being historically accurate, he was being juvenile. Spike Lee knew what was up.


What a smartly wrapped bunch of bullshiat!
 
2013-01-03 06:39:13 AM

rynthetyn: Anyone who doesn't love fried chicken and grape soda has something wrong with them.


To be fair, actually having grape soda in the 80s/early 90s meant your family was rich enough that they were probably white. The bulk brands were usually called purple drink or purple soda, because they were purple and, I assume, couldn't actually call themselves "grape" legally.

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Tarantino wasn't being historically accurate,


Well, he was and he wasn't. The reference wasn't to the actual civil war in the 1850s, it was to Italian westerns and their surreal interpretation of the US civil war in the 1950s. In the latter context it's pretty accurate, down to the absurd stuff with dynomite and the revolver shots causing people to fly backwards.

Part of that involves using offensive slang that would have been offensive in the '50s to '70s. Not really new ground for Tarantino, about half his movies are intended to be time-shifted exploitation cinema. If you don't like it that's fine, but not liking it is not the same thing as him getting it wrong.

//You should watch the original Django at some point, it's pretty trippy.
 
2013-01-03 06:53:19 AM
A word is a word. Words by themselves have no power. They are words. What empowers a word is the context, and meaning behind the word. If you're having an interview with Samuel L. Jackson, and you're bringing up the topic of ethnic slurs in a Tarantino movie he's in -- don't be surprised if this is how Mr. Jackson responds. This question has been answered repeatedly by Mr. Jackson over the years of working on various projects with Tarantino.

Tarantino doesn't use that word in his movies because he wants to 'be black'. He doesn't use that word in his movies to be 'historically accurate'. He uses that word because he makes movies that bring back the cinematic nostalgia of his childhood. He uses it based on artistic merit. And it's his right to use it. Just as it's Spike Lee's right, and the right of everyone else to criticisize him about it.

And Katt Williams only proves Sammy's point by using the 'No True Scotsman' argument when it comes to using that ethnic slur.

The films that Tarantino grew up with used ethnic slurs repeatedly, and Tarantino loves Blaxploitation films. He also loves Kung Fu films, which were equally as racist -- but I don't see him catch nearly enough flak for the racism in the Kill Bill movies as he does for his use of the word n*gger in his other films.

Tarantino makes films to bring back senses of nostalgia of old films he grew up with. You can't whitewash racism from our history. But you can be a mature adult and look at it in context. You do more damage to race relations by pretending that era of Hollywood didn't exist and refuse to acknowledge it in retrospect. You demean the progress culture has made since then by refusing to be an adult and sticking fingers in your ears when the topic comes up and going "Lalala". If you want to end racism, then it's easier to own our history and recognize we were wrong for what we did and move on, and when looking back in time, being able to look back and recognize it for what it is.

Tarantino may not be a Spielberg, and I don't think he's ever said he's tried to be Spielberg. I think of him more like Kevin Smith. His films aren't to send messages, they're made for target audiences who recognize elements in his films for what they are, and if you aren't part of that target audience, then you'll consider him a hack who needs to stop making films.

Tarantino does nostalgia, plain and simple. It never ceases to amaze me that people don't get that.
 
2013-01-03 06:56:57 AM
Say n-gger again, say n-gger again! I dare you, I double dare you, motherfarker!
 
2013-01-03 07:04:24 AM

Weatherkiss: A word is a word. Words by themselves have no power. They are words. What empowers a word is the context, and meaning behind the word. If you're having an interview with Samuel L. Jackson, and you're bringing up the topic of ethnic slurs in a Tarantino movie he's in -- don't be surprised if this is how Mr. Jackson responds. This question has been answered repeatedly by Mr. Jackson over the years of working on various projects with Tarantino.

Tarantino doesn't use that word in his movies because he wants to 'be black'. He doesn't use that word in his movies to be 'historically accurate'. He uses that word because he makes movies that bring back the cinematic nostalgia of his childhood. He uses it based on artistic merit. And it's his right to use it. Just as it's Spike Lee's right, and the right of everyone else to criticisize him about it.

And Katt Williams only proves Sammy's point by using the 'No True Scotsman' argument when it comes to using that ethnic slur.

The films that Tarantino grew up with used ethnic slurs repeatedly, and Tarantino loves Blaxploitation films. He also loves Kung Fu films, which were equally as racist -- but I don't see him catch nearly enough flak for the racism in the Kill Bill movies as he does for his use of the word n*gger in his other films.

