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(NPR)   Kimchi could be the biggest food hit of 2013   (npr.org ) divider line
    More: Sick, Weekend Edition, Le Cordon Bleu, street food  
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9739 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Dec 2012 at 7:42 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



225 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-12-31 04:29:12 AM  
I'm ok with this.
 
2012-12-31 06:03:30 AM  
Blech.
 
2012-12-31 07:25:46 AM  

Krieghund: I'm ok with this.


Ironic?

My ten year old likes it enough I ended up making myself to save money. I introduced him to it under the guise of 'Army food'.
 
2012-12-31 07:25:54 AM  
Mmm... Lactobacillus.
 
2012-12-31 07:39:52 AM  
I made the mistake of walking into my Korean friend's house when his mom was unsealing a batch one day in high school. To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.
 
2012-12-31 07:43:19 AM  
or... not
 
2012-12-31 07:44:50 AM  
Lots of fiber.
 
2012-12-31 07:45:43 AM  

BalugaJoe: Lots of fiber.


So does tree bark. I'd rather eat that.
 
2012-12-31 07:47:09 AM  
Heck no! Glazed donuts wll be the food of choice in 2013...
 
2012-12-31 07:47:48 AM  
kimchi is farkin delicious
 
2012-12-31 07:48:58 AM  
Shadowknight: I made the mistake of walking into my Korean friend's house when his mom was unsealing a batch one day in high school. To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

www.bookmice.net
 
2012-12-31 07:51:38 AM  
I love kimchi! It was banned at home, and at work due to the smell, so now I can only sneak it. Yummmm!
 
2012-12-31 07:53:47 AM  

Krieghund: I'm ok with this.


no. fark that.
 
2012-12-31 07:54:06 AM  
If you like Kimchi, eat it. It sure is good for you.

I've liked it, and have been eating it, since 1981.

You are free to like it or hate it. Don't expect me to care, though.
 
2012-12-31 07:54:38 AM  
pjmedia.com
 
2012-12-31 07:55:12 AM  
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2012-12-31 07:55:17 AM  
Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?
 
2012-12-31 07:59:23 AM  

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?


If you don't like the smell of brussel sprouts, you only really smell them up close. Kimchi goes everywhere, permeates even granite, and will linger for days. Especially if yu have the misfortune to hang around someone who eats it. The kimchi farts are enough to strip chrome off a bumper.
 
2012-12-31 08:00:21 AM  
Kimchi dates back 2000 years to the ding dong dynasty.
 
2012-12-31 08:01:25 AM  
I hope it doesn't get too popular. My Asian grocery store makes their own and sells it at a rather reasonable price.
 
2012-12-31 08:02:16 AM  

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?


Because, when my wife makes Brussels sprouts, she uses bacon.
 
2012-12-31 08:03:47 AM  
I suspect that most folks that claim to hate kimchi have never actually tasted any.
 
2012-12-31 08:04:22 AM  
On Fark:

Stick your Kimchi up the ass!

Secretly:

(I'd like it if it wasn't Asian, though)
 
2012-12-31 08:05:29 AM  
It's all fun and games until you end up like I did, at Kunsan, AB with a flatulent roomate who drank nothing but Soju and ate his weight in that shiat every day.
 
2012-12-31 08:08:45 AM  

lilplatinum: Kimchi dates back 2000 years to the ding dong dynasty.


you can tell from the smell
 
2012-12-31 08:12:35 AM  
Nothing wrong with a little Korean Sauerkraut.

/Your sauerkraut is now Gangnam style
 
2012-12-31 08:13:09 AM  

Krieghund: I'm ok with this.


Not me, Fibber McGee. tell you why, slice o pie: Will soon become viciously over priced as dooshbag foodies and noobs run amuck while to devour it as restaurants profit with glees. This has happened to way too many peasant/commoner foods as well as tasty 'sleeper' bottles of wine. I hate that. The prices goes up and never returns to sanity.
 
2012-12-31 08:13:12 AM  
Kimchi is amazingly delicious. I love to mix it with shredded pork or beef and rice... mmMmMm
 
2012-12-31 08:13:29 AM  
I've said it many times before - I don't like sauerkraut, but I do like kimchi.
 
2012-12-31 08:13:43 AM  
About 40 years ago, I was in the service with a guy who's unit was 'attacking in a different direction' in Korea in 1951 or so. He ran through some back yard and fell into a barrel of kimchi and was captured.

He was not a fan of the stuff.
 
2012-12-31 08:13:57 AM  

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?


What's wrong with brussels sprouts???? THEY ARE THE BEST VEGETABLE BY FAR!
 
2012-12-31 08:17:04 AM  

LlamaGirl: What's wrong with brussels sprouts???? THEY ARE THE BEST VEGETABLE BY FAR!


OK maybe. Best? Nope. I can think of half a dozen veggies that are better.
 
2012-12-31 08:18:11 AM  

lilplatinum: Kimchi dates back 2000 years to the ding dong dynasty.


I wanted to like it. I really do enjoy other Korean foods that I've tried. After several tries from different places I just can't like it. It's gross. I don't mind if other people enjoy it, but I honestly don't know why.

Also bell peppers are the worst thing scientists claim to be edible. I know my tastes are a little off from most people.
 
2012-12-31 08:19:15 AM  
Our department was stuffed into a couple of small offices with one common doorway; you went through our little office to get to the even tinier one in the back. So one day a gal working in the back office decided that her sinuses were stuffed up and that kimchi would be a good thing to open them up with.

Didn't get the smell out of the offices for weeks.
 
2012-12-31 08:19:18 AM  
I love me some Korean food.

Pork neck bone soup with Kimchi is pretty bad ass.

Hell Yes.
 
2012-12-31 08:19:56 AM  

dofus: OK maybe. Best? Nope. I can think of half a dozen veggies that are better.


Maybe to you, but to me sprouts are king. I am a cabbage whore.
 
2012-12-31 08:20:33 AM  

LlamaGirl: cabbage whore


That's my new band name, right there.
 
2012-12-31 08:20:39 AM  
If they made kimchi with Brussels sprouts I'd be a happy man indeed...
 
2012-12-31 08:22:25 AM  
1) Go to Korean restaurant
2) Get a kimchi pancake


www.foodgps.com

/mmmmmmmmmm
 
2012-12-31 08:23:01 AM  
I thought this was brussel sprouts. I'm going to leave it anyways.

i2.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-12-31 08:24:22 AM  
I like Kimchi but I don't like it when it's fizzy. That's just... wrong.
 
2012-12-31 08:25:13 AM  

Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.


Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.
 
2012-12-31 08:28:23 AM  
Ahhhh takes me back to my 2LT days in the land of the morning calm. Nothing like walking into a heated train car from the cold in the winter months. As soon as the door opened.....BAM Kimchi and dried squid smell smacks you.

/CSB
//Liked it mixed wiith rice but that was about the only way I could stomach it.
///kamsahamnida
 
2012-12-31 08:28:44 AM  

GungFu: On Fark:

Stick your Kimchi up the ass!

Secretly:

(I'd like it if it wasn't Asian, though)


Why does the fact that it's Asian matter? If it's yummy, it's yummy; if it's not yummy, it's not yummy.
 
2012-12-31 08:29:39 AM  
Is Kimchi carcinogenic, anti-carcinogenic, or both?
 
2012-12-31 08:29:58 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: That's my new band name, right there.


I'll be your number one fan!
 
2012-12-31 08:30:55 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.


TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste
 
2012-12-31 08:35:45 AM  

dervish16108: Is Kimchi carcinogenic, anti-carcinogenic, or both?


yes
 
2012-12-31 08:37:09 AM  
Remember your high school gym locker room? The smell of old gym shoes, sweat socks and unwashed jock straps? That's what kimchi tastes like. It tastes like that smell. Disgusting.
 
2012-12-31 08:37:14 AM  

Into the blue again: 1) Go to Korean restaurant
2) Get a kimchi pancake


[www.foodgps.com image 525x394]

/mmmmmmmmmm


Had one of those last week.  mmmmmmmm is right!

My wife is Korean and I LOVE it!  Nothing better than some white rice and kimchi.  Damn, now I'm hungry.
 
2012-12-31 08:38:37 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I suspect that most folks that claim to hate kimchi have never actually tasted any.


I've also never eaten a steaming bowl of fermented diarrhea either. Don't need to to know it would taste like shiat, though. The smell is enough warning.
 
2012-12-31 08:39:27 AM  

Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste


Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.
 
2012-12-31 08:39:33 AM  
Lived in Korea for awhile, cucumber kimchi is awesome, and kimchi jjigae is always good.

What's really fun though is dodging the piles of kimchi barf while strolling through town on a Sunday morning.
 
2012-12-31 08:40:55 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Shadowknight: I made the mistake of walking into my Korean friend's house when his mom was unsealing a batch one day in high school. To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

[www.bookmice.net image 245x215]


Truly freaky pic... looks EXACTLY like the kibble-vomit my late cat Vincent used to leave everywhere.
 
