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(That Video Site)   Professional chef submits 6 minute video on how to cook the perfect steak. Fark: in a frying pan   (thatvideosite.com) divider line 116
    More: Asinine, Aziz Ansari, Ricky Gervais, chefs, perfect steak  
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4761 clicks; posted to Video » on 29 Dec 2012 at 12:18 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-29 05:39:37 AM
Not only looks good and tasty to me, but I've seen Alton Brown and Gordon Ramsay use similar techniques.
 
2012-12-29 05:40:32 AM
Bookmarking
 
2012-12-29 05:51:05 AM
Cast iron pans for the win. Subby needs to get his head out of the BBQ
 
2012-12-29 05:58:41 AM
You can nicely sear steaks in any old non-stick pan if you have a gas range.
 
2012-12-29 06:26:11 AM
Heat iron skillet as hot as you can. Briefly sear your steak on stove top. Put skillet in oven until desired temp is reached. Still not quite as good as a legit grill, but definitely edible. Great for apartment dwellers or people who don't want to freeze while grilling in January.

 Just remember your oven mitts. Ask me how I know this...
 
2012-12-29 06:32:21 AM
Ok, I'll weigh in here. I cook my steaks on the stovetop as well. Carbon steel or cast iron pans. Well seasoned, really hot. Been doing it for years. Everyone raves about the steaks. (I do center loins (filets) typically) I don't get the "flip every 15 seconds" thing. Seared hard for a couple minutes on each side (no flipping), then into 500 degree oven for final few minutes. Rest the steaks. Serve up the sides while the steak rests, then serve all at once. Rarely isn't perfect. I won't argue with the man's results, just a little head-tilt at the flipping so often. And so much oil in the pan...

Eh. Just go cook a steak and enjoy!
Happy New Year you FARKERS!

-Spad
 
2012-12-29 06:44:43 AM
I cook steaks like this and always get asked for the method (learned it from one of Heston Blumenthal's TV shows). I think I'll trust the technique of someone who has 3 Michelin stars and owns a restaurant which is consistently rated in the top 3 in the world over subby's backyard grill.
 
2012-12-29 06:58:13 AM
I use very hot cast iron with a lot of my steaks, certainly during the week when lighting the charcoal  is too much.
/uses well seasoned 50-year-old cast iron I inherited.

//I have a full set of cast iron (including dutch oven) that I also use on a wood stove during the winter

///don't get me going on my Le Creuset collection!!! All colors
 
2012-12-29 06:58:22 AM

Spiralmonkey: I cook steaks like this and always get asked for the method (learned it from one of Heston Blumenthal's TV shows). I think I'll trust the technique of someone who has 3 Michelin stars and owns a restaurant which is consistently rated in the top 3 in the world over subby's backyard grill.


I have a question. I understand the reasoning behind "aging" the meat uncovered in the fridge for a couple of days, but I'm concerned it will take on flavors from whatever else is in there. Has that been a problem for you, or are my concerns unfounded?
 
2012-12-29 07:28:48 AM

Notabunny: Spiralmonkey: I cook steaks like this and always get asked for the method (learned it from one of Heston Blumenthal's TV shows). I think I'll trust the technique of someone who has 3 Michelin stars and owns a restaurant which is consistently rated in the top 3 in the world over subby's backyard grill.

I have a question. I understand the reasoning behind "aging" the meat uncovered in the fridge for a couple of days, but I'm concerned it will take on flavors from whatever else is in there. Has that been a problem for you, or are my concerns unfounded?


They can be lightly covered in press and seal. You'll be good. Go cook! :P
Oh, and lightly olive-oiling them and a little salt and pepper go a long way!
Happy New Year!
 
2012-12-29 08:12:41 AM
Six minute?

Subby must be on metric time.

Anyway, yeah.  A room-temp steak and few minutes a side in a rockin' hot cast iron pan, followed by a little alone time in a 375-degree-ish oven works.  Take it out, give it a time out in a safe place to think about what it's done, then eat.  Aging helps a little, but let's face it, it's not easy letting a steak just sit there in your fridge, undressed, alone, needing a little love from just the right guy...  It wants it as much as you.
 
