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(About.com)   Because cyclists aren't bad enough. Illinois set to classify inline skaters as "vehicles" and allow them to to skate on the streets, ignore traffic laws   (inlineskating.about.com ) divider line
    More: Stupid, Illinois, Illinois General Assembly, safety hazards, skates  
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3193 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jan 2013 at 12:06 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-01-01 12:57:51 PM  
Wait. Inline skates are still a thing?
 
2013-01-01 12:58:56 PM  
If they are vehicles then they need licenses and insurance when they cause an accident and need to fix my car.

/Chicagoan
 
2013-01-01 12:58:56 PM  

Fluid: Is there no such thing as separate bicycle lanes on US roads? I'm not really up-to-date on how that kinda thing works in other countries.


Rarely. Why? Because adding them in now would be a major expense. The streets, parking lots, and buildings are already there. Putting in a separate bike lane means something else has to move or shrink, at major expense. With no real guarantee of anyone using that new bike lane.
 
2013-01-01 12:59:13 PM  
One last thought:

What we really need in the United States are dedicated bike lanes where there is a median divider between it and the motor vehicle lane, and traffic signals for bikes. Lots or European cities do this.

It obviously prevents both bikes and cars from wandering into the other's lane, minimizing the potential for accidents.

Example of the median divider:

media.tumblr.com
 
2013-01-01 12:59:58 PM  

The Angry Hand of God: YouPeopleAreCrazy: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: Don't forget a proportional cost of enforcement of the rules cyclists regularly ignore.

As opposed to the speeders and red light runners in motor vehicles? Please.
Now add in the cost to take care of the damage done by the respective vehicles. 200lbs (me+bike) crashing into something does not begin to approach the damage of 4600lbs (me+F-150) crashing into something.

I fully agree that a LOT of cyclists routinely do stupid shiat. Blow red lights and stop signs, ride the wrong direction, etc, etc, etc. Asshats.
But so do motor vehicle operators. I could pick any random 1000 yard stretch of street here, and I would be surprised if the percentage of MV operators breaking some law was under 80%.

You notice the bike riders, because they annoy you. If one were to follow you around, how many laws do you break on a normal day?

I completely agree with this. To all those saying, "OMG, WHY U NO GIVE TICKETS TO CYCLISTS WHO RUN RED LIGHT?" I would love to see how many of you jaywalk.


I don't jaywalk, largely because of bicyclists who blow through lights like they own the road.
 
2013-01-01 01:01:02 PM  

Petit_Merdeux: If only cyclists observed all the traffic laws as diligently as motorists!


thurstonxhowell: Do you also get angry at pedestrians for thinking you should stay off the sidewalk?


Sarcasmatron is challenged by at least one of these posts

As an old, very fit user/owner of just about every form of conveyance implicit in this discussion I assert that the problem with all of them is that over a long enough period every single operator of any of them is at best an oblivious fool and at worst an ignorant incompetent inconsiderate waste of life.

/get teh hell off my road, sidewalk, bike lane, bike path, truck stop, runway, skate park, farmer's market and lawn,

//that is all
 
2013-01-01 01:01:32 PM  

Tanukis_Parachute: january 1 and already had a run in with a cyclist that thought the stop sign was a 'suggestion'.

four way stop...i got there first. start to go and a biker blows thru from my right and starts yelling at me for having the audacity to slow him down.

he yelled at me that he was in 'training'. i guess it is training to be dead quicker.



Wait a sec...

So you're at a stop, this guy "blows thru", but stil has time to yell at you for slowing him down, and then tells you that he's training, all while he's moving at a high rate of speed perpendicular to your direction of travel?

Now I'm not saying there's something fishy about your story, but there's something fishy about your story...
 
2013-01-01 01:01:46 PM  

Fluid: Is there no such thing as separate bicycle lanes on US roads? I'm not really up-to-date on how that kinda thing works in other countries.


A lot of major cities have them, but as I noted in my post above, there are rarely median dividers between the lanes. As a result, you often have cars using the bike lane as a temporary parking spot, causing bikes to go into the car lanes. Also, when bikers want to pass a group of bikers in front of them, without the median they can use the car lane as a passing lane.
 
