Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Mail)   China now forcing EVERY internet user to register their real name in new free speech crackdown   (dailymail.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Obvious, official corruption, ruling party, official misconduct, chemical plants, Runaways, Xinhua News Agency, rule following, VPN  
•       •       •

4320 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Dec 2012 at 6:05 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



152 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-12-28 07:47:08 PM  
I don't think that word means what you think it means...
 
2012-12-28 07:47:56 PM  
images.wikia.com
doh...
 
2012-12-28 07:52:00 PM  
Yeah gee, it used to be such a free-thinkers paradise there.
 
2012-12-28 08:36:31 PM  
Good.  I'm sick of trolls who hide behind fictitious personalities and spew garbage.  I can say this, since I am the head of a multi-billion dollar corporation and you are all poor and smelly liberals.  Lol.  Get stenched, nerds.
 
2012-12-28 08:51:07 PM  
Didn't the GOP suggest the same thing for Americans?
 
2012-12-28 09:21:16 PM  

JerkyMeat: Didn't the GOP suggest the same thing for Americans?


Suggest? That's what the Mission Accomplished sign actually meant. It was an inside joke.
 
2012-12-28 09:32:55 PM  
Good luck.  My real name IS sexygrrl69
 
2012-12-28 10:03:55 PM  

Chariset: Good luck.  My real name IS sexygrrl69


Wanna cuddle?  There's a basketball thread at the top of the Sports Tab right now.  No one will see us there.
 
2012-12-28 10:14:09 PM  

some_beer_drinker: I don't think that word means what you think it means...


Which word?
 
2012-12-28 10:16:30 PM  

fusillade762: some_beer_drinker: I don't think that word means what you think it means...

Which word?


the free speech part
 
2012-12-28 11:25:11 PM  

Mike_LowELL: Good.  I'm sick of trolls who hide behind fictitious personalities and spew garbage.  I can say this, since I am the head of a multi-billion dollar corporation and you are all poor and smelly liberals.  Lol.  Get stenched, nerds.


You're probably trolling, but you do realize that this is being done so that it'll be easier for corrupt government officials to retaliate against people who expose their crimes don't you?
 
2012-12-28 11:46:37 PM  

some_beer_drinker: fusillade762: some_beer_drinker: I don't think that word means what you think it means...

Which word?

the free speech part


So being able to round up and arrest people who criticize the government on the internet isn't cracking down on free speech?
 
2012-12-28 11:46:47 PM  
FTFA:   Weibo users quickly reacted with fury to the changes.

They spend too much time with that Weibo anyway.
 
2012-12-28 11:46:55 PM  
I wonder if " Mr. Lee " was taken?
 
2012-12-28 11:58:36 PM  
<sppfchangs.jpg>

Funny because also in US speech is not anonymous to government, if someone cares enough to look, or anyone else with subpoena power.
 
2012-12-29 12:11:47 AM  
The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.
 
2012-12-29 12:18:16 AM  

serial_crusher: Isn't that basically how it works in America? You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.


You see. We warned you libtards that Obama was a communist.
 
2012-12-29 12:24:59 AM  
looks like subby doesn't understand what a free speech crackdown is.
 
2012-12-29 12:29:38 AM  

Makh: FTFA:   Weibo users quickly reacted with fury to the changes.

They spend too much time with that Weibo anyway.


img526.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-29 12:55:58 AM  

serial_crusher: The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.


They can always use a Virtual Private Netwok.
 
2012-12-29 01:27:27 AM  
How Orwellian of them.
 
2012-12-29 01:45:20 AM  

fusillade762: So being able to round up and arrest people who criticize the government on the internet isn't cracking down on free speech?


You have to have free speech before you can have a crackdown on free speech.
 
2012-12-29 01:49:23 AM  
A few million people on Weibo and Baidu will probably register as Jia Jun Peng (贾君鹏), who has a mother that wants them to come home for dinner.

/obscure Chinese internet meme
//the River Crabs won't get the joke
 
2012-12-29 02:14:54 AM  
i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.
 
2012-12-29 03:00:23 AM  

Weaver95: i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.


They already is.
 
2012-12-29 03:05:10 AM  

Weaver95: i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.


The Party of Limited Governmental OversightTM? No.
 
2012-12-29 03:09:00 AM  

doglover: Weaver95: i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.

They already is.


Except it's President Obama

House Republicans urge Obama not to issue cybersecurity order
 
2012-12-29 04:08:52 AM  
we need to arm them with teachers
 
2012-12-29 04:56:20 AM  

Paris1127: A few million people on Weibo and Baidu will probably register as Jia Jun Peng (贾君鹏), who has a mother that wants them to come home for dinner.

/obscure Chinese internet meme
//the River Crabs won't get the joke


I had to look that up. I thought "River Crab" might have been funny slang for something, but it's sad slang for the fact that the word for censorship is censored.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_crab_(Internet_slang)

 What is it about Communist (at least in name) governments that they're so farking insecure about keeping their people in line? The simplification of their language by editing the characters down was like "newspeak" in 1984.
 
2012-12-29 05:21:30 AM  
MadSkillz: Paris1127: A few million people on Weibo and Baidu will probably register as Jia Jun Peng (贾君鹏), who has a mother that wants them to come home for dinner.

/obscure Chinese internet meme
//the River Crabs won't get the joke

I had to look that up. I thought "River Crab" might have been funny slang for something, but it's sad slang for the fact that the word for censorship is censored.


The censorship is pervasive, but Chinese internet users are some of the most advanced because of it: ever heard of the human flesh search engine? And satire is not impossible, because, at least phonetically, due to the different tones used, Chinese can be a good language for wordplay. So "Cao Ni Ma" using the pronunciation "Cǎo Ní Mǎ" is "Grass Mud Horse," but using the pronunciation  "Cào nǐ mā" is "fark your mother."
 
2012-12-29 06:09:12 AM  
What's the Chinese equivalent of Weedlord Bonerhitler?

Or maybe Gene Masseth
 
2012-12-29 06:10:42 AM  
I am Sparticus.
 
2012-12-29 06:14:14 AM  
Isn't the Brits doing the same thing?
 
2012-12-29 06:14:15 AM  
I'm typing this from a small work factory dorm. I made 4360 iPhones today and feel suicidal.
Taking away my internet privileges like trolling or making disparaging remarks about the government will not make me any happier.
I hear we'll be making another version of the iPad soon. YipeeYay. I'm so privileged.

: (

But anyway, how about them Muslim rapists in India?! Religion of Peace, hahaha!
 
2012-12-29 06:17:02 AM  
We need to arm these people.

img.thesun.co.uk
 
2012-12-29 06:17:40 AM  
In what sense is this surprising, unexpected or inconsistent?