2012-12-29 08:59:34 AM

Notabunny: Spiralmonkey: I cook steaks like this and always get asked for the method (learned it from one of Heston Blumenthal's TV shows). I think I'll trust the technique of someone who has 3 Michelin stars and owns a restaurant which is consistently rated in the top 3 in the world over subby's backyard grill.

I have a question. I understand the reasoning behind "aging" the meat uncovered in the fridge for a couple of days, but I'm concerned it will take on flavors from whatever else is in there. Has that been a problem for you, or are my concerns unfounded?


I don't normally age steak in the fridge - the butcher I use ages beef for 30 days so nothing further is necessary. I would think Spad31 is right though, but if in doubt you could always make sure anything else in the fridge is sealed in tupperware or something so there's no crossover.
 
2012-12-29 08:59:40 AM
I am so going to try this very soon.

Definitely going to combine it with this cooking tip (it really works pretty well) - How to Caramelize Onions in 10 Minutes (review)
(youtube)

Original post - How to Caramelize Onions in 10 Minutes or Less - A Rebuttal
(stellaculinary.com)
 
2012-12-29 08:59:49 AM
Mheh. Walk it through a warm room.
 
2012-12-29 09:05:21 AM

PreMortem: Mheh. Walk it through a warm room.


Overdone.
 
2012-12-29 09:08:35 AM
It's hard to tak him seriously when he reccomends puncturing the steak with a thermometer to see if it is done.
 
2012-12-29 09:25:01 AM

z_gringo: It's hard to tak him seriously when he reccomends puncturing the steak with a thermometer to see if it is done.


If you need a thermometer to tell you your steak is done well ...well,   you're done.
 
2012-12-29 09:26:59 AM

PreMortem: Mheh. Walk it through a warm room.


wave a lighter underneath, yell "FIRE!", flip, and repeat.

Bathia_Mapes: Not only looks good and tasty to me, but I've seen Alton Brown and Gordon Ramsay use similar techniques.


was going to come here myself to mention AB doing it.
 
2012-12-29 09:42:14 AM
I've been doing my steaks on a cast iron over a mesquite fire in my Weber as of late. Get that sucker hotter n hell, salt, pepper and 4 minutes a side (2" cuts) covered. I get a touch of the wood flavor and a great sear.
 
2012-12-29 10:42:49 AM

SilentStrider: Bathia_Mapes: Not only looks good and tasty to me, but I've seen Alton Brown and Gordon Ramsay use similar techniques.

was going to come here myself to mention AB doing it.


I did the Alton Brown method from the first episode of Good Eats last week:

 * Oven at 500F, leave cast iron pan in until thoroughly hot
 * Season steak (ribeyes, for me) generously with salt and pepper and a light oil rub (I used canola oil)
 * Transfer pan to burner at high heat
 * Cook steak 30 seconds on each side
 * Transfer pan to 500F oven for another 2 minutes on each sideLet steaks rest for 3+ minutes

When these instructions were done, the steaks were still too rare.  I put them back in the oven for another 2 and a half minutes on each side, and they were still closer to rare than medium rare.  We were cooking three steaks in the pan and using a crummy electric stove top, so I'm not surprised it took us longer.  They were delicious though.  All said and done, I would double all of the cooking times next time.
 
2012-12-29 10:48:03 AM
Wait... you cook your steaks, now?

I just gnaw the flesh right off the cow's bones.

...

Saves time.
 
2012-12-29 11:00:58 AM
I used this method on some half decent filets on Christmas eve and it worked just fine.  Smoking hot cast iron pan, a little grapeseed oil, constant turning, and a short finish in a 400 degree oven, seasoned with sea salt and pepper after.  They were very, very good even for just choice supermarket filets.

I bought two dry aged prime rib eyes yesterday on my first trip to a Wegman's.  Going to do them the same way tonight.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-12-29 11:09:16 AM
It's difficult to make a pan sauce on a grill.
 
2012-12-29 11:12:27 AM

z_gringo: It's hard to tak him seriously when he reccomends puncturing the steak with a thermometer to see if it is done.


Nonsense. You lose a minuscule and completely unnoticeable amount of juice by piercing it. If you puncture it hundreds of times people will notice that it has become hamburger, but a couple holes is fine.
 
