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(Comic Book Legal Defense Fund)   Doodling in your notebook at school? That's an arrestin', searchin', and chargin' with bomb makin'   (cbldf.org) divider line 26
    More: Asinine, New Jersey, IDW Publishing, Neverland, Galloway Township  
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9630 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Dec 2012 at 9:00 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-12-29 09:52:09 AM
4 votes:

iq_in_binary: Yeah, we're worried about another Columbine or Sandy Hook, so let's do our best to prevent it by treating kids in a way that'll make them the kind of people that would pull another Columbine or Sandy Hook.

Fark off morons.


This is the shiat I've been banging my head against the wall over ever since Columbine. Asshat school administrators target kids that they perceive to be troubled, and then put them through a stigmatizing and traumatizing ordeal guaranteeing that if these students weren't disgruntled before, they sure as.shiat are now.

And they sweep it all under the rug to protect their own asses, which is exactly what is going to happen this time around. I'd love to see, for once, these assholes get their feet held to the fire and go through the same ordeal they put the kids through, but considering that the Supreme Court ruled that a school had their right to strip search a girl without any probable cause tells me they will continue to get away with their fascist behavior.
2012-12-29 09:35:50 AM
3 votes:
They did this after Columbine too. One girl I knew of wrote stories that didn't consist of teddy bears and rainbow farts and she had red hair. They almost expelled her.

Asshole school admins just use the current climate to fark with students they don't like.
2012-12-29 09:03:24 AM
3 votes:
How do you quivering shiats roll out of bed in the morning?
2012-12-29 09:02:52 AM
3 votes:
This story continues to enrage me. What have we become?
2012-12-29 12:41:39 PM
2 votes:

SubBass49: I'd do the same. I'm not putting my career and livelihood (as well as that of my family) on the line to take a moral stand on whether a kid should draw guns in their notebook. I don't get paid enough for that shiat. Pass it along to an administrator, just like district procedure says, and let them handle it.


The toughest part about this approach is that I'm not sure there's a way to approach it with the kid without putting them on red alert status.

Example: Teacher does a notebook check (our teachers did this, presumably to make sure we were taking classroom notes as expected) and sees some sort of futuristic-looking laser battle diagrammed in the margin. To an extent, the teacher knows the student's tendencies better than an administrator may, and can make a snap judgment as to whether this is the work of a destructive mind with dangerous possibilities, or a creative mind that's just seen "Star Wars" too many times. Of course, we're really concerned about the kid who seems like the second type but is about to snap violently like we'd imagine the first type would. And you're right, it probably shouldn't be on the shoulders of the teacher's career and conscience to make that call.

But how can the administration react such that the kid isn't branded a threat, regardless of the outcome?

As a student, you know that administration never calls you down to the office just to say hello. It doesn't matter if they summon you over the PA system, or if they quietly pull you out of homeroom; if the guidance department or principal are looking for you, there's something up. Everyone else knows it, too. If you're one of the miscreants, you probably don't care, because it gives you that suggestion of street cred. If you're one of the "good" kids, the stigma is that much worse. People talk, rumors spread, and suddenly you're the good kid who must have done something wrong. And that's assuming that you get to the office, explain your case, and the principals, guidance counselors and resource officer or whoever else is in on the meeting decides that you're no threat. If they feel it warrants follow-up, well, it's more of the above, more rumors, more stress, a questionable reputation. As adults, we can brush this off as teen drama. But when you're a teen living through it, all that stuff actually matters, because you don't have the worldly perspective to know otherwise.

At the best case, you identify a kid who's a threat, to himself or to others, and you act accordingly before the threat gets out of hand. At the worst case...well, a kid is momentarily inconvenienced to ensure they're not a threat. But in the kid's eyes, the inconvenience doesn't end when he walks back to class. I'm not saying that a top-ten student who gets interrogated by a concerned principal is going to become a serial killer. But it might stifle one's creativity, or adversely impact their social standing. Again, small potatoes to us, but that stuff can be earth-shaking for a teen, and over time, it could manifest into something greater.

I'm not saying we can't and shouldn't look deeper into these sorts of warning signs. But we need to recognize that the responses that seem to benefit the greater good often have some kind of less-than-desirable collateral damage. Committing every student who draws a gun in their notes is no more palatable a solution than ignoring all of them. But how do we approach the kids who have yet to fall on the threat radar without risking flagging them as a threat?