Enjoy your products. The blood wipes away with a little Mr. Clean.
 
2012-12-29 06:17:48 AM  
why are fark liberals so ignorant that they say Republicans are pushing for this in america when it's their own messiah doing it?

Fark liberals are the most ignorant farkers on the internet
 
2012-12-29 06:21:30 AM  
So, if a Chinese registry of internet users is a precursor to a crack down on free speech, what is a Fienstien gun ban that requires owners of legally purchased and owned weapons to register them?
 
2012-12-29 06:23:04 AM  
Oh those silly, authoritarian Chinese!

Randi Zuckerberg, Facebook:

"I think anonymity on the Internet has to go away," she said during a panel discussion on social media hosted Tuesday evening by Marie Claire magazine. "People behave a lot better when they have their real names down. ... I think people hide behind anonymity and they feel like they can say whatever they want behind closed doors."

Eric Schmidt, Google:

Speaking on a panel at the event, Schmidt argued that anonymity on the Internet is dangerous. "In a world of asynchronous threats, it is too dangerous for there not to be some way to identify you," he said.

Schmidt took the stance that governments may eventually put an end to anonymity. "We need a [verified] name service for people," he said. "Governments will demand it."

Farkers love and hate the Chinese, as they love and hate themselves.
 
2012-12-29 06:27:03 AM  

MadSkillz: What is it about Communist (at least in name) governments that they're so farking insecure about keeping their people in line? The simplification of their language by editing the characters down was like "newspeak" in 1984.


Simple. Their legitimacy, as a government, is that the people are happy, and things are improving.

So, the people are happy, and things are improving.

No matter what.

Anger tends to lead to riots here in China, too.
 
2012-12-29 06:27:37 AM  
China is and always will be a shiathole until they fix this infatuation with controlling the internet.
 
2012-12-29 06:32:57 AM  
The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.
What scares me is people like Feinstein and company take notes from them because these things sound like good ideas in their warped little minds.

/mark my words, registration is coming this way too.
/its gonna be part of some "save the children" act that sneaks through before a holiday.
 
2012-12-29 06:34:23 AM  

JerkyMeat: Didn't the GOP suggest the same thing for Americans?


this.

and enjoy your "internet freedom" while it lasts kiddies.
it's on it's way here too.

oh i see the post above...
 
2012-12-29 06:34:41 AM  

MadSkillz: What is it about Communist (at least in name) governments that they're so farking insecure about keeping their people in line? The simplification of their language by editing the characters down was like "newspeak" in 1984.


Actually, to put it another way: These types of governments manage their people.

Just like how your typical corporation has rules saying that you can't badmouth the boss and keep your job (your livelihood).
 
2012-12-29 06:35:15 AM  
Amazing! Korea just went the opposite way this year. You used to have to have a Korean ID number to access a number of web sites or make comments. They just eliminated that requirement about 6 months ago.
 
2012-12-29 06:36:18 AM  

tortilla burger: China Corrupt Governments is are and always will be a shiatholes until they fix this infatuation with controlling the internet populace via a police state.


ftfy
 
2012-12-29 06:39:34 AM  
Mike_LowELL: Good.  I'm sick of trolls who hide behind fictitious personalities and spew garbage.  I can say this, since I am the head of a multi-billion dollar corporation and you are all poor and smelly liberals.  Lol.  Get stenched, nerds.

How many years did you serve? If you aren't a green beret seal 9/11 victim and holocaust survivor and ww2 vet who fought and died so that aholes like you have the right to spew that kind of garbage then you should just shut the hell up and let those of us who earned it speak. Semper Fictus!
 
2012-12-29 06:39:43 AM  

doglover: Weaver95: i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.

They already is.


One of these days you're going to figure out that the people in power on the left, such as Obama, Pelosi, and the like are not the same as the rank and file liberal on the left.

And almost without exception, when the people in power on the left are left unchecked they will push through massive government control of everything because its "what's best" for "everyone" and by "everyone" they mean them and by "what's best" they mean control of the money.
 
2012-12-29 06:40:55 AM  
Left, Right, Democracy, Dictatorship, doesn't matter. Politicians are naturally paranoid in the same way dogs lick their balls.
 
2012-12-29 06:41:03 AM  
Haliburton Cummings: tortilla burger: China Corrupt Governments is are and always will be a shiatholes until they fix this infatuation with controlling the internet populace via a police state.

ftfy

you must be the gothiest goth in your whole clan. the wage slaves at cinnabon just don't understand.
 
2012-12-29 06:42:47 AM  
way south: The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.

was the holocaust ok too as long as that moustachiod fella kept it on his side of the pond?
 
2012-12-29 06:43:49 AM  

Lost_in_Korea: Amazing! Korea just went the opposite way this year. You used to have to have a Korean ID number to access a number of web sites or make comments. They just eliminated that requirement about 6 months ago.


Not if you're a kid Link
 
2012-12-29 06:43:54 AM  
In other news, Diane Feinstein will be introducing similar legislation when the Senate convenes again in January.
 
2012-12-29 06:47:10 AM  

Ed Finnerty: serial_crusher: The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.

They can always use a Virtual Private Netwok.


HAHAHAHAHAHA

you better hold on tighter to your "packet" there Turing.

VPN's don't circumvent programs like carnivore and that's almost an obsolete technology at this point.
encryption is (almost) useless too.

i don't have the link handy, but three weeks ago or so, a kid broke the best encryption method in less than 48 hours using a hotrodded server.

that encryption was supposedly unbreakable.

those that own the hose control the water from the well and they are compliant to corporations and the police state...in Gunmerica, England, Canada etc etc...

you go hide behind your "ten proxy" VPN and threaten a president or something and see how long it takes to find you...

now shush
 
2012-12-29 06:47:53 AM  

serial_crusher: The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.


Pretty much, yeah. I guess the difference is that the ISPs don't have to give your info to the feds, but they usually do anyway.
 
2012-12-29 06:48:23 AM  
Didn't Blizzard try this already in the US for their forums and it was boycotted against hardcore?
 
2012-12-29 06:48:49 AM  

Bomb Head Mohammed: way south: The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.

was the holocaust ok too as long as that moustachiod fella kept it on his side of the pond?


godwin troll

10/10
 
2012-12-29 06:49:53 AM  
Don't worry, I hear anonymous will take care of this sort of thing.
 
2012-12-29 06:53:14 AM  

borg
Except it's President Obama
House Republicans urge Obama not to issue cybersecurity order

The White House is currently drafting an executive order that would encourage operators of critical infrastructure, such as banks and electric grids, to meet cybersecurity standards.
They said the president should support the Republicans' cybersecurity bill, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which would encourage companies to share information about cyber threats.


