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(The Times of India)   Happy Birthday, Internet. May you waste our time with silly cat pictures and hardcore pornography for decades to come   (timesofindia.indiatimes.com) divider line 13
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3631 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jan 2013 at 3:34 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-01-01 05:25:43 PM  
3 votes:
Happy birthday, TCP/IP based Internet. (FTFS)

The Internet (in the form of ARPAnet) actually was around much longer than this--closer to 41 years, in fact--but in its earlier days used a different protocol, NCP--TCP/IP was tested experimentally in the 70s (originally being based in amateur radio packet protocols) and on "Flag Day" (1 January 1983) the Internet was switched en masse to TCP/IP based networking. (NCP was already showing its age by then, and for several months before "Flag Day" there were gateways set up--then again, conversion en masse was easier because there were a lot fewer sites online then. Quite the far cry from the fustercluck that is trying to get sites to go to IPv6 from IPv4.)

Then again, most of what folks think of re the "modern Internet" dates from the TCP/IP era, so I can see that as a hallmark date for the opening of the "present-day Internet". :D

(Note that I'm also not including That Former Forum Network We Don't Talk About On The Modern Internet. That Network actually used to not have most of its traffic be "liberated" software and video and MP3s, but was used for Fark-esque discussion before the days of WWW forums, and was originally based on a totally different protocol--UUCP, a sort of "store and forward" networking for Unix-based boxen that came about separately in the late 70s, with the earliest beginnings of That Former Forum Network We Don't Talk About On The Modern Internet being in 1981. (There are, remarkably, some very very early archives still available from the pre-TCP/IP Internet era there and on the Telecom Digest list (which dated from 1981). Comparatively speaking, the World Wide Web--especially as it is known now--is just a baby :3)
2013-01-02 02:10:32 AM  
1 votes:
We had gophers for our internet, but luckily, they didn't chew the wires.
You would finger people without asking permission first.
You had no idea what speed was until you connected with a 9600 dial-up modem. (For some reason the 14400 didn't leave an impression on me, more 'meh')
Interested in reading a web page? You had the option of turning off images so the text would load faster.

As much as it is mocked today, I think people don't give enough credit to AOL in taking the internet mainstream. I was paying something like 200 bucks a month (as a student mind you) to do stuff that I could have done for free if I had put in a day's worth of learning, but it was RIGHT THERE NOW. Chat, surfing, boards, etc.

/miss you Red Dragon Inn
//also, You've Got Mail
///gave up on IT when compilers would hang on 200 lines of code just 'cause you forgot something somewhere and now you had to go line by line to find out you forgot a semicolon in one of those lines
////IT needed OCD people in those days
2013-01-01 06:58:10 PM  
1 votes:
This was, I think, one of the great moments in human history. When, at least from an idealistic viewpoint, our visionaries were able to implement something that essentially said "We don't have to know you and you don't have to know is, but we are willing to connect with you."

Of course there are all sorts of things that get in the way in the practical world and it was limited in scope until the www came about, but the whole premise of the largely agnostic, open internet continues to boggle my mind even as I've watched it develop since I was in elementary school. Ever since then authoritarians of every stripe have tried to limit and roll back this basic premise. It is a dangerous concept, one that makes the world more vulnerable, undermines social stability and attacks the legitimacy of existing institutions. And I find that to be a very big positive for the internet.
2013-01-01 06:16:28 PM  
1 votes:
Boxen!

I only heard that term in passing, but wowcakes is it an oldie.

Dear Batf**k Insane Kitty, who I swiped from somewhere else:
I hope I am still posting you in Fark when I'm 80 years old :3

[hearts]

i.imgur.com
2013-01-01 06:06:04 PM  
1 votes:

Great Porn Dragon: Happy birthday, TCP/IP based Internet. (FTFS)

The Internet (in the form of ARPAnet) actually was around much longer than this--closer to 41 years, in fact--but in its earlier days used a different protocol, NCP--TCP/IP was tested experimentally in the 70s (originally being based in amateur radio packet protocols) and on "Flag Day" (1 January 1983) the Internet was switched en masse to TCP/IP based networking. (NCP was already showing its age by then, and for several months before "Flag Day" there were gateways set up--then again, conversion en masse was easier because there were a lot fewer sites online then. Quite the far cry from the fustercluck that is trying to get sites to go to IPv6 from IPv4.)