2013-01-01 01:02:33 PM  
Most motorists appreciate the cruising through rather than the waiting.
I have stopped at a 4 way and let a car slip through on ice.
What would could have happened we both would have regretted.
 
2013-01-01 01:03:41 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: You notice the bike riders, because they annoy you. If one were to follow you around, how many laws do you break on a normal day?


I notice bike riders because when they do something stupid and I almost end up creaming them the potential for death or harm is exponentially higher compared to someone in a car.

Because of this there's a tendency to violate laws they should be observing because they feel they're not as safe as others on the road. The refuse to accept the personal responsibility for a situation they have willingly agreed to put themselves in.

I also notice them because when an incident occurs they have more of a tendency to blow it out of proportion (become verbally or physically violent) compared to the reaction from another motorist.

So, in conclusion, they're more likely to incur greater damage, prone to ignore driving laws because of the basic laws of physics in a situation they have willingly inserted themselves into, and they're whiny about it.

If you're looking for why people driving cars hate bicyclists you can start right there.
 
2013-01-01 01:04:39 PM  
"friends don't let friends fruit boot"

they are fruit boots.

 
2013-01-01 01:07:14 PM  

you have pee hands: I hope this means they can get DUIs.

Of course the average inline skater is so goddamned clumsy it'd be hard to pick out the drunk ones.


I wonder if you can be charged, if you have access to skates, while "under the influence"?

$$$$$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$$$
 
2013-01-01 01:07:38 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: Don't forget a proportional cost of enforcement of the rules cyclists regularly ignore.

As opposed to the speeders and red light runners in motor vehicles? Please.
Now add in the cost to take care of the damage done by the respective vehicles. 200lbs (me+bike) crashing into something does not begin to approach the damage of 4600lbs (me+F-150) crashing into something.

I fully agree that a LOT of cyclists routinely do stupid shiat. Blow red lights and stop signs, ride the wrong direction, etc, etc, etc. Asshats.
But so do motor vehicle operators. I could pick any random 1000 yard stretch of street here, and I would be surprised if the percentage of MV operators breaking some law was under 80%.

You notice the bike riders, because they annoy you. If one were to follow you around, how many laws do you break on a normal day?


This is a big part of it. Everyone on the road is awful, not just cyclists, but you notice cyclists. I've biked a certain neighborhood route nearly five times a week for a few months now and a hilariously small percentage of people ever comes to a complete stop at the 4-way stop signs unless someone is visible approaching on the crossing road.

Because of this it seems like most drivers don't even want a cyclist to fully stop because they don't want to wait for a biker to accelerate across the intersection. I come to a momentary full stop as (just long enough to stop without having to put my foot down), and just doing that I have gotten honked at. When I am coming up to an intersection where someone else has the right of way, 80% of the time they will sit there waving frantically for me to go despite me having a stop sign that I have to obey.

That isn't even to mention the absurd designs of bike infrastructure which are just as bad if not worse as stupid car infrastructure decisions. You have bike lanes which are in blind spots for driveways, bike lanes going straight that are on the right side of right-turn-only lanes, and even a combination bike-lane/parking-area (seriously, who thought that was a good idea?)
 
2013-01-01 01:10:09 PM  

Skarekrough: So, in conclusion, they're more likely to incur greater damage, prone to ignore driving laws because of the basic laws of physics in a situation they have willingly inserted themselves into, and they're whiny about it.

If you're looking for why people driving cars hate bicyclists you can start right there.


What you also don't notice is the commuter cyclist riding one block over, on a residential street. Obeying all the laws, slipping quietly through town. Why is he over there? Because it is a much easier ride, as opposed to being an idiot on the main through street.

But that guy never appears on your radar.
 
2013-01-01 01:12:01 PM  

Derigiberble: That isn't even to mention the absurd designs of bike infrastructure which are just as bad if not worse as stupid car infrastructure decisions. You have bike lanes which are in blind spots for driveways, bike lanes going straight that are on the right side of right-turn-only lanes, and even a combination bike-lane/parking-area (seriously, who thought that was a good idea?)


So much this. There are way more ways to design a dangerous bike system than to build a safe, effective one.
And traffic designers seem to be determined to build out every possible bad one.
 
