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(NYPost)   Heating oil company delivers 300 gallons to Brooklyn house. Homeowner: No tanks   (nypost.com) divider line 96
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14969 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Dec 2012 at 12:53 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-28 10:58:19 AM
Vinny Burns, owner of the heating-oil company, acknowledged that a mistake was made but insisted that everybody would get paid back.

The only holdup is that his insurance company wrongly sold him a policy that doesn't cover incidents like this, he said.


I don't think the insurance company feels the same way.
 
2012-12-28 11:17:24 AM
FTFA: "Reliable Heating Oil Inc. was supposed to deliver the oil to 142 Cleveland St. last January - but accidentally pumped it into an old oil pipe at the Gochnauers' home at 132 Cleveland."

Ha!
 
2012-12-28 12:55:27 PM
They are looking for the Brooklyn

They are looking for the Brooklyn queens.
 
2012-12-28 12:56:59 PM
This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline.
 
2012-12-28 12:57:49 PM
Every year you read a few stories like this one, that could have been prevented by a $4 bag of Quickcrete and a $10 pipe cap added to the cost of replacing the oil system and removing the tank.
 
2012-12-28 12:59:34 PM
www.fightersgeneration.com

Tank You subby!
 
2012-12-28 01:00:12 PM
Nutwrench"This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline."

seriously THIS!! That was the first thing I did when I removed my fuel oil tank, and I live in the country where this is VERY unlikely. I cant imagine trying to get the smell of diesel out of your house.
 
2012-12-28 01:01:49 PM
This is why you don't fark around trading commodity futures.
 
2012-12-28 01:07:06 PM
Invite the neighborhood kids for an indoor slip-n-slide.
 
2012-12-28 01:09:14 PM
Jesus, people. If you're going to have your oil tank removed, have the goddamn filler pipe removed as well.
 
2012-12-28 01:11:11 PM
I kind of feel like the oil company could counter-sue on the basis of the still-functioning oil pipe to the basement. Seriously, people, cap yo' shiat.
 
2012-12-28 01:21:44 PM

NutWrench: This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline.


Yeah, they did that to a buddy of mine's up in Vermont.
Dan (won't say his last name) is a good guy and you never see him angry at anyone for anything, but I thought he could murder when he told me what happened. Then I had a company from S.A. (not mentioning names) do me a spill of 400 gal. of kero on my private wetland in Franklin county, and had the audacity to try to charge me for it.
They ended up not only losing a customer but barely avoiding costly litigation by arbitrating with me.
Same assholes that are over charging for Gas in northern VT.
 
2012-12-28 01:24:24 PM
Needs a lawyer who's first name is Oily. Plus you get some dental work done in between court dates. And you can get some copies of your birth certificate, too.

rawreplay.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2012-12-28 01:31:00 PM
So wait, there are still dirt basements in NYC?
 
2012-12-28 01:32:34 PM

CheekyMonkey: Jesus, people. If you're going to have your oil tank removed, have the goddamn filler pipe removed as well.


This. Not that the oil company isn't responsible, but this was an easily avoidable issue.
 
2012-12-28 01:34:20 PM

buzzcut73: Every year you read a few stories like this one, that could have been prevented by a $4 bag of Quickcrete and a $10 pipe cap added to the cost of replacing the oil system and removing the tank.


Seems to me that it could also have been prevented by the delivery driver reading the address correctly, which would have cost even less than your proposal.
 
2012-12-28 01:35:53 PM
I agree with everyone who says to fill in/weld shut the pipe, but I also think it'd be nice for the delivery guy to jump out, knock on the door and check in before pumping.

Two things that can be done to avoid these stories. I'd put a little more weight into the owner capping the pipe, though. It is his house.
 
2012-12-28 01:37:33 PM

THX 1138: Seems to me that it could also have been prevented by the delivery driver reading the address correctly, which would have cost even less than your proposal.


I worked for an oil company a long time ago, and while you're correct the homeowner still bears some responsibility for not plugging the fill with cement, or removing it completely.