2012-12-31 08:41:47 AM  
If you don't know how good kimchi is, you don't know squat.
 
2012-12-31 08:42:36 AM  
www.accelerator3359.com
 
2012-12-31 08:44:26 AM  

Spandau: Into the blue again: 1) Go to Korean restaurant
2) Get a kimchi pancake


[www.foodgps.com image 525x394]

/mmmmmmmmmm

Had one of those last week.  mmmmmmmm is right!

My wife is Korean and I LOVE it!  Nothing better than some white rice and kimchi.  Damn, now I'm hungry.


I had a much longer, but convoluted reply. I re-read it and was ashamed at the disjointed structure, so I will just say this: I first tried Kimchi this past year thanks to a Korean fellow from PA (I live in MA). Yes. Yes it is.
 
2012-12-31 08:47:17 AM  

Wizzbang: Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste

Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.


See, I love blue cheese and Gorgonzola and the like. I am not sure I can give stinky tofu any more chances..... IMHO it was that bad.
 
2012-12-31 08:49:18 AM  
Kimchee is awesome and I have been eating it for years. I even made my own once, its easy to make.
 
2012-12-31 08:49:30 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Shadowknight: I made the mistake of walking into my Korean friend's house when his mom was unsealing a batch one day in high school. To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluid

[www.bookmice.net image 245x215]




Ah, natto. Yes, truly disgusting.

http://www.thesneeze.com/2004/steve-d ont-eat-it-vol-6.php

Sorry, having trouble with the clicky-pops.
 
2012-12-31 08:50:18 AM  
What's not to love about kimchi? It's sauerkraut with heat!
 
2012-12-31 08:54:00 AM  
How similar is kimchi to sauerkraut? I love pork chops cooked in sauerkraut.
 
2012-12-31 08:54:47 AM  
When I was shot down over Korea, I had to eat kimchi.

He was our interpreter.

i46.tinypic.com
 
2012-12-31 08:54:57 AM  
I like sauerkraut, my grandmother used to make it, and it was damned good... but I've had kimchi that was awful. I choked it down because I was a guest and didn't want to disappoint. I'd never eat it again if I had a choice. Maybe that's too harsh, but my first taste of the stuff was sufficiently wretched I am scared to try it again.

I've had kombucha. It's okay. I didn't love it, I didn't hate it. Had a strange tingle on the tongue sensation. I guess it was the carbonation mixed with the various acidic fermentation products. It wasn't unpleasant though.
 
2012-12-31 08:55:20 AM  
My wife makes her own Kimchi. No, she's not Korean, Filipina. She doesn't ferment it though, eats it fresh.
 
2012-12-31 08:56:46 AM  

rev. dave: How similar is kimchi to sauerkraut? I love pork chops cooked in sauerkraut.


Your average mass-available kimchi is napa cabbage based and only lightly fermented. The big difference is the chili flake.
 
2012-12-31 08:57:04 AM  
I've got two pals who served in Worst Korea whilst in the military. They both said the first thing you notice when you get off the plane is the awful stench of cabbage hanging in the air. I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?
 
2012-12-31 08:57:19 AM  

Bobhein: If they made kimchi with Brussels sprouts I'd be a happy man indeed...


Huh. Thanks for this.
 
2012-12-31 08:59:35 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: I've said it many times before - I don't like sauerkraut, but I do like kimchi.


Why do you hate white people?
 
2012-12-31 09:01:08 AM  
"Don't you understand, man? You've struck cole slaw!"
 
2012-12-31 09:01:33 AM  
Kimchi fan here. It took several tries and a couple awkward glances around Korean restaurants for me, but I eventually realized kimchi is more of a condiment rather than a side dish. I understand if a few farkers might find ketchup or mustard delicious straight from the bottle, but we also know that these things exist in order to make the main meal even more delicious. Once I understood this about kimchi, I now cannot have a Korean dish without it.

/Bibimbap and kimchi is one of my ultimate comfort foods
 
2012-12-31 09:02:16 AM  
When I heard about this bizarre West Coast fusion of Korean and Mexican food, I thought this was some stupid fad, and that it couldn't possibly last because it's stupid.

I was wrong. Bulgogi tacos are awesome. Kimchi quesadillas are too.

Kimchi quesadilla recipe, if you care/dare
 
2012-12-31 09:02:48 AM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-31 09:06:40 AM  
www.samarthcaterers.com

Bi Bim Bap with a healthy dose of kim chi. That stuff is delicious.
 
2012-12-31 09:08:31 AM  
I LOVE kimchi. Guess I don't get the "sick" tag. It's not like it's Lutefisk or Surströmming.
 
2012-12-31 09:09:48 AM  
TFA is 25 years behind San Francisco on Phô, 20 years behind on Thai, and ten years behind on fermented foods.
 
2012-12-31 09:11:38 AM  
Kimchi, and a few other foods out there in the world, always seem to bring up these 2 questions:
1 - Who was the first person to think that this was a good idea to prepare food this way?
2 - Who was the first person to eat it and convince everyone else that it was actually good?
 
2012-12-31 09:11:54 AM  

caddisfly: [www.samarthcaterers.com image 680x450]

Bi Bim Bap with a healthy dose of kim chi. That stuff is delicious.


I love Korean food. The bonus with Bi Bim Bop is that it looks like something Klingon would eat.
 
2012-12-31 09:16:19 AM  
Brussels sprouts are gross if cooked any other way other than roasting.

Never steam or boil them... they turn pungent and disgusting. I don't know how people manage to choke them down, never mind like them like that.


In a pyrex dish, one layer of sprouts lightly drizzled with oil, and some cracked pepper and sea salt. Put them in the oven at 350 and when they are soft all the way through- they are done. They turn buttery and sweet, with just a hint of a mustard-like bite... and they're so good you want to eat them all right there.

The roasting technique turned them from the most hated vegetable to my current favorite.
 
2012-12-31 09:16:56 AM  
I really did want to like it but I haven't found any yet that I do.
 
2012-12-31 09:20:04 AM  
I first heard of Kimchi about 15 years ago. I read the jar and said, "HAHA, who the hell would eat that crap!"

I guess Kimchi is the new chipotle is the new salsa.

/becausepeopleliketosaysalsaaaa
 
2012-12-31 09:24:14 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I suspect that most folks that claim to hate kimchi have never actually tasted any.


exactly!

because we can't get past the farking stink of it.
 
2012-12-31 09:24:39 AM  

NormallyTechnos: rev. dave: How similar is kimchi to sauerkraut? I love pork chops cooked in sauerkraut.

Your average mass-available kimchi is napa cabbage based and only lightly fermented. The big difference is the chili flake.


My wife uses Bok Choy. She only uses Napa Cabbage if she can't find Bok Choy in the store.
 
2012-12-31 09:24:58 AM  

caddisfly: Bi Bim Bap


I call this bim bim bop, and it's my new favorite dish to eat. OMG, must have this soon or I might perish.
 
2012-12-31 09:25:34 AM  
The problem with saying you like or don't like kimchi is that there's no single recipe for the stuff.
 
2012-12-31 09:27:05 AM  

Ikahoshi: Brussels sprouts are gross if cooked any other way other than roasting.

Never steam or boil them... they turn pungent and disgusting. I don't know how people manage to choke them down, never mind like them like that.


In a pyrex dish, one layer of sprouts lightly drizzled with oil, and some cracked pepper and sea salt. Put them in the oven at 350 and when they are soft all the way through- they are done. They turn buttery and sweet, with just a hint of a mustard-like bite... and they're so good you want to eat them all right there.

The roasting technique turned them from the most hated vegetable to my current favorite.


THIS

I didn't discover this until Christmas 2011. My mom used to boil the brussel sprouts, and they were farking gross. I basically use the above receipe, except we cut them in half first. You can also roast them in a pan as well, similar method.
 
2012-12-31 09:27:31 AM  

caddisfly: [www.samarthcaterers.com image 680x450]

Bi Bim Bap with a healthy dose of kim chi. That stuff is delicious.


Oh dear lord that looks SO good right now!  I love that dish too!  You guys are killing me here this morning.
 
2012-12-31 09:30:33 AM  
Maangchi is the queen of Kim chi. Observe. Link
 
2012-12-31 09:32:54 AM  
Well, now that NPR says it's cool, I'm going to have to stop eating it.
 
2012-12-31 09:34:24 AM  

MaliFinn: The problem with saying you like or don't like kimchi is that there's no single recipe for the stuff.


I love kimchi. I've had some that was so good I was happy to eat it straight from the jar, and others that just lacked that magic and needed to be used as an ingredient.

Chopping it small and adding it to a grilled cheese sandwich is the best.
 
