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(That Video Site)   Professional chef submits 6 minute video on how to cook the perfect steak. Fark: in a frying pan   (thatvideosite.com) divider line 116
    More: Asinine, Aziz Ansari, Ricky Gervais, chefs, perfect steak  
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4761 clicks; posted to Video » on 29 Dec 2012 at 12:18 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-29 02:47:40 PM

shadownick: shadownick: Searing does not lock in any juices.   In fact, you can sear at any point in the cook.  I usually cook my steak indirect for 5-8 minutes and do the sear at the end.   The whole point of a good sear is to produce the Maillard reaction on the meat and provide that tasty, tasty flavor.   Good Eats actually did an experiment proving that searing result in a greater net moisture loss than not searing.

Also, in high end steak houses, they typically cook the steak Sous Vide all day and then finish in the salamander at about 1200 when the steak is ordered., they never touch an oven.

/not trying to argue with anyone, just educate

[www.biggreenegg.com image 300x360]

The only way I do steaks now.   Reverse T-Rex method with jack daniels chips ftw

Also, Jaccarding the steak is key


this last bit. I picked up a Jaccard tenderizer at the recommendation of White Oak Pastures (producers of the only beef I'll buy these days). couldn't live without it now. grass fed rib-eyes using the Alton Brown pan-sear method for the win. if you don't know the difference you're on a lower rung of the food chain.
 
2012-12-29 02:50:01 PM

homelessdude: Original post - How to Caramelize Onions in 10 Minutes or Less - A Rebuttal


If you want them to caramelize really fast, chuck a smidge of baking soda in with them. By making the pan a little basic, the maillard reaction proceeds much faster. Deglaze with something acidic, like wine, and you won't get the bitter taste.

Be careful with this technique though- it makes things go so fast that you can quickly go from "caramelized onions" to "brown, onion-flavored liquid". Of course, "brown, onion-flavored liquid" is what I use for all of my stews anymore. I make stews without an ounce of added water.
 
2012-12-29 02:53:51 PM

Honest Bender: Anyway, you sear it in a hot pan to lock in the juices


'Searing to keep in the juices' is a farking lie and you need to know this NOW.

It does no such thing and has been proven scientifically time and time and time again (A,'s Test Kitchen, Cook's Country' specifically, plus a few cook books and and sources I don't remember)

It will start to crust the outside but has NOTHING to do with 'locking in the juices'.

My pet peeve, let me show it to you.
 
2012-12-29 02:56:32 PM

Spiralmonkey: Notabunny: Spiralmonkey: I cook steaks like this and always get asked for the method (learned it from one of Heston Blumenthal's TV shows). I think I'll trust the technique of someone who has 3 Michelin stars and owns a restaurant which is consistently rated in the top 3 in the world over subby's backyard grill.

I have a question. I understand the reasoning behind "aging" the meat uncovered in the fridge for a couple of days, but I'm concerned it will take on flavors from whatever else is in there. Has that been a problem for you, or are my concerns unfounded?

I don't normally age steak in the fridge - the butcher I use ages beef for 30 days so nothing further is necessary. I would think Spad31 is right though, but if in doubt you could always make sure anything else in the fridge is sealed in tupperware or something so there's no crossover.


Thanks, guys. My son has turned into quite the carnivore, and I'm anxious to give this a try. =)
 
2012-12-29 03:28:40 PM
Philistines. Every Farker knows the proper way to cook a steak is to throw it raw onto the grill, and then stand 10 feet away and light a match for 3 seconds.
 
2012-12-29 03:28:49 PM

revrendjim: z_gringo: It's hard to tak him seriously when he reccomends puncturing the steak with a thermometer to see if it is done.

Nonsense. You lose a minuscule and completely unnoticeable amount of juice by piercing it. If you puncture it hundreds of times people will notice that it has become hamburger, but a couple holes is fine.


Pretty much this.  I can grill a mean steak, but I just can't get the touch technique down.  I use a thermometer (never had to puncture more than 2 holes, usually one because my grill is remarkably consistent.)

You would not notice the difference.

Also, you're poking it near the end.  So its either going to be ready to take off the grill, or will need like 30 seconds more.

This would be akin to saying taking the first bite into the steak ruins it.
 
