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(NPR)   Kimchi could be the biggest food hit of 2013   (npr.org) divider line 61
    More: Sick, Weekend Edition, Le Cordon Bleu, street food  
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9723 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Dec 2012 at 7:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-12-31 07:47:48 AM
6 votes:
kimchi is farkin delicious
2012-12-31 09:06:40 AM
5 votes:
www.samarthcaterers.com

Bi Bim Bap with a healthy dose of kim chi. That stuff is delicious.
2012-12-31 08:03:47 AM
4 votes:
I suspect that most folks that claim to hate kimchi have never actually tasted any.
2012-12-31 07:59:23 AM
4 votes:

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?


If you don't like the smell of brussel sprouts, you only really smell them up close. Kimchi goes everywhere, permeates even granite, and will linger for days. Especially if yu have the misfortune to hang around someone who eats it. The kimchi farts are enough to strip chrome off a bumper.
2012-12-31 09:49:08 AM
3 votes:
Why the Sick tag? Kimchi is really good!

While living in Japan, I'd make キムチなべ (Kimchi Nabe). One of my favorite foods, actually. So good.

1.bp.blogspot.com
2012-12-31 08:22:25 AM
3 votes:
1) Go to Korean restaurant
2) Get a kimchi pancake


www.foodgps.com

/mmmmmmmmmm
2012-12-31 08:12:35 AM
3 votes:
Nothing wrong with a little Korean Sauerkraut.

/Your sauerkraut is now Gangnam style
2012-12-31 08:01:25 AM
3 votes:
I hope it doesn't get too popular. My Asian grocery store makes their own and sells it at a rather reasonable price.
2012-12-31 07:54:38 AM
3 votes:
pjmedia.com
2012-12-31 07:54:06 AM
3 votes:
If you like Kimchi, eat it. It sure is good for you.

I've liked it, and have been eating it, since 1981.

You are free to like it or hate it. Don't expect me to care, though.
2012-12-31 07:39:52 AM
3 votes:
I made the mistake of walking into my Korean friend's house when his mom was unsealing a batch one day in high school. To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.
2012-12-31 04:29:12 AM
3 votes:
I'm ok with this.
2012-12-31 01:32:07 PM
2 votes:

MaliFinn: The problem with saying you like or don't like kimchi is that there's no single recipe for the stuff.


There are many different kinds of kimchi, but usually when a person just says "kimchi," you can figure that they mean the variety made with red pepper and nappa cabbage.  Of course, even then, there are many variations and recipes.  Interesting historical fact: the red pepper used in kimchi ("gochu") came originally from the Americas.
2012-12-31 01:19:05 PM
2 votes:

LooseLips: Kimchi fan here. It took several tries and a couple awkward glances around Korean restaurants for me, but I eventually realized kimchi is more of a condiment rather than a side dish. I understand if a few farkers might find ketchup or mustard delicious straight from the bottle, but we also know that these things exist in order to make the main meal even more delicious. Once I understood this about kimchi, I now cannot have a Korean dish without it.

/Bibimbap and kimchi is one of my ultimate comfort foods


I know what you mean.

The korean word for those little bowls of things they serve with meals, including kimchi, is "banchan."  They generally translate "banchan" as "side dishes" but I think that's a mistake.  They really are more like condiments.  Kimchi is really more like a condiment in that it's meant to be placed on top of or mixed into a dish like salt or butter, not really eaten on its own (though yes, of course occasionally some Koreans will do that).

I have an American friend who's never been to Asia but loves kimchi.  There are no Korean restaurants where he lives now, so every time he comes to town on a visit, one of the first things he'll say is, "Let's go to the Korean restaurant!."  He'll order kimchi fried rice and then, while I'm eating my bibimbap, he'll dump the little bowl of kimchi onto his kimchi friend rice and gobble it up.  I have to ask for a second bowl of kimchi if I want any for myself, and even then, he'll take half of THAT.

It's a bit embarrassing, really.  It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.  Except the analogy doesn't quite work because most Asians have had hamburgers before.

/Oh, and he eats the kimchi with his fingers, too, but that's a separate issue.
2012-12-31 11:47:14 AM
2 votes:
Kimchi is fantastic, and ridiculously easy to make.  If you don't let it go for months of fermentation, it doesn't stink either.  "Fresh" Kimchi is more popular anyway, so for those who care about 'authenticity' don't need to worry.  The really funky stuff is more of a niche product.

