If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Huffington Post)   As more and more young people question the value of going $150,000 in debt so they can get a job as a Starbuck's barista, America's small liberal-arts colleges face a struggle for survival   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 247
    More: Obvious, arts, Starbucks, U.S. universities, civic engagement, Beloit College, degree programs, academic major, climbing walls  
•       •       •

4995 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Dec 2012 at 12:59 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



247 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
BHK
2012-12-31 04:24:51 PM

factoryconnection: The older I get, the more lucky I feel that my parents were ball-busters when it came to academics AND activities throughout school. I got a full scholarship via Navy ROTC, which included books, summer training and a guaranteed, 4-year job after college. My total time spent with Uncle Sam totaled 11 years, and I came away completely debt free with not only an attractive BS diploma but a career-founding resume that has served me since.

School debt is a monster deadweight on so many of my contemporaries, and as tuition/fees rise quickly while wages have stagnated for decades, the problem will only get worse. Schools, lenders, and public education policy makers have got to pull their sh*t together and get education costs under control.


And military costs. One way or another, taxpayers are going to pay for all that education.
 
2012-12-31 04:32:16 PM

Evil Twin Skippy: ProfessorOhki: Coastalgrl: The cost of books is outrageous. I get a tuition waiver in exchange for teaching/research thankfully so Im not getting any more student lons. But this is the first time I'm at a school who uses Barnes and Noble as their bookseller. I have never seen more overpriced books in my life. If I went with the school for my books this term, it would total $800 for 2 grad and 1 undergrad class. I had a few of the books already and only purchased books for the undergrad class......managed to skate for $320 using Amazon but that's for one class.

These better be the best programming books ever.

They were not. You only need the one book and it's like $45. $20 if you can convince an old UNIX guy to part with one of his copies.

[cm.bell-labs.com image 196x256]
/fark textbook publishers

Actually, my original copy was xeroxed from an old Unix guy.

/And you'll get my "official" copy when you pull it from my cold, dead hands


Apparently its $50 off Amazon.

The class is requesting three books by Walter Savitch on C++ Programming. Any good?

The professor comes highly recommended to me by a colleague and that's more than half the battle in my mind. but we shall see. If the books stink, I can return them if need be. Unlike at a college textbook store where you cant' return till a certain date and then they wont take back more than they feel they need.
 
2012-12-31 04:34:16 PM

freewill: Psycat: The University of Minnesota is accredited and is a very good land-grant school. I'm guessing you're some idiot with a B.S. in Butthurt and eleventy-zillion dollars in loans, and my post irritated you to the point where you had to make an obnoxious, unsolicited reply. You made it pretty obvious that I hit a nerve, so suck it while I work my dream job as a full-time artist...

I was trying to figure out what that guy's problem was, myself. It's either the worthless degree and a fortune in loans or it's opposite, he never went and is pissed to think he could have done it affordably. Either way, your point was good.


Thanks, freewill! I just posted an innocuous blurb about my own college experience, and he went ballistic on me. I'm guessing he's a textbook example of an over-educated barista with a zillion dollars on loans and the fact that I didn't make the same mistake must have hit a nerve.


For the most part, nobody really gives a shiat where you go to undergrad. With a few exceptions, you aren't doing yourself any favors choosing an expensive big name and taking out enough loans to drink and party over working a little while you go to a reputable state school where you can get in-state tuition. That's for starry eyed teenagers who think their "college experience" is going to be anything more than a fading blip on the radar of their life once they get out of there and start their careers.

/ ...and it will be, if you spend the rest of your life paying off six figures of loans as a waiter.


Agreed. I think so many of the young whipper-snappers have the silly idea that college is exactly like "Animal House". Maybe it's that way for 5%, but the other 95% are guys studying on the GI Loan, single mothers trying to break out of poverty, people returning to school in their 30s, and people like me who had to commute and flip McBurgers to get through school.

On top of that, some of the smartest people I know never went to college and one of them studied plumbing in vo-tech before becoming a professional 'drain surgeon'--and plumbers make a hell of a lot of money...
 
2012-12-31 04:40:01 PM

freewill: I was trying to figure out what that guy's problem was, myself. It's either the worthless degree and a fortune in loans or it's opposite, he never went and is pissed to think he could have done it affordably. Either way, your point was good.


