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(Huffington Post)   Russell Crowe agrees with Adam Lambert that no one in the cast of Les Miserables could sing   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 153
    More: Followup, Les Miserables, Adam Lambert, Russell Crowe, movie musicals, Miranda Lambert, Hugh Jackman, les mis, Seth MacFarlane  
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6597 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 02 Jan 2013 at 1:39 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-02 03:03:18 PM  

Solon Isonomia: WTF, Anne Hathaway's performance of I Dreamed A Dream makes Morissey look like the happiest man who ever lived. I was moved strongly when I heard it on her NPR interview a few weeks ago; I was ready to open up my veins after seeing the whole thing yesterday. How the fark is that not a successful performance?


And if I Dreamed a Dream and her death weren't sad enough, there she is, all skinny and near bald at the end there waiting to escort Hugh to the great beyond. Even in death she wasn't allowed to keep her hair? Yeah, the audience in my theater pretty much kept it together through out that movie but then when she came back it was nothing but a room full of sniffles. Even Future Mr. Mouse needed a minute during the credits to recover because he was just so GD sad.

So, for some levity, here's Ann vs. Sam Jackson in a Sad Off.
 
2013-01-02 03:11:33 PM  

KatjaMouse: Solon Isonomia: WTF, Anne Hathaway's performance of I Dreamed A Dream makes Morissey look like the happiest man who ever lived. I was moved strongly when I heard it on her NPR interview a few weeks ago; I was ready to open up my veins after seeing the whole thing yesterday. How the fark is that not a successful performance?

And if I Dreamed a Dream and her death weren't sad enough, there she is, all skinny and near bald at the end there waiting to escort Hugh to the great beyond. Even in death she wasn't allowed to keep her hair? Yeah, the audience in my theater pretty much kept it together through out that movie but then when she came back it was nothing but a room full of sniffles. Even Future Mr. Mouse needed a minute during the credits to recover because he was just so GD sad.

So, for some levity, here's Ann vs. Sam Jackson in a Sad Off.


Damn right, motherfarker - how can slavery compete with a film who's title literally translates to "The Miserable?"
 
2013-01-02 03:16:38 PM  

chndrcks: I'm a big fan of Les Mis - grew up listening to it and saw it live many times (my family is involved with the arts). Overall, I really enjoyed the movie. I liked the rawness of the singing, but it's a personal preference. I really dislike tv/film musicals where it's obvious the song is recorded in a studio. Maybe it's just poor audio engineering, but I seem to notice in a lot of these cases there's a different sound/tone between dialogue and the song that starts, and it's just jarring to my ear. But setting that aside, this person is running down stairs, jumping over obstacles, and their voice never falters? I'd rather the realism, even if it isn't perfect (I feel similarly about things like auto-tune).

That being said, I had two main problems with the movie:

1) Russell Crowe as Javert. The casting might make some sense if you think of Javert as an emotionless robocop, but Javert is as passionate as anyone else in the show. He's a Believer, he just has messed up beliefs.

2) Changes made to Eponine. In all honesty, these weren't that big, but she's my favorite character so they bothered me more. Why change all the stuff with the notes? In the original, Marius asks her to take a note to Cosette, which she does (more or less), then she goes back to be with Marius and gets shot for her trouble. This makes Marius look like a selfish ass (which he is) and Eponine as foolishly in love with him. With the changes in the film, she looks selfish and is only shot 'doing the right thing' by bringing him the letter.

I could almost understand if they needed to make changes to save time, but then Gavroche takes the letter from Marius to val Jean, so they went out of their way to change the Eponine part.


In the book Eponine has nearly no redeeming qualities.
 
2013-01-02 03:21:34 PM  

AnotherBluesStringer: meanmutton: What's really annoying is that because of that horrible musical, we can't get a movie adaptation of the actual book. That cast doing an actual movie instead of a musical would have been an awesome movie.


Haven't there been several?


There was one back in the 90s but I didn't really like it and, frankly, isn't that long enough for them to have redone it three times? Like Three Muskateers and Batman?
 