/Korean wife
//Lunar New Year was food crazy, until her folks moved to Colorado
2012-12-31 11:23:07 AM
2 votes:
You don't have to look too far to find "Poor people food" that just won't go away:

2.bp.blogspot.com
2012-12-31 11:11:42 AM
2 votes:

If food smells bad, I won't eat it.  If it looks bad, I won't eat it.  I eat with my nose and eyes first.  As a result, there's a lot of foods people love that I just won't touch, because it either smells like a rotting corpse or looks disgusting.  Kimchi is one of those foods.  My boyfriend loves it, and I make him eat it at someone else's house, because I don't want that god-awful odor permeating our furniture.  I tasted it once, just to shut him up, and about 15 minutes later, it ended up in our downstairs toilet.

So yeah, that's been my experience with the product.
2012-12-31 10:11:16 AM
2 votes:
You people must have been exposed to some terrible kimchi with all this talk of stink. I have never in my life smelled bad kimchi. I think saurkraut stinks to high heaven, but none of the kimchi I've ever eaten has smelled that way. You need to have a serious look at the settings on your refrigerator thermostat and a long think about how you handle expiration dates on your food if you're having this problem.
2012-12-31 08:13:12 AM
2 votes:
Kimchi is amazingly delicious. I love to mix it with shredded pork or beef and rice... mmMmMm
2012-12-31 08:13:09 AM
2 votes:

Krieghund: I'm ok with this.


Not me, Fibber McGee. tell you why, slice o pie: Will soon become viciously over priced as dooshbag foodies and noobs run amuck while to devour it as restaurants profit with glees. This has happened to way too many peasant/commoner foods as well as tasty 'sleeper' bottles of wine. I hate that. The prices goes up and never returns to sanity.
2013-01-01 12:21:20 AM
1 votes:
It's revolting. It smells worse than it tastes but, gah! I ate it for months when we had a Korean student staying with us and it never got better and I never got used to it.
2012-12-31 08:44:28 PM
1 votes:
Kimchi can;t hold a candle to Mondoo....best stuff ever. Brugogie is pretty great too.

Only thing is, now after Gundam style the Koreans are going to thing the invented the world best food too..as well as pop music. My wife is Korean BTW.Little country big egos
2012-12-31 03:09:32 PM
1 votes:

ciberido: This text is now purple: As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.

Don't be obtuse.   Yes, cheese is literally soured milk, but most Americans don't "think cheese tastes like sour milk."  Most Asians under 40 don't view cheese that way, either.  You made a false assertion, I pointed out that it was wrong, and you're now retreating behind a technicality.


Go back and read what I wrote. I never asserted that cheese tastes like sour milk.

I asserted that cheese *is* sour milk, and that westerners smell like sour milk to non-dairy cultures. That's less to do with cheese consumption than adult liquid milk consumption.
2012-12-31 02:25:40 PM
1 votes:

scubamage: Honestly, I know it's probably foul stuff, but I still want to try it. I've found that most foods that are eaten by large groups of people are pretty yummy once you try them enough times for your brain to categorize them (that's why when you're a little kid you hate brussels sprouts - they just taste like bitter, but when you're an adult you are better able to pick up on the other subtle flavors besides the wall of bitter - similar examples are coffee and hoppy beer).


Also, it seems that within the last 10 years, people suddenly relearned how asparagus and brussels sprouts should be cooked.

For the last 50 years, it seems everything kept trying the British Method (boiling into submission).
2012-12-31 02:21:15 PM
1 votes:

ciberido: This text is now purple: John Redcorn: I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?

Sour milk. That's the usually description of westerners from asians, who come from a culture almost devoid of dairy.


Oh, god, not this stupid crap again.

That was probably true like 50 years ago (at least for cheese), but it's now poppycock.  Asians, especially Japanese and Koreans, LOVE cheese.  And ice cream and yogurt   You can go into any modern grocery store in Korea or Japan (and by "modern" I mean it has a refrigerator) and you will find ice cream, cheese, yogurt, and even butter for sale.  And I'm talking anywhere, not just places that cater to tourists.

Pizza Hutt and McDonalds are extremely popular throughout Asia, and guess what pizzas and cheese burgers have on them?  Hint: it's not sour milk.  And there's frequently a Baskin-Robbins nearby.