I was actually imprisoned in an extradimensional vortex for 2,363 years. That said, I'm just slightly resentful that there isn't a similar celebration for my sacrifices. Living with a gang of Indian serial-rapists and hiking barefoot through an Arctic wasteland in order to achieve my educational goals so that I can work my dream job as a full-time straw purchaser of neutron bombs for various rogue states seems to be on par with the intrepid behavior of exceptional Farkers that seemingly defies the trend towards unaffordable education in America today.
 
2012-12-31 04:46:13 PM
bhcompy:

Going to community college and paying $36/credit for a liberal arts education is much more efficient than going to Haverford and spending $60,000 per year unless you're using it as a springboard to grad school. That is really the only valid reason to attend a prestigious liberal arts college these days.

David Bowie's son "Zowie" went to the College of Wooster, which has only about 2,000 students. He went on to make my favorite SF movie of the 21st century. But he later graduated also from the London Film school as a trained director.

Does this prove or disprove your assertion? Was Wooster College "efficient" for him? I'm not sure myself.
 
2012-12-31 04:55:00 PM
My college education has actually helped, even if I never got work as a rocket scientist. The engineering and physics aspect of my education does help with my unique genre of art. The many liberal-arts classes I took as electives--from art of the cinema to Greek history--really did help to round out my education and give me an appreciation of things that go way beyond finding work as an engineer.

As for my college composition courses, they helped expand my vocabulary to the point where I can inundate people under a phalanx of egregiously prolix and sesquipedalian verbosity to lend a simulacrum of verisimilitude that I'm pretty gosh-darned perspicacious after all. With the $10,000 I spent on my education, I'm going to use those 50-cent words as much as possible ;)
 
2012-12-31 05:11:33 PM

The One True TheDavid: bhcompy:

Going to community college and paying $36/credit for a liberal arts education is much more efficient than going to Haverford and spending $60,000 per year unless you're using it as a springboard to grad school. That is really the only valid reason to attend a prestigious liberal arts college these days.

David Bowie's son "Zowie" went to the College of Wooster, which has only about 2,000 students. He went on to make my favorite SF movie of the 21st century. But he later graduated also from the London Film school as a trained director.

Does this prove or disprove your assertion? Was Wooster College "efficient" for him? I'm not sure myself.


It doesn't change my assertion at all, because my assertion didn't mention the obvious assumption that if you can already afford it without loans it doesn't matter at all, or the other obvious assumption about being of direct lineage of a famous person. Regardless, he used that as a springboard to a prestigious college for grad school(Vanderbilt) before dropping out and going to film school, which is a(the?) valid application of a liberal arts college education.
 
2012-12-31 05:19:15 PM

ProfessorOhki: Coastalgrl: The cost of books is outrageous. I get a tuition waiver in exchange for teaching/research thankfully so Im not getting any more student lons. But this is the first time I'm at a school who uses Barnes and Noble as their bookseller. I have never seen more overpriced books in my life. If I went with the school for my books this term, it would total $800 for 2 grad and 1 undergrad class. I had a few of the books already and only purchased books for the undergrad class......managed to skate for $320 using Amazon but that's for one class.

These better be the best programming books ever.

They were not. You only need the one book and it's like $45. $20 if you can convince an old UNIX guy to part with one of his copies.

[cm.bell-labs.com image 196x256]
/fark textbook publishers


I have a first edition! Says 1978 in it. Not selling it though.
 
2012-12-31 05:30:37 PM
People don't pay for art, music or performance, anymore. I know. I make music and mix records for a living. Picasso? Get it on the torrents, brah.
 
2012-12-31 05:32:25 PM
Looks like starbucks has become the McDonalds of the 2010's.

/Some people at McDonalds make more money than teachers
//Just because someone says working somewhere is bad doesn't mean it is
 
2012-12-31 05:37:54 PM

monoski: Imagine when they find out they can take that $150k and start up their own venture (maybe even a Bucks franchise) skip the 4 years of drinking and whoring and get right down the business of working for a living...


Starbucks does not franchise.
 
2012-12-31 05:39:15 PM

bunner: People don't pay for art, music or performance, anymore. I know. I make music and mix records for a living. Picasso? Get it on the torrents, brah.


I feel bad when I watch movies at other people's houses. Shouldn't I be paying someone? Anyone?
 
2012-12-31 05:42:32 PM
Some of those Starbucks Girls are kinda of hot
 
2012-12-31 05:55:20 PM
Here's an idea, stop charging so f'ing much. The true plan here is to dumb down america or make them so debt laden that they are easy to control. Nobody questions privacy invasions, nobody complains that the monopolies are making us all used to being treated like crap. And people are too busy worrying about the rent to worry about the betrayal of our rights by our corrupt government. The war in Oceana is already in play...
 