2012-12-29 11:13:39 AM
Cast iron rules in winter, but the perfect steak requires smoke and fire.
 
2012-12-29 11:43:35 AM

Bathia_Mapes: Not only looks good and tasty to me, but I've seen Alton Brown and Gordon Ramsay use similar techniques.


I followed Ramsay's directions, and they were the best steaks I've ever cooked.
 
2012-12-29 11:56:23 AM
I tried the cast iron thing. Three microwaves later I'm back to Chinet.
 
2012-12-29 12:37:28 PM
I have a cast-iron skillet that has raised ribs that i only use for grilling steaks. It's pretty baller.
 
2012-12-29 12:38:23 PM
I've found (and Kenji at Food Labs agrees) that salting the steak well before cooking instead of just before gives better results. Other than that and using less oil because my cast iron is awesome, that's how I cook my steaks.
 
2012-12-29 12:38:31 PM
This really is the best way to cook a steak. I've been doing it this way for years and prefer this way over every other method. Not everything has to be grilled.
 
2012-12-29 12:38:41 PM
Sous Vide cook for 24 hours, finish exterior on hot pan.
 
2012-12-29 12:42:20 PM
How can you have any pudding if you don't eat rest your meat??!
 
2012-12-29 12:50:40 PM

Manfred J. Hattan: I've found (and Kenji at Food Labs agrees) that salting the steak well before cooking instead of just before gives better results. Other than that and using less oil because my cast iron is awesome, that's how I cook my steaks.


Kenji is awesome, and everyone here should read it. Remember: Kenji actually will do blind taste tests to figure out if a particular technique is worth doing.

/Science. It works biatches.
 
2012-12-29 01:04:50 PM
Holy Maillard, Batman! Are people still surprised that you can sear meat in a fry pan?

I wish my Mom knew this when I was a child. In cold months she would prepare meat (steaks, hamburger, etc.) using the broiler in the oven and the meat would have no browning and be gray most of the way through. Maybe she did this just to make my Dad look good when he would fire up the charcoal in the warm months.
 
2012-12-29 01:08:15 PM
I've never been a fan of steak on an oven, but that is probably due to never having a good one. I'll give this a try.

/not a good cook, but can do ok with the right receipe
 
2012-12-29 01:26:56 PM
I can remember which cooking show covered this, probably something with Alton Brown. Anyway, you sear it in a hot pan to lock in the juices and start the caramelization on the outside. Then you toss it in a hot oven (500 deg. is usually quoted, but hotter is better). At those temps, it doesn't take very long to cook. Minutes, usually.

For reference, this is typically how steaks are cooked in quality steak houses. Only, they tend to use a salamander instead of an oven.
 
2012-12-29 01:27:36 PM
I guess I am going to be having steak for supper. In a frying pan.
 
2012-12-29 01:30:52 PM
Steak porn

I think I'm gonna try this next week.
 
2012-12-29 01:39:00 PM
Yup, cast iron is the way to go. Did a couple of the best bacon wrapped filets I've ever had last night this way.  I used to be all about the grill until I tried the cast iron method using the oven and stove top. Now the grill is reserved for burgers, brats, and wieners.
 
2012-12-29 01:46:20 PM

dickfreckle: Heat iron skillet as hot as you can. Briefly sear your steak on stove top. Put skillet in oven until desired temp is reached. Still not quite as good as a legit grill, but definitely edible. Great for apartment dwellers or people who don't want to freeze while grilling in January.

 Just remember your oven mitts. Ask me how I know this...


the same way I had "All Clad" on my palm for 2 weeks?
 
2012-12-29 01:50:22 PM

Honest Bender: I can remember which cooking show covered this, probably something with Alton Brown. Anyway, you sear it in a hot pan to lock in the juices and start the caramelization on the outside. Then you toss it in a hot oven (500 deg. is usually quoted, but hotter is better). At those temps, it doesn't take very long to cook. Minutes, usually.

For reference, this is typically how steaks are cooked in quality steak houses. Only, they tend to use a salamander instead of an oven.


You are certainly pretentious in your know-it-all ignorance.

1. Searing meat does not "lock in the juices".
2. Restaurants finish steaks in an medium oven, not under a high temperature salamander.
 