Thank God I'm not an administrator.
2012-12-29 09:52:24 AM
2 votes:
He didn't get tasered or shot so their response did show some restraint.
2012-12-29 09:15:48 AM
2 votes:
Be afraid. It's your duty as a patriot.
2012-12-29 09:05:44 AM
2 votes:
"The details on what was precisely in the drawings are sketchy"

Well, yeah. That's kinda how you do it.
2012-12-29 09:05:13 AM
2 votes:
I heard about a similar story where a kid in Galloway Township was arrested for doodling in his notebook and police found chemicals that "if mixed together, could explode". Must be a lot of this going around.
2012-12-29 09:09:43 PM
1 votes:
I'm going to tell you one way to stop this.

Starve the Beast.

As long as the government can borrow and print money to pay for this bullshiat, they will do more of it. Don't like the TSA and Homeland security? Cut off their money.
2012-12-29 01:12:46 PM
1 votes:

SubBass49: iq_in_binary: Story of my life. Columbine was 7th grade for me. White, Single, Intelligent (I was in a GT program). Played video games. I swear to god they looked for whatever they could to suspend me and have expulsion hearings. My friends, too.

Half of them ended up dangling from hemp.

And people wonder why I spent my early twenties a Randroid.

Was your school administration that bored? I know lots of people that fit your description who went about their daily lives with no problem after Columbine. Me thinks you may be leaving some things out of this story...just sayin'


No, they just plain wanted me and everybody like me gone, anybody who was in the Harris and Klebold folder (White, Intelligent, Single, plays video games).

They suspended me for writing an article for the farking school newspaper for christ sakes. Now, some were legitimate (1 fight, I don't think anything written in dry erase ink qualifies as "defacement" but wtf ever), but most of them were either for completely bullshiat reasons or for things I wasn't even involved in. One kid was passing out a floppy with a bunch of text files on it, one of them was the Anarchist Cookbook, the rest were phreaking mags and stuff you see any nerdy kid with a computer messing around with. I got suspended and had an expulsion hearing for having taken one of the floppies. I mean for farks sake it was Colorado's highest scored gifted and talented program, of course we're going to have stuff like that. Most of us were fluent in 3 languages at 13 and had IQs above 132 (the minimum IQ you had to have to get into the school).

Want to see an interesting trend? Look at the teen suicide rates in CO after Columbine. It was atrocious.
2012-12-29 12:28:46 PM
1 votes:
... and these are the kind of jackbooted thug bureaucrats you want to ditch the 2nd Amendment in favor of?
2012-12-29 11:17:37 AM
1 votes:
At no point in time did the boy threaten the school, school officials, or his classmates. He cooperated fully with authorities, and a search of the school itself found nothing dangerous. The boy's mother describes him as a good boy and frequent volunteer with a passion for disassembling old things and reassembling them. School district superintendent Steve Ciccariello stated that he would not expect violent behavior from the student. Further, Galloway Township Police Chief Pat Moran recognized that "There was no indication he was making a bomb, or using a bomb or detonating a bomb." Despite all this, the boy was arrested - all because he doodled in his notebook.

AT NO POINT DID HE THREATEN THE SCHOOL

RELEASE HIM
2012-12-29 11:10:31 AM
1 votes:

Silly Jesus: There's a difference between "OMG police are horrible and just out to get you and under no circumstances talk to them even when it is legitimately beneficial (to you or others) to do so" and "don't readily admit to your crime."


It's never "legitimately beneficial" to talk to the cops without a lawyer.

Watch the video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wXkI4t7nuc

Pay special attention to the parts where he shows that even an innocent person can get in trouble if they do so.

img831.imageshack.us
2012-12-29 11:01:26 AM
1 votes:
Bomb making chemicals = Diet Coke and Mentos.

I also think some people need to read "1984" and learn about thought crimes.
gja [TotalFark]
2012-12-29 10:46:02 AM
1 votes:
Not-so-much CSB as true/odd:
Back in high-school our teacher was doing a bit of paperwork and over heard us arguing about a chemistry problem.
We were collectively discussing the right and proper way to make fulminate of mercury.
He came over and grabbed the papers we were working on and his face got really red and he was PISSED.
His voice was very stern when he said "What the hell is wrong with you kids?" "..do you not pay attention in class at ALL?"
"This process if both fuming and exothermic, but none of you have mentioned the use of a ventilation hood, or a cooling method to leech off the excess heat rendered."
He threw the notes back on the desk and said "That just became a quiz for you 5 turkeys, better be right before end of class tomorrow"


I wonder what jail we would have all gone to for that now? And for how long?