2013-01-02 03:22:19 PM  

KatjaMouse: chndrcks: 1) Russell Crowe as Javert. The casting might make some sense if you think of Javert as an emotionless robocop, but Javert is as passionate as anyone else in the show. He's a Believer, he just has messed up beliefs.

If you've seen Master and Commander then you know he is a passionate actor (I prefer it when he plays more interesting character pieces, though). If this were a straight up adaptation of the book he would have executed it with flawless victory. His downfall was when he was asked to sing on camera.


The worst of it is that I think he (or the director) got stuck with the idea that he had to sing in the higher, nasal register. There is one segment, when he's been tied up at the Barricade (the "How fitting that you should kill with a knife" sequence), when he's singing/speaking in "The Russel Crowe Voice" and it is absolutely PERFECT. My wife and I both practically gasped at hearing it because it would have been amazing if he'd been in that voice for the movie.

It would not have necessarily been a pleasant singing part to listen to, but it would have had amazing character and would have fitted in very well with the rest of the roughness from the other case members. I really think that the small flash of what could have been turned it from "disappointment in casting" to "what the fark it could have been perfect raaaage".

You know, as much rage as a pair of music nerds can really conjure up, which is pretty much nil.
 
2013-01-02 03:23:15 PM  

meanmutton: There was one back in the 90s but I didn't really like it and, frankly, isn't that long enough for them to have redone it three times? Like Three Muskateers and Batman?


People actually have fun with Batman and The Musketeers. You think Hollywood wants to continually revisit something that literally means The Miserable?
 
2013-01-02 03:31:31 PM  
At least we know russel crowes band is a farkin pile of shiat
 
2013-01-02 03:39:20 PM  

borg: Wasn't Crowe a singer before he was an actor and Doesn't Jackman  a Tony for best actor in musical theatre?


Yes, and I enjoy many of his performances as a singer.

This wasn't one of them.
 
2013-01-02 03:48:16 PM  

FooDog: Was it any worse than this guy?
[www.filmfamous.com image 490x370]


They both sucked.

/hated her in that role
 
2013-01-02 03:50:56 PM  

AnotherBluesStringer: Hearing Jackman butcher the shiat out of "Bring Him Home" is what did it for me.


Yeah he did butcher it, but that song was pretty much written for Colm Wilkinson.
 
2013-01-02 03:51:59 PM  
I have only seen the trailers. The onl;y person who sounds awful is Amanda Sigfried(sp?). She sounds like her teeth are chattering or that someone is ruccing her kneck visciously up and down on every note.

/hot in Chloe though
 
2013-01-02 04:01:19 PM  
25.media.tumblr.com
You know who really sucked as Thenardier? Matt Lucas  he was awful IMHO
 
2013-01-02 04:03:00 PM  

Jim from Saint Paul: I have only seen the trailers. The onl;y person who sounds awful is Amanda Sigfried(sp?). She sounds like her teeth are chattering or that someone is ruccing her kneck visciously up and down on every note.

/hot in Chloe though


Seyfried. She's actually a trained singer and that technique is called "vibrato".
 
2013-01-02 04:03:34 PM  
Wait - are we seriously considering criticism from someone whose name we know only because he was a friggin' runner-up in a friggin' game show? Really?

Adam Lambert is an attention remora. Fark him.
 
2013-01-02 04:12:11 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: AnotherBluesStringer: Hearing Jackman butcher the shiat out of "Bring Him Home" is what did it for me.

Yeah he did butcher it, but that song was pretty much written for Colm Wilkinson.


I agree. I also liked Alfie Bow's version.
 
2013-01-02 04:16:53 PM  
Before the film began I thought to myself, what if someone's phone rings during Anne's 'I Dreamed a Dream'. Sure enough one started ringing when the music started. no joke. At least they caught it on the third ring before she started singing.
If that was you, great work.
 
2013-01-02 04:19:36 PM  
Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.
 
2013-01-02 04:19:39 PM  
FWIW I liked Crowe as Javert- sure, his singing was rough but I thought it added to his performance as he put some oomph behind it for the most part.