2012-12-31 05:55:22 PM
An argument in favor of a liberal-arts education:

When I was in high school, I was good in science, math, and German, but the classes I loved the most were my art classes. Unfortunately, I had no clue what art form I was most interested in--studio arts, architecture, movie-making--couldn't make up my mind.

I did have a passing interest in aircraft in my senior year. Guidance counselors and most of the muckety-mucks in the local community were pushing science and technology majors--after all, we were still in a Cold War with the Russkies when I was in high school. Between that push and my vain need to show off that I was a total math-n-science stud, not to mention my interest in airplanes, I foolishly decided to study aerospace engineering in school.

Aerospace engineering isn't about being a test pilot or anything cool like that. It's mostly math and more math and maybe 5% of my classmates were women, so it was like living in a monastery filled with math geeks. I was thoroughly bored with it before I graduated, but didn't want to add another year or two, so I plodded forward. About the only things that made college worthwhile were the cool liberal-arts courses I took as electives, and all the time I spent socializing in the student union. In the end, I never actually worked as a rocket scientist, and while I'm glad I got the degree, it would have been a lot more fun if I had majored in art instead. Heck, an art degree would have kicked off my career as an artist a lot earlier than it actually started.

And that's the rub. Whatever you study in college has a good chance of being obsolete by the time you graduate, or the job market gets over-saturated with others with the same degree, so deciding on a major based on the future job market is pretty damned risky. From my experience, it's probably best to study what you love, instead of spending 4 years studying something boring, because you'll probably end up a barista anyways.

In the end, I ended up doing what I always wanted to do anyways. What's funny is that all the weird kinetic-art tricks I learned as a kid and gave up in college--when I was trying to be a serious adult--ended up being the very things that helped me establish my own career. As a professional artist, I find that having a long, impressive list of museums and galleries on my Curriculum Vitae goes a lot further than a Master of Fine Arts degree towards getting new gigs...
 
2012-12-31 05:59:20 PM

Psycat: I find that having a long, impressive list of museums and galleries on my Curriculum Vitae goes a lot further than a Master of Fine Arts degree towards getting new gigs...


That's a good point... when some curator is looking for janitorial services, it's better to hire someone who has cleaned up other museums.

Mahhughes: The true plan here is to dumb down america or make them so debt laden that they are easy to control. Nobody questions privacy invasions, nobody complains that the monopolies are making us all used to being treated like crap. And people are too busy worrying about the rent to worry about the betrayal of our rights by our corrupt government. The war in Oceana is already in play...


I blame the Masons, who are in collusion with the Muslim faith, Wiccans and socialists; the efforts of which are being orchestrated by that Satanic whore more commonly known as the Roman Catholic Church.
 
2012-12-31 06:06:12 PM
TWX



Blame the lack of value as perceived by the public at large coupled with the rise of "business school".

Classical education used to help broaden the minds of those who graduated from it. Those people would go on to be civic leaders and their broadened worldview and knowledge outside of the provincial education they otherwise would have been limited by would help them to be better civic leaders, politicians, and yes, bureaucrats. We now elect those with lesser educations tailored toward understanding one's fellow man, which is evident in political discourse these days.

I see business school as primarily a way to give degrees to people who abhor the concept of the classical liberal arts education that used to produce industry management and businessmen. Those business school graduates often think they know what's best for everyone even though they really don't have much experience with other facets of life and really don't know how others live or how to really make improvements, as their education was too narrow, too tailored.

People like to claim that Bachelor of Science degrees don't prepare graduates with a well-enough-rounded education, but that seems to be a much wider problem.



Yeah, your thinking is about 60 or 70 years out of date. The world has changed. Its called a global economy now where we aren't the only stud on the block.
 
2012-12-31 06:07:19 PM

Great Janitor: More and more I question the value of college. I was fed the "Go to college, get an education, make more money." I did that, found that you can make more money not going into college and instead, going into sales or starting your own business. If you have a calling and a burning desire to become a lawyer, doctor, scientist or engineer, then college definitely. If not, them the debt isn't worth it.


Agreed in general. But some of the best engineers at my current start-up have no college degree. Lawyer or doctor, definitely.
 