2012-12-29 03:34:21 PM

downstairs: I can grill a mean steak, but I just can't get the touch technique down.


Touch? I just go by eye. Is the outside nice and seared and crispy? Good, then it's done.

My formula for indoor steaks is sear each side for 1:30, then broil for another 1:30. With a nice thick rib-eye, the results are nicely rare and juicy an hell.
 
2012-12-29 03:34:27 PM

stonelotus: shadownick: shadownick: Searing does not lock in any juices.   In fact, you can sear at any point in the cook.  I usually cook my steak indirect for 5-8 minutes and do the sear at the end.   The whole point of a good sear is to produce the Maillard reaction on the meat and provide that tasty, tasty flavor.   Good Eats actually did an experiment proving that searing result in a greater net moisture loss than not searing.

Also, in high end steak houses, they typically cook the steak Sous Vide all day and then finish in the salamander at about 1200 when the steak is ordered., they never touch an oven.

/not trying to argue with anyone, just educate

[www.biggreenegg.com image 300x360]

The only way I do steaks now.   Reverse T-Rex method with jack daniels chips ftw

Also, Jaccarding the steak is key

this last bit. I picked up a Jaccard tenderizer at the recommendation of White Oak Pastures (producers of the only beef I'll buy these days). couldn't live without it now. grass fed rib-eyes using the Alton Brown pan-sear method for the win. if you don't know the difference you're on a lower rung of the food chain.


I used to use the Alton Brown method, and it produces an excellent steak, but once i got my big green egg, I'll never go back.  Next kitchen purchase is going to be a Sous Vide Supreme though, so steaks will be cooked in that, then seared on the Egg.   With a grate sitting about an inch away from the coals, I'm searing at around 1500 degrees.
 
2012-12-29 03:35:27 PM

Notabunny: Thanks, guys. My son has turned into quite the carnivore, and I'm anxious to give this a try. =)


The truth is it's actually pretty hard to screw up a top-notch cut like a T-bone unless you overcook it. With a young and growing carnivore you'll want to become familiar with some cheaper meats that are a little more difficult to do just right. Here's a guide to some cheaper steak cuts that you might find useful. That guide is for the grill but all can be adapted to a pan using a variation on the techniques in the video here.
 
2012-12-29 03:41:40 PM

t3knomanser: downstairs: I can grill a mean steak, but I just can't get the touch technique down.

Touch? I just go by eye. Is the outside nice and seared and crispy? Good, then it's done.


If I did it inside, I could probably tell.  However, my backyard is very, very dark (we eat dinner very late).  I wear one of those lights you put on your forehead.  I don't trust the way the steak looks in that scenario.
 
2012-12-29 03:55:36 PM
I've gotten away from laying anything on the barbecue. Do yourselves a favour (if you own a propane barbecue). Take a piece of tinfoil (a 1 ft sq will do) and lay it down on the grills for 5 minutes. Notice how much soot is on the backside of it. Means your cheap grills are not burning at the right temp, and are laying all that carcinogenic hydrocarbon soot all over your food. Not thanks. I use tinfoil on the barbecue, or cook steaks and such in a nice thick cast iron pan.
 
2012-12-29 03:55:54 PM

Counter_Intelligent: Bookmarking


What a bookmark might look like.
 
2012-12-29 03:57:13 PM
An article that mentions how Peter Luger's and Morton's cooks their steaks. I was shocked when I found out how Luger's does it.

Sorry, but Fark doesn't allow for links to WSJ.com, please cut and paste link below.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118920026703920971.html
 
2012-12-29 04:03:55 PM
For all you farker's if you are not using a butter and oil mixture to pan fry. You are doing it wrong.
Flip once and put a pat of butter on the done side to melt and ooze over the soon to be eaten treasure.
Butter makes everything better and ribeyes rule.
 
2012-12-29 04:10:14 PM
Always let your meat rest.
 
2012-12-29 04:30:59 PM
Sounds like this restaurant is just another one of the increasingly poor decisions of Todd English.
 
2012-12-29 04:33:41 PM
This man is English and he cooks his steak in oil on a pan which rubs me the wrong way. Ruth's Chris has been ruining steaks with butter for years.