2012-12-31 09:35:33 AM  

Spandau: caddisfly: [www.samarthcaterers.com image 680x450]

Bi Bim Bap with a healthy dose of kim chi. That stuff is delicious.

Oh dear lord that looks SO good right now!  I love that dish too!  You guys are killing me here this morning.


Tell me about it. I've been searching Yelp for a local Korean place that's open at 6:00 a.m.!
 
2012-12-31 09:36:55 AM  
The first time I had kimchi, my Korean mother-in-law just slapped a bunch on a plate, and I took a bite, and I can't really remember the next few days, but there was darkness and pain.

The second time I had kimchi, I was in a Korean restaurant and was given kimchi as a garnish, or condiment, and that made so much more sense. A little bit of it adds a lot, and it's awesome. Like Tabasco sauce, but with horrible fermented evil instead of aged peppers.
 
2012-12-31 09:39:24 AM  

The Irresponsible Captain: Nothing wrong with a little Korean Sauerkraut.

/Your sauerkraut is now Gangnam style


Being a microbiology teacher and sometimes directly involved in the kimchi-making process, I am surprised the cabbage doesn't get up and do Gangnam style after fermentation!
 
2012-12-31 09:39:54 AM  
It's good on a hot dog with chili and helps clear both your sinuses and your asspipe.

I like the radish kind too. Plenty at the local H mart.
 
2012-12-31 09:45:55 AM  
Not sure why the smell of kimchi is revolting to people (natto, anyone?). I love the stuff, though. Definitely kicks up a bunch of stuff...my favorite is kimchi ramen. If you want disgusting, try some pickled whole squids. Absolutely the grossest Asian food I've ever eaten.
 
2012-12-31 09:45:58 AM  
asianpose.com
">
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-12-31 09:46:08 AM  
Shadowknight: "Ah, natto. Yes, truly disgusting."

I'll try anything, but natto is the only stuff that's given me pause. Ate it anyways. It was an excellent laxative.
 
2012-12-31 09:47:47 AM  

John Redcorn: I've got two pals who served in Worst Korea whilst in the military. They both said the first thing you notice when you get off the plane is the awful stench of cabbage hanging in the air. I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?


You speak truth, sir. My dad also served in Worst Korea just after the war, and came back abhorring that smell. When he let this fact slip to my 20-year-old brother, he douchebaggedly went down to Little Saigon and bought a huge jar of the stuff and started eating it every day as a pathetic form of passive aggression. I think that's where I got my love for it. I was 9, and would eat my bro's kimchi on the sly as a secondary and even more pathetic form of passive aggression because he was such a dick to me. Boy, that sure showed him.

Yeah, I know. CSB.

I recently bought kimchi in one of those sealed resealable capri-sun-looking bags like they now sell tuna in. I'm interested in seeing if it affects the taste.
 
Rat
2012-12-31 09:48:37 AM  
In small doses, that stuff is delicious. But doing a 10 mile run behind KATUSAs that downed an entire pot of the shiat at chow last night will induce a vomitous delight only known to American GIs. I swear that the smell sloughs off in sweat, and when it does, its worse than before.

© I still sneak a small amount when we go to a buffet that has it, but damn, really, its not an entree.
 
2012-12-31 09:49:08 AM  
Why the Sick tag? Kimchi is really good!

While living in Japan, I'd make キムチなべ (Kimchi Nabe). One of my favorite foods, actually. So good.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-31 09:49:17 AM  
sick tag? WTF?
I can't remotely connect kimchi with the word sick...

some food that could be "sick" but I still find delicious personnally: durian, stinky tofu, blue cheese, thousand-year egg,
 
2012-12-31 09:50:23 AM  
I love Korean food. I wish Korean restaurants would have some kind of guide to proper Korean table manners, though. I'm always concerned I look like a starving field hand when I eat in one of those places.
 
2012-12-31 09:57:21 AM  
I have a big jar on the porch. Seriously, my wife won't let me eat it in the house. I have to sit outside with my jar of kimchi and a fork, like an asshole.

I guess that's why they say marriage is about compromise. I have to enjoy kimchi out in the cold, my wife has to put up with getting a dutch oven later that night as my revenge.

See? Compromise.
 
2012-12-31 09:59:10 AM  

caddisfly: [www.samarthcaterers.com image 680x450]

Bi Bim Bap


theconsigliori.com
 
2012-12-31 09:59:55 AM  

LDM90: I first heard of Kimchi about 15 years ago. I read the jar and said, "HAHA, who the hell would eat that crap!"

I guess Kimchi is the new chipotle is the new salsa.

/becausepeopleliketosaysalsaaaa


Don't forget:

Roasted Garlic
Cilantro
 
2012-12-31 10:00:26 AM  

Smoky Dragon Dish: caddisfly: [www.samarthcaterers.com image 680x450]

Bi Bim Bap with a healthy dose of kim chi. That stuff is delicious.

I love Korean food. The bonus with Bi Bim Bop is that it looks like something Klingon would eat.


I shall call you "Gagh", Klingon form worm.
 
2012-12-31 10:02:26 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

perhaps she wants some more kimchi kimchi?
 
2012-12-31 10:05:03 AM  

Kevin72: TFA is 25 years behind San Francisco on Phô, 20 years behind on Thai, and ten years behind on fermented foods.


Keep in mind that most Americans still think General Tso's Chicken is exotic.
 
2012-12-31 10:08:20 AM  

Into the blue again: 1) Go to Korean restaurant
2) Get a kimchi pancake


[www.foodgps.com image 525x394]

/mmmmmmmmmm


Why go to a restaurant? Seems easy enough to make at home.

And yes, it does sound and look delicious! I'll definitely give it a go.
 
2012-12-31 10:08:51 AM  
spe.fotolog.com
 
2012-12-31 10:09:05 AM  
Kimchi isn't for everyone. My Dad's second wife was Korean, and while she was sort of a contemptible human being, she was a great cook. She skinned him in the divorce, and stayed in Texas to open a restaurant, and then married a second husband, skinned him in a divorce, and bought a grocery store in Seoul, and then managed to turn that into three stores, and two more restaurants back there, and still has the Texas joint running, with two more added on, thanks to husband number three. She has a thing with threes and food and cash. She is also a brilliant cook, and while I can't say anything really good about her as a human being, especially what she put my sister through, her kimchi was top notch, and what she does with pork and beef and noodles is to die for.
 
2012-12-31 10:11:12 AM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Kevin72: TFA is 25 years behind San Francisco on Phô, 20 years behind on Thai, and ten years behind on fermented foods.

Keep in mind that most Americans still think General Tso's Chicken is exotic.


Hell, most Americans think authentic Mexican dishes are numbered.
 
2012-12-31 10:11:12 AM  
I'm just here say that I eat natto about 3 times a week, kimchi 5 or 6 times, dried squid is my favourite low-cal snack, and brussels sprouts are awesome, even when boiled.

The only thing I can't stomach is sea squirt or sea pineapple. The mere thought makes me nauseous.
 
2012-12-31 10:11:16 AM  
You people must have been exposed to some terrible kimchi with all this talk of stink. I have never in my life smelled bad kimchi. I think saurkraut stinks to high heaven, but none of the kimchi I've ever eaten has smelled that way. You need to have a serious look at the settings on your refrigerator thermostat and a long think about how you handle expiration dates on your food if you're having this problem.
 
2012-12-31 10:13:47 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: You people must have been exposed to some terrible kimchi with all this talk of stink. I have never in my life smelled bad kimchi. I think saurkraut stinks to high heaven, but none of the kimchi I've ever eaten has smelled that way. You need to have a serious look at the settings on your refrigerator thermostat and a long think about how you handle expiration dates on your food if you're having this problem.


Depends on the kimchi.

I don't see why a bad smell would necessarily mean bad taste, though. Some of the best cheese, to choose a Western food, stinks to high heaven but tastes wonderful.
 
2012-12-31 10:20:18 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: You people must have been exposed to some terrible kimchi with all this talk of stink. I have never in my life smelled bad kimchi. I think saurkraut stinks to high heaven, but none of the kimchi I've ever eaten has smelled that way. You need to have a serious look at the settings on your refrigerator thermostat and a long think about how you handle expiration dates on your food if you're having this problem.


Kimchi is the only food I've encountered that has an aroma that can completely fill a fridge while still being sealed in a glass jar. It doesn't necessarily stink, but man that is a powerful odor.

Doesn't really compare with durian fruit though. Someone brought some durian wafer cookies to work once. No one would eat them, so they got tossed into a mini-fridge overnight before being thrown away. That fridge was never used in the office again. It sat in the hallway for a week with a "Free" sign on it before someone took it out to the dumpster to get rid of the smell.
 
2012-12-31 10:23:13 AM  

Smoky Dragon Dish: Ikahoshi: Brussels sprouts are gross if cooked any other way other than roasting.

Never steam or boil them... they turn pungent and disgusting. I don't know how people manage to choke them down, never mind like them like that.