2012-12-31 06:11:47 PM

The_Gallant_Gallstone: Psycat: I find that having a long, impressive list of museums and galleries on my Curriculum Vitae goes a lot further than a Master of Fine Arts degree towards getting new gigs...

That's a good point... when some curator is looking for janitorial services, it's better to hire someone who has cleaned up other museums.


Wow, the butthurt is strong with this one. I still can't figure why you went ballistic on my Boobies other than you're a jackass who's envious that I spent my money more wisely than you did. Or maybe the Indian serial rapists you lived with really scrambled your brains through butt rape. Either way, I must have done something to rattle your cage because you're making it pretty damned obvious that you have some sort of issues. But that's good; an instigator like you who starts trouble deserves to be in a perpetual state of anger.

No, jerkwad, when I'm in a museum, I'm the star--hell, you're probably not even qualified to sweep afterwards. I get paid a minimum of $500 a day to come in, set up one of my amazing contraptions, and sign autographs afterwards. So suck it, envious loser...
 
2012-12-31 06:16:44 PM
Whoa, that's weird. I typed in "previous post" in my previous post and Fark turned it into "Boobies" for some strange reason. Was the Fark software programmed by some barista with a degree in underwater basket-weaving?
 
2012-12-31 06:23:44 PM
Anyways, today is the day I enjoy the last of my stupid vices before my New Year's resolutions kick in. So I'm drinking high-fructose corn-syrup drinks, eating crappy Ramen noodles, and cruising waste-of-time websites like Fark, 4 Chan, and Craigslist. I'm about due for a nap before heading out to find a New Year's party in my artist co-op...

/auf Nimmerwiedersehen
 
2012-12-31 07:30:10 PM
As part of the college admissions process, I think that people should be required to submit a business plan (or *some* sort of plan) with respect to their expectations and goals.

Person A: "Engineering is in my blood. When I was seven, I created my own microwave communications system from junk I found at the dump. It's all I've ever wanted to do. I intend to take Engineering co-op and pay for my degree through summer placements. I've spoken to a number of 'big name' engineering companies who already said that they'd be interested in hiring me once I graduate as long as I maintain a GPA of 3.2:
Recruiter: "Welcome to college!"

Person B: "I'm not really sure what I want to do with my life, but I'm planning to get three degrees (Womyn Studies, English Literature, and Art History) cuz I'm really insecure and mediocre. I intend to pay for my education with student loans. After I graduate, I assume someone will want to hire me for six figures, although I've done no research into this whatsoever. But three degrees. Three!"
Recruiter: "Here's an application form for Starbucks. I think it's more your style".
 
2012-12-31 07:32:09 PM
I couldn't tell you who has what degree where I work. No one cares. It's all about delivery.
 
2012-12-31 07:37:24 PM

vudukungfu: letrole: [i.qkme.me image 400x600]

Looks like the typical Johnston State Co-Ed here in Vermont. Got kicked out of a more prestigious school for doing too much acid and such, then mommy and daddy buy her a jeep and a year long ski pass and tuition at JSC, with a lease on an apartment in town, so she can have her privacy while throwing wild parties and farking 57 year old men she met on Alt dot com. (hey, firsthand knowledge) Yep,


Wow - in your profile picture you don't look anywhere close to 57.
 
2012-12-31 07:39:53 PM

Demodiki: I couldn't tell you who has what degree where I work. No one cares. It's all about delivery.


If it takes longer than 30 minutes, do I get my pizza for free?
 
TWX
2012-12-31 07:50:21 PM

Buffalo77: Yeah, your thinking is about 60 or 70 years out of date. The world has changed. Its called a global economy now where we aren't the only stud on the block.


Last time I looked, lots of countries don't import nearly as much as we do, and many countries are seemingly happy even if they don't have the largest GDPs.

I don't want to live in a country whose sole purpose is to grow economy. I want to live in a country that manages to provide a comfortable way of life for everyone that wants to apply themselves, and doesn't let people completely fall through the cracks.

I see many degrees as promoting a method or career for only one's own personal benefit, rather than for one's personal benefit first, but for positive contributions for society as well. This, "I've got mine, screw you all," attitude is not good for us.
 
2012-12-31 08:32:45 PM

WhippingBoy: Demodiki: I couldn't tell you who has what degree where I work. No one cares. It's all about delivery.

If it takes longer than 30 minutes, do I get my pizza for free?


Well...yeah.
 