2013-01-01 01:13:35 PM  

Too Pretty For Prison: thornhill: This is all an enforcement issue. If people believe laws are enforced, they don't break them.

Nobody driving a car runs a red or stop sign even if there is clearly no other car in the area because they know if the police catch them, there are going to be serious repercussions.

Cyclists never get pulled over and ticketed for breaking traffic laws; they conclude the laws are never enforced; and thus, don't think twice about breaking them.

Cities need to start putting traffic cops on corners and ticketing bicyclists.

I've wondered why they aren't required to put a license plate on their bicycles. Obviously, not every bicycle - the backlash would be enormous if they tried to make you license your 6 year old's training bike. But require licenses for bicycles that travel on roads where the speed limit is greater than 25. I live in St. Louis. I doubt our problem is nearly as bad as it is in other cities, but there are enough here to make it an issue. I've seen them travel in packs and block lanes, run lights, run stop signs (that one is the worst - they treat them like they are completely optional), and there seems to be a complete disregard for hand signals.

You make a great point. There are no consequences for breaking the law and they know it.


www.microcosmdistribution.com

/doncha think
 
2013-01-01 01:14:04 PM  

ZAZ: If they are legally vehicles, does running one over count as vandalism rather than assault?


If you damage the vehicle... which is the skates and the bikes. I'm pretty sure running a motorcycle or car off the road and damaging the person inside counts as assault.
 
2013-01-01 01:16:28 PM  

thornhill: This is all an enforcement issue. If people believe laws are enforced, they don't break them.

Nobody driving a car runs a red or stop sign even if there is clearly no other car in the area because they know if the police catch them, there are going to be serious repercussions.

Cyclists never get pulled over and ticketed for breaking traffic laws; they conclude the laws are never enforced; and thus, don't think twice about breaking them.

Cities need to start putting traffic cops on corners and ticketing bicyclists.


I'll go further: anything more than walking must be registered, licensed and pay a road use tax.

Think mopeds, scooters, rascals, golf carts, bicycles, skates, etc.

Universal applicability of traffic laws.
 
2013-01-01 01:16:37 PM  
Illinois just made stop lights optional for motorcycles and bicycles. Link
 
2013-01-01 01:17:28 PM  

Too Pretty For Prison: I live in St. Louis. I doubt our problem is nearly as bad as it is in other cities, but there are enough here to make it an issue. I've seen them travel in packs and block lanes, run lights, run stop signs (that one is the worst - they treat them like they are completely optional), and there seems to be a complete disregard for hand signals.


I was visiting your fine town last summer, and driving down a street at 5pm following a pack of bicylists giving them decent room when suddenly one of them just pulled over, into my lane to make a left turn. No signal, no warning, just bam, right in front of me. If I hadn't been paying extremely close attention, he would have ended up bouncing off my front bumper.
 
2013-01-01 01:18:43 PM  
Wait... Only inline skates?

cdn.fd.uproxx.com
 
2013-01-01 01:21:50 PM  
And the licensing/taxing thing for cycling is asinine. Licensing and/or taxing cyclists would just be a money grab for the sake of grabbing money. Cycling puts no appreciable wear and tear on the roads to justify a tax and making people pay a fee to ride their bike to work instead of their car (that they already pay a fee for) is just going to put more cars on the road.

The enforcement of these fees would be a nightmare. Our city grows by 50,000 college students in the fall. If even 20% of them bring a bike to get around campus that's 10,000 licenses the police have to issue and/or try to enforce. And since they're here for only 8 months a year, is it fair to charge them a fee for the whole year? What about the fact that bikes are only an option (for most) on relatively nice weather days? They'd be here for 8 months but can only really ride their bikes to classes for 6 months out of the year. And what would the penalty be? Impound the bike? A fine? Where would we store the hundreds of bikes they'd impound since it would likely be cheaper to buy a new one at WalMart than pay the $50 fee to get it out of impound and $25 to license it. If you make the fees proportional to a car you'd end up with $1 license fees, meaning it'd cost WAY more to issue the license than the license itself, putting the states even further in debt each year. You can't make the fine less than the license because that just incentivizes people to ride without a license because getting caught is cheaper than the license itself.