/and yet none of us have ever blown up anyone/anything other than some junk at a landfill, nor ever shot/shot at, a person or animal
2012-12-29 10:35:01 AM
1 votes:

beefoe: I heard about a similar story where a kid in Galloway Township was arrested for doodling in his notebook and police found chemicals that "if mixed together, could explode". Must be a lot of this going around.


Yeah, I thought this was a repeat. This is a different incident?

My daughter drew a picture last night of a space princess with a cool ray gun blasting aliens which were glowing skeletons. It was a good pic, and it bugged me that as her mom instead of just praising her artwork and creativity I had to spend time telling her to never ever ever ever draw anything like it at school, or bring it or anything like it into school to show her friends.
2012-12-29 10:23:57 AM
1 votes:
I was a compulsive notebook-margin doodler. As someone who enjoyed sci-fi and action flicks, some of those doodles were not always G-rated sunshine and rainbows. Hell, in junior year of high school we were asked to write a short story for a graded assignment. I turned in a rewrite of something I'd written a couple years prior, a murder-mystery whodunit that was part "X-Files," part something that would probably become CSI in later years, and my teacher loved it. I know I wasn't the only fertile mind in those days; for that matter, my writing was inspired when I read some fiction by a friend (who would become part of the so-called Trenchcoat Mafia) and was sure I could write better than he could. Now, I read news stories like this one, and I have to wonder what the repercussions would be for any of us in today's school environment.

Of course, my fictional story was written a few months before Columbine. Flash forward to our senior year of high school, when my best friend and I arrived at the annual "senior breakfast" at a local restaurant/event center. It was raining, so my friend wore a long green raincoat into the building. As he entered, he could hear murmurs between the administrators at the door, asking each other "is that a trenchcoat?" They were also perturbed by the fact he wasn't wearing a tie, but eventually one of the admins insisted that he had to get rid of the raincoat...so he brought it back to his car, got his tie, and walked back sans raincoat, in the rain. Yup, makes perfect sense. The best part is that my friend and I had a reputation - as did our circle of friends - of being straitlaced, well-dressed, well-mannered top-ten students. So it wasn't like we were just screwing with authority.

It's all just a part of the burning need for administrators to "do something" to show they're "in charge" of the situation. It doesn't matter if the effort is meaningful or fruitful as long as it's effort. And as was hinted at above, sometimes the cure is worse than the disease, usually when you're trying to cure someone who isn't sick in the first place.
2012-12-29 10:13:48 AM
1 votes:

jaybeezey: And the conversion of America to the Land of Chickenshiats has begun.


"Begun"?

i560.photobucket.com

Zeb Hesselgresser: Begun? Closer to finished.


Exactly.
2012-12-29 09:58:50 AM
1 votes:
imageshack.us
2012-12-29 09:29:59 AM
1 votes:
Yeah, we're worried about another Columbine or Sandy Hook, so let's do our best to prevent it by treating kids in a way that'll make them the kind of people that would pull another Columbine or Sandy Hook.

Fark off morons.
2012-12-29 09:25:57 AM
1 votes:

Zeb Hesselgresser: Popcorn Johnny: We don't have any details, but lets not let that stop us from assuming that the kid is innocent and the officials are morons.

It's the Fark way.

Galloway Township Police Chief Pat Moran "There was no indication he was making a bomb, or using a bomb or detonating a bomb." Despite all this, the boy was arrested


Every person who had a hand in having him arrested given that should be fired with absolutely no benefits.
2012-12-29 09:21:40 AM
1 votes:

Popcorn Johnny: We don't have any details, but lets not let that stop us from assuming that the kid is innocent and the officials are morons.

It's the Fark way.



It's also a safe bet.
2012-12-29 09:19:15 AM
1 votes:

Amos Quito: beefoe: I heard about a similar story where a kid in Galloway Township was arrested for doodling in his notebook and police found chemicals that "if mixed together, could explode". Must be a lot of this going around.


Okay, now I'm worried.

Would someone please post a comprehensive list of all "chemicals" that might potentially explode or otherwise be "dangerous" in some way either alone or mixed with other "chemicals"?

God only knows how many household cleaners I have that could potentially land me in the pokey.


Do you have a bottle of ammonia and a bottle of bleach in your house?  You obviously want to make a chlorine gas bomb, terrorist.
2012-12-29 09:10:03 AM
1 votes:
We don't have any details, but lets not let that stop us from assuming that the kid is innocent and the officials are morons.

It's the Fark way.
2012-12-29 09:04:06 AM
1 votes:
And the conversion of America to the Land of Chickenshiats has begun.

Anyone got the new Newspeake Dictionary?
 
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