2012-12-31 08:38:43 PM
It was very difficult having this discussion with my daughter, a senior in H.S. at the time, whether or not to go to college.  Ultimately she decided to enter the workforce.  She has moved out and has her own apartment now, a car and a decent job at the same company where her mom works.  And no debt.

She has been saving money for college in the future if she chooses.
 
2012-12-31 09:03:44 PM
I dont get all the biatching about college debt. Dont like paying bills? Then dont borrow money. It isnt rocket science. If you went to college and still owe money then pay your damn debt. Part of the reason college costs so much is all the deadbeats that dont pay what they owe.

Rather than owing when you get out why not work and pay your way through? I owed nothing when I got out. I also never borrowed a damn bit. Nor was I given any of the funds. Instead I worked 40-50 hrs a week. It slowed me down a bit and I was only able to carry 12 units or so a semester but I was able to get the job done and get out owing nothing. While some liberal arts folks I knew continued to pay for years and/or struggled to find work I was able to put the engineering degree to immediate use.
 
2012-12-31 09:27:41 PM

Ima4nic8or: I dont get all the biatching about college debt. Dont like paying bills? Then dont borrow money. It isnt rocket science. If you went to college and still owe money then pay your damn debt. Part of the reason college costs so much is all the deadbeats that dont pay what they owe.


True that... if you want a bailout, get yourself a $1,250/hour lobbyist and be a Too Big To Fail institution.

/ Personal Responsibility... good for the Little People
 
2012-12-31 09:50:37 PM

Ima4nic8or: I dont get all the biatching about college debt. Dont like paying bills? Then dont borrow money. It isnt rocket science. If you went to college and still owe money then pay your damn debt. Part of the reason college costs so much is all the deadbeats that dont pay what they owe.


I always thought the reason college costs so much was because a bunch of people were going in on student loans or the GI Bill (if military), that the colleges figured they were going to get theirs, so why not raise the tuition prices and milk the fark out of a cash-cow.
 
2012-12-31 10:09:51 PM

Ima4nic8or: I dont get all the biatching about college debt. Dont like paying bills? Then dont borrow money. It isnt rocket science. If you went to college and still owe money then pay your damn debt. Part of the reason college costs so much is all the deadbeats that dont pay what they owe.

Rather than owing when you get out why not work and pay your way through? I owed nothing when I got out. I also never borrowed a damn bit. Nor was I given any of the funds. Instead I worked 40-50 hrs a week. It slowed me down a bit and I was only able to carry 12 units or so a semester but I was able to get the job done and get out owing nothing. While some liberal arts folks I knew continued to pay for years and/or struggled to find work I was able to put the engineering degree to immediate use.


You are so bootstrappy!
 
2012-12-31 10:40:36 PM
Just as a note;

A) 17-18 year old just graduating high school have a tendency to be idiots. Especially when it comes to genuine predator-like adversarial relationships, where Party B is telling party A to do something for "Their own good" that will screw them over for decades, because it will make Party B more money.

B) Student loans people are party B.

C) As much as you cry "BE SMARTER", there is a lot of money to be made tricking young people into signing away their financial futures, and they're unlikely to catch on anytime soon.

D) We need to take care of party B. Harshly. And all the people accessorizing it. Which includes people denying there's anything wrong with Party B at all.
 
2012-12-31 10:46:43 PM

Psycat: Whoa, that's weird. I typed in "previous post" in my previous post and Fark turned it into "Boobies" for some strange reason. Was the Fark software programmed by some barista with a degree in underwater basket-weaving?


Read the FArQ.
 
2013-01-01 12:14:47 AM
$150,000 is a small price to pay for the right to one-up mention where you went to college in every single conversation you will have for the rest of your life.
 
2013-01-01 12:25:59 AM
My son is turning 18 next year, and (thanks to starting early and some help from his grandparents), has a good-sized 529 plan in place.....that being said, we're making sure he is doing everything to get even more of a leg up - he just got his Eagle Scout rank, and is working on SAT prep....but his first two years will likely be at community college...because it's cheaper, gives him time to make some changes in direction if he needs to, and two years to grow up a bit before making decisions that cost a lot more to change. Also, where UVA and William and Mary have a 33% admission rate....it's guaranteed if you get a 2-year NoVA degree. So, a lot of stress gets taken off the bill, too.
 
2013-01-01 12:45:59 AM

towatchoverme: LtDarkstar: towatchoverme: LtDarkstar: haha you're doing it wrong!

Me + technical college (few thousand at most) + part time evening classes at Ottawa University = $50k/yr job ;) & no student loans! heh!