Also, without getting into it. There a lot of the 'people with glass houses...' going on here.
I'm sure every bike hater in this thread has never rolled a stop sign, turned right on red at a 'no right on red' turn, gone over a posted speed limit, done a U-turn where it is illegal, illegally changed lanes, or the dozens of other things that you do every day that is technically illegal.

I'd be willing to bet that literally every single time you get in your car, you break at least one traffic law. No matter how stupid you think that law might be.
 
2013-01-01 01:28:55 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: What you also don't notice is the commuter cyclist riding one block over, on a residential street. Obeying all the laws, slipping quietly through town. Why is he over there? Because it is a much easier ride, as opposed to being an idiot on the main through street.

But that guy never appears on your radar.


There are wreckless bikers, and legal bikers, just as there are reckless and legal drivers.

The main difference is when a reckless car driver causes an accident with another car (such as driving full-speed into oncoming traffic), the reckless car driver usually doesn't call in a horde of other wreckless drivers to attack the other person.
 
2013-01-01 01:29:15 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Fluid: Is there no such thing as separate bicycle lanes on US roads? I'm not really up-to-date on how that kinda thing works in other countries.

Rarely. Why? Because adding them in now would be a major expense. The streets, parking lots, and buildings are already there. Putting in a separate bike lane means something else has to move or shrink, at major expense. With no real guarantee of anyone using that new bike lane.


I live on a heavily traveled street that used to have a left turn lane until some genius in the city's engineering department decided that it would be a good route for a bike lane so that the cyclists would stay off the parallel 6 lane street a few blocks over. So they took out the turn lane to make room for the bike lane, but they didn't take out the left turn light. Oh, and they had to repave the street so it would be smooth enough to ride on (during the six months of the year it's not covered in ice and snow). In the end, everyone uses the road as it was marked before, so the cyclists mostly still ride on the sidewalk. *facepalm*
 
2013-01-01 01:29:16 PM  

Fluid: Is there no such thing as separate bicycle lanes on US roads? I'm not really up-to-date on how that kinda thing works in other countries.


On the streets in many US cities there are separate lanes for bicycles. And next to these lanes you will see bikers merrily going down the sidewalk with no regard for the pedestrians who use them.
 
2013-01-01 01:31:01 PM  

ancker: I'd be willing to bet that literally every single time you get in your car, you break at least one traffic law. No matter how stupid you think that law might be.


I'd be willing to bet that you are wrong.

Also, rolling a stop sign is a bit different than blowing past it going 25 MPH. While both are illegal, one is probably a bit more dangerous. Can you guess which one?
 
2013-01-01 01:32:28 PM  

Skarekrough: Because of this there's a tendency to violate laws they should be observing because they feel they're not as safe as others on the road. The refuse to accept the personal responsibility for a situation they have willingly agreed to put themselves in.


What laws are you referring to specifically?  I mean, the traditional butthurt is that bikes run red lights and stop signs all the time.  But, I'm not really aware of any of those douchebags thinking that running a light somehow makes them safer.  They just don't want to be inconvenienced by having to stop.

Skarekrough: I also notice them because when an incident occurs they have more of a tendency to blow it out of proportion (become verbally or physically violent) compared to the reaction from another motorist.


As you said, we're more vulnerable to damage.  If you do something stupid that almost puts a dent in my bumper, I'm not going to be quite as pissed as I am when you do something stupid that almost kills me.
I think I tend to react equally angrily when I'm in my car, but my voice is muffled and my hand gestures are less visible, so it might be less noticeable.
 
2013-01-01 01:33:53 PM  

Omnivorous: Illinois just made stop lights optional for motorcycles and bicycles. Link


No, not optional..
At a stop light on a bike, the previous choices were: A) wait forever because it does not register the bike mass (is the light broken?) B) wait until someone else comes along in a car to trigger the signal, C) run the light (breaking the law), or D) wait some unknown period of time until you determine that the light is broken.

This law codifies the 'reasonable wait time' to 2 minutes.
 
2013-01-01 01:33:57 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy:

Locally, reg fees are by vehicle value. Other places by weight or horsepower. You do want to be fair in those fees, right?
Here's the yearly dime for my bike. Happy now?


