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(PCWorld)   Should 2013 be the year you switch to Linux? One penguin seems to think so   (pcworld.com) divider line 186
    More: Interesting, linux, PC users, class switching, Start Button, online banking, ubuntu, switches  
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3875 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Jan 2013 at 6:30 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-01 10:36:16 PM  

jonny_q: Tree-based structure is straightforward.


It is and it isn't. When trying to find something when you don't know where it is in the tree, it's next to impossible. We've tacked on metadata to solve this, as well as stuff like symlinks and hardlinks. I don't have a finished picture in my head, but it'd be nice for filesystems to at least add things like the ability to shelve files easily (group these ten things into a single project, no matter where they actually reside in the tree), and decent versioning would be nice, too.

jonny_q: Or do you just wanna make that more free-form?


I mean a complete inversion of our approach to things. I mean all applications are nothing more than services- they present data and business rules in a format that can be consumed by widgets. So you wouldn't have Word, in this environment. You'd have a Word service that can open documents and return an object model representing the contents. The OS would then present this to the user- how? Well, it might track down a Word widget that can provide the user an editor. Or maybe it'll just display key bits of information about the file. Or maybe it'll just dump it straight to the printer.

Instead of treating an application as a silo, it inherently isn't. This is closer to how the command line was meant to work, and it's also very similar to how the web works today. Obviously this isn't a fully fleshed out idea, and there are a lot of drawbacks and tradeoffs.

I'm just brainstorming things that are different that could improve how we use our computers in meaningful ways.
 
2013-01-01 10:37:57 PM  
It's never going to be The Year of Linux at the rate they're going.

I use Ubuntu. I like it fine. But here's the thing - while I was a fairly adept Windows user, Linux is mostly over my head. Many of the simplest things involve me opening the terminal and learning new commands. I don't mind too much, but I'm half-a-nerd and I like the spirit of the thing. But it isn't very appealing to the vast majority of casual users. This is exasperated by updates and upgrades that drastically change an OS that you've finally gotten used to, with features just suddenly disappearing. Some of these you can replace, assuming you know what to look for and/or what command to enter.

A lot of Linux users look down on Ubuntu or Unity as a dumbed-down version of Linux. That may be so, but they'll need to do a whole lot more dumbing down before they'll ever have an OS that is ready to compete with Microsoft or Apple.
 
2013-01-01 10:40:51 PM  

skinink: "Linux is just as easy to install, configure and use as Windows. Period."
And which distros out of the hundreds out there are easy to install?


Ubuntu, Open SUSE, Mint. Debian isn't any harder to install than Windows XP. I know you're yanking my chain, but we have this thing called the Internet where it's pretty easy to find out which distros are best for new Linux users.
 
2013-01-01 10:40:53 PM  

Quantumbunny: Configuration is also totally worthless in linux. Every few years I try, and for some reason there are STILL files, whether for keyboard or mouse, or monitor resolutions, or who knows what they want to me manually edit. PISS OFF. As a user, I want point and click, and a pretty interface... and I'm a software developer. Good luck convincing end users they want less than that.


I have to manually change stuff in OS X and Windows too (recently changed what Spotlight indexes, and let's not forget the registry in Windows, or how things that require Powershell now). I haven't had to manually edit xorg.conf for years, on some very different configurations (last time I edited one of them was on a SGI Octane running Gentoo. And your average person is not going to have SGI hardware).
 
2013-01-01 10:41:59 PM  
vharshyde: How are those Wireless drivers treating you.

On my old laptop (a dell inspiron 8600 from circa 2003), the wireless chipset (Broadcom) was not detected automatically in Ubuntu 7.04 and required me to download drivers for it. interestingly enough, windows XP also didn't detect it out of the box and required me to download drivers for it. (in both cases, I just slapped an ethernet cable into it and both OSes grabbed the drivers automatically, so there is that).

On my current laptop (a Dell inspiron 1525 from circa 2008, Intel wireless chipset), everything worked perfectly out of the box with Ubuntu 10.04. And this was the era that live CDs/USBs took off, so you could actually test all of your hardware in Ubuntu before doing an install to disk.