/enjoyed the vast majority of Les Mis that I saw
//nodded off for 5 mins or so halfway through
///the GF was not impressed with me
////slashies for victory
 
2013-01-02 04:21:41 PM  

sure haven't: I love how all of a sudden everyone on earth is an expert on "Les Mis". It hasn't been mentioned by anyone anywhere in like two decades, and all of a sudden everyone knows everything about it and "loves it".

/talking about everyone, internet commenters, co-workers, etc


I'll break the trend. An old GF's parents took us to see the play once and I absolutely hated it. I don't mind musicals but do they have to sing EVERYTHING? Would not repeat the experience if you paid me.
 
2013-01-02 04:22:27 PM  

chewielouie: FooDog: Was it any worse than this guy?
[www.filmfamous.com image 490x370]

No. But even that guy was better than this guy: Link

Never. Gets. Old.


Wow, until he hit the high notes about 45 seconds into the actual song, the worst I could see is that his eyebrows wanted to attack me. After the high note, I was torn away fromt he eyebrows for the "singing"...

Ouch!
 
2013-01-02 04:22:29 PM  
This version of Les Miserables is neither fish nor fowl; neither strictly a musical or a dramatic movie, it tries to be both. For trying to do two things at once, it amazingly doesn't outright fail, but it doesn't outright succeed either.

Javert was fine, and Adam Lambert is just angry because he didn't get cast to play Marius or Eponine.
 
2013-01-02 04:29:38 PM  

Peekoo:
In the book Eponine has nearly no redeeming qualities.


That's ... disappointing. I haven't made it through the book yet, despite several attempts.
 
2013-01-02 04:30:02 PM  
If they make a sequel to this:

1.bp.blogspot.com

I will watch it. Make it happen, Crowe.
/Picture is much larger than intended
 
2013-01-02 04:31:12 PM  
I have to disagree with the majority of the people who did not enjoy Jackman's portrayal of Valjean. He was able to do something that is near impossible in the stage version and that is impart "true" emotion into the song. You can feel his pain and anguish when he sings, and that is the most endearing quality of his performance. I was disappointed with his inability to sing the falsetto portion of Bring Him Home, but felt that he did make the performance his own.

I also agree the Amanda Seyfried's performance as adult Cossette was the only time i have not been significantly annoyed by that part.

Also Adam Lambert is an Idiot who needs to realize the only reason he is "famous" is because he came in second in a popularity contest. He is a mediocre singer at best (professionally) and is no where near qualified to critique others performance. Though i do think he probably would have done okay as one of the Lovely Ladies.
 
2013-01-02 04:32:37 PM  

Maysin: I have to disagree with the majority of the people who did not enjoy Jackman's portrayal of Valjean. He was able to do something that is near impossible in the stage version and that is impart "true" emotion into the song. You can feel his pain and anguish when he sings, and that is the most endearing quality of his performance. I was disappointed with his inability to sing the falsetto portion of Bring Him Home, but felt that he did make the performance his own.


Agreed I thought he was great. I would be more than happy for him to win Best Actor - not that he will.
 
2013-01-02 04:33:35 PM  

borg: [25.media.tumblr.com image 640x360]
You know who really sucked as Thenardier? Matt Lucas  he was awful IMHO


Made you realize just how talented Alun Armstrong is.
 
2013-01-02 04:34:15 PM  

DamnYankees: Agreed I thought he was great. I would be more than happy for him to win Best Actor - not that he will.


If Daniel Day Lewis doesn't win Best Actor, I will eat a entire mall kisok of hats.
 
2013-01-02 04:40:47 PM  
Wait. . . . who is adam lambart?
 
2013-01-02 04:44:33 PM  

Mikey1969: Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.


Goes to show what you know. What was note-worthy about this film is that the singing was the actual performance during the take.

Sound mixing/editing behind the scenes: Link
 
2013-01-02 04:50:04 PM  

WhoIsWillo: DamnYankees: Agreed I thought he was great. I would be more than happy for him to win Best Actor - not that he will.

If Daniel Day Lewis doesn't win Best Actor, I will eat a entire mall kisok of hats.


Someone get a screenshot and bookmark the thread.
 
2013-01-02 04:52:01 PM  
I really liked Crowe as Javert, which also happens to be my favorite part. Yes, I know he didn't actually sing... but for "Stars," "Javert's Suicide," and most of "The Confrontation," I would argue song-speak-singing worked just fine.