Yogurt dates back to 500 BCE in India and Iran.  Western Asian countries like Mongolia and Kazakhstan have been drinking fermented milk products since at least that long.

Now, granted, if you talk to an Asian over 40, they may describe cheese (or other daily products) as sour milk.  But it's time to retire this myth.


People as a class tend to smell like what they eat. To people who don't drink much milk, westerners smell like sour milk. You notice odors which stand out from your normal background experience.

As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.
2012-12-31 02:00:21 PM
1 votes:

ciberido: Guuberre: I love Korean food. I wish Korean restaurants would have some kind of guide to proper Korean table manners, though. I'm always concerned I look like a starving field hand when I eat in one of those places.

When I eat in Korean restaurants, waiters and managers come over to my table to explain what I'm doing wrong and teach me how to do it properly.  Without anybody asking.

So either you're doing much better than I do, or else there's something about me that screams "I'm a pathetic, stupid white person and I need help."

Also, if you look like a starving field hand when you eat, you probably fit right in.  Koreans aren't prissy the way Japanese are.

One of the great things about Koreans is that they're extremely helpful.  One of the not-great things about Koreans is  they tend to treat foreigners as if we were nine-year-olds.


I'd liken it less to treating others like nine-year-olds, and more like "let's treat them like pets." Think about how you treat your dog - "awww, good dog! Honey, look at the cute thing the dog is doing! He thinks he's people! Awwww." That sort of mentality. There's no animosity or anything, just a touch of xenophobia (well earned considering what outsiders did to their country throughout history) and trust of other Koreans that can come off like a superiority complex.

Also, don't be nervous about chowing down food in front of Korean folks. You'll notice they do the same thing. And they don't chew with their mouths closed. The table manners can be a little offputting for Americans, but once you are used to it its no big deal.

/worked for Koreans for 10 years
//lunch hour sounded like feeding time at a cattle ranch
2012-12-31 01:57:20 PM
1 votes:

Doink_Boink: I've tried about ten versions of kimchi. I've never tasted the garbage juice that drains from the garbage truck when it's compressing trash, but I would liken kimchi to that.

The best part about kimchi is seeing people get insulted and angry when other people say they don't like it.


Nobody on this thread is insulted and angry because someone said they didn't like kimchi.  We're getting insulted and angry because people are comparing kimchi to sewage.  If you don't like kimchi, fine, I have no problem with that.  If you call kimchi garbage, then yes, you can go fark yourself.

And you're also a liar, because you already knew all this before you pretended ignorance to compound your asshattery.  So have a cigarette and then go fark yourself a second time.
2012-12-31 01:50:33 PM
1 votes:

This text is now purple: John Redcorn: I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?

Sour milk. That's the usually description of westerners from asians, who come from a culture almost devoid of dairy.



Oh, god, not this stupid crap again.

That was probably true like 50 years ago (at least for cheese), but it's now poppycock.  Asians, especially Japanese and Koreans, LOVE cheese.  And ice cream and yogurt   You can go into any modern grocery store in Korea or Japan (and by "modern" I mean it has a refrigerator) and you will find ice cream, cheese, yogurt, and even butter for sale.  And I'm talking anywhere, not just places that cater to tourists.

Pizza Hutt and McDonalds are extremely popular throughout Asia, and guess what pizzas and cheese burgers have on them?  Hint: it's not sour milk.  And there's frequently a Baskin-Robbins nearby.

Yogurt dates back to 500 BCE in India and Iran.  Western Asian countries like Mongolia and Kazakhstan have been drinking fermented milk products since at least that long.

Now, granted, if you talk to an Asian over 40, they may describe cheese (or other daily products) as sour milk.  But it's time to retire this myth.
2012-12-31 01:02:36 PM
1 votes:

Shadowknight: wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?

If you don't like the smell of brussel sprouts, you only really smell them up close. Kimchi goes everywhere, permeates even granite, and will linger for days. Especially if yu have the misfortune to hang around someone who eats it. The kimchi farts are enough to strip chrome off a bumper.


None of what you say is true.  And I lived in Korea.

Kimchi is delicious.  Or at least a lot of people feel that way.  If you don't like it, fine, but don't make up stupid lies about it.
2012-12-31 12:50:23 PM
1 votes:
I've tried about ten versions of kimchi. I've never tasted the garbage juice that drains from the garbage truck when it's compressing trash, but I would liken kimchi to that.