Ditto for my Dell netbook (but that's not fair since the damn thing came with ubuntu preinstalled).

Likewise, on my desktop (hand assembled core i7 on a MSI mobo from circa 2010), I had no hardware trouble to speak of with Ubuntu 10.04. But since I built this specifically to run ubuntu, I made sure to select components that had excellent compatibility (IIRC, Radeon graphcs cards had some issues around this time frame, so I went with an Nvida card).

// If a piece of hardware is popular enough, and the vendor has published documentation on their APIs (like they should be doing), then there will be a decent driver for said hardware.
//
// If the vendor doesn't publish their documentation, then you have to rely on the vendor to create a driver (like Nvidia did), or you have to rely on someone reverse engineering the API. This is a vendor support issue, not an OS issue.
 
2013-01-01 10:42:42 PM  

Saners: What a shiat list. So much that 1,4 and 5 are all the same thing; they each assume that you MUST switch operating systems this year. People still run Windows XP so the fact that Windows 8 just came out is no reason to switch to linux and if you already own a copy of Windows or OSX then Linux being free is pointless to mention.


Unless Microsoft gets hip to Apple's methodology, and turns an update for the older version into malware, to encourage people to upgrade. Happened to me, my Mac was working great, until I installed a system software update. Then things started to go bad, really bad. 15+ minute start up bad. Then it farked Mail up. The latest is opening system preferences crashes the computer. I'm seriously debating Ubuntu, I won't be buying OSX 8, just don't trust Apple anymore at all.
 
2013-01-01 10:42:46 PM  
I used Linux around 1999 to about 2004 and then switched back to Mac and Windows. I liked it, but there was a lot of package difficulties (and I was using Suse/Mandrake/RedHat, the major flavors of the day) and hardware issues. About 2 years ago after swearing at my Windows machine for the millionth time I thought 'Hrm, see what the kids are doing these days' and downloaded Ubuntu and haven't looked back. Switched to Mint about a year ago from Ubuntu for picky reasons...but in general: there is ZERO installing from source anymore. I haven't been able to throw a piece of hardware at my machine it didn't handle great. And NO MORE Hunting around to play mp3s or use Flash or Acrobat. Any minor problems I've encountered, well, google is the best resource and I quickly find the solution. The best part is no more pirated ware and/or paying for crappy software. k3b+devede does anything Nero can do and more. OpenShot is a fantastic video editor I use all the time. I have weird needs too, like having to do sheet music scores for my band, and Frescobaldi does great engraving (along with MuseScore which is on all platforms I believe). I've got to say in fairness for crazy audio editing and recording needs Linux still has issues, using crap like Jack which works 20% of the time. I don't do much that I can't just use Audacity for but it'd be nice if I could get some of those fancy midi things like Rosegarden actually working. That's a minor minor gripe - as a pure desktop machine I don't know why anyone wouldn't use Linux. ESPECIALLY the non-geek users, the people like my Mom who just use their computers like you'd use a tablet (Facebook, email, YouTube videos, etc).
 
2013-01-01 10:44:11 PM  
armanox: I have to manually change stuff in OS X and Windows too

shiat, you just reminded me of .ini files and regedit :P
 
2013-01-01 10:45:23 PM  

swahnhennessy: It's never going to be The Year of Linux at the rate they're going.

I use Ubuntu. I like it fine. But here's the thing - while I was a fairly adept Windows user, Linux is mostly over my head. Many of the simplest things involve me opening the terminal and learning new commands. I don't mind too much, but I'm half-a-nerd and I like the spirit of the thing. But it isn't very appealing to the vast majority of casual users. This is exasperated by updates and upgrades that drastically change an OS that you've finally gotten used to, with features just suddenly disappearing. Some of these you can replace, assuming you know what to look for and/or what command to enter.

A lot of Linux users look down on Ubuntu or Unity as a dumbed-down version of Linux. That may be so, but they'll need to do a whole lot more dumbing down before they'll ever have an OS that is ready to compete with Microsoft or Apple.