Tarantino makes films to bring back senses of nostalgia of old films he grew up with. You can't whitewash racism from our history. But you can be a mature adult and look at it in context. You do more damage to race relations by pretending that era of Hollywood didn't exist and refuse to acknowledge it in retrospect. You demean the progress culture has made since then by refusing to be an adult and sticking fingers in your ears when the topic comes up and going "Lalala". If you want to end racism, then it's easier to own our history and recognize we were wrong for what we did and move on, and when looking back in time, being able to look back and recognize it for what it is.

Tarantino may not ...


You could say that Tarantino doing nostalgia is repeating mistakes of the past. It may not be whitewashing history, the movement of language in film may be attempting to evolve away from a dark and ugly past. Tarantino rekindling the fire for his attempts at remembering his youth only makes a new generation of people that could, in turn, want to recreate their own past. That is a terrible cycle that he is propagating. His nostalgia can be, at times, toxic due to a new generation who lack the context of his nostalgia.

He could retain the feel of those old films. He certainly copies shots and moments that are highly reminiscent of previous films. That is pretty cool. Does he need to inject vitriol into the system as well that may influence a new generation of film studies that merely regurgitates his success when they yearn for nostalgia? Nobody is remaking Birth of A Nation in theme. Groundbreaking as it was in development of movement of shots, nobody is attempting to recreate the nostalgia of that film. It is something to be learned about in history so that we do not repeat it.
 
2013-01-03 07:05:04 AM
i45.photobucket.com

"Sir, he specifically requested two "n*****s". Well, to tell the family secret, my grandmother was Dutch."
 
2013-01-03 07:13:26 AM

Pronoun: Weatherkiss: A word is a word. Words by themselves have no power. They are words. What empowers a word is the context, and meaning behind the word. If you're having an interview with Samuel L. Jackson, and you're bringing up the topic of ethnic slurs in a Tarantino movie he's in -- don't be surprised if this is how Mr. Jackson responds. This question has been answered repeatedly by Mr. Jackson over the years of working on various projects with Tarantino.

Tarantino doesn't use that word in his movies because he wants to 'be black'. He doesn't use that word in his movies to be 'historically accurate'. He uses that word because he makes movies that bring back the cinematic nostalgia of his childhood. He uses it based on artistic merit. And it's his right to use it. Just as it's Spike Lee's right, and the right of everyone else to criticisize him about it.

And Katt Williams only proves Sammy's point by using the 'No True Scotsman' argument when it comes to using that ethnic slur.

The films that Tarantino grew up with used ethnic slurs repeatedly, and Tarantino loves Blaxploitation films. He also loves Kung Fu films, which were equally as racist -- but I don't see him catch nearly enough flak for the racism in the Kill Bill movies as he does for his use of the word n*gger in his other films.

Tarantino makes films to bring back senses of nostalgia of old films he grew up with. You can't whitewash racism from our history. But you can be a mature adult and look at it in context. You do more damage to race relations by pretending that era of Hollywood didn't exist and refuse to acknowledge it in retrospect. You demean the progress culture has made since then by refusing to be an adult and sticking fingers in your ears when the topic comes up and going "Lalala". If you want to end racism, then it's easier to own our history and recognize we were wrong for what we did and move on, and when looking back in time, being able to look back and recognize it for what it is.

Tara ...


His audience is also (or should also) consist of adults who recognize his style as nostalgic. In his childhood, it was perfectly normal for such racism to be in films, and it was prevalent everywhere. This isn't that time though. Tarantino's films are a drop of water in an ocean of modern-day cinema that rejects and takes the correct views of racism. I'd even go as far as to say the people who watch Tarantino's films are probably movie lovers themselves and can perfectly tell the difference between the right and wrong ways to go about racism.
 
2013-01-03 07:14:08 AM

Weatherkiss: A word is a word. Words by themselves have no power. They are words. What empowers a word is the context, and meaning behind the word. If you're having an interview with Samuel L. Jackson, and you're bringing up the topic of ethnic slurs in a Tarantino movie he's in -- don't be surprised if this is how Mr. Jackson responds. This question has been answered repeatedly by Mr. Jackson over the years of working on various projects with Tarantino.

Tarantino doesn't use that word in his movies because he wants to 'be black'. He doesn't use that word in his movies to be 'historically accurate'. He uses that word because he makes movies that bring back the cinematic nostalgia of his childhood. He uses it based on artistic merit. And it's his right to use it. Just as it's Spike Lee's right, and the right of everyone else to criticisize him about it.