The best part about kimchi is seeing people get insulted and angry when other people say they don't like it.
2012-12-31 12:43:12 PM
1 votes:
Everybody complaining that the one time they tried kimchi and it tasted bad need to find a different place to try it at.  Kimchi is something pretty much every Korean person makes, and every single one of them makes it differently.

/I like mine mixed with rice with chicken and a fried egg on top
//not Korean
2012-12-31 12:37:50 PM
1 votes:

frepnog: Queensowntalia: This text is now purple: Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.

I've eaten pokeweed many times. It's extremely delicious.
/I have also eaten cattail heads. Even more delicious.

oh come on. don't like about pokeweed. that shiat is NASTY.

/never ate cattails. didn't know they were edible.


I'm sure it depends how they're prepared. I've had them sliced up in a chicken salad-type dish with various other veggies and mushrooms. Delicious.

RE: cattails - harvest em in the spring when the heads are still green and sheathed in leaves. Boil em for a few minutes then eat them like corn on the cob (they're thin, but they have a reedy core) with salt and butter. So awesome.

My parents are wild foods hobbyists, so I've become fond of all sorts of weird stuff. :)
2012-12-31 12:35:23 PM
1 votes:
The people who say kimchi doesn't have a smell must be smokers who have destroyed their sense of smell. Denying that it has a very strong aroma is just denying reality.

/farking coworker eats it 3 times a week and it stinks up the office to high heaven and then has kimchi breath the rest of the day
//I actually do like it, but the smell is very strong.
2012-12-31 12:11:34 PM
1 votes:
The thing, I think, about people who don't like kimchi is that it's really a class of food rather than a specific food. If you've had awesome kimchi before, like I have, I think you'll probably go "Great!" But I've also seen bad kimchi once or twice, and agree that some kimchi is the definitely the Natural Light of the Korean fermented cabbage world.
2012-12-31 11:24:50 AM
1 votes:
Got my fill of Kimchi when I was in Korea. It tastes like pickled ass.
No thanks.
2012-12-31 11:13:57 AM
1 votes:

Warrener: santadog: After doing a veg/fruit juice fast for 30 days, I can smell the grease from fast food joints in the air.  And it is disgusting.

I get roughly 70% of my calories from animal fat... and I can smell the rancid, foul grease from fast food joints in the air. And it is disgusting.

aagrajag: There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.

Interesting that you would describe insects as a vile food of last resort. The little guys pictured below are pretty closely related to grasshoppers, but Americans seem to love eating the damned things.
[3.bp.blogspot.com image 239x320]

And of course there have been quite a few cultures over the years that have eaten grubs, ants, and plenty of other bugs because they tasted good and were quite nutritious.


I've been crabbing in south Georgia before and you usually pull up a few shrimp with the crabs. If anything, the damn things remind me of fleas with the way they jump around.
2012-12-31 11:02:56 AM
1 votes:

ElFugawz: Kimchi - good, Natto - bad.
Homemade Korean food - awesome.


You should try it with shiso sauce. Nummy.

www.beeboo.co.jp
2012-12-31 10:54:26 AM
1 votes:
That stuff is already half way down the highway to Doo-dooville before it even hits you mouth
2012-12-31 10:50:09 AM
1 votes:

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate?


Because kimchi is a cultural food of last resort. It's something to which amazingly leaps of effort are expended to render something godawful into some semblance of palatability. It occasionally becomes a delicacy (snails), more often becomes a comfort food (haggis, kimchi, pretty much any odd fried food), and occasionally survives only as a practical joke or an object lesson about just how bad the bad old days were (lutefisk).

You sometimes wander into a food which smells godawful but doesn't take like it smells (durian).

But people hate kimchi because it's poor people food from one of the most downtrodden cultures on earth (the Koreans wish their history went as well as that of the Poles or Ukrainians). And like most really downtrodden poor people food, it smells to high hell and usually manages to only taste of low hell.
2012-12-31 10:09:05 AM
1 votes:
Kimchi isn't for everyone. My Dad's second wife was Korean, and while she was sort of a contemptible human being, she was a great cook. She skinned him in the divorce, and stayed in Texas to open a restaurant, and then married a second husband, skinned him in a divorce, and bought a grocery store in Seoul, and then managed to turn that into three stores, and two more restaurants back there, and still has the Texas joint running, with two more added on, thanks to husband number three. She has a thing with threes and food and cash. She is also a brilliant cook, and while I can't say anything really good about her as a human being, especially what she put my sister through, her kimchi was top notch, and what she does with pork and beef and noodles is to die for.
2012-12-31 10:08:51 AM
1 votes:
spe.fotolog.com
2012-12-31 09:45:58 AM
1 votes:
asianpose.com
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farm9.staticflickr.com
2012-12-31 09:24:14 AM
1 votes:

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I suspect that most folks that claim to hate kimchi have never actually tasted any.


exactly!

because we can't get past the farking stink of it.
2012-12-31 09:11:38 AM
1 votes:
Kimchi, and a few other foods out there in the world, always seem to bring up these 2 questions:
1 - Who was the first person to think that this was a good idea to prepare food this way?
2 - Who was the first person to eat it and convince everyone else that it was actually good?
2012-12-31 09:02:16 AM
1 votes:
When I heard about this bizarre West Coast fusion of Korean and Mexican food, I thought this was some stupid fad, and that it couldn't possibly last because it's stupid.

I was wrong. Bulgogi tacos are awesome. Kimchi quesadillas are too.

Kimchi quesadilla recipe, if you care/dare
2012-12-31 09:01:33 AM
1 votes:
Kimchi fan here. It took several tries and a couple awkward glances around Korean restaurants for me, but I eventually realized kimchi is more of a condiment rather than a side dish. I understand if a few farkers might find ketchup or mustard delicious straight from the bottle, but we also know that these things exist in order to make the main meal even more delicious. Once I understood this about kimchi, I now cannot have a Korean dish without it.

/Bibimbap and kimchi is one of my ultimate comfort foods
2012-12-31 08:54:57 AM
1 votes:
I like sauerkraut, my grandmother used to make it, and it was damned good... but I've had kimchi that was awful. I choked it down because I was a guest and didn't want to disappoint. I'd never eat it again if I had a choice. Maybe that's too harsh, but my first taste of the stuff was sufficiently wretched I am scared to try it again.

I've had kombucha. It's okay. I didn't love it, I didn't hate it. Had a strange tingle on the tongue sensation. I guess it was the carbonation mixed with the various acidic fermentation products. It wasn't unpleasant though.
2012-12-31 08:50:18 AM
1 votes:
What's not to love about kimchi? It's sauerkraut with heat!
2012-12-31 08:49:18 AM
1 votes:
Kimchee is awesome and I have been eating it for years. I even made my own once, its easy to make.
2012-12-31 08:39:33 AM
1 votes:
Lived in Korea for awhile, cucumber kimchi is awesome, and kimchi jjigae is always good.

What's really fun though is dodging the piles of kimchi barf while strolling through town on a Sunday morning.
2012-12-31 08:37:09 AM
1 votes:
Remember your high school gym locker room? The smell of old gym shoes, sweat socks and unwashed jock straps? That's what kimchi tastes like. It tastes like that smell. Disgusting.
2012-12-31 08:19:18 AM
1 votes:
I love me some Korean food.

Pork neck bone soup with Kimchi is pretty bad ass.

Hell Yes.
2012-12-31 08:13:57 AM
1 votes:

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?


What's wrong with brussels sprouts???? THEY ARE THE BEST VEGETABLE BY FAR!
2012-12-31 08:13:43 AM
1 votes:
About 40 years ago, I was in the service with a guy who's unit was 'attacking in a different direction' in Korea in 1951 or so. He ran through some back yard and fell into a barrel of kimchi and was captured.

He was not a fan of the stuff.
2012-12-31 08:08:45 AM
1 votes:

lilplatinum: Kimchi dates back 2000 years to the ding dong dynasty.


you can tell from the smell
2012-12-31 08:05:29 AM
1 votes:
It's all fun and games until you end up like I did, at Kunsan, AB with a flatulent roomate who drank nothing but Soju and ate his weight in that shiat every day.
2012-12-31 07:55:12 AM
1 votes:
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
2012-12-31 07:53:47 AM
1 votes:

Krieghund: I'm ok with this.


no. fark that.
2012-12-31 07:51:38 AM
1 votes:
I love kimchi! It was banned at home, and at work due to the smell, so now I can only sneak it. Yummmm!
2012-12-31 07:44:50 AM
1 votes:
Lots of fiber.
2012-12-31 06:03:30 AM
1 votes:
Blech.
 
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