THIS

I didn't discover this until Christmas 2011. My mom used to boil the brussel sprouts, and they were farking gross. I basically use the above receipe, except we cut them in half first. You can also roast them in a pan as well, similar method.


Hmmm, I wonder if people were massively overcooking your steamed/boiled sprouts.
 
2012-12-31 10:37:00 AM  
Good, hopefully my local supermarket will start carrying sauerkraut.  I eat spoonfuls a day and am sick of going to a further market just to get my damn kraut.
 
2012-12-31 10:38:10 AM  

John Redcorn: I've got two pals who served in Worst Korea whilst in the military. They both said the first thing you notice when you get off the plane is the awful stench of cabbage hanging in the air. I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?


After doing a veg/fruit juice fast for 30 days, I can smell the grease from fast food joints in the air.  And it is disgusting.
 
2012-12-31 10:40:42 AM  

gilgigamesh: I have a big jar on the porch. Seriously, my wife won't let me eat it in the house. I have to sit outside with my jar of kimchi and a fork, like an asshole.

I guess that's why they say marriage is about compromise. I have to enjoy kimchi out in the cold, my wife has to put up with getting a dutch oven later that night as my revenge.

See? Compromise.


My mother loves Limburger Cheese.  Same deal.  My Pops says she can only have it in the winter, and the cheese lives on the porch.    That stuff stinks up everything in the frig.
 
2012-12-31 10:41:41 AM  
I absolutely adore kimchi and eat it straight from the jar. It's such a potent flavor I understand why some people can't enjoy it though.
I also love brussels sprouts, prepared any way. Most recently I've been enjoying them gently boiled, then mixed with shallots sauteed in butter, white wine vinegar (or cooking wine + white vinegar, anyway) and broth. Nom.

/I also love cilantro. Clearly, my taste buds are allied with the Forces of Darkness.
 
2012-12-31 10:43:02 AM  
Best part of the cafeteria at HMMA is the big ol' bowl of it at the end of the serving line. Pay for your lunch and take as much kimchi as you want.
 
2012-12-31 10:44:10 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: I suspect that most folks that claim to hate kimchi have never actually tasted any.


I spent a week traveling rural South Korea and never want to smell or taste it again. Also, claiming to hate something you never tried is something I would expect of a ten year old. I don't think it's a stretch to say Kinchi doesn't appeal to a western palate.
 
2012-12-31 10:47:24 AM  

frogjelly: I don't think it's a stretch to say Kinchi doesn't appeal to a western palate.


That's a fair bet. I don't know of a single American who would want to eat their relatives, even if they were well-fermented.
 
2012-12-31 10:48:06 AM  

The Irresponsible Captain: Nothing wrong with a little Korean Sauerkraut.


Came to ask/say this. I love sauerkraut - so much I one day hope to marry it - and isn't kimchi pretty similar?
 
2012-12-31 10:50:09 AM  

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate?


Because kimchi is a cultural food of last resort. It's something to which amazingly leaps of effort are expended to render something godawful into some semblance of palatability. It occasionally becomes a delicacy (snails), more often becomes a comfort food (haggis, kimchi, pretty much any odd fried food), and occasionally survives only as a practical joke or an object lesson about just how bad the bad old days were (lutefisk).

You sometimes wander into a food which smells godawful but doesn't take like it smells (durian).

But people hate kimchi because it's poor people food from one of the most downtrodden cultures on earth (the Koreans wish their history went as well as that of the Poles or Ukrainians). And like most really downtrodden poor people food, it smells to high hell and usually manages to only taste of low hell.
 
2012-12-31 10:51:33 AM  

John Redcorn: I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?


Sour milk. That's the usually description of westerners from asians, who come from a culture almost devoid of dairy.
 
2012-12-31 10:53:08 AM  
If only that hiker in Australia had Kimchi instead of potatoes.
 
2012-12-31 10:54:26 AM  
That stuff is already half way down the highway to Doo-dooville before it even hits you mouth
 
2012-12-31 10:56:28 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.


do a hot tar job on the roof of a dog food factory. you'll puke a rainbow.
 
2012-12-31 10:56:42 AM  

This text is now purple: wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate?

Because kimchi is a cultural food of last resort. It's something to which amazingly leaps of effort are expended to render something godawful into some semblance of palatability. It occasionally becomes a delicacy (snails), more often becomes a comfort food (haggis, kimchi, pretty much any odd fried food), and occasionally survives only as a practical joke or an object lesson about just how bad the bad old days were (lutefisk).

You sometimes wander into a food which smells godawful but doesn't take like it smells (durian).

But people hate kimchi because it's poor people food from one of the most downtrodden cultures on earth (the Koreans wish their history went as well as that of the Poles or Ukrainians). And like most really downtrodden poor people food, it smells to high hell and usually manages to only taste of low hell.


Did a cabbage screw your wife or something? There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.

"Poor people food"? Fermented vegetables of various kinds are popular all over the planet; kimchi is just Korean pickles. They're also very healthy.
 
2012-12-31 10:59:33 AM  
Kimchi - good, Natto - bad.
Homemade Korean food - awesome.
 
2012-12-31 11:02:56 AM  

ElFugawz: Kimchi - good, Natto - bad.
Homemade Korean food - awesome.


You should try it with shiso sauce. Nummy.

www.beeboo.co.jp
 
2012-12-31 11:03:37 AM  

Son of Thunder: wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?

Because, when my wife makes Brussels sprouts, she uses bacon.


http://www.chow.com/recipes/29507-brussels-sprouts-with-kimchi-and-ba c on
 
2012-12-31 11:03:53 AM  

aagrajag: ElFugawz: Kimchi - good, Natto - bad.
Homemade Korean food - awesome.

You should try it with shiso sauce. Nummy.


It looks like someone jizzed in beans.
 
2012-12-31 11:05:42 AM  

santadog: After doing a veg/fruit juice fast for 30 days, I can smell the grease from fast food joints in the air.  And it is disgusting.


I get roughly 70% of my calories from animal fat... and I can smell the rancid, foul grease from fast food joints in the air. And it is disgusting.

aagrajag: There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.


Interesting that you would describe insects as a vile food of last resort. The little guys pictured below are pretty closely related to grasshoppers, but Americans seem to love eating the damned things.
3.bp.blogspot.com

And of course there have been quite a few cultures over the years that have eaten grubs, ants, and plenty of other bugs because they tasted good and were quite nutritious.
 
2012-12-31 11:06:32 AM  
I'd like to see dog on the menu in North America (obviously, this will never happen).
It's got a unique taste and texture (similar to stringy roast beef), and goes well with kimchi.

I don't understand why it's OK to eat a pig, but not a dog.
 
2012-12-31 11:07:12 AM  

Shadowknight: aagrajag: ElFugawz: Kimchi - good, Natto - bad.
Homemade Korean food - awesome.

You should try it with shiso sauce. Nummy.

It looks like someone jizzed in beans.


Well, it's actually full of mold, but you're quite right about the appearance.

If it goes bad, it basically turns into ammonia.

Still, very health and cheap if you can develop a taste for it.
 
2012-12-31 11:07:30 AM  

santadog: gilgigamesh: I have a big jar on the porch. Seriously, my wife won't let me eat it in the house. I have to sit outside with my jar of kimchi and a fork, like an asshole.

I guess that's why they say marriage is about compromise. I have to enjoy kimchi out in the cold, my wife has to put up with getting a dutch oven later that night as my revenge.

See? Compromise.

My mother loves Limburger Cheese.  Same deal.  My Pops says she can only have it in the winter, and the cheese lives on the porch.    That stuff stinks up everything in the frig.


Honestly, a dinner of limburger and kimchi sounds divine (kimchi would probably be great to cleanse the palate). I just can't get my mind around natto. And that's speaking as someone who has eaten grasshoppers, meal worms, snails, tripe, headcheese, souse, etc.
 
2012-12-31 11:09:42 AM  
I love Korean food.  Kimchi is yummy!
 
2012-12-31 11:10:09 AM  

Warrener: santadog: After doing a veg/fruit juice fast for 30 days, I can smell the grease from fast food joints in the air.  And it is disgusting.

I get roughly 70% of my calories from animal fat... and I can smell the rancid, foul grease from fast food joints in the air. And it is disgusting.

aagrajag: There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.

Interesting that you would describe insects as a vile food of last resort. The little guys pictured below are pretty closely related to grasshoppers, but Americans seem to love eating the damned things.
[3.bp.blogspot.com image 239x320]

And of course there have been quite a few cultures over the years that have eaten grubs, ants, and plenty of other bugs because they tasted good and were quite nutritious.