And Katt Williams only proves Sammy's point by using the 'No True Scotsman' argument when it comes to using that ethnic slur.

The films that Tarantino grew up with used ethnic slurs repeatedly, and Tarantino loves Blaxploitation films. He also loves Kung Fu films, which were equally as racist -- but I don't see him catch nearly enough flak for the racism in the Kill Bill movies as he does for his use of the word n*gger in his other films.

Tarantino makes films to bring back senses of nostalgia of old films he grew up with. You can't whitewash racism from our history. But you can be a mature adult and look at it in context. You do more damage to race relations by pretending that era of Hollywood didn't exist and refuse to acknowledge it in retrospect. You demean the progress culture has made since then by refusing to be an adult and sticking fingers in your ears when the topic comes up and going "Lalala". If you want to end racism, then it's easier to own our history and recognize we were wrong for what we did and move on, and when looking back in time, being able to look back and recognize it for what it is.

Tarantino may not ...


I'm too lazy to find the link right now, but Tarantino had a really interesting interview with Henry Louis Gates about his use of the n-word and how he handles race in his movies. He goes off on a fairly lengthy rant about how much he hates D.W. Griffith for what "Birth of a Nation" did--that he thought Griffith was guilty of crimes against humanity for that movie. He also goes off on how he hates John Ford because Ford was one of the klansmen in Birth of a Nation and went on to make westerns that gloried in genocide against the Native Americans. You've got to look at Django in that context as well, because Tarantino was very much doing an intentional subversion of the horribly racist tropes that Griffith and Ford used in their movies.

He basically made a movie that's both homage to the spaghetti westerns and blaxploitation films he loves so much while at the same time being an intentional deconstruction and subversion of a lot of the racist film tropes.

/I'd love to see him do a western revenge epic from the point of view of the Native Americans
 
2013-01-03 07:17:52 AM
When PC becomes self-parody....
 
2013-01-03 07:23:51 AM
I just want to know...do I just laugh and enjoy along with the movie or do I shift around uncomfortably and try to be all concerned while not finding any enjoyment at all?

I'm going to see this movie with a black woman from Nigeria this weekend, so I'm just trying to figure out the best course of action. I flew her in specifically to go on a date to see this movie.

/I had to give her my bank account number before she agreed to the date
//is that racist too?
 
2013-01-03 07:28:07 AM

Weatherkiss: His audience is also (or should also) consist of adults who recognize his style as nostalgic. In his childhood, it was perfectly normal for such racism to be in films, and it was prevalent everywhere. This isn't that time though. Tarantino's films are a drop of water in an ocean of modern-day cinema that rejects and takes the correct views of racism. I'd even go as far as to say the people who watch Tarantino's films are probably movie lovers themselves and can perfectly tell the difference between the right and wrong ways to go about racism.


Should also is a funny phrase for the subject. Think of the people that saw Basterds. Lots of folks, and I don't mean our friends who may have gotten other messages, remember the violence. Not the nostalgia of the violence, but the actual action. Tarantino may be a drop in an expanding pool, but a metric fark ton of people know who he is and pay to see his movies.

Think of how smart in terms of common sense the average person is. 49% of people are worse judges. And a boatload of them pay to see Tarantino movies because of previous expectations of violence that he has built himself on. Straight up dumb people those movies. I look forward to seeing what their nostalgia brings for us when they want to refer back to Tarantino. Not an exploration of his own nostalgia, but a re-imagining of overtones that stuck with them. And I'll be there, stuck in the middle with you.
 
2013-01-03 07:36:08 AM

bulldg4life: I just want to know...do I just laugh and enjoy along with the movie or do I shift around uncomfortably and try to be all concerned while not finding any enjoyment at all?

I'm going to see this movie with a black woman from Nigeria this weekend, so I'm just trying to figure out the best course of action. I flew her in specifically to go on a date to see this movie.

/I had to give her my bank account number before she agreed to the date
//is that racist too?


Don't feel bad. I have to do that to get any woman to go out with me.
 
2013-01-03 07:40:40 AM

The Muthaship: When PC becomes self-parody....


You mean netbooks?
 