Well, in the new Windows it's all changed -- again -- so it's not going to be the OS you've gotten used to.

Go get Linux Mint. Install it as a dual boot (it's easy).

You can do everything fine without using the command line. However using the command line for basci tasks is pretty dang easy
 
2013-01-01 10:47:41 PM  

swahnhennessy: This is exasperated by updates and upgrades that drastically change an OS that you've finally gotten used to, with features just suddenly disappearing. Some of these you can replace, assuming you know what to look for and/or what command to enter.


This kind of stuff happens in Windows and Mac, too, though. It's unfair to single out Linux. The fact that, in Linux, the lost functionality can sometimes be restored is an advantage that open source software has over proprietary software.
 
2013-01-01 10:48:36 PM  

t3knomanser: When trying to find something when you don't know where it is in the tree, it's next to impossible.


t3knomanser: I'm just brainstorming things that are different that could improve how we use our computers in meaningful ways.


Windows and Mac OS (and probably Linux, I dunno, I don't use it much) already do this.

They index file names AND contents. Simply type some words into the Search box and you get your relevant files.

I work with severely computer-unsavvy people. Tech-tards. Computer-phobes. And teaching them to let the computer search for things solves 90% of our problems.

"Aunt Sally Christmas" TA DA!

"December rent payments" TA DA!

"Colson County property tax" TA DA!
 
2013-01-01 10:49:27 PM  

RatOmeter: TimeCubeFan: Pro Tools. Virtual Instrument libraries. And pretty much all my music production software. I'd love to try Linus, but if it doesn't run my studio apps then it's pretty much useless to me.

Linux audio/studio distribrutions

Quite a few musicians use an audio/studio oriented Linux distro. Even for live performances.


I've used Ardour for recordings in the past. I Ebayed an 8 channel firewire audio interface which I have working reasonably well with a couple different Linux machines, and I'm happy with the setup. I've never really used Pro Tools, so I don't really know how they stack up, but I like Ardour a lot and it was more than enough for what I needed. I'm not sure who else uses it, but it is sold as part of Harrison Mixbus. I wouldn't tell people to go and rip their Pro Tools setups apart and drop in a Linux-based studio, but if you're interested in Linux and pro audio it's something to check out. I can't really speak for the virtual instruments, as I don't really use any.

I would recommend though that if you're new to Linux and want to play with pro audio, consider one of the pre-made distros. There are some tweaks you can do to improve performance (latency) with audio, and these usually implement them by default. I'm typing this on a Gentoo machine, and I don't really mind doing some of that stuff myself when I'm just messing around, but unless you want to get your hands dirty you don't need to bother.
 
2013-01-01 10:51:52 PM  

vharshyde: lordargent: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: Linux is just as easy to install, configure and use as Windows.

My ubuntu installs go a lot easier than my WIN 7 installs.


How are those Wireless drivers treating you.

In all seriousness, this hogwash can go die in a hole already. Ubuntu(or any linux distro really) is a hobbyist's toy, a model railroad that you nerds are so desperate to get other people involved with because you're clamoring for even just one person to care half as much as you have about the fact that three weeks after you started your linux install, it's now almost working to 90% of your system's marked capacity. I don't swing my hobby of polishing my testicles with the floor buffers at the mall while Security isn't looking and demand that you do the same, so I see absolutely no reason why I should hear this rubbish every single year. And it is every goddamn year.


I'd like to comment on this as a Linux user who is not a geek, who has used a bunch of different LInux distros over more than a decade and has also used Windows a lot too. First of all, wireless drivers specifically: I just put Linux on my wife's notebook and the wireless card was detected with the Ubuntu Live CD, so that was easy! Secondly, three weeks to get a Linux install up and running actually was near the norm for me back in 2000. Now it is about 4 hours from inserting the install disc to PERFECT SYSTEM. But even in the bad old days I saw the major difference between Linux and Windows as this: Linux would take a bit to get up and perfect, but once it was like that, it seemed to be like that forever. Windows, it would work flawlessly right out of the box and then gradually deteriorate until you're trying to kill 4 hours while it defrags and you still get .dll errors like crazy. Now I know there's tons of fixes and virus checking and cleaners you can use for Windows, but I'm not a computer geek - which is WHY I like Linux. Man, I don't know what goes in /etc and what goes in /usr. I know my computer will boot flawlessly, quickly, all the time and anytime I want to watch pornography it is there for me, working.
 