People who drive are expected to pay registration fees and gas taxes.

People who use public transportation are required to pay a fare to ride the bus, train, or ferry.

Why then shouldn't the bikers be required to pay a fee toward the upkeep of the bike lanes and paths? Since bikers by and large ignore traffic signals, stop signs, and other road users it's the least they could do.
 
2013-01-01 01:34:36 PM  
I just think it's bad that cyclists can phase between being a pedestrian and being a road vehicle. That can result in some confusion. "I'm a vehicle! Respect my right to the road. Oh a stop sign. I'm a pedestrian now! I don't have to stop for stop signs."
 
2013-01-01 01:36:02 PM  
I'm sure this is a problem outside of Chicago.

Also, if you can't skate close to the posted speed limit or skate on the sidewalks, you should be cited. Just like it was a car.
 
2013-01-01 01:36:40 PM  

ancker: And the licensing/taxing thing for cycling is asinine. Licensing and/or taxing cyclists would just be a money grab for the sake of grabbing money. Cycling puts no appreciable wear and tear on the roads to justify a tax and making people pay a fee to ride their bike to work instead of their car (that they already pay a fee for) is just going to put more cars on the road.

The enforcement of these fees would be a nightmare. Our city grows by 50,000 college students in the fall. If even 20% of them bring a bike to get around campus that's 10,000 licenses the police have to issue and/or try to enforce. And since they're here for only 8 months a year, is it fair to charge them a fee for the whole year? What about the fact that bikes are only an option (for most) on relatively nice weather days? They'd be here for 8 months but can only really ride their bikes to classes for 6 months out of the year. And what would the penalty be? Impound the bike? A fine? Where would we store the hundreds of bikes they'd impound since it would likely be cheaper to buy a new one at WalMart than pay the $50 fee to get it out of impound and $25 to license it. If you make the fees proportional to a car you'd end up with $1 license fees, meaning it'd cost WAY more to issue the license than the license itself, putting the states even further in debt each year. You can't make the fine less than the license because that just incentivizes people to ride without a license because getting caught is cheaper than the license itself.

Also, without getting into it. There a lot of the 'people with glass houses...' going on here.
I'm sure every bike hater in this thread has never rolled a stop sign, turned right on red at a 'no right on red' turn, gone over a posted speed limit, done a U-turn where it is illegal, illegally changed lanes, or the dozens of other things that you do every day that is technically illegal.

I'd be willing to bet that literally every single time you get in your car, you break at least one traffic law. No matter how stupid you think that law might be.


Plate the bike like a motorcycle so it goes into the DMV database. If every state plated bicycles this would be much simpler, and the fees would be due in the home state but be legal everywhere

The rest of the argument is the same as for people that own a motorcycle. Even though you can't really drive them all year in places that get winter, you still pay the years registration.

I don't believe in plating bikes, but it wouldn't be that complicated.
 
2013-01-01 01:38:27 PM  
I love the "You drive 5 over the speed limit so I get to disregard stop lights and signs" argument.
 
2013-01-01 01:39:54 PM  

The Angry Hand of God: I completely agree with this. To all those saying, "OMG, WHY U NO GIVE TICKETS TO CYCLISTS WHO RUN RED LIGHT?" I would love to see how many of you jaywalk.


If you jaywalk such that traffic has to brake for you, you should be ticketed. If you jaywalk and it doesn't affect anybody, who cares?

The same thing with bikes. I don't care if they blow through stop signs and red lights...AS LONG AS IT DOESN'T AFFECT MOTORISTS (OR PEDESTRIANS). But, as soon as they are screwing with the cars (as they frequently do), they should be ticketed every time.

So its perfectly consistent - you break the law and screw somebody else, you get a ticket whether its in a car, on foot, or on a bike/skates.
 
2013-01-01 01:40:46 PM  

The Angry Hand of God:

I completely agree with this. To all those saying, "OMG, WHY U NO GIVE TICKETS TO CYCLISTS WHO RUN RED LIGHT?" I would love to see how many of you jaywalk.