I thought the stories of English food being terrible were an exaggeration until I spent a few days in London and managed to have only two meals that weren't positively awful. I had a nice dinner at Belgo (some Belgian place) and a decent lunch at some Italian Deli near Piccadilly, but that was it. Everything else was bland and plain and boring. Even hard to screw up meals were terrible. I tried "gourmet burgers" at two different locations and they were the worst burgers I've ever had to this day. How do you screw up a burger? I could take plain ground beef without any spices or anything and still make a more flavourful burger. I'm not sure what they were or weren't doing, or perhaps I'm spoiled by better beef back home, but that doesn't explain why the I was able to find a better burger at a ferry Marina in Greece.

/snark I know, there's probably great food there if you know where to go and what to order
 
2012-12-29 04:34:49 PM
So I live up the street from a bar and a big grocery store. And a couple of nights ago I was completely smashed and decided I needed a steak dinner. Picked out a nice steak from the store (I love 24 hour grocery stores, I never shop sober anymore) and walked on home to cook it. I might have used a bit too much oil in the pan because I nearly lit my kitchen on fire. Three foot high flames when I turned that farker over. The smoke alarm went off, the Ms. ain'thighatallrye woke up, the cats wanted food, I nearly crapped my pants, well, at any rate, it was completely worth it. That steak tasted like a blowjob from god.
 
2012-12-29 04:54:18 PM
I will stick to microwaving all my steaks, thank you very much.
 
2012-12-29 04:56:47 PM
shadownick:
I used to use the Alton Brown method, and it produces an excellent steak, but once i got my big green egg, I'll never go back.  Next kitchen purchase is going to be a Sous Vide Supreme though, so steaks will be cooked in that, then seared on the Egg.

Or do it yourself. I made two following this guy's plan. About $200 for both, and they've been in constant use for the past year and change. :D
 
2012-12-29 04:58:09 PM

itsdan: Sous Vide cook for 24 hours, finish exterior on hot pan.


We should get a group of Boston Farker modernist chefs together.
 
2012-12-29 05:05:08 PM
Perfect steak:
You will need:
1 cow
1 large flamethrower
1 salt to taste

Method:
Burn the cow gently with a huge cloud of lethal flame
Sprinkle with salt
Let it rest (important!) for about 27 hours
Carve off the steak you want from the now rested lump of fire blasted bovine flesh
Put the rest if the cow in the fridge for afterwards or send to PETA in leather satchels
Enjoy!
 
2012-12-29 05:56:46 PM

Theaetetus: shadownick:
I used to use the Alton Brown method, and it produces an excellent steak, but once i got my big green egg, I'll never go back.  Next kitchen purchase is going to be a Sous Vide Supreme though, so steaks will be cooked in that, then seared on the Egg.

Or do it yourself. I made two following this guy's plan. About $200 for both, and they've been in constant use for the past year and change. :D


A buddy of mine is a chef at Alinea(Michelin 3-star restaurant) here in Chicago.  The man is a walking encyclopedia of Sous Vide cooking.  I may have to make a couple and sell him one for home use :)
 
2012-12-29 06:32:53 PM

dickfreckle: Heat iron skillet as hot as you can. Briefly sear your steak on stove top. Put skillet in oven until desired temp is reached. Still not quite as good as a legit grill, but definitely edible. Great for apartment dwellers or people who don't want to freeze while grilling in January.

 Just remember your oven mitts. Ask me how I know this...


Eddie Adams from Torrance: Cast iron rules in winter, but the perfect steak requires smoke and fire.


I don't understand why any comments other than the above were needed on this thread.
 
2012-12-29 06:36:45 PM

Theaetetus: Or do it yourself. I made two following this guy's plan. About $200 for both, and they've been in constant use for the past year and change. :D


That's what I followed to build mine too, found it in an issue of MAKE. Can't find pictures but it looks the same anyways.
 
2012-12-29 07:00:15 PM

Notabunny: Spiralmonkey: Notabunny: Spiralmonkey: I cook steaks like this and always get asked for the method (learned it from one of Heston Blumenthal's TV shows). I think I'll trust the technique of someone who has 3 Michelin stars and owns a restaurant which is consistently rated in the top 3 in the world over subby's backyard grill.

