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(Uproxx)   Every pop culture reference from Tarantino movies, in chronological order   (uproxx.com) divider line 58
    More: Cool, Quentin Tarantino, django  
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8440 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 02 Jan 2013 at 7:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-02 07:16:36 PM
That's all his movies are. 180 minute cliches.
 
2013-01-02 07:30:38 PM
The hard part would be finding parts of his movies that aren't pop culture references.
 
2013-01-02 07:45:43 PM

NutznGum: That's all his movies are. 180 minute cliches.


I don't care what they are or aren't. They're incredibly fun and have some of the best dialogue you'll find in any film.
 
2013-01-02 07:47:31 PM
Made to a minute 8 and then got bored.
 
2013-01-02 07:47:46 PM
Quentin Tarantino tries too hard to be as good as Kevin Smith.
 
2013-01-02 07:48:08 PM
oh... only the explicitly name-dropping references.  meh.

The gauge is still cool I guess.
 
2013-01-02 07:48:40 PM
Just compiling all the references from one movie would take more cocaine than I want to think about
 
2013-01-02 07:51:02 PM
The meaning of recursive?

It's a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film...
 
2013-01-02 07:53:07 PM
Oh man there goes my queue.
 
2013-01-02 07:56:24 PM

calbert: Quentin Tarantino tries too hard to be as good as Kevin Smith.


IAmRight? Is that you?
 
2013-01-02 07:58:27 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: The meaning of recursive?

It's a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film referencing a Quentin Tarantino film...


Tarantinception??
 
2013-01-02 07:58:28 PM
I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.
 
2013-01-02 08:00:35 PM
I'll take Tarantino dialogue over another explosion in a Michael Bay film.
 
2013-01-02 08:00:44 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.


I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.
 
2013-01-02 08:01:11 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds


I love Basterds, the first 20 minutes are masterful.
 
2013-01-02 08:01:17 PM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: oh... only the explicitly name-dropping references.  meh.

The gauge is still cool I guess.


Yeah, I really hoping for something more in-depth, like, this scene from Jackie Brown is an homage to this scene from the 1978 film The $6000 N-Word, and this set piece from Kill Bill was a reference to Rolling Thunder's climax.

Oh well. Maybe one day.
 
2013-01-02 08:02:51 PM

mitchcumstein1: Tarantinception??


BWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAM motherfarkers



mitchcumstein1: I love Basterds, the first 20 minutes are masterful.


I dug the hell out of that movie. And yeah, the opening scene was some impressive stuff.
 
2013-01-02 08:03:52 PM

Wayne 985: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.

I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.


I should probably see Basterds again without any expectations. When it was first announced, it was basically going to be The Expendables - Tarantino wanted to get Arnold, Sly, Bruce Willis, etc... and make a Dirty Dozen type WW2 action flick. That's what I went in expecting, and I ended up kind of hating it, though its completely my fault.

Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.
 
2013-01-02 08:11:22 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Wayne 985: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.

I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.

I should probably see Basterds again without any expectations. When it was first announced, it was basically going to be The Expendables - Tarantino wanted to get Arnold, Sly, Bruce Willis, etc... and make a Dirty Dozen type WW2 action flick. That's what I went in expecting, and I ended up kind of hating it, though its completely my fault.

Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.


Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Wayne 985: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.

I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.

I should probably see Basterds again without any expectations. When it was first announced, it was basically going to be The Expendables - Tarantino wanted to get Arnold, Sly, Bruce Willis, etc... and make a Dirty Dozen type WW2 action flick. That's what I went in expecting, and I ended up kind of hating it, though its completely my fault.

Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.


I thought he was supposed to be Appalachian?
 
2013-01-02 08:12:02 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: I dug the hell out of that movie. And yeah, the opening scene was some impressive stuff.


The tension just builds and builds and builds. Plus, you have Christoph Waltz speaking three languages and maybe being the most likeable villain since Lector, but in a completely different way? I will watch that movie whenever it comes on.
 
2013-01-02 08:13:27 PM
Oh, and the scene in the basement is brilliant as well.
 
2013-01-02 08:16:40 PM

mitchcumstein1: The tension just builds and builds and builds. Plus, you have Christoph Waltz speaking three languages and maybe being the most likeable villain since Lector, but in a completely different way? I will watch that movie whenever it comes on.


From what I understand, Leo DiCaprio was the first person considered for the part of Hans Landa.

Now, I like Leo's work, but thank merciful crepes that Tarantino went with Waltz. The man is an honest-to-goodness polyglot, which makes the different scenes with the different languages *work.*

And that opening scene is brilliantly done in terms of watching the possession of power shift from the farmer to Landa.


mitchcumstein1: Oh, and the scene in the basement is brilliant as well.