Oh I get it, so bikers shouldn't have to stop at red lights because people jaywalk? Speaking as one who walks during non-working hours, I can say that bikers are a pest: get off the sidewalk, stop at red lights and stop signs, then maybe you can biatch about jaywalkers and speeders
 
2013-01-01 01:41:42 PM  
Ancker: I'd be willing to bet that literally every single time you get in your car, you break at least one traffic law. No matter how stupid you think that law might be.

One of the Lerner brothers (who ran the suburban newspaper chain in Chicago) had a policeman bet him that he couldn't go around the block without breaking a law. He took the bet, losing when he was driving with only one hand on the steering wheel.
 
2013-01-01 01:42:29 PM  
Best damn system I've ever seen keeps the strollers out of the way so the bikes and roller blade folks can duke it out in peace.www.updowntowners.com
 
2013-01-01 01:45:44 PM  

thornhill: This is all an enforcement issue. If people believe laws are enforced, they don't break them.

Nobody driving a car runs a red or stop sign even if there is clearly no other car in the area because they know if the police catch them, there are going to be serious repercussions.

Cyclists never get pulled over and ticketed for breaking traffic laws; they conclude the laws are never enforced; and thus, don't think twice about breaking them.

Cities need to start putting traffic cops on corners and ticketing bicyclists.


Or we should start being allowed to drive cars through reds after stop when there clearly aren't other vehicles.
 
2013-01-01 01:46:22 PM  

ancker: I'd be willing to bet that literally every single time you get in your car, you break at least one traffic law. No matter how stupid you think that law might be.


As I said above, this argument is silly.

Nobody cares if you break a law if it doesn't affect somebody else. If you roll through a Stop sign when nobody is around, its not big deal. Similarly, nobody really cares if a bike blows through a stop sign when the road is empty.

However, it IS a big deal if you break the law such that it affects everybody else on the damn road. This is what bikers do when they regularly blow through stop signs and lights such that cars have to brake for them.  Cars generally don't get to break motoring laws such that it screws everybody else on the road, but some bikers seem to think that its their God given right to break whatever law they want even if it screws over other vehicles.
 
2013-01-01 01:46:34 PM  

Zarquon's Flat Tire: I love the "You drive 5 over the speed limit so I get to disregard stop lights and signs" argument.


No, that's not the argument.
 
2013-01-01 01:50:58 PM  

thornhill: This is all an enforcement issue. If people believe laws are enforced, they don't break them.

Nobody driving a car runs a red or stop sign even if there is clearly no other car in the area because they know if the police catch them, there are going to be serious repercussions.

Cyclists never get pulled over and ticketed for breaking traffic laws; they conclude the laws are never enforced; and thus, don't think twice about breaking them.

Cities need to start putting traffic cops on corners and ticketing bicyclists.


I imagine a police-issued potato-cannon that fires a broomstick into their spokes from up to 100 feet away
 
2013-01-01 01:52:36 PM  

Krazikarl: ancker: I'd be willing to bet that literally every single time you get in your car, you break at least one traffic law. No matter how stupid you think that law might be.

As I said above, this argument is silly.

Nobody cares if you break a law if it doesn't affect somebody else. If you roll through a Stop sign when nobody is around, its not big deal. Similarly, nobody really cares if a bike blows through a stop sign when the road is empty.

However, it IS a big deal if you break the law such that it affects everybody else on the damn road. This is what bikers do when they regularly blow through stop signs and lights such that cars have to brake for them.  Cars generally don't get to break motoring laws such that it screws everybody else on the road, but some bikers seem to think that its their God given right to break whatever law they want even if it screws over other vehicles.


I have not seen this. As someone who has ridden a bike and skateboard frequently on roads, "blowing" through a stop sign in a busy intersection usually doesn't work out in the favor of the smaller vehicle. In any case, you can continue making things up, or regurgitating the same crap someone else said.
 
2013-01-01 01:52:49 PM  

Zarquon's Flat Tire: I love the "You drive 5 over the speed limit so I get to disregard stop lights and signs" argument.


It's not the "so we get to break the law too" it's the "Stop pretending that you motorists are infallible" part.

Both parties are supposed to follow the rules. But for some reason, you think it's worse when a cyclist doesn't.
 
2013-01-01 01:55:58 PM  
If you use a public resource (the roads) you should do it responsibly and appropriately.

