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(NPR)   Kimchi could be the biggest food hit of 2013   (npr.org) divider line 225
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9716 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Dec 2012 at 7:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-31 02:17:17 PM

This text is now purple: ciberido: It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.

Ketchup sandwiches are a thing.


My grandmother used to make ketchup soup when my kid was young. Poor people do a lot to try and get by.
 
2012-12-31 02:17:52 PM
Not kid, Dad.
 
2012-12-31 02:21:15 PM

ciberido: This text is now purple: John Redcorn: I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?

Sour milk. That's the usually description of westerners from asians, who come from a culture almost devoid of dairy.


Oh, god, not this stupid crap again.

That was probably true like 50 years ago (at least for cheese), but it's now poppycock.  Asians, especially Japanese and Koreans, LOVE cheese.  And ice cream and yogurt   You can go into any modern grocery store in Korea or Japan (and by "modern" I mean it has a refrigerator) and you will find ice cream, cheese, yogurt, and even butter for sale.  And I'm talking anywhere, not just places that cater to tourists.

Pizza Hutt and McDonalds are extremely popular throughout Asia, and guess what pizzas and cheese burgers have on them?  Hint: it's not sour milk.  And there's frequently a Baskin-Robbins nearby.

Yogurt dates back to 500 BCE in India and Iran.  Western Asian countries like Mongolia and Kazakhstan have been drinking fermented milk products since at least that long.

Now, granted, if you talk to an Asian over 40, they may describe cheese (or other daily products) as sour milk.  But it's time to retire this myth.


People as a class tend to smell like what they eat. To people who don't drink much milk, westerners smell like sour milk. You notice odors which stand out from your normal background experience.

As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.
 
2012-12-31 02:25:40 PM

scubamage: Honestly, I know it's probably foul stuff, but I still want to try it. I've found that most foods that are eaten by large groups of people are pretty yummy once you try them enough times for your brain to categorize them (that's why when you're a little kid you hate brussels sprouts - they just taste like bitter, but when you're an adult you are better able to pick up on the other subtle flavors besides the wall of bitter - similar examples are coffee and hoppy beer).


Also, it seems that within the last 10 years, people suddenly relearned how asparagus and brussels sprouts should be cooked.

For the last 50 years, it seems everything kept trying the British Method (boiling into submission).
 
2012-12-31 02:26:54 PM

scubamage: This text is now purple: ciberido: It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.

Ketchup sandwiches are a thing.

My grandmother used to make ketchup soup when my kid was young. Poor people do a lot to try and get by.


...

How does ketchup soup work? It's sort of a thin minestrone?
 
2012-12-31 02:27:01 PM
When I worked at AFKN Taegu (radio station), I made a big batch of cheesecake squares for Thanksgiving and foolishly stored them in the big upstairs refrigerator where the engineers kept their meals. The cheesecake fully absorbed the scent and flavor of kimchi and was rendered inedible overnight. The Korean engineers loved it, though. Kept asking when I'd make more of it.

/Somethings just aren't meant to be "fusion" foods.
 
2012-12-31 02:31:17 PM

This text is now purple: scubamage: This text is now purple: ciberido: It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.

Ketchup sandwiches are a thing.

My grandmother used to make ketchup soup when my kid was young. Poor people do a lot to try and get by.

...

How does ketchup soup work? It's sort of a thin minestrone?


I'm honestly not sure - my dad doesn't really have fond memories of the stuff other than "it tasted like crap." I assume it was ketchup, stock from scrap bones, and butter (all things that would have been available in the Bronx in the 1940's/50's). But they ate it with bread.
 
2012-12-31 02:36:21 PM
in the 1950s, my grandpa's neighbor came back from the korean war and told him about kimchi.

so my grandpa started making it the old fashioned way by putting it in mason jars and burying them in the backyard to let it ferment. grandma wouldn't let him eat his "Chinese Sauerkraut" in the house. not a lot of people in Shaker Heights Ohio eating that stuff.

Grandpa was pretty farking cool.
 
2012-12-31 02:39:25 PM

thisiszombocom: no hawt'shoppedasian women? yellow fevers are slacking


That first gal in the yellow, man, she doesn't even have wrinkles and folds in her elbows. How much I gotta work out to get elbows that smooth and balmy?
 
2012-12-31 02:48:23 PM

Fuggin Bizzy: thisiszombocom: no hawt'shoppedasian women? yellow fevers are slacking

That first gal in the yellow, man, she doesn't even have wrinkles and folds in her elbows. How much I gotta work out to get elbows that smooth and balmy?


You need to work out at the photoshop gym.
 
2012-12-31 02:50:11 PM

This text is now purple: As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.


Don't be obtuse.   Yes, cheese is literally soured milk, but most Americans don't "think cheese tastes like sour milk."  Most Asians under 40 don't view cheese that way, either.  You made a false assertion, I pointed out that it was wrong, and you're now retreating behind a technicality.
 
2012-12-31 03:09:32 PM

ciberido: This text is now purple: As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.

Don't be obtuse.   Yes, cheese is literally soured milk, but most Americans don't "think cheese tastes like sour milk."  Most Asians under 40 don't view cheese that way, either.  You made a false assertion, I pointed out that it was wrong, and you're now retreating behind a technicality.


Go back and read what I wrote. I never asserted that cheese tastes like sour milk.

I asserted that cheese *is* sour milk, and that westerners smell like sour milk to non-dairy cultures. That's less to do with cheese consumption than adult liquid milk consumption.
 
2012-12-31 03:42:06 PM

This text is now purple: Also, it seems that within the last 10 years, people suddenly relearned how asparagus and brussels sprouts should be cooked.

For the last 50 years, it seems everything kept trying the British Method (boiling into submission).