The only part I didn't much care for was the scene with Mike Myers, because it totally took you out of the movie and made you go, "Oh, hey, it's Mike Myers."

Kinda like seeing Ted Danson appear out of nowhere in Saving Private Ryan.
 
2013-01-02 08:21:18 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: StreetlightInTheGhetto: oh... only the explicitly name-dropping references.  meh.

The gauge is still cool I guess.

Yeah, I really hoping for something more in-depth, like, this scene from Jackie Brown is an homage to this scene from the 1978 film The $6000 N-Word, and this set piece from Kill Bill was a reference to Rolling Thunder's climax.

Oh well. Maybe one day.


Thanks for indicating that need not forward the link to my fiance so that we could have a three hour talk about it
 
2013-01-02 08:21:41 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: mitchcumstein1: The tension just builds and builds and builds. Plus, you have Christoph Waltz speaking three languages and maybe being the most likeable villain since Lector, but in a completely different way? I will watch that movie whenever it comes on.

From what I understand, Leo DiCaprio was the first person considered for the part of Hans Landa.

Now, I like Leo's work, but thank merciful crepes that Tarantino went with Waltz. The man is an honest-to-goodness polyglot, which makes the different scenes with the different languages *work.*

And that opening scene is brilliantly done in terms of watching the possession of power shift from the farmer to Landa.


mitchcumstein1: Oh, and the scene in the basement is brilliant as well.

The only part I didn't much care for was the scene with Mike Myers, because it totally took you out of the movie and made you go, "Oh, hey, it's Mike Myers."

Kinda like seeing Ted Danson appear out of nowhere in Saving Private Ryan
.



www.wearysloth.com

I know what you mean.
 
2013-01-02 08:25:10 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: And that opening scene is brilliantly done in terms of watching the possession of power shift from the farmer to Landa.


The French actor, I don't know his name, but he was phenomenal too. Just watching his face as the conversation went on. Realizing that Landa was on to him, and that he was going to have to give up his people was just amazing.

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: The only part I didn't much care for was the scene with Mike Myers, because it totally took you out of the movie and made you go, "Oh, hey, it's Mike Myers."

Kinda like seeing Ted Danson appear out of nowhere in Saving Private Ryan.


Mike Myers doing a modified Austin Powers accent no less. No, that was bad.

But in the bar, the entire interaction between Dianne Krueger, the three Basterds and August Diehl, who also speaks four languages in real life, is just fantastic. You know it's going to end badly, you just don't know how it's going to get there.

Hell, even Eli Roth isn't horrible in the film.
 
2013-01-02 08:29:40 PM

mitchcumstein1: Hell, even Eli Roth isn't horrible in the film.


He did his best, I'm sure.

/escuzzi
 
2013-01-02 08:33:55 PM

mooseyfate: www.wearysloth.com

I know what you mean.


In all fairness, Jimmy Fallon is a distraction in whatever shows he's in.

(Not in a good way, I mean.)


mitchcumstein1: The French actor, I don't know his name, but he was phenomenal too. Just watching his face as the conversation went on. Realizing that Landa was on to him, and that he was going to have to give up his people was just amazing.


*hits up Wikipedia*

Denis Menochet, that is.

And yeah, a lot of riffs are made about Tarantino taking ideas from other sources and whatnot, but that opening scene is proof enough to his most diehard critics that he *can* direct the hell out of a scene.


mitchcumstein1: Mike Myers doing a modified Austin Powers accent no less. No, that was bad.


You kept waiting for him to do something WACKY, because Mike Myers. Not a good casting decision, but... meh.


mitchcumstein1: But in the bar, the entire interaction between Dianne Krueger, the three Basterds and August Diehl, who also speaks four languages in real life, is just fantastic. You know it's going to end badly, you just don't know how it's going to get there.


The whole thing is a powder keg.

Like Hitchcock said, the suspense is in the anticipation of the bomb going off, not the act of the bomb going off. Tarantino knows this as well. He hits out of the park there.


mitchcumstein1: Hell, even Eli Roth isn't horrible in the film.


I was leery about his inclusion from the trailers (not a fan of Hostel and the like), but Eli Roth held up his end of the film well enough, yeah.
 
2013-01-02 08:37:53 PM

mooseyfate: mitchcumstein1: Hell, even Eli Roth isn't horrible in the film.

He did his best, I'm sure.

/escuzzi


he did try... He was one of my favorite guys in the film.. I'm not saying he was believeable... but he was interesting.... sometimes, thats good enough.
 