I have a question. I understand the reasoning behind "aging" the meat uncovered in the fridge for a couple of days, but I'm concerned it will take on flavors from whatever else is in there. Has that been a problem for you, or are my concerns unfounded?

I don't normally age steak in the fridge - the butcher I use ages beef for 30 days so nothing further is necessary. I would think Spad31 is right though, but if in doubt you could always make sure anything else in the fridge is sealed in tupperware or something so there's no crossover.

Thanks, guys. My son has turned into quite the carnivore, and I'm anxious to give this a try. =)


tupperware will seal the steak in it's own little micro environment, and the steak wont dry. aging the steak is kinda of a mummification process when you get down to it. you want to allow the moisture to evaporate out of the meat which will concentrate the flavors of the meat you are dry aging.

if you don't want other flavors in the fridge to get into the meat via exposure, do a better job of isolating THOSE smells. but the meat needs the right humidity and air flow over it for it to do it's thing. sealing it in a Tupperware container, or similar, is not going to allow that to happen. the stuf will just rot like that, ou want slow mummification, and a little bit of fermentation going on with that thing.
 
2012-12-29 07:22:01 PM
That may be the best recipe on the planet, but I'm not taking two days to cook a steak.
 
2012-12-29 07:23:47 PM
I've tried the method in the video. And yes, these guys do have 3 Michelin stars, but frankly, I also have a Big Green Egg on my porch and it produces vastly superior tasting stakes every time compared to pan searing and then oven baking it.

Why? I mean these guys are michelin star rated and therefore they MUST be right, right?

No. That just means that they prepare MEALS that rise to that level.

If you go to a proper steak house with a wood fired grill, you encounter a whole different level of specialization in the preparation of meat.

Me, I fire up the big green egg and get that sonovagun nice and hot. I grill my steaks over oak charcoal with pecan and oak wood. The heat and smoke impart depth and complexity that you will NOT get from a cast iron pan.

You want to compare, try making a smoked apple pie and compare that to the same apple pie made in an electric or gas oven. If you prefer the one made in the electric or gas... enjoy your life... without a soul.

But regardless the method he gives is a good one... for a well seasoned, well aged piece of beef that you just want its flavors to come out. It's flat outright the right way to cook a steak... when all you have is the great indoors to work with.

Me, I prefer grilling because to me that's a more natural, more interesting, and more primal flavor.
 
2012-12-29 07:49:10 PM
I never realized that about resting the steak for a few minutes to retain the juices. And it feels like that should be painfully obvious.

Y'all might think me to be a heathen, but frankly i'm just not fond of grilling. Feels too rustic for my taste.
 
2012-12-29 07:59:14 PM

Bell-fan: I've tried the method in the video. And yes, these guys do have 3 Michelin stars, but frankly, I also have a Big Green Egg on my porch and it produces vastly superior tasting stakes every time compared to pan searing and then oven baking it.

Why? I mean these guys are michelin star rated and therefore they MUST be right, right?

No. That just means that they prepare MEALS that rise to that level.

If you go to a proper steak house with a wood fired grill, you encounter a whole different level of specialization in the preparation of meat.

Me, I fire up the big green egg and get that sonovagun nice and hot. I grill my steaks over oak charcoal with pecan and oak wood. The heat and smoke impart depth and complexity that you will NOT get from a cast iron pan.

You want to compare, try making a smoked apple pie and compare that to the same apple pie made in an electric or gas oven. If you prefer the one made in the electric or gas... enjoy your life... without a soul.

But regardless the method he gives is a good one... for a well seasoned, well aged piece of beef that you just want its flavors to come out. It's flat outright the right way to cook a steak... when all you have is the great indoors to work with.