Then again, most of what folks think of re the "modern Internet" dates from the TCP/IP era, so I can see that as a hallmark date for the opening of the "present-day Internet". :D

(Note that I'm also not including That Former Forum Network We Don't Talk About On The Modern Internet. That Network actually used to not have most of its traffic be "liberated" software and video and MP3s, but was used for Fark-esque discussion before the days of WWW forums, and was originally based on a totally different protocol--UUCP, a sort of "store and forward" networking for Unix-based boxen that came about separately in the late 70s, with the earliest beginnings of That Former Forum Network We Don't Talk About On The Modern Internet being in 1981. (There are, remarkably, some very very early archives still available from the pre-TCP/IP Internet era there and on the Telecom Digest list (which dated from 1981). Comparatively speaking, the World Wide Web--especially as it is known now--is just a baby :3)


here is the link we don't talk about.
Link
Operator Pat -- baud tone
2013-01-01 04:51:13 PM  
1 votes:

macdaddy357: Opening the network to the public didn't happen until 10 years later, but the technology is 30 years old.


To be clear, I was hitting up BBS's long before then. So was Matthew Broderick. I suppose the advent of www is different, but my compy386 and dial-up modem don't understand why.
2013-01-01 04:46:50 PM  
1 votes:
The internet is another year older
i0.kym-cdn.com
/hot like this hand of mine
2013-01-01 04:22:11 PM  
1 votes:
I'm an old school IT guy back to the days of paper tape. And I remember what it was like before the Internet reached the public. Seriously, I would put the Internet up with the discovery of fire, the wheel, and the printing press in terms of it's impact. When Vinton Cerf and Berners-Lee die, they should entomb them in a pyramid in Silicon Valley.
2013-01-01 04:09:52 PM  
1 votes:

opiumpoopy: CavalierEternal: Wait, you mean the internet hasn't always been around? How did you people share funny picture captions and awkwardly flirt?

In the college dorm, most people had a sheet of paper on their door to receive notes from people dropping by. Funny picture captions and awkward flirtations both got covered by this.

/ I'm talking 1994 here. WWW and common mobile phone ownership started in 1995, the year after I graduated.

// Lawn, etc.


By 1995 we'd upgraded to small dry erase boards. Judging from the content of said boards, Goons had already come into existence.

/phalluses, phalluses as far as the eye could see
2013-01-01 03:54:37 PM  
1 votes:

opiumpoopy: CavalierEternal: Wait, you mean the internet hasn't always been around? How did you people share funny picture captions and awkwardly flirt?

In the college dorm, most people had a sheet of paper on their door to receive notes from people dropping by. Funny picture captions and awkward flirtations both got covered by this.

/ I'm talking 1994 here. WWW and common mobile phone ownership started in 1995, the year after I graduated.

// Lawn, etc.


Yep. And if you were meeting up with friends out, you had to prearrange a time and location.
2013-01-01 03:49:14 PM  
1 votes:

CavalierEternal: Wait, you mean the internet hasn't always been around? How did you people share funny picture captions and awkwardly flirt?


In the college dorm, most people had a sheet of paper on their door to receive notes from people dropping by. Funny picture captions and awkward flirtations both got covered by this.

/ I'm talking 1994 here. WWW and common mobile phone ownership started in 1995, the year after I graduated.

// Lawn, etc.
2013-01-01 03:49:13 PM  
1 votes:

CavalierEternal: But without the internet, how did you check your spelling? You must have looked like fools!


i49.tinypic.com
2013-01-01 03:40:06 PM  
1 votes:

CavalierEternal: Wait, you mean the internet hasn't always been around? How did you people share funny picture captions and awkwardly flirt?


We wrote on small squares of pulp and placed them in a box alongside the curb of our homes. They were called letters and they took days, sometimes even weeks to arrive at their given destination.
 
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