So telling public utilities and banks to tighten up security holes is bad, but cispa is good.


sendtodave ,
Randi Zuckerberg, Facebook:
"I think anonymity on the Internet has to go away," she said during a panel discussion on social media hosted Tuesday evening by Marie Claire magazine. "People behave a lot better when they have their real names down. ... I think people hide behind anonymity and they feel like they can say whatever they want behind closed doors."


Randi Zuckerberg would be the first to start eating babies if it was in fashion, and then point the fingers at others.
 
2012-12-29 06:58:55 AM  

Haliburton Cummings: Ed Finnerty: serial_crusher: The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.

They can always use a Virtual Private Netwok.

HAHAHAHAHAHA

you better hold on tighter to your "packet" there Turing.

VPN's don't circumvent programs like carnivore and that's almost an obsolete technology at this point.
encryption is (almost) useless too.

i don't have the link handy, but three weeks ago or so, a kid broke the best encryption method in less than 48 hours using a hotrodded server.

that encryption was supposedly unbreakable.

those that own the hose control the water from the well and they are compliant to corporations and the police state...in Gunmerica, England, Canada etc etc...

you go hide behind your "ten proxy" VPN and threaten a president or something and see how long it takes to find you...

now shush


You may want to read my post more carefully.
 
2012-12-29 06:58:56 AM  

Enemabag Jones: Randi Zuckerberg would be the first to start eating babies if it was in fashion, and then point the fingers at others.


If it were in fashion, how would she be the first?
 
2012-12-29 07:02:57 AM  

stirfrybry: why are fark liberals so ignorant that they say Republicans are pushing for this in america when it's their own messiah doing it?

Fark liberals are the most ignorant farkers on the internet


I've been saying that about the FarkLibtards for years.
 
2012-12-29 07:03:00 AM  

stirfrybry: why are fark liberals so ignorant that they say Republicans are pushing for this in america when it's their own messiah doing it?

Fark liberals are the most ignorant farkers on the internet


As opposed to booger-eating, drooling trolls like you?

No.
 
2012-12-29 07:05:24 AM  

Bomb Head Mohammed: Mike_LowELL: Good.  I'm sick of trolls who hide behind fictitious personalities and spew garbage.  I can say this, since I am the head of a multi-billion dollar corporation and you are all poor and smelly liberals.  Lol.  Get stenched, nerds.

How many years did you serve? If you aren't a green beret seal 9/11 victim and holocaust survivor and ww2 vet who fought and died so that aholes like you have the right to spew that kind of garbage then you should just shut the hell up and let those of us who earned it speak. Semper Fictus!


Shut up, Mooslum.
 
2012-12-29 07:08:52 AM  

Bomb Head Mohammed: way south: The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.

was the holocaust ok too as long as that moustachiod fella kept it on his side of the pond?


When compared to the atrocities of equal or greater value we passed up on stopping?
Some would (and did) say it was ok to ignore, but fortunately there were other reasons we got involved in that war.

/You might recall the German bombing of Pearl Harbor.
 
2012-12-29 07:09:02 AM  

Tumunga: stirfrybry: why are fark liberals so ignorant that they say Republicans are pushing for this in america when it's their own messiah doing it?

Fark liberals are the most ignorant farkers on the internet

I've been saying that about the FarkLibtards for years.


So, as a FarkIdiot, you think encouraging banks and power plants and so forth to be secure is bad, and you prefer the Republican CISPA plan, which is a far greater Federal intrusion into your privacy, because it was proposed by Republicans.

Got it.
 
2012-12-29 07:12:50 AM  
sendtodave
Enemabag Jones: Randi Zuckerberg would be the first to start eating babies if it was in fashion, and then point the fingers at others.
If it were in fashion, how would she be the first?


I am so glad you asked, senttodave, ignoring my clear use of confused logic, or at least a badly composed sentence.

Randi Zuckerberg has shilled for making online anonymity go away and then she chided a facebook friend for sharing a photograph with the public that Randi left open to her.

Link

Link

Remember how the word 'bush' and 'incompetent' were tied together in 2005-2008. I would like to see that same thing in with 'Randi Zuckerberg' and 'coont'.
 
2012-12-29 07:27:23 AM  

JerkyMeat: Didn't the GOP suggest the same thing for Americans?



.
You seem confused, so-called-progressives are not part of the Republican party.

"Equal time Rule" - First they tried to force private networks to air opinions they do not hold. Link

Then

"Employee Free Choice Act" - or "Card Check" where your free speech at the ballot box would be used to harass and intimidate you and your family. Link

And

Then all of the other examples cited above by others. You got to love how so-called-progressives Stalinists have such cute sounding names for their hideously dark intents.
 
2012-12-29 07:28:55 AM  
Don't they all have one of 10 last names?
 
2012-12-29 07:29:15 AM  
I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything. Requiring people to own what they say is not a restriction on freedom of speech.

China does not guarantee freedom of speech to their citizens, nor so far as I know they don't even make a pretense of it. If you're interested in the rights of the Chinese, this is the problem you should be complaining about.
 
2012-12-29 07:31:56 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: Isn't the Brits doing the same thing?


.
And both countries have awesome gun control. Coincidence?

sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2012-12-29 07:42:38 AM  
China is really complex. Legally Chinese citizens have freedom of speech, but the state will often prosecute speech they disagree with under arcane laws like "spreading rumors" or "subverting the state" or other laws that make it illegal to challenge the supreme role of the party.

What's even more scary is the extra-legal "reform through labor" program officials use to punish people outside legal channels, or the black jails used to detain people so they don't make complaints.

What's happening here is the new Politburo Standing Committee members are engaging in a new anti-corruption campaign to try and salvage the image of the Party that's taken a beating in the past decade. The amount of corruption in China is seriously staggering, at nearly all levels of society- even the little old lady who sells dumplings outside my apartment has to pay off the code enforcement officials to keep her business going, and I personally know two foreign teachers who had to leave my city because their boss couldn't afford the bribes to get their paperwork done.

So what's happening is that Chinese internet users have gotten really, really good at exposing corruption online, and officials who have millions in illegal income, secret mistresses, numerous apartments or luxury watches and clothing far outside their means are running scared that they'll get caught in up in the dragnet from the Party leadership.

The other half of it is the need for the new leaders to control the rhetoric and make a show of force to remind everyone they're in charge and to fall in line. This is a surprising development, especially since Xi Jinping is viewed cautiously as someone who might loosen up the country, but it's not entirely unexpected. These kinds of regulations don't really matter much, since the government can find you even if you're posting anonymously. The most critical comments posted online are taken down quickly anyway, and they'll find you if they really need to.