I've eaten grasshoppers. In fact it's a local specialty; you can buy them at the supermarket. I can't say they're particularly good or bad.

img01.hamazo.tv
 
2012-12-31 11:11:42 AM  

If food smells bad, I won't eat it.  If it looks bad, I won't eat it.  I eat with my nose and eyes first.  As a result, there's a lot of foods people love that I just won't touch, because it either smells like a rotting corpse or looks disgusting.  Kimchi is one of those foods.  My boyfriend loves it, and I make him eat it at someone else's house, because I don't want that god-awful odor permeating our furniture.  I tasted it once, just to shut him up, and about 15 minutes later, it ended up in our downstairs toilet.

So yeah, that's been my experience with the product.
 
2012-12-31 11:13:57 AM  

Warrener: santadog: After doing a veg/fruit juice fast for 30 days, I can smell the grease from fast food joints in the air.  And it is disgusting.

I get roughly 70% of my calories from animal fat... and I can smell the rancid, foul grease from fast food joints in the air. And it is disgusting.

aagrajag: There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.

Interesting that you would describe insects as a vile food of last resort. The little guys pictured below are pretty closely related to grasshoppers, but Americans seem to love eating the damned things.
[3.bp.blogspot.com image 239x320]

And of course there have been quite a few cultures over the years that have eaten grubs, ants, and plenty of other bugs because they tasted good and were quite nutritious.


I've been crabbing in south Georgia before and you usually pull up a few shrimp with the crabs. If anything, the damn things remind me of fleas with the way they jump around.
 
2012-12-31 11:15:14 AM  

aagrajag: "Poor people food"? Fermented vegetables of various kinds are popular all over the planet; kimchi is just Korean pickles. They're also very healthy.


Amazingly, there are poor people the world over. Cabbage and rice are some of the cheapest things around, and fermenting/pickling is typically used to stretch food or at least bury its flavor in vinegar.

Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.
 
2012-12-31 11:16:57 AM  
You know, I've eaten grasshoppers, grubs, and other pretty nasty things before as a part of a survival course. Here in Spain and the rest of Europe I have eaten things I never thought I would.

I still can't do kimchi.
 
2012-12-31 11:17:42 AM  

Warrener: aagrajag: There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.

Interesting that you would describe insects as a vile food of last resort. The little guys pictured below are pretty closely related to grasshoppers, but Americans seem to love eating the damned things.
3.bp.blogspot.com


graphics8.nytimes.com
www.medtogo.com

Not markedly different.
 
2012-12-31 11:19:45 AM  

This text is now purple: aagrajag: "Poor people food"? Fermented vegetables of various kinds are popular all over the planet; kimchi is just Korean pickles. They're also very healthy.

Amazingly, there are poor people the world over. Cabbage and rice are some of the cheapest things around, and fermenting/pickling is typically used to stretch food or at least bury its flavor in vinegar.

Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.


The thing is though, once a country becomes sufficiently wealthy, the tasty cheap foods stick around, while the eat-this-crap-or-starve variety disappears pretty quickly. Both South Korea and Japan are very rich countries and pickles of all sorts are a major part of the diet.
 
2012-12-31 11:20:30 AM  

This text is now purple: Warrener: aagrajag: There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.

Interesting that you would describe insects as a vile food of last resort. The little guys pictured below are pretty closely related to grasshoppers, but Americans seem to love eating the damned things.
3.bp.blogspot.com

Not markedly different.


If they could find a way to make a scorpion taste good and able to harvest a useful amount of meat from it, I bet people would eat it.
 
2012-12-31 11:21:51 AM  

This text is now purple: Warrener: aagrajag: There are food sources that are kinda vile, and are consumed only for lack of something better. Insects, for example.

Interesting that you would describe insects as a vile food of last resort. The little guys pictured below are pretty closely related to grasshoppers, but Americans seem to love eating the damned things.
3.bp.blogspot.com

[graphics8.nytimes.com image 395x275]
[www.medtogo.com image 800x533]

Not markedly different.


I was at a Chinese restaurant in Tokyo last week. They had scorpions on the menu, for real. I wanted to try them, but didn't have enough cash for that and Peking duck.
 
2012-12-31 11:23:07 AM  
You don't have to look too far to find "Poor people food" that just won't go away:

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-31 11:23:47 AM  

This text is now purple: Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.


I've eaten pokeweed many times. It's extremely delicious.
/I have also eaten cattail heads. Even more delicious.
 
2012-12-31 11:24:50 AM  
Got my fill of Kimchi when I was in Korea. It tastes like pickled ass.
No thanks.
 
2012-12-31 11:26:58 AM  
Why not curry?
 
2012-12-31 11:29:41 AM  
You've struck coleslaw!
 
2012-12-31 11:30:28 AM  
I liked kimchi before it was cool
 
2012-12-31 11:31:49 AM  
stupid too-big image...
img829.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-31 11:38:42 AM  

LlamaGirl: I am a cabbage whore.


I have this mental picture of you wearing cabbage leaves like the PETA chick in the lettuce bra.
 
2012-12-31 11:43:37 AM  

Grandemadaca: Why go to a restaurant? Seems easy enough to make at home.

And yes, it does sound and look delicious! I'll definitely give it a go.


I'm not close enough to the Korean mart to pick up a pot of kimchi today, but I will grab some scallions to make a green onion pancake instead. I'm not familiar with Maangchi, but I'll give her version a try.
 
2012-12-31 11:45:14 AM  
i26.photobucket.com
Approves
 
2012-12-31 11:47:14 AM  
Kimchi is fantastic, and ridiculously easy to make.  If you don't let it go for months of fermentation, it doesn't stink either.  "Fresh" Kimchi is more popular anyway, so for those who care about 'authenticity' don't need to worry.  The really funky stuff is more of a niche product.

/Korean wife
//Lunar New Year was food crazy, until her folks moved to Colorado
 
2012-12-31 11:56:36 AM  

computerguyUT: Got my fill of Kimchi when I was in Korea. It tastes like pickled ass.
No thanks.


Same here. Kimchi is only good if you eat it in Korea. Otherwise, you're just an insufferable "food tourist".
 
2012-12-31 12:01:02 PM  

wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?


I was planning on having both of those with some roast pork tomorrow.
 
2012-12-31 12:07:26 PM  
Korean Food IS Amazeballs!

I love me some kimchi.

//One of my favorite things about living in LA is food adventures in K-town.
 
2012-12-31 12:11:34 PM  
The thing, I think, about people who don't like kimchi is that it's really a class of food rather than a specific food. If you've had awesome kimchi before, like I have, I think you'll probably go "Great!" But I've also seen bad kimchi once or twice, and agree that some kimchi is the definitely the Natural Light of the Korean fermented cabbage world.
 
2012-12-31 12:11:41 PM  

Queensowntalia: This text is now purple: Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.

I've eaten pokeweed many times. It's extremely delicious.
/I have also eaten cattail heads. Even more delicious.


oh come on. don't like about pokeweed. that shiat is NASTY.

/never ate cattails. didn't know they were edible.
 
2012-12-31 12:12:02 PM  
Kimchi is awesome, along with with their BBQ. I can't stand the rest of the food, though. Even after living in Korea for 8 years. It's not bad, but I wouldn't rank it in the top 20 countries for food. The Korean government is obsessed with making Korean food more popular but I think they're wasting money as it just can't be forced onto people. My wife is Korean but thank god she knows the food sucks and cooks mainly Vietnamese and Thai.

Vietnamese is by far the best Asian food I've had.

Damn...now I want to get back to Saigon.
 
2012-12-31 12:14:38 PM  
Food trucks and hipster places have really ramped up with different Kimchi burgers. Kimchi, Spicy Mayo (or Sriracha), meat of choosing, toasted bread / buns. Every single one I have had was amazing and I didn't notice a smell.
 
2012-12-31 12:17:26 PM  

Into the blue again: 1) Go to Korean restaurant
2) Get a kimchi pancake

/mmmmmmmmmm


Mmmmmm. Had one on Saturday.

Who are all these weirdos who hate kimchi?
 
2012-12-31 12:35:13 PM  
Had a Korean roommate in college. Came home one day to him making kimchi. I thought the sewer line had burst. Puked right then and there. Awful awful shiat.

Kimchi: not even once

/csb
 
2012-12-31 12:35:23 PM  
The people who say kimchi doesn't have a smell must be smokers who have destroyed their sense of smell. Denying that it has a very strong aroma is just denying reality.

/farking coworker eats it 3 times a week and it stinks up the office to high heaven and then has kimchi breath the rest of the day
//I actually do like it, but the smell is very strong.
 
2012-12-31 12:37:50 PM  

frepnog: Queensowntalia: This text is now purple: Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.

I've eaten pokeweed many times. It's extremely delicious.
/I have also eaten cattail heads. Even more delicious.

oh come on. don't like about pokeweed. that shiat is NASTY.

/never ate cattails. didn't know they were edible.


I'm sure it depends how they're prepared. I've had them sliced up in a chicken salad-type dish with various other veggies and mushrooms. Delicious.