You clearly got what you paid for.

It was a good deal and I make more money than most people that live in this area :) (Web designer)

You're in the wrong area. :-) You still in Ottawa? Self-employed or with a firm?


Milwaukee, WI area actually. With a large international company.
 
2013-01-01 12:47:21 AM
Don't take out so much in loans. Get some scholarships instead.
 
2013-01-01 01:45:44 AM
Or maybe go to a state school instead
 
2013-01-01 04:36:41 AM

lilplatinum: Is this the thread where the IT monkeys with their CS Degrees and crappy jobs go and mock people who have the types of degrees that their bosses do?


Its also the thread where guys who graduated 10 years ago berate today's students for racking up huge debts without any clue has to how much tuition has gone up since they went.


Seriously. If you haven't been in college in more than six or so years look up the cost per credit hour of your old school. It'll blow your freakin' hair back to see how much more expensive it became. I'm going back this semester to finish what I started and when I realized how much it had gone up since just 2006 I wanted to kill myself. What used to pay for an entire year will barely buy one semester these days. And that is not an exaggeration. Back when we went to school a kid could get a degree in underwater basket weaving and not be fiscally destroyed by it, unlike today.
 
2013-01-01 10:52:46 AM

burning_bridge: lilplatinum: Is this the thread where the IT monkeys with their CS Degrees and crappy jobs go and mock people who have the types of degrees that their bosses do?

Its also the thread where guys who graduated 10 years ago berate today's students for racking up huge debts without any clue has to how much tuition has gone up since they went.


Seriously. If you haven't been in college in more than six or so years look up the cost per credit hour of your old school. It'll blow your freakin' hair back to see how much more expensive it became. I'm going back this semester to finish what I started and when I realized how much it had gone up since just 2006 I wanted to kill myself. What used to pay for an entire year will barely buy one semester these days. And that is not an exaggeration. Back when we went to school a kid could get a degree in underwater basket weaving and not be fiscally destroyed by it, unlike today.


My jaw dropped when I stumbled on my Dad's University catalog from 1972; graduate school tuition was $20/per credit hour back then. In some ways, people really did have it easier back in those days.

/ puts the Boomer disdain for subsequent generations in perspective as well...
 
2013-01-01 10:59:20 AM

burning_bridge: Its also the thread where guys who graduated 10 years ago berate today's students for racking up huge debts without any clue has to how much tuition has gone up since they went.


Hey it increased plenty between 1999-2003 when I was there, sure the prices are out of control - but its still, what, 5 grand a semester. Thats 10 grand a year of tuition and fees and if you are smart you can knock that out in 3 or 3.5 years. Work during college and you are out with manageable debt - as long as you weren't an idiot that went to private school for undergrad.

(If you did go somewhere that costs 30k a year for undergrad for an English degree and you do it via loans, then yes, I have no sympathy for you).
 
2013-01-01 12:51:06 PM
Learn a trade with your hands

you'll be alright
 
2013-01-01 06:13:11 PM

AsprinBurn: The technique? YouTube it.


Lately I've taken up several styles of dancing... while videos are helpful, it's hardly sufficient, except for perhaps a few uniquely talented individuals. Doesn't necessarily mean you need study at Juilliard, but sometimes it is indeed worth it to pay someone to teach you something...
 
2013-01-01 10:30:42 PM

proteus_b: AsprinBurn: The technique? YouTube it.

Lately I've taken up several styles of dancing... while videos are helpful, it's hardly sufficient, except for perhaps a few uniquely talented individuals. Doesn't necessarily mean you need study at Juilliard, but sometimes it is indeed worth it to pay someone to teach you something...


Juilliard is all paid for by donations. Dance lessons are $30-$75/hr. $150/hr for truly professional stuff. But I don't know anybody with tens of thousands in dance instruction debt.
 
2013-01-03 08:42:16 AM

Wangiss: Juilliard is all paid for by donations. Dance lessons are $30-$75/hr. $150/hr for truly professional stuff. But I don't know anybody with tens of thousands in dance instruction debt.


thank you for that completely irrelevant comment.
 
2013-01-03 01:10:03 PM

proteus_b: Wangiss: Juilliard is all paid for by donations. Dance lessons are $30-$75/hr. $150/hr for truly professional stuff. But I don't know anybody with tens of thousands in dance instruction debt.

thank you for that completely irrelevant comment.


I do my best.
 
Displayed 47 of 247 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report