Although it's scary, VPN services seem to have stabilized pretty quickly. My feeling is that the government isn't totally serious about another free speech crackdown like this and things will go back to normal.
 
2012-12-29 07:47:12 AM  

way south: The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.
What scares me is people like Feinstein and company take notes from them because these things sound like good ideas in their warped little minds.

/mark my words, registration is coming this way too.
/its gonna be part of some "save the children" act that sneaks through before a holiday.


Umm... Patriot Act?

It's been stated pretty well on this thread already but ALL people with power will eventually become paranoid and want to take away people's rights.
 
2012-12-29 07:50:13 AM  
Article: Chinese doing bad reprehensible shiat

Fark comments section: OMG GOP LOL MESSIAH 0BAMAFONE LOL MUSLIN REPTILIAN JEWS
 
2012-12-29 07:57:10 AM  
But my real name is DoctorOfLove, and I do live on the dark side of the moon.
 
2012-12-29 07:59:15 AM  
randomjsa: And almost without exception, when the people in power on the left are left unchecked they will push through massive government control of everything because its "what's best" for "everyone" and by "everyone" they mean them and by "what's best" they mean control of the money.

derp derp derp.
 
2012-12-29 08:03:38 AM  
randomjsa,

Sometimes your comments are reasonable, sometimes they are just off the chart. Can you explain more?
 
2012-12-29 08:03:59 AM  

ShannonKW: I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything. Requiring people to own what they say is not a restriction on freedom of speech.

China does not guarantee freedom of speech to their citizens, nor so far as I know they don't even make a pretense of it. If you're interested in the rights of the Chinese, this is the problem you should be complaining about.


Indeed, in the entire history of what we call "the Chinese people", there has never been a high regard for any notion of freedom. Order tends to be the defining word in the culture much moreso than freedom.

So I'm not sure why anyone should be wringing their hands over this move by the PRC.
 
2012-12-29 08:04:37 AM  

ArkAngel: Mike_LowELL: Good.  I'm sick of trolls who hide behind fictitious personalities and spew garbage.  I can say this, since I am the head of a multi-billion dollar corporation and you are all poor and smelly liberals.  Lol.  Get stenched, nerds.

You're probably trolling, but you do realize that this is being done so that it'll be easier for corrupt government officials to retaliate against people who expose their crimes don't you?


It's Mike_LowELL, you will learn to love him.
 
2012-12-29 08:08:26 AM  
People think that we have anonymity on the Internet?
That's amusing.
 
2012-12-29 08:08:59 AM  

Nadnerbus: So, if a Chinese registry of internet users is a precursor to a crack down on free speech, what is a Fienstien gun ban that requires owners of legally purchased and owned weapons to register them?



What? How DARE you?

Guns are bad and Fienstien is good and you're a booger face!
 
2012-12-29 08:18:19 AM  

tortilla burger: China is and always will be a shiathole until they fix this infatuation with controlling the internet authoritarianism.



Coming soon to a theater near you, America.
 
2012-12-29 08:19:51 AM  
I'll be a lot of them will give the Wong name.
 
2012-12-29 08:20:05 AM  

Nadnerbus: So, if a Chinese registry of internet users is a precursor to a crack down on free speech, what is a Fienstien gun ban that requires owners of legally purchased and owned weapons to register them?


Wowsers.
It's too early for such deep thoughts.

/getting more coffee.
//no snark intended.
 
2012-12-29 08:24:04 AM  

MadSkillz: What is it about Communist (at least in name) governments that they're so farking insecure about keeping their people in line?


That kind of shiat has been going on in China since before the first Emperor. In China, at least, it's nothing to do with Communism. It's all about a well-ordered society with the government (of whatever type) securely on top.
 
2012-12-29 08:24:43 AM  
So this means the Chinese hackers will have to register before they steal all of our corporate secrets? ...
no wait we have all of our stuff made there so they already have all those important files.... The American corporate penis is so much larger they have nothing to fear....Stupid corporate farks
 
2012-12-29 08:25:55 AM  
Didn't some legislator in Kentucky try to pass a bill that would have made it illegal to post anonymously on the internet?
 
2012-12-29 08:28:14 AM  

ShannonKW: I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything.


Because if you knew my real name you would do what? Track me down and berate me for mocking you?
 
2012-12-29 08:30:44 AM  

0Icky0: ShannonKW: I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything.

Because if you knew my real name you would do what? Track me down and berate me for mocking you?


No, I mock you now.

/we mock what we don't understand

//obscure?
 
2012-12-29 08:31:51 AM  

way south: Bomb Head Mohammed: way south: The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.

was the holocaust ok too as long as that moustachiod fella kept it on his side of the pond?

When compared to the atrocities of equal or greater value we passed up on stopping?
Some would (and did) say it was ok to ignore, but fortunately there were other reasons we got involved in that war.

/You might recall the German bombing of Pearl Harbor.


No, no, NO!

You got it all bass-ackwards. It was a Nazi U-boat that torpedoed the Maine, in the Bay of Pigs.
 
2012-12-29 08:45:10 AM  

Lost_in_Korea: Amazing! Korea just went the opposite way this year. You used to have to have a Korean ID number to access a number of web sites or make comments. They just eliminated that requirement about 6 months ago.


They probably gave up when they realized all the ID numbers were registered to someone named Kim.
 
2012-12-29 08:45:38 AM  
Good!

The single greatest enemy of progress is questions.

Free speech is bad, M'kay.
 
2012-12-29 08:50:29 AM  
The people of China may not have free speech, but at least they don't have to worry about their government taking their guns away.
 
2012-12-29 08:57:50 AM  
About time the Government did something about this. They should cut down on those 8 hours away from the factory too, clearly they have too much personal time if they're badmouthing the government. Get back to work and be happy you have a job.... as many Americans are out of work, and can't afford things like multiple iPads and new sneakers.... while you rail against making $1.70/month.
 
2012-12-29 09:04:53 AM  
What's Chinese for "Weedlord Bonerhitler?"
 
2012-12-29 09:07:07 AM  

0Icky0: ShannonKW: I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything.

Because if you knew my real name you would do what? Track me down and berate me for mocking you?


Being able to positively identify Internet users has more practical merits than enabling a personal game of name calling. There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine, because anyone who let his inner adolescent guide him to post worthless, offensive shiate would find himself on the carpet answering for it, just as much as if he had said it in person.