2013-01-03 07:48:24 AM

rynthetyn: I'm too lazy to find the link right now, but Tarantino had a really interesting interview with Henry Louis Gates about his use of the n-word and how he handles race in his movies. He goes off on a fairly lengthy rant about how much he hates D.W. Griffith for what "Birth of a Nation" did--that he thought Griffith was guilty of crimes against humanity for that movie. He also goes off on how he hates John Ford because Ford was one of the klansmen in Birth of a Nation and went on to make westerns that gloried in genocide against the Native Americans. You've got to look at Django in that context as well, because Tarantino was very much doing an intentional subversion of the horribly racist tropes that Griffith and Ford used in their movies.

He basically made a movie that's both homage to the spaghetti westerns and blaxploitation films he loves so much while at the same time being an intentional deconstruction and subversion of a lot of the racist film tropes.

/I'd love to see him do a western revenge epic from the point of view of the Native Americans


I read the same interview and agree 100% with your conclusion. 

Ah, here it is. I've read parts one and two, both outstanding.
 
2013-01-03 07:49:49 AM
Also, being about the same age as QT, I was one of those white kids who, after watching Roots, felt bad about being white. I also didn't understand why my parents wouldn't buy me a Tashiki.
 
2013-01-03 07:57:49 AM
 
2013-01-03 08:01:08 AM
I suddenly remember an old episode of The Jeffersons where George Jefferson is talking to some uptight fundie who refused to say 'damn', or even 'darn', because it meant 'damn'. Of course, George found a way to make him say it..
 
2013-01-03 09:09:56 AM

WhyteRaven74: cabritosaurio: Or maybe the interviewer doesn't want to suffer a potential career backlash by the hollywood PC police just to please Sam.

Hollywood PC police? Yeah, 1998 called to let you know you can keep your crazy.


Ok. We could also pretend that their would have been zero outrage
 
2013-01-03 09:13:13 AM
i.imgur.com

J.D.: You know how I'm totally down with the rap music?
Turk: Dude, be whiter.
J.D.: Here's the thing: TuPac, DMX, Dr. Dre, in most of their songs, these artists use an extremely volatile racial slur...the "N" word.
Turk: I got it.
J.D.: Right. My question is this: If we're both singing along, and knowing that otherwise I would never use the word, am I allowed to say...
Turk: No.
J.D.: See, that's good for me to know. I didn't...I didn't know that
 
2013-01-03 09:14:24 AM
Could he have said "nig-ra"? I wonder if the filter's gonna catch that. I shall add comment and see.
 
mhd
2013-01-03 09:22:46 AM
i.imgur.com
 
zez
2013-01-03 09:32:38 AM

bulldg4life: I just want to know...do I just laugh and enjoy along with the movie or do I shift around uncomfortably and try to be all concerned while not finding any enjoyment at all?

I'm going to see this movie with a black woman from Nigeria this weekend, so I'm just trying to figure out the best course of action. I flew her in specifically to go on a date to see this movie.

/I had to give her my bank account number before she agreed to the date
//is that racist too?


Nigeria? Please
 
2013-01-03 09:39:29 AM

Wayne 985: Eh, I get it. I've said the word while discussing it or quoting someone, but never in front of a black person. Perhaps if they wanted me to, like Jackson did, but it's like saying "c*nt" in front of a woman. Regardless of the context, there are all sorts of "DANGER! DANGER!" warnings going off in one's head.


I just called a woman that word yesterday.

/sometimes it's an accurate description
 
2013-01-03 09:40:24 AM
www.tv-nostalgie.de

"Well I got news for you... today or a hundred years from now don't make a bit of difference - as far as they're concerned, we'll always be ni**ers."
- Jimmy (Jake Sisko)
 
2013-01-03 09:54:06 AM

The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: LectertheChef: I don't see how you could get away with not saying it in that particular movie. Do people really think you can just whitewash the racism in this country, as easily as you would wash down some fried chicken with grape soda?

I love fried chicken and Welch's grape soda.


/pretty damn white


That's because you dont really know shiat about black folks. Grape soda is for cracker ass-crackers. Purple drank is for the homies, you dig?
 
2013-01-03 10:06:00 AM
Link NSFW
 
2013-01-03 10:30:18 AM

vrax: ExperianScaresCthulhu: that interview proves Spike Lee's point for him.
and Samuel Jackson refusing to let the interviewer have it both ways also proves a point.

I wasn't aware that Spike Lee had a point.


Yeah what was his point? anyone?
 
2013-01-03 10:40:26 AM
Tell me: what happened to make us so afraid that
You couldn't make a Mel Brooks movie today?

Saw Blazing Saddles yesterday...

// Sam Jax does mean to piss you off
 
2013-01-03 10:46:27 AM
As Jake Hamilton, I'm getting a kick from this thread...
 