2013-01-02 08:45:41 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.


You mean Brad Pitt and his horrible impression of Cary Elwes as Curtis in the English language version of Porco Rosso, yes?
 
2013-01-02 08:47:38 PM
Tarantino peaked with Salma and the snake dance. No dialogue needed.
 
2013-01-02 08:48:51 PM
Having said that, I honestly believe Tarantino could pull of a reboot of The English Patient.
 
2013-01-02 08:49:18 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.


Say what you will, but this makes me laugh every time.
 
2013-01-02 09:40:30 PM
That was mildly interesting but I'd like to see the stuff he "pays homage" to back to back with the stuff he lifted it from.

I haven't seen Django I want to see the original first, the Spagetti Western that took the American Western and put it over the top.  Saw Woo's The Killer again recently, which had the everyone pointing guns at each other faceoff bit.

Kind of reminds me of Peckinpah, where classic American genres are reinterpreted oversees in a way over the top way and an American kind of latches onto that and reclaims it.

I don't know what my point is but I'm sure somewhere, a Frenchman said it better.
 
2013-01-02 09:44:37 PM
It's unfortunate that I won't be seeing Django simply because I can't farking stand Leonardo DiCaprio or Jamie Foxx.
 
2013-01-02 09:49:10 PM

djkutch: Tarantino peaked with Salma and the snake dance. No dialogue needed.


I have a crippling fear of snakes and believe Salma Hayek is one of, if not the hottest women alive so that scene was a matter/anti-matter thing for me.

As for Tarantino's dialog, Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, good. Kill Bill, Death proof, not so much. But what the hell have I written? Well, that got produced anyway.
 
2013-01-02 09:50:14 PM
no Flowers on the wall?
 
2013-01-02 09:56:08 PM
Meh - wake me when it's all the pop culture references in Spaced.
 
2013-01-02 10:03:04 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Wayne 985: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.

I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.

I should probably see Basterds again without any expectations. When it was first announced, it was basically going to be The Expendables - Tarantino wanted to get Arnold, Sly, Bruce Willis, etc... and make a Dirty Dozen type WW2 action flick. That's what I went in expecting, and I ended up kind of hating it, though its completely my fault.

Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.


I just can't watch a Brad Pitt movie. All he does is mumble unintelligibly. Yeah, I know that's redundant.
 
2013-01-02 10:06:31 PM

What_Would_Jimi_Do: no Flowers on the wall?


Good catch.
 
2013-01-02 10:12:13 PM
4.bp.blogspot.com
Dick dick dick dick dick dick dick
 
2013-01-02 10:18:45 PM

John Buck 41: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Wayne 985: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.

I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.

I should probably see Basterds again without any expectations. When it was first announced, it was basically going to be The Expendables - Tarantino wanted to get Arnold, Sly, Bruce Willis, etc... and make a Dirty Dozen type WW2 action flick. That's what I went in expecting, and I ended up kind of hating it, though its completely my fault.

Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.

I just can't watch a Brad Pitt movie. All he does is mumble unintelligibly. Yeah, I know that's redundant.


You have to admit Brad produced in Legends of the Fall.

Brad with long hair.
Brad with long hair on horse back.
Brad with wet hair.
Brad shirtless.
Brad shirtless with wet hair.
Brad shirtless with wet hair on horse back.

How Oscar missed. I'll never know.i
 
2013-01-02 10:32:00 PM
I don't get the hate of Tarantino making pop references in his movies. Pixar movies will riff on many different pop references and people act like it's slick. Maybe Lars von Trier would be your kind of director, the kind who makes movies about how bad America is even though he's never been to America.
 
2013-01-02 10:37:25 PM

What_Would_Jimi_Do: no Flowers on the wall?


That don't bother me at all.
 
2013-01-02 10:37:28 PM

djkutch: John Buck 41: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Wayne 985: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.

I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.

I should probably see Basterds again without any expectations. When it was first announced, it was basically going to be The Expendables - Tarantino wanted to get Arnold, Sly, Bruce Willis, etc... and make a Dirty Dozen type WW2 action flick. That's what I went in expecting, and I ended up kind of hating it, though its completely my fault.

Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.

I just can't watch a Brad Pitt movie. All he does is mumble unintelligibly. Yeah, I know that's redundant.

You have to admit Brad produced in Legends of the Fall.

Brad with long hair.
Brad with long hair on horse back.
Brad with wet hair.
Brad shirtless.
Brad shirtless with wet hair.
Brad shirtless with wet hair on horse back.