It's worth noting that you do not have the right to buttonhole your department head in a corridor and call him a reeking, syphilitic twat. Or, to be tedious, you do have that right -- while he has the corresponding right to have security pitch your ass out on the sidewalk with the contents of your desk tossed out after you. It is because we will be held to account for the things we say that we are encouraged to be civil and truthful, and for many of us this is the only thing that keeps us from from turning our daily society into a sordid shiat-flinging match resembling the Politics tab.
 
2012-12-29 09:15:11 AM  
Ching Chong Bing Bong?
 
2012-12-29 09:31:57 AM  

hitlersbrain: way south: The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.
What scares me is people like Feinstein and company take notes from them because these things sound like good ideas in their warped little minds.

/mark my words, registration is coming this way too.
/its gonna be part of some "save the children" act that sneaks through before a holiday.

Umm... Patriot Act?

It's been stated pretty well on this thread already but ALL people with power will eventually become paranoid and want to take away people's rights.


A perfect example of what can go wrong.
Question is now to get those kinds of people out of power once they get too clingy about their office before they write these kinds of laws.
Because even when they are ejected by vote, they leave behind nasty little things like that.

SpeedyBB: way south: Bomb Head Mohammed: way south: The Chinese can do whatever the Chinese want so long as the crazy stays on their side of the line.

was the holocaust ok too as long as that moustachiod fella kept it on his side of the pond?

When compared to the atrocities of equal or greater value we passed up on stopping?
Some would (and did) say it was ok to ignore, but fortunately there were other reasons we got involved in that war.

/You might recall the German bombing of Pearl Harbor.

No, no, NO!

You got it all bass-ackwards. It was a Nazi U-boat that torpedoed the Maine, in the Bay of Pigs.


That was only in retaliation for John Wilkes Boothe shooting the Arch-duke in Dealy plaza.
 
2012-12-29 09:33:36 AM  

ShannonKW: There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine,


I can well imagine.
But what I can't imagine is how this has any relationship to the world-wide Internet.
 
2012-12-29 09:35:56 AM  
The measure will 'ensure internet information security, safeguard the lawful rights and interests of citizens, legal entities or other organizations and safeguard national security and social public interests,' according to the official Xinhua News Agency.


/um....yaaa...and i have some swampland for you to buy, cheap.
 
2012-12-29 09:44:50 AM  
It's going to be a great day when the Chinese realize that they are strong. Mind you it's going to also be farking TERRIFYING, but still, a great day.

/We live in interesting times
//whether this is good or not is debatable.
 
2012-12-29 09:47:20 AM  
but there is no free speech in china. sucks to be them. but if they dont like it, they can change it by just over throwing their government
or not using the internet
 
2012-12-29 09:50:58 AM  
Another small component of P. Fart O'bama's masterplan to take all my guns. Why can't you libs see it? Free speech in China? Tax rates in France? Rape-rape in India? These are distractions while his sinister plan to take all the guns goes into effect. He's sneaky. Steps 1 and 2? Sign bills that allow for more gun rights. Steps 3? Frequently insist you have no plans to create additional restrictions on firearms. Steps 4 - 11000? Government-staged gun violence.

WAKE UP SHEEPLE!!11,!
 
2012-12-29 09:54:07 AM  
So they're getting their ideas from youtube, now?
 
2012-12-29 09:55:45 AM  

namatad: but there is no free speech in china. sucks to be them. but if they dont like it, they can change it by just over throwing their government
or not using the internet



Armed with... chopsticks?
 
2012-12-29 10:00:18 AM  

Mike_LowELL: Good.  I'm sick of trolls who hide behind fictitious personalities and spew garbage.  I can say this, since I am the head of a multi-billion dollar corporation and you are all poor and smelly liberals.  Lol.  Get stenched, nerds.


10/10
 
2012-12-29 10:08:57 AM  
Welcome to Dubyas 'Murica.
 
2012-12-29 10:14:58 AM  

stirfrybry: why are fark liberals so ignorant that they say Republicans are pushing for this in america when it's their own messiah doing it?

Fark liberals are the most ignorant farkers on the internet


Tee-hee!
 
2012-12-29 10:17:28 AM  
More Chins than a Chinese Internet Registry.
 
2012-12-29 10:18:21 AM  
This will come to America. Just watch. The total fark left will embrace it in the name of safety. That is the real reason Obama and Hilary tried to blame the Middle East attacks on a Youtube video. Setting the stage to make it safer for us. Won't somebody think of the children?
 
2012-12-29 10:27:26 AM  
The funny part is the people thinking the government can't attach your name to your Internet activities here in the U.S.
 
2012-12-29 10:37:19 AM  
Lol some of you guys are taking Mike seriously.
 
2012-12-29 10:45:42 AM  

borg: doglover: Weaver95: i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.

They already is.

Except it's President Obama

House Republicans urge Obama not to issue cybersecurity order


Weaver and the others in the Czar_angelus/Linux_Yes crew will pretend you never said this. Just wait until the next thread.
 
2012-12-29 10:55:52 AM  

0Icky0: ShannonKW: There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine,

I can well imagine.
But what I can't imagine is how this has any relationship to the world-wide Internet.


Well, let me help you.

Knowing who you are dealing with would would regulate dealings on the Internet just as it always has in face-to-face encounters. Knowing whether or not your correspondent is a child, to give just one example, would greatly assist in judging how to respond to him.

On the receiving end, responsibility on the Internet would be diffuse, but significant. In the West at present no prudent employer hires a man without doing a Internet search for him. Were our Internet postings linked to our true identities, the all those Stormfront rantings against brown people and Jews would be wedded to our names, and soon civility would wash over the Internet like a perfumed breeze -- at least among people who who hope for respectable employment. The rest we could put on "ignore"

It shouldn't be that hard to think of other good effects that would come of knowing the identity of the people you deal with on the internet. Reputation is an ancient device for ordering the behavior of people, even in the absence of law, and it could be made to work for us on the Internet.
 
2012-12-29 11:03:58 AM  
You don't need to give people freedom, you just need to tell them they are free; and they'll believe it.

For example, the United States.
 
2012-12-29 11:06:21 AM  
I don't know how much it will matter. As Mira said in the movie:

cps-static.rovicorp.com

"Aren't there like a bilion John Lee's in China. Oh, right."
/okay, so it's a bit snarky
 
2012-12-29 11:17:21 AM  
Wait, that's not relevant. It's apparently too early.

But, I suppose it's too late to retract the statement with dignity.
 
2012-12-29 11:25:47 AM  

Nemo's Brother: borg: doglover: Weaver95: i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.

They already is.

Except it's President Obama

House Republicans urge Obama not to issue cybersecurity order

Weaver and the others in the Czar_angelus/Linux_Yes crew will pretend you never said this. Just wait until the next thread.