RE: cattails - harvest em in the spring when the heads are still green and sheathed in leaves. Boil em for a few minutes then eat them like corn on the cob (they're thin, but they have a reedy core) with salt and butter. So awesome.

My parents are wild foods hobbyists, so I've become fond of all sorts of weird stuff. :)
 
2012-12-31 12:38:31 PM  
Subby has obviously never had kimchi, otherwise he'd be quite excited.
 
2012-12-31 12:43:12 PM  
Everybody complaining that the one time they tried kimchi and it tasted bad need to find a different place to try it at.  Kimchi is something pretty much every Korean person makes, and every single one of them makes it differently.

/I like mine mixed with rice with chicken and a fried egg on top
//not Korean
 
2012-12-31 12:43:22 PM  

dr.zaeus: It's all fun and games until you end up like I did, at Kunsan, AB with a flatulent roomate who drank nothing but Soju and ate his weight in that shiat every day.


'98, '99?
Sorry about that.
 
2012-12-31 12:50:23 PM  
I've tried about ten versions of kimchi. I've never tasted the garbage juice that drains from the garbage truck when it's compressing trash, but I would liken kimchi to that.

The best part about kimchi is seeing people get insulted and angry when other people say they don't like it.
 
2012-12-31 01:00:27 PM  

frepnog:
oh come on. don't like about pokeweed. that shiat is NASTY.


Never tried the greens like in the song Poke Salad Annie. Have enjoyed the stems sliced and fried like okra. Must be picked in early spring before it turns purple.
 
2012-12-31 01:02:36 PM  

Shadowknight: wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate? And why the brussels sprout love?

If you don't like the smell of brussel sprouts, you only really smell them up close. Kimchi goes everywhere, permeates even granite, and will linger for days. Especially if yu have the misfortune to hang around someone who eats it. The kimchi farts are enough to strip chrome off a bumper.


None of what you say is true.  And I lived in Korea.

Kimchi is delicious.  Or at least a lot of people feel that way.  If you don't like it, fine, but don't make up stupid lies about it.
 
2012-12-31 01:07:43 PM  

rev. dave: How similar is kimchi to sauerkraut? I love pork chops cooked in sauerkraut.


They're not really all that much alike.  It's quite possible to love one and not care for the other at all.

I like the both, personally, but i don't see any great similarity.
 
2012-12-31 01:15:09 PM  

ciberido: None of what you say is true.  And I lived in Korea.

Kimchi is delicious.  Or at least a lot of people feel that way.  If you don't like it, fine, but don't make up stupid lies about it.


I grew up with a friend who's parents were from Korea.  Granted, my only experience with the stuff is from their version of it, but it was enough.
 
2012-12-31 01:15:21 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Shadowknight: I made the mistake of walking into my Korean friend's house when his mom was unsealing a batch one day in high school. To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

[www.bookmice.net image 245x215]


Thats soybean fermented, not kimchi which is cabbage fermented. Natto is japanese also. Not bad, but be ready for the strong stuff!

Love me some kimchi though!
 
2012-12-31 01:17:29 PM  

picturescrazy: Also bell peppers are the worst thing scientists claim to be edible. I know my tastes are a little off from most people.


You know nothing about bad food. The absolute worst "edible" food is the raw banana slug. The next in line is the chitin. I've eaten slug before as part of survival training. Afterwards I was told that chitin isn't as bad but I refuse to eat that. There are far better things to eat in tidal pools. Like limpet. Yummy!
 
2012-12-31 01:19:05 PM  

LooseLips: Kimchi fan here. It took several tries and a couple awkward glances around Korean restaurants for me, but I eventually realized kimchi is more of a condiment rather than a side dish. I understand if a few farkers might find ketchup or mustard delicious straight from the bottle, but we also know that these things exist in order to make the main meal even more delicious. Once I understood this about kimchi, I now cannot have a Korean dish without it.

/Bibimbap and kimchi is one of my ultimate comfort foods


I know what you mean.

The korean word for those little bowls of things they serve with meals, including kimchi, is "banchan."  They generally translate "banchan" as "side dishes" but I think that's a mistake.  They really are more like condiments.  Kimchi is really more like a condiment in that it's meant to be placed on top of or mixed into a dish like salt or butter, not really eaten on its own (though yes, of course occasionally some Koreans will do that).

I have an American friend who's never been to Asia but loves kimchi.  There are no Korean restaurants where he lives now, so every time he comes to town on a visit, one of the first things he'll say is, "Let's go to the Korean restaurant!."  He'll order kimchi fried rice and then, while I'm eating my bibimbap, he'll dump the little bowl of kimchi onto his kimchi friend rice and gobble it up.  I have to ask for a second bowl of kimchi if I want any for myself, and even then, he'll take half of THAT.

It's a bit embarrassing, really.  It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.  Except the analogy doesn't quite work because most Asians have had hamburgers before.

/Oh, and he eats the kimchi with his fingers, too, but that's a separate issue.
 
2012-12-31 01:26:01 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: picturescrazy: Also bell peppers are the worst thing scientists claim to be edible. I know my tastes are a little off from most people.

You know nothing about bad food. The absolute worst "edible" food is the raw banana slug. The next in line is the chitin. I've eaten slug before as part of survival training. Afterwards I was told that chitin isn't as bad but I refuse to eat that. There are far better things to eat in tidal pools. Like limpet. Yummy!


Balut.... nuf said.
 
2012-12-31 01:26:46 PM  
I like kimchi...

but I hate NPR hipsters.
 
2012-12-31 01:32:07 PM  

MaliFinn: The problem with saying you like or don't like kimchi is that there's no single recipe for the stuff.


There are many different kinds of kimchi, but usually when a person just says "kimchi," you can figure that they mean the variety made with red pepper and nappa cabbage.  Of course, even then, there are many variations and recipes.  Interesting historical fact: the red pepper used in kimchi ("gochu") came originally from the Americas.
 
2012-12-31 01:32:36 PM  

Into the blue again: 1) Go to Korean restaurant
2) Get a kimchi pancake
[www.foodgps.com image 525x394]
/mmmmmmmmmm


super mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
and crazy easy to make at home too

good kimchi is great, bad kimchi is terrible
I really wish that the local non-asian stores would STOP CARRYING the CRAP that they call kimchi.
WTF?!!!
 
2012-12-31 01:36:28 PM  

ciberido: I have to ask for a second bowl of kimchi if I want any for myself, and even then, he'll take half of THAT.


YO-GI-YO!!!
kimchi chu-sae-yo!
kam-sa-ham-ni-da

tada - all you need to know to get MORE kimchi
and the look on their face when some white guys does it is hilarious.
 
2012-12-31 01:38:11 PM  

Guuberre: I love Korean food. I wish Korean restaurants would have some kind of guide to proper Korean table manners, though. I'm always concerned I look like a starving field hand when I eat in one of those places.


When I eat in Korean restaurants, waiters and managers come over to my table to explain what I'm doing wrong and teach me how to do it properly.  Without anybody asking.

So either you're doing much better than I do, or else there's something about me that screams "I'm a pathetic, stupid white person and I need help."

Also, if you look like a starving field hand when you eat, you probably fit right in.  Koreans aren't prissy the way Japanese are.

One of the great things about Koreans is that they're extremely helpful.  One of the not-great things about Koreans is  they tend to treat foreigners as if we were nine-year-olds.
 
2012-12-31 01:46:00 PM  

This text is now purple: aagrajag:

Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.


Stinging nettles are very tasty, but they have to be wild-crafted, you'll never find fresh nettles in stores. Steamed, with some soy sauce & mayonnaise, they kept my hay-fever under control all this Spring.

/fiance wildcrafts herbs for fun and $
/also makes sauerkraut and kimshi at home, so tasty
 
2012-12-31 01:50:33 PM  

This text is now purple: John Redcorn: I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?

Sour milk. That's the usually description of westerners from asians, who come from a culture almost devoid of dairy.



Oh, god, not this stupid crap again.

That was probably true like 50 years ago (at least for cheese), but it's now poppycock.  Asians, especially Japanese and Koreans, LOVE cheese.  And ice cream and yogurt   You can go into any modern grocery store in Korea or Japan (and by "modern" I mean it has a refrigerator) and you will find ice cream, cheese, yogurt, and even butter for sale.  And I'm talking anywhere, not just places that cater to tourists.

Pizza Hutt and McDonalds are extremely popular throughout Asia, and guess what pizzas and cheese burgers have on them?  Hint: it's not sour milk.  And there's frequently a Baskin-Robbins nearby.

Yogurt dates back to 500 BCE in India and Iran.  Western Asian countries like Mongolia and Kazakhstan have been drinking fermented milk products since at least that long.

Now, granted, if you talk to an Asian over 40, they may describe cheese (or other daily products) as sour milk.  But it's time to retire this myth.
 