2013-01-03 10:53:56 AM
www.eonline.com
 
2013-01-03 10:58:57 AM
 
2013-01-03 10:58:59 AM

Ebenator: Link NSFW


OK, that was funny.
 
2013-01-03 11:07:05 AM

rynthetyn: /I'd love to see him do a western revenge epic from the point of view of the Native Americans


Now that I would see, but done in a manner that the audience would understand why that happened.

I'm sure Tarantino would nail it.
 
2013-01-03 11:16:00 AM

B.L.Z. Bub: Irving Maimway: Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep

You like people who have no manners? You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons? The interviewer was nice enough to give publicity to his movie and that's how he treats him? Fark Samuel Jackson. Yeah, I said it. Fark him. His ego has grown way too big.


Actually, people who say "the n-word" are being rude.
 
2013-01-03 11:25:21 AM
www.occidentalism.org

(Attractive and successful African American)dly
 
2013-01-03 11:34:10 AM

B.L.Z. Bub: Irving Maimway: Yet again I am reminded of why I like Samuel L Jackson so much.

//Go the fark to sleep

You like people who have no manners? You like people who enjoy making interviewers uncomfortable for very stupid, insignificant reasons? The interviewer was nice enough to give publicity to his movie and that's how he treats him? Fark Samuel Jackson. Yeah, I said it. Fark him. His ego has grown way too big.


Not sure if trolling but I'll wade into this one.  It's Hamilton's question that probably (rightfully) annoyed Jackson.  "There's been a lot of controversy surrounding the N-word in this movie..." Hamilton begins. "

The only controversy is the media-generated one.  The word as used in the movie is perfectly fine in context.  It's a movie about slaves and that's how slaves were referred to.  No controversy, no issue, just history.  A sordid, embarrassing history, yes, but denying it happened or trying to whitewash it is ignorant and insulting to any African-American.  So, if Hamilton wants to talk about a pointless, hyped up controversy, then I'm fine with Jackson making him squirm.
 
2013-01-03 11:58:23 AM

TheJoe03: I gotta side with Sam Jackson on this, people that say "the N-word" are annoying as fark.


Agreed. It's not like people don't know what you are referring too. And he wouldn't have been using it in a derogatory way.
 
2013-01-03 11:59:45 AM

Pronoun: I see both sides of it to an extent. I understand that the word has power and to be able to speak of it in a frank manner devalues its power. On the other hand, there is a level of training that people may receive to reject such a vile word. As a child, you may have tattled on somebody using the "F-Word". You may have grown out of that phase and use fark on a daily basis. Sometimes the lesson on a particularly hurtful and terrible word remains with you. Such is the impact of racial slurs to people that do not wish to offend. Its not unreasonable not to say it. It is conditioning to be aware of context of a word that is absolutely repulsive for what it has meant and still means today.


Words don't have power, people give them power.
 
2013-01-03 12:18:47 PM

rynthetyn: The Gordie Howe Hat Trick: LectertheChef: I don't see how you could get away with not saying it in that particular movie. Do people really think you can just whitewash the racism in this country, as easily as you would wash down some fried chicken with grape soda?

I love fried chicken and Welch's grape soda.


/pretty damn white

Anyone who doesn't love fried chicken and grape soda has something wrong with them.


Nick Kroll does this great joke as Fabrice. "You know who really likes fried chicken? Black people. You know who else really likes fried chicken? EVERYBODY because that sh*t is delicious."
 
2013-01-03 12:21:29 PM
Would you go to a doctor who replaces penis, vagina, and anus with dooder, wee wee, and booty? No. Why? Because that's farking ludicrous. Words alone are meaningless... their meaning comes from context. If you're discussing the word ni*ger as it pertains to the usage of the word itself, saying it shouldn't be a problem. Ni*ger, as a collection of sounds that form a word, has no magical power. It's only disgusting, vile, and worthy of a good ass-kicking when used in a certain context. If you want to have an adult interview, then you have to speak like an adult. Otherwise, no, you don't get to ask that question.

/which, since we're on the subject, IS a stupid question.
 
2013-01-03 02:17:50 PM
I always enjoyed Louis C.K.'s take on that (their?) word from his stand up.

Link

I can appreciate that he understands context matters, and that a word in and of itself is meaningless. Saying it isn't going to magically bring it back into existance...this isn't Hogwarts and Lord Voldemort territory.
 