They're whining about it because it will make their rich corporate masters pay more money to protect critical infrastructure like water and power from cyber-attacks. NOT, like the GOP, because they're scared of a peasant uprising.

Nice try though.
 
2012-12-29 11:37:31 AM  

serial_crusher: The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.


If you're going to be *BILLED* you of course have to identify yourself. That doesn't mean you can't use non-billed services (such as prepaid or the like) without providing identifying information.

As a foreigner using internet cafes in China (I'm NOT posting from there now--while FARK itself is useable from over there most of the linked articles aren't) I have seen this develop:

Originally there was no ID requirement at all. I walked in, picked up a card and sat down at a machine. When I was done I turned the card in and paid for the time I had it. (Enforcement was based on having to have the card sitting there in plain sight while using the machine.)

At the time the machines were W98, no USB ports which means no flash drives--no way to transfer a file. I had my wife talk to the people there (she's a native speaker), they were willing to let me use my laptop there rather than the provided machines. Technically this wasn't kosher as my system didn't have the monitoring software but since I'm a foreigner who only is over there for a few weeks at a time it's a little silly to try to keep parts of the web from me. Even a couple of cops who noticed the situation understood it was stupid to block me. I much preferred my machine as their keyboards were garbage and the monitoring software had a resource leak--it would take Windows into la-la land after a bit over an hour of discussion forums. (Most of the people played games and didn't run into the problem.)

One day a local who was called on failing to sign in made a stink about the fact that I obviously had not signed in. There was no way I possibly could as the sheet was in Chinese. I did the only thing I could, I handed over the only ID I had on me and let them figure out what to do. Later I noticed that I was in the log as "Mr. Driver".

Times changed, the machines became XP with USB ports and it switched to pre-pay. You buy your card and get change when you turn it back in.

Times changed again, a new cafe. Rather than buying the card for each visit (still possible but more expensive) I bought a card that I keep. I just check in and out each time and I have to sign on to the machine itself. (There is a way to sign off, I have no idea how. When I check out it signs off.) They took a scan of my passport when I got the card, that scan is linked to the card. (When I check in it comes up on their screen, I've seen it.)

Times changed again, now despite the fact that they have the scan of my passport tied to the card they also have to scan it every time I check in. (Which occasionally proves problematic when they have a new employee that doesn't know how to do it.)

Since my last visit times have changed again, now to use the free Wi-Fi in the airport you have to get a code via SMS--this ties your usage to you.


At least in the earlier years there apparently were no consequences from trying to access blocked websites. I did so repeatedly (I was accessing an unblocked website that pulled ad banners from a blocked one.) and nobody seemed to follow up on it.
 
2012-12-29 11:56:13 AM  
affordablehousinginstitute.org

2.bp.blogspot.com

Try to remember before you forget.
/we should have boycotted the shiat out of everything Communist Chinese and sold Taiwan whatever they wanted.
 
2012-12-29 12:06:24 PM  
This policy will soon be exported to the United States. We live on Chinese imports.
 
2012-12-29 12:12:50 PM  

randomjsa: doglover: Weaver95: i'm sort of expecting the GOP to try to push this sort of legislation here in the US.

They already is.

One of these days you're going to figure out that the people in power on the left, such as Obama, Pelosi, and the like are not the same as the rank and file liberal on the left.

And almost without exception, when the people in power on the left are left unchecked they will push through massive government control of everything because its "what's best" for "everyone" and by "everyone" they mean them and by "what's best" they mean control of the money.


Yes, try to scare me with what those evil scary liberals might do. Meanwhile completely ignore what has already been done from both sides.

B-B-B-Butt. You're talking out of yours, AGAIN.
 
2012-12-29 12:15:45 PM  

ShannonKW: 0Icky0: ShannonKW: I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything.

Because if you knew my real name you would do what? Track me down and berate me for mocking you?

Being able to positively identify Internet users has more practical merits than enabling a personal game of name calling. There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine, because anyone who let his inner adolescent guide him to post worthless, offensive shiate would find himself on the carpet answering for it, just as much as if he had said it in person.

It's worth noting that you do not have the right to buttonhole your department head in a corridor and call him a reeking, syphilitic twat. Or, to be tedious, you do have that right -- while he has the corresponding right to have security pitch your ass out on the sidewalk with the contents of your desk tossed out after you. It is because we will be held to account for the things we say that we are encouraged to be civil and truthful, and for many of us this is the only thing that keeps us from from turning our daily society into a sordid shiat-flinging match resembling the Politics tab.


Can I demand proper identification from strangers on the street, that I overhear?
 
2012-12-29 12:19:45 PM  
But my real name is mudpants.
 
2012-12-29 12:40:04 PM  
Fook Yu!
s9.postimage.org
 
2012-12-29 12:40:50 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: ShannonKW: 0Icky0: ShannonKW:  cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything.

closed message board to which only faculty members may post


I was thinking 8/10 for Shannon, who argues in his bio that there's a fine line betwixt trolling and honest provocation.  How do you go on Fark -- a site on which the vast majority of people do not self-identify as they might on FB or others like that -- and argue with a straight face that anonymous online speech is harmful or nothing but vitriol and bile?  Thick skin, how does it work?  Shannon implies he is a faculty member at a university (in the Middle East?).  I guess he would support those asinine campus speech codes designed to prevent the snowflakes from getting their widdle feelings hurt.
 
2012-12-29 12:48:33 PM  
Governments find it helpful to be able to identify the dissidents.
who knew?
 
2012-12-29 01:00:33 PM  

ShannonKW: 0Icky0: ShannonKW: There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine,

I can well imagine.
But what I can't imagine is how this has any relationship to the world-wide Internet.

Well, let me help you.

Knowing who you are dealing with would would regulate dealings on the Internet just as it always has in face-to-face encounters. Knowing whether or not your correspondent is a child, to give just one example, would greatly assist in judging how to respond to him.

On the receiving end, responsibility on the Internet would be diffuse, but significant. In the West at present no prudent employer hires a man without doing a Internet search for him. Were our Internet postings linked to our true identities, the all those Stormfront rantings against brown people and Jews would be wedded to our names, and soon civility would wash over the Internet like a perfumed breeze -- at least among people who who hope for respectable employment. The rest we could put on "ignore"

It shouldn't be that hard to think of other good effects that would come of knowing the identity of the people you deal with on the internet. Reputation is an ancient device for ordering the behavior of people, even in the absence of law, and it could be made to work for us on the Internet.


Yes, we should all be forced legally, and at gunpoint I might add, so that you can feel satisfied.

No one will ever take advantage of the fact that you are forced to id yourself. Plus some companies will make a lot of money and the bueracracy will grow. It's a win-win situation all around.
 