2013-01-01 11:01:31 PM  

lordargent: It's open source, you will find more than enough people who want to do QA.


Open source != zero cost to develop and test. Volunteers are great, but for the most part you get what you pay for. Just look at all the low quality bugs on Launchpad, or all the "expired" bugs where testers never bothered to respond to questions.


On the flip side, how much time was spent on Ubuntu 1 (cloud storage) when dropbox.com already works perfectly in Ubuntu?

How about Ubuntu 1 for Mac (aren't apple users going to use the apple option anyway?)


Canonical wants to control the entire desktop stack. Not entirely sure why they've made Ubuntu 1 such a priority, but I imagine buzzword compliance has something to do with it.
 
2013-01-01 11:06:50 PM  

TimeCubeFan: Pro Tools. Virtual Instrument libraries. And pretty much all my music production software. I'd love to try Linus, but if it doesn't run my studio apps then it's pretty much useless to me.


Cheap file server.
 
2013-01-01 11:11:26 PM  
Here is the important thing to a lot of users like myself: How consistent is the user experience between versions? I am not talking between distros, but versions of the same distro.

I've grown up with desktops, starting in the early 80's. I've done the tape drive, the floppies, typing BASIC games out of magazines, command line. The greatest revolution to me was when Windows and IBM pretty much forced standardization on the consumer market. All through high school I could work on a report at home or at school in one lab, but I could not start it at one place and finish it elsewhere. In college I could, and that was fantastic. Browser wars? Abusive monopolies? Who cares? Does my shiat work on a given workstation? Can I sit down at a computer and know how to do what I need to do? Those are the things that matter.

Microsoft has been screwing up this good thing they had. They are mucking with the interface.

There is less and less consistency of experience. This is driving a lot of people I know away from Microsoft, a little bit at a time. They added ribbons to Office? I switched my parents and my wife first to Open Office and now Libre. Things like that.

What consistency of user experience can one count on in a given Linux distro? That right there will determine the relative success of Linux in the consumer market. That, Spider Solitaire and Freecell. People will adapt... to a new system that promises greater consistency.
 
2013-01-01 11:16:17 PM  
MrEricSir: Open source != zero cost to develop and test. Volunteers are great, but for the most part you get what you pay for. Just look at all the low quality bugs on Launchpad, or all the "expired" bugs where testers never bothered to respond to questions.

If nobody is willing to test/respond to inquiries about a bug, then is that bug really of big importance?

IE, if you ran into a bug that affected you, and someone responded to you asking for details, and you just ignore them, then what gives? If the person that submitted the bug doesn't even care enough to respond then fark that bug.

Like One Hundred Papercuts.

From my personal experience, I used Windows OSes for around 20 years (3.11 was released in 1993), and in Ubuntu 10.04, I finally have an OS that doesn't annoy me to use it. Sure there are some issues, but those issues are dwarfed by all of the crazy shiat I encountered over the years (and still encounter) on windows OSes.

// unfortunately, versions of Ubuntu newer than 10.04 bring back that annoyance factor. I don't know what I'm going to do when 10.04 goes out of the support window :(
 
2013-01-01 11:21:37 PM  
If you know what an OS is, nobody cares what you think.

99% of users never choose or install or upgrade an OS.

They buy computers & tablets & phones and use the included software. That's where the money is.
 
2013-01-01 11:27:39 PM  
There will never be a time when people en masse switch over to any flavor of Linux. Never.
 
2013-01-01 11:28:26 PM  
As a FreeBSD user, I'm offended.

/starts a "2013 is the year of the *BSD desktop" blog post
 
2013-01-01 11:29:27 PM  

MrEricSir: lordargent: Shuttleworth is trying to make Ubuntu into the next windows, but in doing so is throwing choice and configurability out to the dogs as a result.