Pedestrians should be careful and not jaywalk. If they break the law, they should get ticketed.

Drivers should go through training (which they do) and get ticketed when they break the law (which happens, but not often enough).

Bikers should go through training (which they don't, at least not here) and get ticketed when they break the law (which they don't here).

Grow up and stop pretending that you, and your mode of transportation, is better than others. Do what's right for you, and don't screw others over.
 
2013-01-01 01:57:58 PM  

The Angry Hand of God: I have not seen this. As someone who has ridden a bike and skateboard frequently on roads, "blowing" through a stop sign in a busy intersection usually doesn't work out in the favor of the smaller vehicle. In any case, you can continue making things up, or regurgitating the same crap someone else said.


I see it constantly. You obviously have not ever lived near a college campus or in a heavily residential area inside of a large city. If you had lived in an area like that, you would see this behavior each and every day in the spring/summer. If you don't think that this happens, you simply have no clue.

It usually doesn't happen at busy intersections. You pulled the "busy" qualifier out of your ass so that you had a stronger argument. It happens in residential areas where traffic and car speed is lower. Cyclists know that they can essentially force cars to stop if they are at low speeds without too much of a threat to their safety.

Go to an area with lots of college students, and watch them bike around residential areas with some car traffic. Go ahead and tell me what percentage stop all the time at signs/lights. You will then have a clue of what you are talking about.
 
2013-01-01 01:57:58 PM  

Pinhead Patriot: Wait... Only inline skates?

[cdn.fd.uproxx.com image 600x400]


"hey, a blowjob is a job"
 
2013-01-01 01:58:14 PM  

Krazikarl:
However, it IS a big deal if you break the law such that it affects everybody else on the damn road. This is what bikers do when they regularly blow through stop signs and lights such that cars have to brake for them.  Cars generally don't get to break motoring laws such that it screws everybody else on the road, but some bikers seem to think that its their God given right to break whatever law they want even if it screws over other vehicles.


Does this happen, yes. Does it happen enough that it's an epidemic, no.
As stated before, I live in a college town with a huge campus and have drove onto campus to work for 9 years. There are TONS of bikes. I have never once had to slam on my brakes to avoid hitting a cyclist who 'blew through' a stop sign/light. I see WAY more people walking during 'no-walk' signs.
 
2013-01-01 02:02:07 PM  

Marcintosh: Best damn system I've ever seen keeps the strollers out of the way so the bikes and roller blade folks can duke it out in peace.[www.updowntowners.com image 850x508]


Where I live has a paved trail around the rivers that is supposed to be shared. I wish that set up was thought about when they created the river park trails. A lot of times both the walkers and bikers get into each other's way. Usually it is either side not paying attention. There haven't been any real accidents but a lot of near misses between the two. Most of the time I blame the walkers who usually have pets or children and do not keep them close to the edge of the trail for other runners or cyclists to pass them.
 
2013-01-01 02:03:12 PM  

The number 7 and the letter Q!:

Bikers should go through training (which they don't, at least not here) and get ticketed when they break the law (which they don't here).

Grow up and stop pretending that you, and your mode of transportation, is better than others. Do what's right for you, and don't screw others over.


If you've gone through driving training, you've gone through cycling training. The rules are the same with occasional exceptions (like being able to ride double-file or getting to run a red light if it the trigger isn't working for you) in some jurisdictions. Most of the exceptions are less strict than for cars. If you simply follow the "Rules of the road" on a bike, you'll be fine.

When you are on the road whether it be on bike, motorcycle, moped, or golf cart, you must behave exactly as if you were in a car.
 
2013-01-01 02:03:14 PM  

serial_crusher: But, I'm not really aware of any of those douchebags thinking that running a light somehow makes them safer.  They just don't want to be inconvenienced by having to stop.


http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/public/cyclesafety/article3314455.ece

"some junctions are so dangerous that to wait for green is to risk my life for no benefit to anybody."

A quick google search pulls up hundreds of similar articles.

I know that these idiots make up only a tiny minority of cyclists, but it doesn't help when they are given a spot in the media to convince others that following the law really is more dangerous than randomly darting out in front of 50MPH cross-traffic.
 
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