2012-12-31 01:52:16 PM  
no hawt asian women? yellow fevers are slacking

korea.lablob.com

2.bp.blogspot.com

fashiontrenddesign.com
 
2012-12-31 01:57:20 PM  

Doink_Boink: I've tried about ten versions of kimchi. I've never tasted the garbage juice that drains from the garbage truck when it's compressing trash, but I would liken kimchi to that.

The best part about kimchi is seeing people get insulted and angry when other people say they don't like it.


Nobody on this thread is insulted and angry because someone said they didn't like kimchi.  We're getting insulted and angry because people are comparing kimchi to sewage.  If you don't like kimchi, fine, I have no problem with that.  If you call kimchi garbage, then yes, you can go fark yourself.

And you're also a liar, because you already knew all this before you pretended ignorance to compound your asshattery.  So have a cigarette and then go fark yourself a second time.
 
2012-12-31 02:00:21 PM  

ciberido: Guuberre: I love Korean food. I wish Korean restaurants would have some kind of guide to proper Korean table manners, though. I'm always concerned I look like a starving field hand when I eat in one of those places.

When I eat in Korean restaurants, waiters and managers come over to my table to explain what I'm doing wrong and teach me how to do it properly.  Without anybody asking.

So either you're doing much better than I do, or else there's something about me that screams "I'm a pathetic, stupid white person and I need help."

Also, if you look like a starving field hand when you eat, you probably fit right in.  Koreans aren't prissy the way Japanese are.

One of the great things about Koreans is that they're extremely helpful.  One of the not-great things about Koreans is  they tend to treat foreigners as if we were nine-year-olds.


I'd liken it less to treating others like nine-year-olds, and more like "let's treat them like pets." Think about how you treat your dog - "awww, good dog! Honey, look at the cute thing the dog is doing! He thinks he's people! Awwww." That sort of mentality. There's no animosity or anything, just a touch of xenophobia (well earned considering what outsiders did to their country throughout history) and trust of other Koreans that can come off like a superiority complex.

Also, don't be nervous about chowing down food in front of Korean folks. You'll notice they do the same thing. And they don't chew with their mouths closed. The table manners can be a little offputting for Americans, but once you are used to it its no big deal.

/worked for Koreans for 10 years
//lunch hour sounded like feeding time at a cattle ranch
 
2012-12-31 02:04:01 PM  

Into the blue again: Wizzbang: Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste

Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.

See, I love blue cheese and Gorgonzola and the like. I am not sure I can give stinky tofu any more chances..... IMHO it was that bad.


Stinky tofu was one of the things that Andrew Zimmerman couldn't eat. I've watched that guy eat worms straight from trees. He nearly retched when he took a bite of genuine super-stinky tofu.

/never in a million years
 
2012-12-31 02:08:04 PM  

Anastacya: Into the blue again: Wizzbang: Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste

Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.

See, I love blue cheese and Gorgonzola and the like. I am not sure I can give stinky tofu any more chances..... IMHO it was that bad.

Stinky tofu was one of the things that Andrew Zimmerman couldn't eat. I've watched that guy eat worms straight from trees. He nearly retched when he took a bite of genuine super-stinky tofu.

/never in a million years


Honestly, I know it's probably foul stuff, but I still want to try it. I've found that most foods that are eaten by large groups of people are pretty yummy once you try them enough times for your brain to categorize them (that's why when you're a little kid you hate brussels sprouts - they just taste like bitter, but when you're an adult you are better able to pick up on the other subtle flavors besides the wall of bitter - similar examples are coffee and hoppy beer).
 
2012-12-31 02:09:20 PM  

Queensowntalia: This text is now purple: Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.

I've eaten pokeweed many times. It's extremely delicious.


I can't get past the part where I have to blanch it *three times* to render it non-toxic, just to get something that tastes like spinach. Although poke grows like a weed in my yard, so does spinach.
 
2012-12-31 02:12:14 PM  

EyeballKid: I hope it doesn't get too popular. My Asian grocery store makes their own and sells it at a rather reasonable price.


This. I buy it by the bucket. I think my sense of smell is broken though, because I seriously barely notice the smell unless I open the jar and put my face in there.

/might explain why most foods don't bother me, even durian
 
2012-12-31 02:13:00 PM  

llamalarity: frepnog:
oh come on. don't like about pokeweed. that shiat is NASTY.

Never tried the greens like in the song Poke Salad Annie. Have enjoyed the stems sliced and fried like okra. Must be picked in early spring before it turns purple.


Even then, you're not encouraged to ever eat the stems. They become toxic prior to the onset of obvious purple color.
 
2012-12-31 02:14:35 PM  

ciberido: It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.


Ketchup sandwiches are a thing.
 
2012-12-31 02:15:54 PM  

CyberHippyRedux: This text is now purple: aagrajag:

Although if you want to see what really desperate people will turn into food, consider that pokeweed, stinging nettles and russian thistles are edible, given the right timing or sufficient length of effort.

Stinging nettles are very tasty, but they have to be wild-crafted, you'll never find fresh nettles in stores. Steamed, with some soy sauce & mayonnaise, they kept my hay-fever under control all this Spring.

/fiance wildcrafts herbs for fun and $
/also makes sauerkraut and kimshi at home, so tasty


I want to meet someone who has ever eaten salted tumbleweeds by choice.

\At least in a situation where the other choice wasn't "starvation".
 
2012-12-31 02:17:17 PM  

This text is now purple: ciberido: It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.

Ketchup sandwiches are a thing.


My grandmother used to make ketchup soup when my kid was young. Poor people do a lot to try and get by.
 
2012-12-31 02:17:52 PM  
Not kid, Dad.
 
2012-12-31 02:21:15 PM  

ciberido: This text is now purple: John Redcorn: I wonder what Koreans think of the U.S. when they land here? "My god everybody is fat and it smells like mayonnaise!"?

Sour milk. That's the usually description of westerners from asians, who come from a culture almost devoid of dairy.


Oh, god, not this stupid crap again.

That was probably true like 50 years ago (at least for cheese), but it's now poppycock.  Asians, especially Japanese and Koreans, LOVE cheese.  And ice cream and yogurt   You can go into any modern grocery store in Korea or Japan (and by "modern" I mean it has a refrigerator) and you will find ice cream, cheese, yogurt, and even butter for sale.  And I'm talking anywhere, not just places that cater to tourists.

Pizza Hutt and McDonalds are extremely popular throughout Asia, and guess what pizzas and cheese burgers have on them?  Hint: it's not sour milk.  And there's frequently a Baskin-Robbins nearby.

Yogurt dates back to 500 BCE in India and Iran.  Western Asian countries like Mongolia and Kazakhstan have been drinking fermented milk products since at least that long.

Now, granted, if you talk to an Asian over 40, they may describe cheese (or other daily products) as sour milk.  But it's time to retire this myth.


People as a class tend to smell like what they eat. To people who don't drink much milk, westerners smell like sour milk. You notice odors which stand out from your normal background experience.

As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.
 
2012-12-31 02:25:40 PM  

scubamage: Honestly, I know it's probably foul stuff, but I still want to try it. I've found that most foods that are eaten by large groups of people are pretty yummy once you try them enough times for your brain to categorize them (that's why when you're a little kid you hate brussels sprouts - they just taste like bitter, but when you're an adult you are better able to pick up on the other subtle flavors besides the wall of bitter - similar examples are coffee and hoppy beer).


Also, it seems that within the last 10 years, people suddenly relearned how asparagus and brussels sprouts should be cooked.

For the last 50 years, it seems everything kept trying the British Method (boiling into submission).
 
2012-12-31 02:26:54 PM  

scubamage: This text is now purple: ciberido: It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.

Ketchup sandwiches are a thing.

My grandmother used to make ketchup soup when my kid was young. Poor people do a lot to try and get by.


...

How does ketchup soup work? It's sort of a thin minestrone?
 
2012-12-31 02:27:01 PM  
When I worked at AFKN Taegu (radio station), I made a big batch of cheesecake squares for Thanksgiving and foolishly stored them in the big upstairs refrigerator where the engineers kept their meals. The cheesecake fully absorbed the scent and flavor of kimchi and was rendered inedible overnight. The Korean engineers loved it, though. Kept asking when I'd make more of it.

/Somethings just aren't meant to be "fusion" foods.
 
2012-12-31 02:31:17 PM  

This text is now purple: scubamage: This text is now purple: ciberido: It would be like if you had a penpal in Asia who came to America for the very first time and when you went out to eat together, she ordered a hamburger, threw the meat patty away, and used the bun to make a ketchup sandwich.

Ketchup sandwiches are a thing.

My grandmother used to make ketchup soup when my kid was young. Poor people do a lot to try and get by.

...

How does ketchup soup work? It's sort of a thin minestrone?


I'm honestly not sure - my dad doesn't really have fond memories of the stuff other than "it tasted like crap." I assume it was ketchup, stock from scrap bones, and butter (all things that would have been available in the Bronx in the 1940's/50's). But they ate it with bread.
 