Every checkbox, every option, every configuration parameter increases the QA load exponentially. Linux fans want bells and whistles, but they also want to pay $0. That's a tough spot for Ubuntu's product team. I'd argue that keeping the options simple is the best way to please the most people.

That said, both Windows (up to 7 at least) and OS X have more window management options than Unity.


It's simply not true that Linux users want to pay $0. Many people are willing to pay and do pay for free software. I like the software that the Free Software Foundation makes so much that I donate $10. $120 a year is a small price to pay for great software especially since it is still less money than a copy of Windows would cost.

Developers can and do make money by developing free software. It isn't turning anyone into Bill Gates or Steve Jobs but it's possible to make a living. One way is accepting payments from individuals or organizations for developing free software that suits their needs or adding requested features to existing software.

It's more than a bunch of nerds who don't want to spend money. Free software is a community and grateful users such as myself who don't have the skills to develop software give back either by donating money or time to improve the quality of the software. Linux users are a diverse crowd and there is no one stereotype that can describe all of us. Go to www.humblebundle.com and you will see that we are willing to pay money for something we want. When given the option to pay what you want for a package of indie games Linux users have paid an average of about $4.00 more than Windows users and almost $3.00 more than Mac users.
 
2013-01-01 11:33:40 PM  
I think I will stick with Windows 2008 R2 as my primary desktop OS. I have a couple of Windows 2012 servers running at home, and a test environment at the office. I have Windows 8 installed on my Samsun series 5 which I like a lot. I stick with Microsoft because my job revolves around several Microsoft products. I am the company DBA / SharePoint admin. That being said I was given an old HP 6730 laptop that I am in the process of loading p with Ubuntu Server so I can expand my skills a little.
 
2013-01-01 11:52:07 PM  
I switched to Linux in either 1993 or 1994 (it's been long enough that I can't remember, but this was in the days of downloading a bunch of 3.5" floppy images) so she's only off by 19 or 20 years. N00b. :)

I had at least one Linux machine in my house from then until 2006 (and if you count things that are powered off, I still have two) but after about 2001, Linux was relegated to tinkering or running servers (when I still ran servers at home), and OS X was the UNIX I used when I actually wanted to get shiat done.

I still use Linux at work, though, along with Tru64 and Win7.
 
2013-01-02 12:09:04 AM  

Gonz: Pokey.Clyde: Not necessarily. As several others have mentioned, games for one are a big reason.

Well, that's fine, if you want to use your computer for playing games, like it's a different and expandable console.


Games are all I use my Windows box for. When I want to be productive I use my Mac. The bottom line is none of the software I bought my computers to use runs on Linux. And 90% of it never will.
 
2013-01-02 12:20:13 AM  

Ed Grubermann: The bottom line is none of the software I bought my computers to use runs on Linux. And 90% of it never will.


That's odd, all the software I use on my computers runs on Linux. Maybe you need different software.
 
2013-01-02 12:20:20 AM  
Will this be the Year of Linux on the Desktop?

i126.photobucket.com
(hot like a cpu after recompiling an OS)

"Get use to disappointment."
 
2013-01-02 12:40:32 AM  

Mitt Romneys Tax Return: Ed Grubermann: The bottom line is none of the software I bought my computers to use runs on Linux. And 90% of it never will.

That's odd, all the software I use on my computers runs on Linux. Maybe you need different software.


I'm not talking broad categories, like spreadsheets, browsers, etc... I'm talking about very specific programs. They don't exist for Linux and there are no acceptable analogs.
 
2013-01-02 12:42:22 AM  

numbquil: It's simply not true that Linux users want to pay $0. Many people are willing to pay and do pay for free software. I like the software that the Free Software Foundation makes so much that I donate $10. $120 a year is a small price to pay for great software especially since it is still less money than a copy of Windows would cost.

Developers can and do make money by developing free software. It isn't turning anyone into Bill Gates or Steve Jobs but it's possible to make a living. One way is accepting payments from individuals or organizations for developing free software that suits their needs or adding requested features to existing software.