2013-01-03 02:41:33 PM

Pappas: Would you go to a doctor who replaces penis, vagina, and anus with dooder, wee wee, and booty? No. Why? Because that's farking ludicrous. Words alone are meaningless... their meaning comes from context. If you're discussing the word ni*ger as it pertains to the usage of the word itself, saying it shouldn't be a problem. Ni*ger, as a collection of sounds that form a word, has no magical power. It's only disgusting, vile, and worthy of a good ass-kicking when used in a certain context. If you want to have an adult interview, then you have to speak like an adult. Otherwise, no, you don't get to ask that question.

/which, since we're on the subject, IS a stupid question.


images.wikia.com
Bajingo.
 
2013-01-03 03:02:27 PM

thisispete: Makh: What?

SilentStrider: Who?

Wiki-wiki Slim Shady.


Okay, but I don't see how this is relevant...Link
 
2013-01-03 03:31:40 PM
Niggger
 
2013-01-03 03:32:59 PM
37,000 white women raped by black men in the USA each year.
Media silent.
 
2013-01-03 03:38:13 PM
Someone should totally link to the Louis CK bit about "the n-word".
 
2013-01-03 04:07:17 PM

bulldg4life: I just want to know...do I just laugh and enjoy along with the movie or do I shift around uncomfortably and try to be all concerned while not finding any enjoyment at all?

I'm going to see this movie with a black woman from Nigeria this weekend, so I'm just trying to figure out the best course of action. I flew her in specifically to go on a date to see this movie.

/I had to give her my bank account number before she agreed to the date
//is that racist too?


They don't say kaffir in the movie so you'll be alright.
 
2013-01-03 04:14:21 PM
This is an amazing discussion on a website that censors words like fark and shiat. Sam is laughing at you too, Fark.
 
2013-01-03 04:30:08 PM
It's just a word, damn.

Also, Katt Williams needs to get the fark off Twitter already. Go get yourself some help, nubian!
 
2013-01-03 05:39:15 PM

Shocho: This is an amazing discussion on a website that censors words like fark and shiat. Sam is laughing at you too, Fark.


I'd like to ask Jackson what he thinks of the controversial use of "Attractive and Successful African American" in Django. He'd probably lol when told about the filter.
 
2013-01-03 06:44:53 PM

Shocho: This is an amazing discussion on a website that censors words like fark and shiat. Sam is laughing at you too, Fark.


^^^^^^^^^^^ too
 
2013-01-03 06:45:46 PM
"We were in rehearsals and Leo's saying his line, 'n***er this, n***er that. Then Samuel pulls him aside and says, 'Hey motherf***er, this is just another Tuesday for us, let's go."
 
2013-01-03 07:42:12 PM

Second Try: 37,000 white women raped by black men in the USA each year.
Media silent.


0/10. Your sister took it willingly, but nice fake outrage.
 
2013-01-03 07:56:24 PM
Wow, 2nd try is a race baiting, klan loving piece of sub amphibian shiat.
 
2013-01-03 08:01:17 PM

FatSteveWasted: Wow, 2nd try is a race baiting, klan loving piece of sub amphibian shiat.


It's easy for him to be a racist tough guy from the confines of mommy's basement.
 
2013-01-03 11:41:24 PM

Second Try: 37,000 white women raped by black men in the USA each year.
Media silent.


http://i248.photobucket.com/albums/gg200/mmaclenn/citation.jpg
 
2013-01-03 11:47:41 PM

Second Try: 37,000 white women raped by black men in the USA each year.
Media silent.


i248.photobucket.com
sorry
 
2013-01-05 04:55:20 AM

Irving Maimway: Also, being about the same age as QT, I was one of those white kids who, after watching Roots, felt bad about being white. I also didn't understand why my parents wouldn't buy me a Tashiki.


My dad DID buy me a dashiki, he was in Africa. My brother and I got matching West African holiday outfits. Purple and green, and most excellent.

/white
 
2013-01-05 09:14:29 AM

cloud_van_dame: Irving Maimway: Also, being about the same age as QT, I was one of those white kids who, after watching Roots, felt bad about being white. I also didn't understand why my parents wouldn't buy me a Tashiki.

My dad DID buy me a dashiki, he was in Africa. My brother and I got matching West African holiday outfits. Purple and green, and most excellent.

/white


JEALOUS!!!!
 
2013-01-05 02:09:06 PM
I ain't sayin she's a gold digga....ugh
But she ain't dealin with no....broke, Broke???ugh.
.
.
.
He's not a very good rhymer......ugh
 
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