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(The Register)   Celebrating 50 years of the LED   (theregister.co.uk) divider line 31
    More: Interesting, free electrons, diodes, fiber-optics, inert gas, LEDs, Texas Instruments, Oh Christmas Lights, gallium arsenide  
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2815 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Dec 2012 at 9:44 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-30 12:43:23 AM  
"Whoa, like, has it been that long, dude?"
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-12-30 12:51:11 AM  
Back in the day I had models of both starship Enterprise and a Klingon war vessel.  Both had LEDs, my dad told me they would never burn out.

I often think of how much I could make now had I not A) opened the boxes and built the models; and B) put firecrackers in strategic places and blown them to crap.

To give dad credit, the LEDs never did burn out.

/ miss him
// he's alive, but he's not there no mo :(
 
2012-12-30 05:48:00 AM  
I don't know if it's just me, but I've had far more trouble with strings of LED Christmas lights going out the past couple of years than I've ever had with the traditional sets. Almost half the lights from last year's sets were off when I checked them at Thanksgiving. Now the sets I bought this year have a couple of strings out (really dim, actually) as well. I may go back to traditional at this rate.
 
2012-12-30 09:54:39 AM  

SnarfVader: I don't know if it's just me, but I've had far more trouble with strings of LED Christmas lights going out the past couple of years than I've ever had with the traditional sets. Almost half the lights from last year's sets were off when I checked them at Thanksgiving. Now the sets I bought this year have a couple of strings out (really dim, actually) as well. I may go back to traditional at this rate.


Issues with string lights going out are pretty much always connector issues, and almost never bulb issues.

Basically, your problem is more likely related to buying literally the cheapest lights you could find than it is the basic technology behind the bulbs themselves. Or possibly how you're storing them. Neither kind of tech is really prone to spontaneous failure on that scale.
 
2012-12-30 10:23:04 AM  
I'm just tired of every manufacturer putting those bright-ass blue LED's in everything. I farking hate them.
I don't need a blue light as bright as the sun to indicate that something is on. A nice mellow green will suffice. I've got electrical tape covering more blue LED's than anything.
 
2012-12-30 10:41:24 AM  
I celebrate the LED every time one of those godforsaken LED headlights nearly blinds me and drives me off of the highway.
 
2012-12-30 10:51:06 AM  

Jim_Callahan: SnarfVader: I don't know if it's just me, but I've had far more trouble with strings of LED Christmas lights going out the past couple of years than I've ever had with the traditional sets. Almost half the lights from last year's sets were off when I checked them at Thanksgiving. Now the sets I bought this year have a couple of strings out (really dim, actually) as well. I may go back to traditional at this rate.

Issues with string lights going out are pretty much always connector issues, and almost never bulb issues.

Basically, your problem is more likely related to buying literally the cheapest lights you could find than it is the basic technology behind the bulbs themselves. Or possibly how you're storing them. Neither kind of tech is really prone to spontaneous failure on that scale.


Bull farking shiat! If I wanted to be cheap, I wouldn't have bought LED's. When was the last time you bought Christmas lights? You go to a store (I went to Lowe's and Home Depot), you buy the lights they have available in LED's. There's not a whole lot of choice in which brand you get. Additionally, the strings I'm having trouble with are the 150 bulb contractor grade C-9's and several 50 bulb C-6's. I'm not having any trouble with the smaller mini-light strings so far.

I think it's these small, cylindrical nodes that are on each string. Those look like mini transformers to me and I believe they may step down the voltage to each bank of lights. I believe, despite them being advertised as outdoor, they can't handle the weather of the Pacific Northwest.
 
2012-12-30 11:31:49 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: I celebrate the LED every time one of those godforsaken LED headlights nearly blinds me and drives me off of the highway.


LED or blue Xenon headlamps?
 
2012-12-30 11:34:38 AM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: I celebrate the LED every time one of those godforsaken LED headlights nearly blinds me and drives me off of the highway.


If they truly last much longer than the halogen bulbs in my headlights, I might be interested in buying a pair. Granted, the halogens last for years of driving, but with my car, changing them out is a real pain. ( I just did that, so I won't be buying bulbs for another 9+ years anyways,probably exceeding the life of my late 90's car)

/ not even sure if my car would be compatible with the LED headlights
// more research on my part is needed
/// I'm ready for the FARK hate on this issue...
 
2012-12-30 11:44:58 AM  

logieal: I'm just tired of every manufacturer putting those bright-ass blue LED's in everything. I farking hate them.
I don't need a blue light as bright as the sun to indicate that something is on. A nice mellow green will suffice. I've got electrical tape covering more blue LED's than anything.


If we gather up enough like-minded people, we can submit one of those petition thingies to Obama.

/it's all a conspiracy by the Black Electrical Tape manufacturers
 
2012-12-30 11:46:49 AM  
Let me guess! We only have LEDs because of NASA?

FTA:
"Cat's whisker electroluminescence was discovered as a phenomenon as far back as 1907 by Marconi's Henry Round, the first studies of embryonic LEDs were recorded by Oleg Vladimirovich Losev in 1928, and Rubin Braunstein discovered infrared from gallium arsenide at RCA in 1955.