EXACTLY.  I spent the first 35 years of my like knowing I hated brussels sprouts.  Until my friend- a professional cook- showed me how its done.
 
2012-12-31 04:43:35 PM

Wizzbang: Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste

Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.


My brother was stationed on the DMZ for awhile, and before he deployed, one of his senior NCO's urged him to try kimchi, saying it was one of the best things to eat in Korea. When he got there, he followed up on it and went to a restaurant and ordered kimchi. He got a bowl of foul-smelling, slimy vegetables that he couldn't stand. He told the NCO about his experience, and thanked him for the bad prank. The NCO laughed, and said "No, no Mac. That was winter kimchee, the stuff they store up from the summer to eat in the wintertime. You want the summer kimchee, made fresh. It's a whole different animal!"

My bro waited until summertime rolled around and tried it again...crispy, crunchy veggies with a snap and a hit of cool heat. After that, he couldn't stop raving about it.
 
2012-12-31 05:15:54 PM

This text is now purple: ciberido: This text is now purple: As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.

Don't be obtuse.   Yes, cheese is literally soured milk, but most Americans don't "think cheese tastes like sour milk."  Most Asians under 40 don't view cheese that way, either.  You made a false assertion, I pointed out that it was wrong, and you're now retreating behind a technicality.

Go back and read what I wrote. I never asserted that cheese tastes like sour milk.

I asserted that cheese *is* sour milk, and that westerners smell like sour milk to non-dairy cultures. That's less to do with cheese consumption than adult liquid milk consumption.


Working in the IT industry I can confirm that people from India eat a lot of curry and really smell like curry. It's a scientific fact.
 
2012-12-31 05:21:07 PM

scubamage: Anastacya: Into the blue again: Wizzbang: Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste

Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.

See, I love blue cheese and Gorgonzola and the like. I am not sure I can give stinky tofu any more chances..... IMHO it was that bad.

Stinky tofu was one of the things that Andrew Zimmerman couldn't eat. I've watched that guy eat worms straight from trees. He nearly retched when he took a bite of genuine super-stinky tofu.

/never in a million years

Honestly, I know it's probably foul stuff, but I still want to try it. I've found that most foods that are eaten by large groups of people are pretty yummy once you try them enough times for your brain to categorize them (that's why when you're a little kid you hate brussels sprouts - they just taste like bitter, but when you're an adult you are better able to pick up on the other subtle flavors besides the wall of bitter - similar examples are coffee and hoppy beer).


I can think of foods that I used to enjoy as a child, such as musk melons, that I no longer savor. That happens with nearly everyone, that as you mature your tastes change. Unfortunately I have another dynamic that alters my tastes. I have a disease called Sjogrën's Syndrome, which affects the mucous membranes (eyes, mouth & etc). One of the joyous side effects of this disease is making you sensitive to certain types of food. I used to enjoy Chipotle's chicken soft tacos. Now I can barely take a bite without my mouth burning. Ketchup, mayonnaise, salt, chocolate.. you name it. If I force the issue and eat it anyway, I eventually strip my tongue and basically have a "burnt" skin feeling. It truly sucks. It is one thing for your tastes to change and you not be interested in a food anymore, something else entirely when you have no choice on whether you can continue enjoying it.
 
2012-12-31 07:12:18 PM

vernonFL: Kimchee is awesome and I have been eating it for years. I even made my own once, its easy to make.


Yes - after finishing a jar I always add some more veggies, put it out on the counter for a few days, and extend the magic!
 
2012-12-31 07:51:55 PM

Warrener: That fridge was never used in the office again. It sat in the hallway for a week with a "Free" sign on it before someone took it out to the dumpster to get rid of the smell.


An office full of people who don't know how to get rid of the smell in a fridge.

Wow. I just... wow.

/Baking soda
//Anything citric like malt vinegar or lemon
///Charcoal
////Coffee grounds
 
2012-12-31 08:44:28 PM
Kimchi can;t hold a candle to Mondoo....best stuff ever. Brugogie is pretty great too.

Only thing is, now after Gundam style the Koreans are going to thing the invented the world best food too..as well as pop music. My wife is Korean BTW.Little country big egos
 
2012-12-31 09:20:18 PM
some of you people will eat anything.

i1207.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-31 10:53:17 PM
f00.inventorspot.com

/'nuff said
 
2012-12-31 11:21:35 PM
A few things for western devils to consider:
1. Koreans find the stuff objectionable at a young age, but are gradually conditioned to "need" to eat it nearly every day.
2. Koreans largely form their diet based on what they believe to be healthful, not what is palletable.
3. It did not contain hot pepper until colonialism brought it to the east.
4. It's probiotic qualities can be found in many less odiferous pickled foods.
5. Westerners eating the stuff outside of Korean restaurants give of the "I judge myself by how exotic/ethnic my diet is" vibe.
 
2013-01-01 12:21:20 AM
It's revolting. It smells worse than it tastes but, gah! I ate it for months when we had a Korean student staying with us and it never got better and I never got used to it.
 
2013-01-01 12:42:44 PM

Pants full of macaroni!!: Kevin72: TFA is 25 years behind San Francisco on Phô, 20 years behind on Thai, and ten years behind on fermented foods.

Keep in mind that most Americans still think General Tso's Chicken is exotic.


I...damn...now you've depressed me.

/kimchi is fantastic
 
2013-01-01 10:24:45 PM

This text is now purple: wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate?

....But people hate kimchi because it's poor people food from one of the most downtrodden cultures on earth (the Koreans wish their history went as well as that of the Poles or Ukrainians). And like most really downtrodden poor people food, it smells to high hell and usually manages to only taste of low hell.


Fark you. Come back when you have the slightest idea of what you are talking about.
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