/come at me bro
//aware no one else liked him
 
2013-01-02 04:53:16 PM  

sure haven't: I love how all of a sudden everyone on earth is an expert on "Les Mis". It hasn't been mentioned by anyone anywhere in like two decades, and all of a sudden everyone knows everything about it and "loves it".


This is how bad info gets passed around.
 
2013-01-02 04:57:21 PM  

fusillade762: I'll break the trend. An old GF's parents took us to see the play once and I absolutely hated it. I don't mind musicals but do they have to sing EVERYTHING? Would not repeat the experience if you paid me.


To be honest I think it's usually misrepresented most of the time by being called a musical. It's really an Operetta. And lots of people like operettas and operas. Otherwise Rent and Jesus Christ Superstar would never have been so successful.

/Only one of those examples made it into movie form fully intact
//which one do you think was the successful one?
 
2013-01-02 04:59:16 PM  

Maysin: I have to disagree with the majority of the people who did not enjoy Jackman's portrayal of Valjean. He was able to do something that is near impossible in the stage version and that is impart "true" emotion into the song. You can feel his pain and anguish when he sings, and that is the most endearing quality of his performance. I was disappointed with his inability to sing the falsetto portion of Bring Him Home, but felt that he did make the performance his own.

I also agree the Amanda Seyfried's performance as adult Cossette was the only time i have not been significantly annoyed by that part.

Also Adam Lambert is an Idiot who needs to realize the only reason he is "famous" is because he came in second in a popularity contest. He is a mediocre singer at best (professionally) and is no where near qualified to critique others performance. Though i do think he probably would have done okay as one of the Lovely Ladies.


Adam Lambert was a theatre kid and performed in a few musicals professionally before Idol - think he played Fieryo in Wicked - so maybe he's not up to your standards because of American Idol, but he comes from that background, so I think he has every right to say what he likes. And anyone who has working ears can hear the Russell is out of his element here.
 
2013-01-02 04:59:59 PM  

The Dreaded Rear Admiral: I really liked Crowe as Javert, which also happens to be my favorite part. Yes, I know he didn't actually sing... but for "Stars," "Javert's Suicide," and most of "The Confrontation," I would argue song-speak-singing worked just fine.

/come at me bro
//aware no one else liked him


I thought he did fine in "The Confrontation", but when he was singing alone, he was not good. However, when balanced against another voice, he worked quite well. Except the first couple lines in "One Day More", which was really the one number I loved that did not translate to the screen at all.
 
2013-01-02 05:01:15 PM  

AeAe: Mikey1969: Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.

Goes to show what you know. What was note-worthy about this film is that the singing was the actual performance during the take.

Sound mixing/editing behind the scenes: Link


Wow, what an absolutely stupid idea... I think it's funny that at least 3 of the people who got named on the screen had "re-recording" in their job title somewhere... Just further proof that they knew that it was a dumb idea to begin with.
 
2013-01-02 05:01:30 PM  

ds_4815: sure haven't: I love how all of a sudden everyone on earth is an expert on "Les Mis". It hasn't been mentioned by anyone anywhere in like two decades, and all of a sudden everyone knows everything about it and "loves it".

This is how bad info gets passed around.

Huh? Sure, no one's mentioned the world's longest-running musical, seen by 60 million folks in 42 countries, the one that, in 2013 alone, has 20 venues performing it in the United States, in like two decades.

Read "I haven't heard anything about it in like two decades, and so I'm projecting that experience to everyone else in an attempt to stay relevant." Oddly enough,
 
2013-01-02 05:11:37 PM  

Mikey1969: Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.


True, but as someone else pointed out, ADR wasn't done as much for the vocals in this production. They literally wanted to do this as they would a musical production (as best they could at least, and then put it on film). That meant the mixing/mastering of the vocals as well (i.e., not much is done in terms of processing the audio of a live musical, therefore not much was done in post either).
 
2013-01-02 05:13:14 PM  
Hollywood needs to make some good Sondheim movies. I would kill to see Into the Woods done right.
 