2012-12-29 01:58:34 PM

HairBolus: You are certainly pretentious in your know-it-all ignorance.


I promise, I'm not the one who pissed in your cheerios this morning...

1. Searing meat does not "lock in the juices".

If you say so, boss. Do you have anything to back that up? Because I've heard many a television cook say that it does. I myself am not a chef of any type so I'll leave it up to you to educate the classroom.

2. Restaurants finish steaks in an medium oven, not under a high temperature salamander.

Tomato tomahto. I think everyone else knew what I was saying. I didn't think I really needed to get into a detailed step-by-step guide.

/Go take a shower. Maybe you can pull that stick out of your ass while you're washing the sand out of your vagina.
 
2012-12-29 02:18:21 PM

Honest Bender: HairBolus: You are certainly pretentious in your know-it-all ignorance.

I promise, I'm not the one who pissed in your cheerios this morning...

1. Searing meat does not "lock in the juices".

If you say so, boss. Do you have anything to back that up? Because I've heard many a television cook say that it does.


They're wrong. Every decent food chemist from Harold McGee to Nathan Myhrvold agrees that searing actually pulls slightly (but just slightly) more juices out than if a steak is not seared.
 
2012-12-29 02:18:57 PM
Cooked a thick rib-eye like this last night. Season with Johnny's salt, sear 5 minutes on each side in a cast iron skillet on medium high, finish in skillet in 350-degree oven for five minutes. Let steak rest on a plate for 5 minutes. Juicy and oh so yummy.
 
2012-12-29 02:19:44 PM
Searing does not lock in any juices.   In fact, you can sear at any point in the cook.  I usually cook my steak indirect for 5-8 minutes and do the sear at the end.   The whole point of a good sear is to produce the Maillard reaction on the meat and provide that tasty, tasty flavor.   Good Eats actually did an experiment proving that searing result in a greater net moisture loss than not searing.

Also, in high end steak houses, they typically cook the steak Sous Vide all day and then finish in the salamander at about 1200 when the steak is ordered., they never touch an oven.

/not trying to argue with anyone, just educate

www.biggreenegg.com

The only way I do steaks now.   Reverse T-Rex method with jack daniels chips ftw
 
2012-12-29 02:24:41 PM

shadownick: Searing does not lock in any juices.   In fact, you can sear at any point in the cook.  I usually cook my steak indirect for 5-8 minutes and do the sear at the end.   The whole point of a good sear is to produce the Maillard reaction on the meat and provide that tasty, tasty flavor.   Good Eats actually did an experiment proving that searing result in a greater net moisture loss than not searing.

Also, in high end steak houses, they typically cook the steak Sous Vide all day and then finish in the salamander at about 1200 when the steak is ordered., they never touch an oven.

/not trying to argue with anyone, just educate

[www.biggreenegg.com image 300x360]

The only way I do steaks now.   Reverse T-Rex method with jack daniels chips ftw


Also, Jaccarding the steak is key
 
2012-12-29 02:35:42 PM

Manfred J. Hattan: They're wrong. Every decent food chemist from Harold McGee to Nathan Myhrvold agrees that searing actually pulls slightly (but just slightly) more juices out than if a steak is not seared.


shadownick: /not trying to argue with anyone, just educate


Thank you both for your calm and educational comments. I think we can all agree that calm and reasonable discourse is preferable to shiatting the bed like whatshisname did up thread.
 
2012-12-29 02:35:43 PM
Subby, go back to sticking your meat over the fire that Ooog made. Either that or evolve.
 
2012-12-29 02:39:39 PM
t2.gstatic.com

Taught me how to make a pan seared steak that will have your mom, and your dogs drooling.
He laid down the science on that shiat.
 
2012-12-29 02:46:26 PM
Maxim - I think - ran an article 6-7 years ago on to make the perfect steak.

Needed: a filet, and IRON pan, kosher salt and pepper and olive oil.

Heat the pan to smoking hot
Add olive oil
Take filet, sprinkle BOTH sides with a fair amount of kosher salt and some pepper.
Put in pan and wait 4 minutes.
Flip and wait 2 minutes.
Remove from pan, let rest about 4-5 minutes
ENJOY!

This method really impresses women for some unknown reason.
 
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