It's more than a bunch of nerds who don't want to spend money. Free software is a community and grateful users such as myself who don't have the skills to develop software give back either by donating money or time to improve the quality of the software. Linux users are a diverse crowd and there is no one stereotype that can describe all of us. Go to www.humblebundle.com and you will see that we are willing to pay money for something we want. When given the option to pay what you want for a package of indie games Linux users have paid an average of about $4.00 more than Windows users and almost $3.00 more than Mac users.


Relying on donations is really, really tough. Believe me, I'm an open source developer and that's what we do where I work.

So yes, I know that you can make money developing open source software, but that has nothing whatsoever to do with the point I was making.
 
2013-01-02 12:59:47 AM  
As for Mint - I just went over to their site so I could configure a bootable USB stick (as I'd got the most recent version of Ubuntu and after playing with it for a few minutes decided that I had the same reaction to Unity that everyone else did). The Mint download page is interesting because off the bat there seems to be four varieties of Mint and for the life of me I couldn't figure out which was the most commonly used one. Mate? Cinnamon? (KDE and XFCE I recognized - but the placement on the site seemed to indicate that Mate or Cinnamon were the preferred versions of the distro)

So right off the bat - before I've got to the bit where I download and install what seems to be the "New Ubuntu/New Fedora/New Mandrake/New SuSE/New Debian/New RedHat/New Slackware/New Currently Recommended Distro before we all decide we hate it because it was really good when it started and they they borked it up" - I'm provided with a bucket of choices that don't make a lot of sense.

The reality is that 95% of the guys I new who were hardcore Linux nerds back in the salad days of the late 90's - when "year of the Linux desktop" kinda seemed possible - are all running Mac OSX now because they got to the stage where they don't give a fark.

If Mint is the new "Gateway Distro" and it makes it complicated to figure out which fricking version you should start with - desktop market share ain't going anywhere.
 
2013-01-02 01:54:29 AM  
Unity finally broke my loyalty to Ubuntu, and, consequently, I haven't been using linux much in the last 6 months or so. Mint looks really good, though, so I'm going to give it a spin.

Seriously, though, if I want a dictatorial interface, I'll buy a Mac and never look back. The greatest thing about linux is its configurability.

/longtime linux dabbler
//dual boot for the music software.
 
2013-01-02 02:02:08 AM  

narkor: As for Mint - I just went over to their site so I could configure a bootable USB stick (as I'd got the most recent version of Ubuntu and after playing with it for a few minutes decided that I had the same reaction to Unity that everyone else did). The Mint download page is interesting because off the bat there seems to be four varieties of Mint and for the life of me I couldn't figure out which was the most commonly used one. Mate? Cinnamon? (KDE and XFCE I recognized - but the placement on the site seemed to indicate that Mate or Cinnamon were the preferred versions of the distro)

So right off the bat - before I've got to the bit where I download and install what seems to be the "New Ubuntu/New Fedora/New Mandrake/New SuSE/New Debian/New RedHat/New Slackware/New Currently Recommended Distro before we all decide we hate it because it was really good when it started and they they borked it up" - I'm provided with a bucket of choices that don't make a lot of sense.

The reality is that 95% of the guys I new who were hardcore Linux nerds back in the salad days of the late 90's - when "year of the Linux desktop" kinda seemed possible - are all running Mac OSX now because they got to the stage where they don't give a fark.

If Mint is the new "Gateway Distro" and it makes it complicated to figure out which fricking version you should start with - desktop market share ain't going anywhere.


If you can't be bothered to spend 5 minutes with google to figure out which desktop is best for you, then you should go buy that Mac, my friend.
 
2013-01-02 02:16:22 AM  
2013 is the year of the Linux desktop

/This is not a repeat of every year since 1990
 
2013-01-02 02:17:57 AM  

ThunderPelvis: If you can't be bothered to spend 5 minutes with google to figure out which desktop is best for you, then you should go buy that Mac, my friend.


This is the kind of assholery that is why Linux will never make it to the desktop.

Any help you will get from the linux community will be from a high and mighty dickweed that thinks missing manuals, and unclear instructions are what makes linux good.
 