How Oscar missed. I'll never know.i


They don't have a Best Supporting Beefcake award

//yet
 
2013-01-02 10:41:45 PM

moothemagiccow: djkutch: John Buck 41: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Wayne 985: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: I have to say, after being lukeworm on Kill Bill and completely disappointed in Inglorious Basterds, that Django is a farking masterpiece. My favorite Tarantino movie since Pulp Fiction. Saw it last night and can't wait to see it again.

I loved Django and will be seeing it again, but I'm a little shocked that you didn't like Basterds. It seems the closest of his films to Django.

Speaking of which, if Christoph Waltz doesn't win another Oscar for this role, there's something very wrong.

I should probably see Basterds again without any expectations. When it was first announced, it was basically going to be The Expendables - Tarantino wanted to get Arnold, Sly, Bruce Willis, etc... and make a Dirty Dozen type WW2 action flick. That's what I went in expecting, and I ended up kind of hating it, though its completely my fault.

Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.

I just can't watch a Brad Pitt movie. All he does is mumble unintelligibly. Yeah, I know that's redundant.

You have to admit Brad produced in Legends of the Fall.

Brad with long hair.
Brad with long hair on horse back.
Brad with wet hair.
Brad shirtless.
Brad shirtless with wet hair.
Brad shirtless with wet hair on horse back.

How Oscar missed. I'll never know.i

They don't have a Best Supporting Beefcake award

//yet


It's a shame. He would have run away with Troy.
 
2013-01-02 10:42:24 PM

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Oh, and I hated Brad Pitt and his horrible southern accent.


The role was "cartoon redneck." Did you expect some research and a voice coach?

It wasn't serious business southern like Ewan McGregor in Big Fish or Michael Caine in Cider House Rules. Now those were terrible.
 
2013-01-02 11:08:06 PM
My beef with Inglorious Basterds was twofold. I saw it on midnight showing in Vegas after a night of drinks. At around 3 a.m. (thanks to a projector delay + assload of movie previews) I was entertained, I like it, yet I'm also losing my patience. The I'm gonna shoot your nuts off, but first let's have a long conversation about accents and drinks scene followed by Quentin's obligatory foot fetish moment with Hans and the actress chick in the cinema had taxed me to the point where I was barely holding back to say, f'k man, get this over with in the theater.

A year later, watched the movie again sober, wasn't so bad for its length. Actually did better on second showing.

However, beef No. 2 was the hype. As someone said earlier in the thread, previews, commercials and interviews made it sound like it would be a Dirty Dozen movie and Brad Pitt would be a constant element. I think he had about 15 minutes of screen time total, and it was more Guns of Navarone than Expendables in level of action. Not a bad thing, but the mismarketing kinda pissed me off.
 
2013-01-03 12:57:23 AM

mooseyfate: Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: mitchcumstein1: The tension just builds and builds and builds. Plus, you have Christoph Waltz speaking three languages and maybe being the most likeable villain since Lector, but in a completely different way? I will watch that movie whenever it comes on.

From what I understand, Leo DiCaprio was the first person considered for the part of Hans Landa.

Now, I like Leo's work, but thank merciful crepes that Tarantino went with Waltz. The man is an honest-to-goodness polyglot, which makes the different scenes with the different languages *work.*

And that opening scene is brilliantly done in terms of watching the possession of power shift from the farmer to Landa.


mitchcumstein1: Oh, and the scene in the basement is brilliant as well.

The only part I didn't much care for was the scene with Mike Myers, because it totally took you out of the movie and made you go, "Oh, hey, it's Mike Myers."

Kinda like seeing Ted Danson appear out of nowhere in Saving Private Ryan.


[www.wearysloth.com image 320x240]

I know what you mean.


If you really need a comedian as filler, then give the comedian's character a reasonable level of snark in at least line limited to him so that the audience reacts with "LOL that's (comedian's name) alright" instead of "LOL WTF was the point." See: Don Rickles in Kelly's Heroes, though his character was more important in the overall plot.
 
2013-01-03 03:11:14 AM
The Selma Hayek snake dance is on YouTube. I'd never seen it before. Yow.

Link
 
2013-01-03 05:22:47 AM

Wasn't Looking at his Neck: If you really need a comedian as filler, then give the comedian's character a reasonable level of snark in at least line limited to him so that the audience reacts with "LOL that's (comedian's name) alright" instead of "LOL WTF was the point." See: Don Rickles in Kelly's Heroes, though his character was more important in the overall plot.


It is strange how these things vary - in the UK, Don Rickles is barely known except for his role in Kelly's Heroes so nothing of that comes through anyway, but having "Lovejoy" as the central character of Deadwood was deeply bizarre (but not for native US audiences of course as it is unlikely more than a tiny fraction would know him from that show).
 
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