Me, I prefer grilling because to me that's a more natural, more interesting, and more primal flavor.


yes, everything is stated is true. but you perfer the ceramic cooker method. and, lets face it.. the big greenm egg is a pricy bit of technology that can be easily replicated with a couple of terracotta pots.

wood fired, in my opinion is always going to preferable, and whenever I go out and collect firewood, I get people to pay me to remove hardwood, nut and fruit trees, and I save a good portion of that wood just for cooking. build up a campfire with the good wood, let it burn down, then cook over it when it's got down to a good coal burn...

wonderful stuff.

but... as the old sayings go.. more than one way to skin a cat. and differnt strokes for differnt folks.

there is nothing at all wrong with the pan seal and broil method in a pan. it's just another way to do it. and has it's pros and cons, like with anything. I like it personally for the quickness and the caramelizing of the natural sugars in the meat. Pull out the juices in the pan,m pull the steak and let it rest, and then use those drippings to saute up some onion and wild mushroom, a bottle of beer added to that and make a nice reduction sauce to pour over the meat..and a baked potato..

oh dear, it can be a wonderful thing indeed.

but, I'm sure that everyone can agree, that slapping a steak (regardless of cut) on a George Foreman, lean, mean, fat reducing machine counter-top grill is the devils handiwork
 
2012-12-29 08:09:50 PM

shadownick: Theaetetus: shadownick:
I used to use the Alton Brown method, and it produces an excellent steak, but once i got my big green egg, I'll never go back.  Next kitchen purchase is going to be a Sous Vide Supreme though, so steaks will be cooked in that, then seared on the Egg.

Or do it yourself. I made two following this guy's plan. About $200 for both, and they've been in constant use for the past year and change. :D

A buddy of mine is a chef at Alinea(Michelin 3-star restaurant) here in Chicago.  The man is a walking encyclopedia of Sous Vide cooking.  I may have to make a couple and sell him one for home use :)


Went there last October. Incredible. Pass on my compliments.
 
2012-12-29 08:22:22 PM
The best steak is grilled, but also broiled - season your steak (T-bone, ribeye, porterhouse) and stick in the broiler for 5 minutes on one side. Salt the steak after that, flip it, salt the other side and broil for another 7 to 10 minutes. Depending on the thickness of the steak, you can adjust the time for each side. From broiler to plate is the resting time. The best.
 
2012-12-29 08:30:28 PM
My issue with grilling steak is that I can't seem to ever get my grill hot enough. It's a small kettle, suitable for my small patio. I use cowboy charcoal. But I cannot get the grill hot enough to crisp the outside yet leave the inside purple or deep red. I like my steaks Pittsburgh style (oddly named, since it has nothing to do with Pittsburgh).

Bernoo: salt the other side and broil for another 7 to 10 minutes


Holy shiat, broiled for 15 minutes? Are you making steak or shoeleather?
 
2012-12-29 08:39:36 PM

t3knomanser: My issue with grilling steak is that I can't seem to ever get my grill hot enough. It's a small kettle, suitable for my small patio. I use cowboy charcoal. But I cannot get the grill hot enough to crisp the outside yet leave the inside purple or deep red. I like my steaks Pittsburgh style (oddly named, since it has nothing to do with Pittsburgh).

Bernoo: salt the other side and broil for another 7 to 10 minutes

Holy shiat, broiled for 15 minutes? Are you making steak or shoeleather?


I don't know what to tell ya. Broilers vary. Use yours accordingly. 5 minutes one side. 5 to 7 to 10 minutes the other side. Brown on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside.
 
2012-12-29 08:48:32 PM
Things this d-bag did wrong: nonstick skillet, iodized table salt, an ocean of what appears to be vegetable oil

Searing a steak indoors can be done, but only on cast iron.  If you have so much oil in a pan that it is sloshing, you are cooking at a carnival; break out the funnel cake.

I have a couple friends that think I'm the worst cook ever because I refuse to cook red meat until it is grey inside.  The farthest I ever go is a light medium rare, unless it is a roast of a lower quality cut.
 
2012-12-29 08:52:40 PM

HotWingAgenda: Things this d-bag did wrong: ... an ocean of what appears to be vegetable oil

... If you have so much oil in a pan that it is sloshing, you are cooking at a carnival; break out the funnel cake.


Sounds like someone who's never deep fried a steak.
 
2012-12-29 09:01:14 PM

AlwaysRightBoy: If you need a thermometer to tell you your steak is done well ...well, you're done.


This is Heston Blumenthal; he doesn't cook it till it's done, he cooks it till it's perfect. He's a chef-scientist, he seeks perfection and his cooking has been called "molecular gastronomy". (he also likes doing mad stuff like meat in disguise as fruit)
 
2012-12-29 10:41:21 PM
As a rule, venison only in a skillet, but it just so happens I'm feeling open-minded tonite, so I'll favorite this thread and come back to it in the future.
 