2012-12-29 01:19:13 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: ShannonKW: 0Icky0: ShannonKW: I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything.

Because if you knew my real name you would do what? Track me down and berate me for mocking you?

Being able to positively identify Internet users has more practical merits than enabling a personal game of name calling. There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine, because anyone who let his inner adolescent guide him to post worthless, offensive shiate would find himself on the carpet answering for it, just as much as if he had said it in person.

It's worth noting that you do not have the right to buttonhole your department head in a corridor and call him a reeking, syphilitic twat. Or, to be tedious, you do have that right -- while he has the corresponding right to have security pitch your ass out on the sidewalk with the contents of your desk tossed out after you. It is because we will be held to account for the things we say that we are encouraged to be civil and truthful, and for many of us this is the only thing that keeps us from from turning our daily society into a sordid shiat-flinging match resembling the Politics tab.

Can I demand proper identification from strangers on the street, that I overhear?


Why in the world would you be able to request info from a conversation that you're not part of? This would be a digital equivalent of a private chat. Now, if this was posted publicly (i.e. Facebook, Fark) then you are publicly stating an opinion to be your own. Why not man up and take accountability for what you say publicly instead of equpping your Cloak of Internet Annonimity +10 to Asshattery?
 
2012-12-29 01:47:26 PM  
images.yuku.com.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2012-12-29 01:48:45 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: Yes, we should all be forced legally, and at gunpoint I might add, so that you can feel satisfied.


"Force" hasn't been mentioned, and bringing it up is silly and hysterical. Guess what sweetie -- you are "forced" to identify yourself if you publish a book or article or (God forbid!) a rap lyric. Everybody knows who Snoop Dogg and Spike Lee are, and they have stood unassassinated behind their opinions, and every Internet jackass can do so too. Even you can do so, if you are so noble and brave as Snoop and Spike.

Richard Dawkins and Noam Chomsky have published their works under their own names. People hate them for it and wish them dead. They are alive in spite of this. You do not need anonymity to do what they have done. The Chinese censor dissident ideas, and this is something that they will one day pay for (assuming some Western power doesn't give them sanctuary when their aggrieved citizenry finally give them the bum's rush). We who wish the Chinese well hope that they will be granted freedom of political expression, but quibbling about one of the many ways in which the Chinese state squelches dissent amounts to nothing.
 
2012-12-29 01:52:20 PM  
China, newest employee of Facebook.
 
2012-12-29 01:56:10 PM  
Me? I'm Harry Manassas.
 
2012-12-29 03:14:13 PM  
China now forcing EVERY internet user to register their real name in new trolling crackdown"
FTFY
 
2012-12-29 03:30:23 PM  

Ed Finnerty: serial_crusher: The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.

They can always use a Virtual Private Netwok.


The Chinese don't like Netwoks because their food keeps falling through the holes when they try to cook up a stir fry
 
2012-12-29 05:47:56 PM  
They're just copying Facebook and Google+.
 
2012-12-29 07:00:00 PM  

ghare: Tumunga: stirfrybry: why are fark liberals so ignorant that they say Republicans are pushing for this in america when it's their own messiah doing it?

Fark liberals are the most ignorant farkers on the internet

I've been saying that about the FarkLibtards for years.

So, as a FarkIdiot, you think encouraging banks and power plants and so forth to be secure is bad, and you prefer the Republican CISPA plan, which is a far greater Federal intrusion into your privacy, because it was proposed by Republicans.

Got it.


Yes?
 
2012-12-29 07:37:50 PM  

Loren: serial_crusher: The measure would require service providers to ask users to provide their real names and other identifying information if they want to post information publicly or sign up for access to the internet and telephone services, Xinhua said.

Isn't that basically how it works in America?  You try signing up for an ISP or phone company without providing your name and billing address.

If you're going to be *BILLED* you of course have to identify yourself. That doesn't mean you can't use non-billed services (such as prepaid or the like) without providing identifying information.

As a foreigner using internet cafes in China (I'm NOT posting from there now--while FARK itself is useable from over there most of the linked articles aren't) I have seen this develop:

Originally there was no ID requirement at all. I walked in, picked up a card and sat down at a machine. When I was done I turned the card in and paid for the time I had it. (Enforcement was based on having to have the card sitting there in plain sight while using the machine.)

At the time the machines were W98, no USB ports which means no flash drives--no way to transfer a file. I had my wife talk to the people there (she's a native speaker), they were willing to let me use my laptop there rather than the provided machines. Technically this wasn't kosher as my system didn't have the monitoring software but since I'm a foreigner who only is over there for a few weeks at a time it's a little silly to try to keep parts of the web from me. Even a couple of cops who noticed the situation understood it was stupid to block me. I much preferred my machine as their keyboards were garbage and the monitoring software had a resource leak--it would take Windows into la-la land after a bit over an hour of discussion forums. (Most of the people played games and didn't run into the problem.)

One day a local who was called on failing to sign in made a stink about the fact that I obviously had not signed in. There was no way I possibly could as the sheet was in Chinese. I did the only thing I could, I handed over the only ID I had on me and let them figure out what to do. Later I noticed that I was in the log as "Mr. Driver".

Times changed, the machines became XP with USB ports and it switched to pre-pay. You buy your card and get change when you turn it back in.

Times changed again, a new cafe. Rather than buying the card for each visit (still possible but more expensive) I bought a card that I keep. I just check in and out each time and I have to sign on to the machine itself. (There is a way to sign off, I have no idea how. When I check out it signs off.) They took a scan of my passport when I got the card, that scan is linked to the card. (When I check in it comes up on their screen, I've seen it.)

Times changed again, now despite the fact that they have the scan of my passport tied to the card they also have to scan it every time I check in. (Which occasionally proves problematic when they have a new employee that doesn't know how to do it.)

Since my last visit times have changed again, now to use the free Wi-Fi in the airport you have to get a code via SMS--this ties your usage to you.


At least in the earlier years there apparently were no consequences from trying to access blocked websites. I did so repeatedly (I was accessing an unblocked website that pulled ad banners from a blocked one.) and nobody seemed to follow up on it.


You are required to provide ID when activating prepaid phone/internet services in the US.

Additionally you can't use prepaid cards internationally now, per US law. Which I found out when I tried to reactivate an old account on Eve Online. I only use prepaid cards since I drive over the road. So I can only use services hosted in the US.

In addition, you are limited to under $1000 in purchases of things like money orders because it is illegal to move funds around anonymously except through direct cash transfers. I have about $20k in cash in my truck as I save up for truck of my own because I don't want anyone to know I have assets to go after. Especially with a divorce in progress. Plus I'm in the middle of a dispute with Sallie Mae who erroneously reported me as in default to the government (been paying 3x the amount owed every month and have the bank statements to back it up) and I'm sure the government can freeze bank accounts in the event of a public default.