2013-01-02 02:19:01 AM  

Ed Grubermann: I'm not talking broad categories, like spreadsheets, browsers, etc... I'm talking about very specific programs. They don't exist for Linux and there are no acceptable analogs.


SHUT UP! THE GIMP REALLY IS AS GOOD AS PHOTOSHOP!

/lolololol
 
2013-01-02 02:35:08 AM  

ThunderPelvis: If you can't be bothered to spend 5 minutes with google to figure out which desktop is best for you, then you should go buy that Mac, my friend.


Unless you're running a VM farm, or some other specialty distribution, you shouldn't have to look up anything. The problem for most users is that the last thing they want is a choice in the UI. Oh, sure, they want to be able to put their kid's picture on their desktop and set the "You've Got Mail!" sound to a duck farting in a airplane restroom, but that's about it. They just want the software. And that's where Linux fails, and until people get their heads out of their butts and stop forking every frigging project every  time two developers can't agree on some nitpicking point, that's where Linus will always fail.
 
2013-01-02 02:36:55 AM  

Ed Grubermann: ThunderPelvis: If you can't be bothered to spend 5 minutes with google to figure out which desktop is best for you, then you should go buy that Mac, my friend.

Unless you're running a VM farm, or some other specialty distribution, you shouldn't have to look up anything. The problem for most users is that the last thing they want is a choice in the UI. Oh, sure, they want to be able to put their kid's picture on their desktop and set the "You've Got Mail!" sound to a duck farting in a airplane restroom, but that's about it. They just want the software. And that's where Linux fails, and until people get their heads out of their butts and stop forking every frigging project every  time two developers can't agree on some nitpicking point, that's where Linus

Linux will always fail.

/FTFM
 
2013-01-02 03:08:03 AM  

fluffy2097: ThunderPelvis: If you can't be bothered to spend 5 minutes with google to figure out which desktop is best for you, then you should go buy that Mac, my friend.

This is the kind of assholery that is why Linux will never make it to the desktop.

Any help you will get from the linux community will be from a high and mighty dickweed that thinks missing manuals, and unclear instructions are what makes linux good.


The Linux community has people who spend a ridiculous amount of time helping newbs.

I'm not responsible for the fact that installing and maintaining Linux sometimes requires a high level of computer literacy, but my mom can use it after it's up and running, and that says a *lot*. However, if you can't do 5 minutes of research before installing a farking operating system, then you shouldn't be installing that operating system.
 
2013-01-02 03:37:19 AM  

t3knomanser: I'm just bullshiatting on ideas, but let's be honest: there hasn't been a significant change in operating systems since the GUI.


I'd love something unique or new, but the file/folder system we have is most efficient for humans to grasp. There may be other methods but they would seem alien to us. As it is, the system emulating an actual file cabinet, it relates to how we do things in the real world. We put X in location Y.

A novel approach would be a GUI that's either 3D or stylized 2D with depth(3D depth but 2d objects), similar to how Hollywood has portrayed computers of the future. The 3D novelty would get old though, because you've got to move your orientation to place X to get to object Y. It's time consuming, most times you just want to click a time or three and have an object open/run.

It may also be cumbersome to do with a mouse and keyboard. Tablets could(and do) use the touch display, some with multiple fingers, and that's where I see the futuristic UI coming to life(limited as it is with ONLY touch), unless large TV's w/ touch get cheap, or some other control technology, we're not going to see anything really innovative that's actually useful.
 
2013-01-02 04:27:14 AM  

ThunderPelvis: my mom can use it after it's up and running, and that says a *lot*.


It says nothing when you have pre-configured a system for someone so that they don't have to do anything except click the Email or web browser or word processor icon. The fact you don't understand that, speaks volumes about your lack of understanding.

If you can walk her through repairing it over the phone, I might start to be mildly impressed that you can do what Windows desktop support monkeys do all day every day. Not because of the OS that you're doing it with, but because I imagine you'd probably curse out your own mother before walking her through fixing something.
 