2013-01-02 05:14:52 PM  

AeAe: Jim from Saint Paul: I have only seen the trailers. The onl;y person who sounds awful is Amanda Sigfried(sp?). She sounds like her teeth are chattering or that someone is ruccing her kneck visciously up and down on every note.

/hot in Chloe though

Seyfried. She's actually a trained singer and that technique is called "vibrato".


Unique technique name.

It, from what I have heard so far, is not enjoyable. Not the way she sounds anyway.

Did I mention Chloe yet?
 
2013-01-02 05:25:22 PM  
Not that Adam Lambert is wrong, but he should be careful about throwing stones in a glass house. None of these pop singers would be anything if it wasn't for amplification and someone on the mixing board. If they tried to sing in a 4,000 seat opera house without a microphone, their thin shrill voices wouldn't be audible in the balcony.
 
2013-01-02 05:26:48 PM  

meathome: Mikey1969: Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.

True, but as someone else pointed out, ADR wasn't done as much for the vocals in this production. They literally wanted to do this as they would a musical production (as best they could at least, and then put it on film). That meant the mixing/mastering of the vocals as well (i.e., not much is done in terms of processing the audio of a live musical, therefore not much was done in post either).


Yeah, but a stage performance has the benefit of being produced on a stage that has at least some acoustics factored into its design, even a sound stage is better than recording all of your audio live in the open air, with no control over the actual environment. That's really why they moved to ADR anyway. Too many random sounds, stray wind, echoey corners, etc... I just don't see the benefit to this, outside of the fact that they can now say they recorded it "live". In other words, bragging rights.
 
2013-01-02 05:36:44 PM  

AeAe: Mikey1969: Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.

Goes to show what you know. What was note-worthy about this film is that the singing was the actual performance during the take.

Sound mixing/editing behind the scenes: Link


Exactly. In filming these scenes, the actors are all wearing wireless mics, pretty much exactly like they do on stage now. I think a sizable portion of the digital effects budget went to removing them from the actor's faces.
 
2013-01-02 05:47:54 PM  

Mikey1969: meathome: Mikey1969: Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.

True, but as someone else pointed out, ADR wasn't done as much for the vocals in this production. They literally wanted to do this as they would a musical production (as best they could at least, and then put it on film). That meant the mixing/mastering of the vocals as well (i.e., not much is done in terms of processing the audio of a live musical, therefore not much was done in post either).

Yeah, but a stage performance has the benefit of being produced on a stage that has at least some acoustics factored into its design, even a sound stage is better than recording all of your audio live in the open air, with no control over the actual environment. That's really why they moved to ADR anyway. Too many random sounds, stray wind, echoey corners, etc... I just don't see the benefit to this, outside of the fact that they can now say they recorded it "live". In other words, bragging rights.


The idea is that when you record in a studio and then lipsync on stage, you are tied to that performance in your acting, the pacing and everything. You can't make little adjustments on set.

If you sing it on set and then redub it in the studio, you have the benefit of better equipment and controlled conditions, but you have to match your earlier performance, and supposedly the result doesn't have the same emotional impact. Plus, modern technology has greatly reduced the benefit of recording in studio as opposed to on a sound stage,

From all I have heard, the main point of recording on the set is to allow the actor to do more acting through their voice than they otherwise could recording the sound separately. Also let's the director have more control, knowing that he has both the visual and audio components to work with on set. Did it work? Don't know, haven't seen it yet, and likely won't get to until it hits Netflix or TV.
 
2013-01-02 06:00:51 PM  

ReverendLoki: The idea is that when you record in a studio and then lipsync on stage, you are tied to that performance in your acting, the pacing and everything. You can't make little adjustments on set.

If you sing it on set and then redub it in the studio, you have the benefit of better equipment and controlled conditions, but you have to match your earlier performance, and supposedly the result doesn't have the same emotional impact. Plus, modern technology has greatly reduced the benefit of recording in studio as opposed to on a sound stage,

From all I have heard, the main point of recording on the set is to allow the actor to do more acting through their voice than they otherwise could recording the sound separately. Also let's the director have more control, knowing that he has both the visual and audio components to work with on set. Did it work? Don't know, haven't seen it yet, and likely won't get to until it hits Netflix or TV.