But the "invention" of the LED is generally attributed to GEC researchers Robert Hall and Nick Holonyak in late 1961. At around the same time, Bob Biard and Gary Pittman were making similar breakthroughs at Texas Instruments, as was Marshall Nathan at IBM, and Robert Rediker from MIT.

It was Texas Instruments that secured the first patent the following year though, and the first commercial LED - known as the SNX-100 - was sold in 1962. IBM used them to replace the hot tungsten bulbs in their punched card readers."

Not space? I wonder what else we have that's not because of space?

Could it be everything?
 
2012-12-30 12:18:37 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Let me guess! We only have LEDs because of NASA?

FTA:
"Cat's whisker electroluminescence was discovered as a phenomenon as far back as 1907 by Marconi's Henry Round, the first studies of embryonic LEDs were recorded by Oleg Vladimirovich Losev in 1928, and Rubin Braunstein discovered infrared from gallium arsenide at RCA in 1955.

But the "invention" of the LED is generally attributed to GEC researchers Robert Hall and Nick Holonyak in late 1961. At around the same time, Bob Biard and Gary Pittman were making similar breakthroughs at Texas Instruments, as was Marshall Nathan at IBM, and Robert Rediker from MIT.

It was Texas Instruments that secured the first patent the following year though, and the first commercial LED - known as the SNX-100 - was sold in 1962. IBM used them to replace the hot tungsten bulbs in their punched card readers."

Not space? I wonder what else we have that's not because of space?

Could it be everything?


LEDs will never work.
 
2012-12-30 12:30:43 PM  
StoPPeRmobile: See, that's the thing. Space Nutters predict things that have never, ever worked, and never will. Even things they've been promising for decades. Nothing. Nada.

If someone make some extraordinary claim about rocks making light, well, it was SHOWN to work. It exists. With early 20th century knowledge! Requiring no extraordinary materials or energy sources. THAT's the difference between people who live in reality, and people who cling desperately to space daydreams.

I really hope that in 2013 you open your eyes and do some learning, and some coming to grips with reality. You will never live on the Moon, or hop a private space tourism rocket for a weekend on Callisto. At best, we'll have a new way for billionaires to waste spare millions on stunts to impress each other.

Like it's always been.
www.examiner.com
 
2012-12-30 12:37:03 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: StoPPeRmobile: See, that's the thing. Space Nutters predict things that have never, ever worked, and never will. Even things they've been promising for decades. Nothing. Nada.

If someone make some extraordinary claim about rocks making light, well, it was SHOWN to work. It exists. With early 20th century knowledge! Requiring no extraordinary materials or energy sources. THAT's the difference between people who live in reality, and people who cling desperately to space daydreams.

I really hope that in 2013 you open your eyes and do some learning, and some coming to grips with reality. You will never live on the Moon, or hop a private space tourism rocket for a weekend on Callisto. At best, we'll have a new way for billionaires to waste spare millions on stunts to impress each other.

Like it's always been.
[www.examiner.com image 250x310]


Well, this hairless, clothed ape, really digs GPS.
 
2012-12-30 12:39:30 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Not space? I wonder what else we have that's not because of space?

Could it be everything?


I'll agree with you that there are few consumer products that were purely the result of the space race, but that spending had Keynesian effects on the rest of technology by guaranteeing a demand for products like compact computers and whatnot. And that effect spreads across the military as well, guaranteeing a demand for exotic parts like monocrystalline turbine blades and carbon composites well before their price point comes down to being suitable for the consumer market.

I remember a complaint about Disney getting DARPA funds to make a better fuse for their daily fireworks show. It was an electronic fuse that incorporated an accelerometer and could go off at a precise point. I don't know if that's spread to other fireworks companies but it's the heart of the new smart grenade launchers. But that MEMS technology that program developed for the accelerometers is in your phone and tablets and Wii controllers.
 
2012-12-30 12:40:28 PM  
cache.gizmodo.com
 
2012-12-30 01:42:15 PM  
Meh. I'm more impressed by Smoke Emitting Diodes, and Light Emitting Resistors.
 
2012-12-30 02:29:09 PM  

dittybopper: Meh. I'm more impressed by Smoke Emitting Diodes, and Light Emitting Resistors.


Just wait til they make ones of those that can do it more than once.

I've flashed a few resistors and smoked a few diodes in my time, I tell ya.
 
2012-12-30 02:44:19 PM  
I celebrate the LED every time one of those godforsaken LED headlights nearly blinds me and drives me off of the highway.

I think you're talking about HID bulbs, which *are* brutal.

I added bluish-white LED daytime running lights (DRLs) to my VW, mainly because they are eyecatching, which is the point for DRLs. I have them wired for daytime use only (they turn off when the headlights are on).
 
2012-12-30 02:53:00 PM  

SnarfVader: I don't know if it's just me, but I've had far more trouble with strings of LED Christmas lights going out the past couple of years than I've ever had with the traditional sets. Almost half the lights from last year's sets were off when I checked them at Thanksgiving. Now the sets I bought this year have a couple of strings out (really dim, actually) as well. I may go back to traditional at this rate.