2012-12-31 02:36:21 PM  
in the 1950s, my grandpa's neighbor came back from the korean war and told him about kimchi.

so my grandpa started making it the old fashioned way by putting it in mason jars and burying them in the backyard to let it ferment. grandma wouldn't let him eat his "Chinese Sauerkraut" in the house. not a lot of people in Shaker Heights Ohio eating that stuff.

Grandpa was pretty farking cool.
 
2012-12-31 02:39:25 PM  

thisiszombocom: no hawt'shoppedasian women? yellow fevers are slacking


That first gal in the yellow, man, she doesn't even have wrinkles and folds in her elbows. How much I gotta work out to get elbows that smooth and balmy?
 
2012-12-31 02:48:23 PM  

Fuggin Bizzy: thisiszombocom: no hawt'shoppedasian women? yellow fevers are slacking

That first gal in the yellow, man, she doesn't even have wrinkles and folds in her elbows. How much I gotta work out to get elbows that smooth and balmy?


You need to work out at the photoshop gym.
 
2012-12-31 02:50:11 PM  

This text is now purple: As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.


Don't be obtuse.   Yes, cheese is literally soured milk, but most Americans don't "think cheese tastes like sour milk."  Most Asians under 40 don't view cheese that way, either.  You made a false assertion, I pointed out that it was wrong, and you're now retreating behind a technicality.
 
2012-12-31 03:09:32 PM  

ciberido: This text is now purple: As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.

Don't be obtuse.   Yes, cheese is literally soured milk, but most Americans don't "think cheese tastes like sour milk."  Most Asians under 40 don't view cheese that way, either.  You made a false assertion, I pointed out that it was wrong, and you're now retreating behind a technicality.


Go back and read what I wrote. I never asserted that cheese tastes like sour milk.

I asserted that cheese *is* sour milk, and that westerners smell like sour milk to non-dairy cultures. That's less to do with cheese consumption than adult liquid milk consumption.
 
2012-12-31 03:42:06 PM  

This text is now purple: Also, it seems that within the last 10 years, people suddenly relearned how asparagus and brussels sprouts should be cooked.

For the last 50 years, it seems everything kept trying the British Method (boiling into submission).


EXACTLY.  I spent the first 35 years of my like knowing I hated brussels sprouts.  Until my friend- a professional cook- showed me how its done.
 
2012-12-31 04:43:35 PM  

Wizzbang: Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste

Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.


My brother was stationed on the DMZ for awhile, and before he deployed, one of his senior NCO's urged him to try kimchi, saying it was one of the best things to eat in Korea. When he got there, he followed up on it and went to a restaurant and ordered kimchi. He got a bowl of foul-smelling, slimy vegetables that he couldn't stand. He told the NCO about his experience, and thanked him for the bad prank. The NCO laughed, and said "No, no Mac. That was winter kimchee, the stuff they store up from the summer to eat in the wintertime. You want the summer kimchee, made fresh. It's a whole different animal!"

My bro waited until summertime rolled around and tried it again...crispy, crunchy veggies with a snap and a hit of cool heat. After that, he couldn't stop raving about it.
 
2012-12-31 05:15:54 PM  

This text is now purple: ciberido: This text is now purple: As for the myth, cheese is literally soured milk.

Don't be obtuse.   Yes, cheese is literally soured milk, but most Americans don't "think cheese tastes like sour milk."  Most Asians under 40 don't view cheese that way, either.  You made a false assertion, I pointed out that it was wrong, and you're now retreating behind a technicality.

Go back and read what I wrote. I never asserted that cheese tastes like sour milk.

I asserted that cheese *is* sour milk, and that westerners smell like sour milk to non-dairy cultures. That's less to do with cheese consumption than adult liquid milk consumption.


Working in the IT industry I can confirm that people from India eat a lot of curry and really smell like curry. It's a scientific fact.
 
2012-12-31 05:21:07 PM  

scubamage: Anastacya: Into the blue again: Wizzbang: Into the blue again: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Shadowknight: To this day, I don't think I've smelled anything worse, and I work with dead bodies and sick people leaking a variety of fluids.

Stinky tofu. A good stinky tofu shop smells up at least a block radius, and the name says it all, really.

TTTTHHHHIIIIIIISSSSSSS

CSB:
I went to a hole i the wall restaurant in Shanghai. Smelled pretty bad, but my Chinese pals told me it was good. Charcoal pit in the middle of the dirty table for skewers of meats. Then out came the stinky tofu. OMFG, worst taste ever. I downed my beer and then like 10 'beef' sticks after to try to clear u the taste

Oh god, the stuff that's labeled stinky is gawdawful overfermented stuff. Smells like something died and was left in a hot car for 3 weeks. The "regular" stuff is just lightly fermented and is like Chinese blue cheese. Decent stuff if you have the taste for it, but the ultra fermented stuff is deadly.

See, I love blue cheese and Gorgonzola and the like. I am not sure I can give stinky tofu any more chances..... IMHO it was that bad.

Stinky tofu was one of the things that Andrew Zimmerman couldn't eat. I've watched that guy eat worms straight from trees. He nearly retched when he took a bite of genuine super-stinky tofu.

/never in a million years

Honestly, I know it's probably foul stuff, but I still want to try it. I've found that most foods that are eaten by large groups of people are pretty yummy once you try them enough times for your brain to categorize them (that's why when you're a little kid you hate brussels sprouts - they just taste like bitter, but when you're an adult you are better able to pick up on the other subtle flavors besides the wall of bitter - similar examples are coffee and hoppy beer).


I can think of foods that I used to enjoy as a child, such as musk melons, that I no longer savor. That happens with nearly everyone, that as you mature your tastes change. Unfortunately I have another dynamic that alters my tastes. I have a disease called Sjogrën's Syndrome, which affects the mucous membranes (eyes, mouth & etc). One of the joyous side effects of this disease is making you sensitive to certain types of food. I used to enjoy Chipotle's chicken soft tacos. Now I can barely take a bite without my mouth burning. Ketchup, mayonnaise, salt, chocolate.. you name it. If I force the issue and eat it anyway, I eventually strip my tongue and basically have a "burnt" skin feeling. It truly sucks. It is one thing for your tastes to change and you not be interested in a food anymore, something else entirely when you have no choice on whether you can continue enjoying it.
 
2012-12-31 07:12:18 PM  

vernonFL: Kimchee is awesome and I have been eating it for years. I even made my own once, its easy to make.


Yes - after finishing a jar I always add some more veggies, put it out on the counter for a few days, and extend the magic!
 
2012-12-31 07:51:55 PM  

Warrener: That fridge was never used in the office again. It sat in the hallway for a week with a "Free" sign on it before someone took it out to the dumpster to get rid of the smell.


An office full of people who don't know how to get rid of the smell in a fridge.

Wow. I just... wow.

/Baking soda
//Anything citric like malt vinegar or lemon
///Charcoal
////Coffee grounds
 
2012-12-31 08:44:28 PM  
Kimchi can;t hold a candle to Mondoo....best stuff ever. Brugogie is pretty great too.

Only thing is, now after Gundam style the Koreans are going to thing the invented the world best food too..as well as pop music. My wife is Korean BTW.Little country big egos
 
2012-12-31 09:20:18 PM  
some of you people will eat anything.

i1207.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-31 10:53:17 PM  
f00.inventorspot.com

/'nuff said
 
2012-12-31 11:21:35 PM  
A few things for western devils to consider:
1. Koreans find the stuff objectionable at a young age, but are gradually conditioned to "need" to eat it nearly every day.
2. Koreans largely form their diet based on what they believe to be healthful, not what is palletable.
3. It did not contain hot pepper until colonialism brought it to the east.
4. It's probiotic qualities can be found in many less odiferous pickled foods.
5. Westerners eating the stuff outside of Korean restaurants give of the "I judge myself by how exotic/ethnic my diet is" vibe.
 
2013-01-01 12:21:20 AM  
It's revolting. It smells worse than it tastes but, gah! I ate it for months when we had a Korean student staying with us and it never got better and I never got used to it.
 
2013-01-01 12:42:44 PM  

Pants full of macaroni!!: Kevin72: TFA is 25 years behind San Francisco on Phô, 20 years behind on Thai, and ten years behind on fermented foods.

Keep in mind that most Americans still think General Tso's Chicken is exotic.


I...damn...now you've depressed me.

/kimchi is fantastic
 
2013-01-01 10:24:45 PM  

This text is now purple: wildcardjack: Why the kimchi hate?

....But people hate kimchi because it's poor people food from one of the most downtrodden cultures on earth (the Koreans wish their history went as well as that of the Poles or Ukrainians). And like most really downtrodden poor people food, it smells to high hell and usually manages to only taste of low hell.


Fark you. Come back when you have the slightest idea of what you are talking about.
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