I get that, I just see WAY too many variables to try and fight to make it worthwhile, but that's just me talking. I think the musical genre hit its zenith with Cop Rock, so what do I know?
 
2013-01-02 06:10:01 PM  

Mikey1969: meathome: Mikey1969: Singer and former American Idol contestant Adam Lambert had some harsh words for the film, saying the vocals in "Les Miserables" should've been "studio recorded" and "sweetened."

Hey Adam, guess what... They ARE "studio recorded". Almost ALLL dialogue is redubbed, and singing definitely is. It's known in the business as ADR.

True, but as someone else pointed out, ADR wasn't done as much for the vocals in this production. They literally wanted to do this as they would a musical production (as best they could at least, and then put it on film). That meant the mixing/mastering of the vocals as well (i.e., not much is done in terms of processing the audio of a live musical, therefore not much was done in post either).

Yeah, but a stage performance has the benefit of being produced on a stage that has at least some acoustics factored into its design, even a sound stage is better than recording all of your audio live in the open air, with no control over the actual environment. That's really why they moved to ADR anyway. Too many random sounds, stray wind, echoey corners, etc... I just don't see the benefit to this, outside of the fact that they can now say they recorded it "live". In other words, bragging rights.


As someone else pointed out, the point of doing it was so that the actors would not be tied to a recording done months beforehand. As for whether or not it worked, I think there were some mixed results.

I think it definitely worked for Anne Hathaway, Samantha Barks and Eddie Redmayne's numbers. In fact, what I find interesting about the film is that Hathaway's musical numbers lose their potency once you can't see her. I bought several of the songs from iTunes today, and listening to "I Dreamed a Dream" without being able to see her performance left me cold. Same for Samantha Barks. Watching her expression while performing "On My Own" was a sublime experience.

On the other hand, I think it did some harm to "Master of the House." I like Sasha's choices as far as his voice, but he literally doesn't stop moving from the beginning to the end of that song, and a lot of what he is doing is rather complicated. I think the physicality of it affected his breathing and strength of his voice. I do like the song, and it is one of my favorite scenes, but I definitely think it was one of the numbers that would have been helped with an actor just lip-synching. Same goes for Helena Bonham Carter. She definitely appeared to be struggling with having to remember to sing and move at the same time.

It worked for Hugh Jackman sometimes, and not for others. I think he thought way too much about how he was going to perform some of the individual numbers, so some of the times he slips between singing to talking sounds forced. Other times, though, it's astonishingly beautiful.
 
2013-01-02 06:16:11 PM  
I liked Crowe as Javert. He was supposed to be a hard, pitiless man, and that's what he sounded like.
 
2013-01-02 06:20:54 PM  

zarberg: Hollywood needs to make some good Sondheim movies. I would kill to see Into the Woods done right.


Hollywood version of Into the Woods? They're actually in pre-production for a version right now. This is my dream cast:

Baker - Neil Patrick Harris
Baker's Wife - Anne Hathaway
Cinderella - Amanda Seyfried
Jack - Josh Gad
Narriator / Old Man - Mickey Rooney
Witch - Meryl Streep
Wolf / Prince - Will Arnett

Did I miss any major roles?
 
2013-01-02 06:24:24 PM  

WhoIsWillo: DamnYankees: Agreed I thought he was great. I would be more than happy for him to win Best Actor - not that he will.

If Daniel Day Lewis doesn't win Best Actor, I will eat a entire mall kisok of hats.


Basically the entire reason why Jackman won't win.
 
2013-01-02 06:30:45 PM  

WhoIsWillo: zarberg: Hollywood needs to make some good Sondheim movies. I would kill to see Into the Woods done right.

Hollywood version of Into the Woods? They're actually in pre-production for a version right now. This is my dream cast:

Baker - Neil Patrick Harris
Baker's Wife - Anne Hathaway
Cinderella - Amanda Seyfried
Jack - Josh Gad
Narriator / Old Man - Mickey Rooney
Witch - Meryl Streep
Wolf / Prince - Will Arnett

Did I miss any major roles?


And people say LES MIS is sad. Watch the second act of Into The Woods and get back to me.
 
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