But the moment I try to do anything with that cash I have to have my ID connected with it. If I do anything with telecommunications I have my name attatched to it. I suppose cybercafes may be an exception but it's been a decade since I have seen one of those. I can access public wifi at restaurants but I'm sure those click through screens capture your browser settings which are usually unique enough to lead the feds to you eventually. Who knows how long McDonalds' wifi provider holds onto that info. Hell they may just archive it automatically for the NSA to data mine.
 
2012-12-29 07:55:57 PM  

Chariset: Good luck.  My real name IS sexygrrl69



Checked your profile. Nice to see you have pictures of your pussy there
 
2012-12-29 08:02:43 PM  

ShannonKW: StoPPeRmobile: Yes, we should all be forced legally, and at gunpoint I might add, so that you can feel satisfied.

"Force" hasn't been mentioned, and bringing it up is silly and hysterical. Guess what sweetie -- you are "forced" to identify yourself if you publish a book or article or (God forbid!) a rap lyric. Everybody knows who Snoop Dogg and Spike Lee are, and they have stood unassassinated behind their opinions, and every Internet jackass can do so too. Even you can do so, if you are so noble and brave as Snoop and Spike.

Richard Dawkins and Noam Chomsky have published their works under their own names. People hate them for it and wish them dead. They are alive in spite of this. You do not need anonymity to do what they have done. The Chinese censor dissident ideas, and this is something that they will one day pay for (assuming some Western power doesn't give them sanctuary when their aggrieved citizenry finally give them the bum's rush). We who wish the Chinese well hope that they will be granted freedom of political expression, but quibbling about one of the many ways in which the Chinese state squelches dissent amounts to nothing.


Have you ever even read a book in your life?
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-12-29 08:04:48 PM  

Critatak: StoPPeRmobile: ShannonKW: 0Icky0: ShannonKW: I wouldn't mind requiring all Internet users to post their name rather than some asinine logon. Anonymity is the cover that encourages most of the punks on the Internet to shiat all over everyone and everything.

Because if you knew my real name you would do what? Track me down and berate me for mocking you?

Being able to positively identify Internet users has more practical merits than enabling a personal game of name calling. There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine, because anyone who let his inner adolescent guide him to post worthless, offensive shiate would find himself on the carpet answering for it, just as much as if he had said it in person.

It's worth noting that you do not have the right to buttonhole your department head in a corridor and call him a reeking, syphilitic twat. Or, to be tedious, you do have that right -- while he has the corresponding right to have security pitch your ass out on the sidewalk with the contents of your desk tossed out after you. It is because we will be held to account for the things we say that we are encouraged to be civil and truthful, and for many of us this is the only thing that keeps us from from turning our daily society into a sordid shiat-flinging match resembling the Politics tab.

Can I demand proper identification from strangers on the street, that I overhear?

Why in the world would you be able to request info from a conversation that you're not part of? This would be a digital equivalent of a private chat.


If I can overhear it, is it still private?
 
2012-12-29 08:31:07 PM  
大麻的伯爵勃起希特勒 is a bit of a mouthful.
 
2012-12-29 08:36:08 PM  

JerkyMeat: Didn't the GOP suggest the same thing for Americans?


You mean like Randi Zuckerberg?

Oh, no, I guess not...
 
2012-12-29 10:46:16 PM  
With over a billion people, they are going to have some repeat names....just saying..

Which Zhu Chen Hiu is the real Zhu Chen Hiu?
Will the real Zhu Chen Hiu please stand up, please stand up, please stand up?
*Sound of a gunshot*
Thank you comrade citizen.
 
2012-12-29 11:40:11 PM  
I guess there have never been authors writing under a nom de plume then.
You have no right to be anonymous? Not even to protect yourself from
criminals in positions of power?
Fakebook and their trained monkeys can take a flying leap at a rolling donut...
As long as this is an imperfect world, I have the right to defend myself from it.
 
2012-12-29 11:57:58 PM  

ShannonKW: 0Icky0: ShannonKW: There are plenty of examples of this in business, government, and academia. My university, for example, has a closed message board to which only faculty members may post. It's damn civil and to the the point, as you can imagine,

I can well imagine.
But what I can't imagine is how this has any relationship to the world-wide Internet.

Well, let me help you.

Knowing who you are dealing with would would regulate dealings on the Internet just as it always has in face-to-face encounters. Knowing whether or not your correspondent is a child, to give just one example, would greatly assist in judging how to respond to him.

On the receiving end, responsibility on the Internet would be diffuse, but significant. In the West at present no prudent employer hires a man without doing a Internet search for him. Were our Internet postings linked to our true identities, the all those Stormfront rantings against brown people and Jews would be wedded to our names, and soon civility would wash over the Internet like a perfumed breeze -- at least among people who who hope for respectable employment. The rest we could put on "ignore"

It shouldn't be that hard to think of other good effects that would come of knowing the identity of the people you deal with on the internet. Reputation is an ancient device for ordering the behavior of people, even in the absence of law, and it could be made to work for us on the Internet.


Removing the option of anonymity forces the individual to cede power to the state or its agents/partners. You can be called out by name for your racist statements, yes, but you can likewise be called out for (or forced to disavow) your legitimate criticisms and complaints, or shamed for your peccadilloes or preferences. Both of these can be done on a massive scale, by both state and corporate entities. "Civility" is a nice thing, to be sure, but when it's used as a cover for exposure, control, and censorship, it quickly becomes tainted and worthless. Forced removal of anonymity across the board like you suggest has absolutely no place in a modern democratic society. It would be double-plus good for a police state, though.
 
2012-12-30 12:32:32 AM  

Ghastly: Didn't some legislator in Kentucky try to pass a bill that would have made it illegal to post anonymously on the internet?


That doesn't count.  It's understood that people from Kentucky don't know anything about the Internet.
 
2012-12-30 02:08:10 AM  
I wonder how many guys named Mi Hung Lo have been registered?
 
2012-12-30 05:10:25 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2012-12-30 10:51:58 AM  

ShannonKW: Reputation is an ancient device for ordering the behavior of people, even in the absence of law, and it could be made to work for us on the Internet.


And pen names are an ancient device for keeping your identity secret when you write stuff that might get you in trouble.
 
2012-12-31 05:47:11 AM  
10,000 people named "Long Wang?
Seems legit.
 
2012-12-31 09:35:55 AM  
Well, if the way they acted when they got Google+ is any indication, maybe China isn't ready for free speech. Just sayin'.
 
Displayed 152 of 152 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report