Welcome to Chinese manufacturing standards and low-current intermittence.

FWIW, my AC-powered LED strings from last year still worked this year and I never took them down so they've been out in the elements for over a year now. The solar ones, not so good. 3 out of 3 failed.
 
2012-12-30 04:45:18 PM  
Great technology, but LED isn't a very catchy name. Can we all agree to call them eCandles or something?
 
2012-12-30 05:20:29 PM  

dittybopper: Meh. I'm more impressed by Smoke Emitting Diodes, and Light Emitting Resistors.


You left out the Bang Emitting Capacitors that seem to happen around me.
 
2012-12-30 06:01:01 PM  

thrasherrr: dittybopper: Meh. I'm more impressed by Smoke Emitting Diodes, and Light Emitting Resistors.

You left out the Bang Emitting Capacitors that seem to happen around me.


There is no smell quite like the smell of a blown electrolytic capacitor.  Sort of like burned peanut butter.
 
2012-12-30 10:26:30 PM  

StrikitRich: LouDobbsAwaaaay: I celebrate the LED every time one of those godforsaken LED headlights nearly blinds me and drives me off of the highway.

LED or blue Xenon headlamps?


No he's thinking LEDs. For some reason, many people (especially older people) say the silver/white LEDs are "Blue"

What the problem is; they are accustomed to "warm white" light from the generations of incandescent lights. If you shopped this christmas for lights you'd notice that they introduced "warm white" LEDs that are more yellowish (more traditional incandescent white color) and renamed the pure white lights "silver white"

Although, HIDs while awesome, can blind you...I just wish people would remember the basic rule of when someone has bright lights or their highbeams on, that you look to the right line when driving
 
2012-12-30 11:20:58 PM  
If you live in a place with snow LED headlights can be a problem. They don't produce nearly as much heat so the lights can freeze over. Where regular halogen bulbs produce enough to melt the ice off. As far as I know all the cars that come with LED headlights also have heaters to clear the lenses if they freeze over.

I put LED Christmas lights on the rafters for our porch. They are a natural yellowish light and work really well. 300 lights total and consuming a whole 24 watts. I'm interested to see if they last nearly as long as they claim.
 
2012-12-31 06:12:50 AM  
Dougie AXP:For some reason, many people (especially older people) say the silver/white LEDs are "Blue"

They are:

a0.vsoh.com
 
2012-12-31 06:15:18 AM  
I forgot to add a nice reference:

a1.vsoh.com
 
2012-12-31 09:15:11 AM  
Cars dont generally come with LED headlights, they come with LED daytime running lights now but those dont blind people.

HID bulbs do, but gennerally only in cars where they are fitted illgaly EG: reflector style housings vice projector style.

reflectors puke light everywhere and dont usually have a verry sharp cutoff at all, while projectors have a straight line cuttof to avoid blinding oncoming traffic

I put HID'sin my car with projectors (came with halogen) and havent had a single problem being flashed and i have driven oncoming to cops and all sorts of emergency vehicals.
 
2012-12-31 11:50:34 AM  

SnarfVader: I think it's these small, cylindrical nodes that are on each string. Those look like mini transformers to me and I believe they may step down the voltage to each bank of lights. I believe, despite them being advertised as outdoor, they can't handle the weather of the Pacific Northwest.


I'm pretty sure those are current-limiting resistors, and the whole string (or a section of it) is put in series. LEDs are rated for a specific forward current, and if you exceed that you shorten their life. With the earlier strings, I think the thinking was that since the AC wave meant a string of the bulbs was on a little less than half the time (hence the flicker), the LEDs had enough time to 'rest' and so they could get away without it. I was playing with running LED strings from 120 VDC, and I think I fried a string this way (constantly on, no resistor to limit the current).

dittybopper: Meh. I'm more impressed by Smoke Emitting Diodes, and Light Emitting Resistors.


Dark Emitting Diodes are fun too.
 
2013-01-01 10:50:08 AM  

linuxpyro: SnarfVader: I think it's these small, cylindrical nodes that are on each string. Those look like mini transformers to me and I believe they may step down the voltage to each bank of lights. I believe, despite them being advertised as outdoor, they can't handle the weather of the Pacific Northwest.

I'm pretty sure those are current-limiting resistors, and the whole string (or a section of it) is put in series. LEDs are rated for a specific forward current, and if you exceed that you shorten their life. With the earlier strings, I think the thinking was that since the AC wave meant a string of the bulbs was on a little less than half the time (hence the flicker), the LEDs had enough time to 'rest' and so they could get away without it. I was playing with running LED strings from 120 VDC, and I think I fried a string this way (constantly on, no resistor to limit the current).


Interesting. Thanks for the info.
 
2013-01-01 02:14:31 PM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: I celebrate the LED every time one of those godforsaken LED headlights nearly blinds me and drives me off of the highway.


actually, the headlights are probably xenon HID, and not LED. There are carmakers using LED accent lights and daytime running lights, and a few aftermarket LED headlights available, but actual LED headlights are unusual at this time.
 
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