2013-01-02 04:36:42 AM  

Mitt Romneys Tax Return: skinink: "Linux is just as easy to install, configure and use as Windows. Period."
And which distros out of the hundreds out there are easy to install?

Ubuntu, Open SUSE, Mint. Debian isn't any harder to install than Windows XP. I know you're yanking my chain, but we have this thing called the Internet where it's pretty easy to find out which distros are best for new Linux users.


Ah yes, the linux attitude I talked of earlier.
 
2013-01-02 04:52:12 AM  

fluffy2097: ThunderPelvis: my mom can use it after it's up and running, and that says a *lot*.

It says nothing when you have pre-configured a system for someone so that they don't have to do anything except click the Email or web browser or word processor icon. The fact you don't understand that, speaks volumes about your lack of understanding.

If you can walk her through repairing it over the phone, I might start to be mildly impressed that you can do what Windows desktop support monkeys do all day every day. Not because of the OS that you're doing it with, but because I imagine you'd probably curse out your own mother before walking her through fixing something.


Uhhh...what do you think 97% of users use their farking computers for?

You want Linux to be effortlessly distributed across all possible platforms. That's hilariously naive and...well, stupid.
 
2013-01-02 05:02:50 AM  

Dejah: I see that "runs your existing applications" is nowhere in your list.


Turns out this is going away in Windows too. Linux was just ahead of the curve.
 
2013-01-02 05:12:49 AM  
2012 was the year most people adopted Linux. They just don't know it yet.
www.technobuffalo.com
/hot
 
2013-01-02 05:14:20 AM  
I thought that large HDDs and dual booting were going to end this silly "debate". Guess not.
Hey, people! It's 2013! You can have several OSs on your computer - you are not limited to just one.
We don't have to argue over which one is "better" anymore.
Unless, of course, we just like to argue for the pleasure of waving our E-peens at one another.
 
2013-01-02 05:40:37 AM  
Apart from serving files and DB what does Linux actually do?
 
2013-01-02 05:52:59 AM  

Honest Bender: Can I run all of my games natively? No? Then it's still not my year to switch.

I love linux, don't get me wrong. I work with hundreds of linux servers every day. Damn fine OS. But when I'm at home... gots to be the windows. Games, man... games.


This.

I work with RHEL linux daily, I love CentOS and Mint, but for home?  No games, no linux.

Until Linux becomes a platform for games, I won't be switching.
 
2013-01-02 05:55:57 AM  

phlatulence: Apart from serving files and DB what does Linux actually do?


Mostly runs millions of smartphones, these days...Android is a Linux distro. Some people also use it as a desktop OS. It's the anchor of the free, noncommercial software community.
 
2013-01-02 06:24:22 AM  

jaytkay: They index file names AND contents. Simply type some words into the Search box and you get your relevant files.


But that's a hack- it's not part of the filesystem. It's a separate set of applications that take the contents of your filesystem and convert it into a searchable database. Why doesn't the filesystem support this?

omeganuepsilon: I'd love something unique or new, but the file/folder system we have is most efficient for humans to grasp


The millions of people who drop everything on their desktop so they can find it easily disagree.

omeganuepsilon: As it is, the system emulating an actual file cabinet


No it isn't. A filing cabinet does not allow you to nest folders to an arbitrary depth. The filesystem doesn't emulate anything- it's a tree datastructure that calls its nodes and leaves things that sound sort of like what we're familiar with.

omeganuepsilon: A novel approach would be a GUI that's either 3D


That's pretty much every GUI these days. They all run through a 3D compositing engine.
 
2013-01-02 06:55:42 AM  
I've got a desktop I'd like to get up and running again, but...

When I try to install Windows 7, the external USB DVD I'm using can't find drivers for the player that the Windows 7 disk is in.
When I try to install Mint Linux via USB, I get all kinds of errors.
I don't try to install OSX because it's not a hackintosh.
 
2013-01-02 07:20:18 AM  

EngineerAU: Will this be the Year of Linux on the Desktop?

[i126.photobucket.com image 198x200]
(hot like a cpu after recompiling an OS)

"Get use to disappointment."


You sound edumacated.
 
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