2012-12-30 01:00:32 AM

revrendjim: Nonsense. You lose a minuscule and completely unnoticeable amount of juice by piercing it. If you puncture it hundreds of times people will notice that it has become hamburger, but a couple holes is fine.


If you're working as a professional cook in a steakhouse, you should--nay,must--be able to determine doneness by touch alone. But for somebody who occasionally makes a steak at home, inserting a meat thermometer is cromulently efficient and reliable.
 
2012-12-30 01:14:59 AM
can't afford the expensive stuff.. but I look for cheap meat with lots of fat lines through it. use cast iron pan.

put some salt on it and let it come to room temp .. get pan super hot with a little bit of veggie oil in it right before I fry it and do to minutes on each side.. when you flip it turn the broiler on high.
put the pan with the steak directly in the oven to broil (remember to move your rack to the top) do about 3 min on each side..
Your done.. let it rest 3 or 4 min maybe 5 like they said in the video.. oh and some sweet butter or straight butter with a tiny bit of sugar with the butter..
add salt and pepper to taste.
 
2012-12-30 01:40:09 AM

dickfreckle: Heat iron skillet as hot as you can. Briefly sear your steak on stove top. Put skillet in oven until desired temp is reached. Still not quite as good as a legit grill, but definitely edible. Great for apartment dwellers or people who don't want to freeze while grilling in January.

 Just remember your oven mitts. Ask me how I know this...


cdn.gunaxin.com
 
2012-12-30 01:51:53 AM

Spad31: I won't argue with the man's results, just a little head-tilt at the flipping so often. And so much oil in the pan...


From what I can tell he's going for it crusty on the outside and very rare on the inside. He said for rare he was checking for an internal temp of 45 C, which is only 113 F, and medium at 55 C which is 131 F. My cookbooks and other references say 145 F for medium-rare, and don't actually have a listing for rare, but it would probably be like 130. Although those directions also assume only one flip.
 
2012-12-30 02:18:52 AM
Not sure why the oven is needed. I cook both sides to color/appearance in the hottest cast iron pan I can make and then cover and reduce heat to lowish. I dont flip after that. But I like one side to be almost charcoal.
 
2012-12-30 02:49:48 AM
Cooking a steak... what are you a woman?
 
2012-12-30 02:51:11 AM

mrlewish: can't afford the expensive stuff.. but I look for cheap meat with lots of fat lines through it. use cast iron pan.

put some salt on it and let it come to room temp .. get pan super hot with a little bit of veggie oil in it right before I fry it and do to minutes on each side.. when you flip it turn the broiler on high.
put the pan with the steak directly in the oven to broil (remember to move your rack to the top) do about 3 min on each side..
Your done.. let it rest 3 or 4 min maybe 5 like they said in the video.. oh and some sweet butter or straight butter with a tiny bit of sugar with the butter..
add salt and pepper to taste.


375°F is the smoke point of olive oil.

You are just adding burnt alive oil to you meat. NTTAWWT. But don't do that. No need. Plenty of oil on that.
steak.

It wont stick. Just wait long enough.

/stop ruining the sacrificial cow
 
2012-12-30 05:48:48 AM
I've always fried steak in a pan, except when my buddy wants to cook on on the grill. I will used the suggestion the English feller had about aging the meat. Seems smart to me.
 
2012-12-30 08:14:16 AM
yup, it's called pittsburgh rare. i do it a little simpler: extra hot pan to start, sear both sides to seal the juices inside, once the outsides look cooked, pour some red wine over it and pop it in a 350 oven to bake for 15 mins. kid of a poor man's broiler. none of this prepping 2 days ahead and leaving out of the fridge crap, more like idea to completion in 30 mins.
 
2012-12-30 08:31:56 AM
ohhh darn, i didn't see the seal the juices argument searching for my main points. will have to look that stuff up sometime.
 
2012-12-30 09:23:58 AM

evilmousse: i didn't see the seal the juices argument searching for my main points.


Searing definitely doesn't "seal" anything, and actually takes more moisture out of the meat. But it also is what gives the meat flavor. So keep searing.
 
2012-12-30 10:26:05 AM
Heston Blumenthal is a bad ass.
 
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