/had a 250 gal spill once
//on Christmas eve
 
2012-12-28 01:38:03 PM

probesport: They are looking for the Brooklyn

They are looking for the Brooklyn queens.


You, my friend, have the cactus.
 
2012-12-28 01:38:32 PM
Must be winter.
 
2012-12-28 01:39:41 PM

airsupport: probesport: They are looking for the Brooklyn

They are looking for the Brooklyn queens.

You, my friend, have the cactus.


Thanks for not giving me the gas face.
 
2012-12-28 01:41:49 PM

probesport: They are looking for the Brooklyn

They are looking for the Brooklyn queens.


No sleep till Brooklyn.
 
2012-12-28 01:46:32 PM

FarkerinMN: Nutwrench"This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline."

seriously THIS!! That was the first thing I did when I removed my fuel oil tank, and I live in the country where this is VERY unlikely. I cant imagine trying to get the smell of diesel out of your house.


At least heating oil doesn't have much of a smell, though. If I remember right, it looks, smells, and feels pretty much like olive oil.
 
2012-12-28 01:47:00 PM

NutWrench: This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline.


The tenants should get a home inspector to that house in a hurry to see what else the landlord didn't think to take care of. If they were the type to think "awe this will never happen" imagine what else they thought would never happen.

/not sure if they're legally able to since they're not owners or potential owners.
 
2012-12-28 01:51:13 PM

foxyshadis: FarkerinMN: Nutwrench"This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline."

seriously THIS!! That was the first thing I did when I removed my fuel oil tank, and I live in the country where this is VERY unlikely. I cant imagine trying to get the smell of diesel out of your house.

At least heating oil doesn't have much of a smell, though. If I remember right, it looks, smells, and feels pretty much like olive oil.


Heating oil IS diesel fuel (just not filtered as much as that which would be put in a car or truck). It most certainly does not smell like olive oil.
 
2012-12-28 01:52:43 PM

foxyshadis: FarkerinMN: Nutwrench"This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline."

seriously THIS!! That was the first thing I did when I removed my fuel oil tank, and I live in the country where this is VERY unlikely. I cant imagine trying to get the smell of diesel out of your house.

At least heating oil doesn't have much of a smell, though. If I remember right, it looks, smells, and feels pretty much like olive oil.


for a home heating system like that it was either dyed diesel fuel or kerosene.
 
2012-12-28 01:53:13 PM
The building owner has part responsibility too. When they converted our place from oil to gas they took out EVERYTHING, including the filler and vent pipes.
 
2012-12-28 01:56:17 PM
hobbiestoy.com

Too much plutonium, BLECHT
 
2012-12-28 01:58:04 PM
Bernier said...that Reliable was helpful immediately after the spill but split once expenses mounted.

How I picture the owner of Reliable
media.comicvine.com
"Yeahs, our mistake. How can wes makes this right...I know! Tells ya what, I'm not gonna charge you for alls that oil you gots. I'll evens through ins ones of those pines scented air fresheners. No charge. EPA clean up charges? Holds on, I thinks I've left something in my car...."
 
2012-12-28 01:58:14 PM
The building owner has no responsibility. He didn't call the company and order the oil. He didn't drive the truck to the wrong house. The oil company farked up big time.
 
2012-12-28 02:07:43 PM

FarkerinMN: Nutwrench"This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline."

seriously THIS!! That was the first thing I did when I removed my fuel oil tank, and I live in the country where this is VERY unlikely. I cant imagine trying to get the smell of diesel out of your house.


Hell I'd mix up a batch of cement. Put a tiny beachball down the pipe as far as I could reach. Inflate it and then pour the cement on top of that.

I can see particularly dumb truck drivers "shiat thing is 'welded' shut. I'm gonna need a bigger wrench'.
 
2012-12-28 02:08:42 PM
There's some irony: Reliable Oil Company. They are now the liable oil company.
 
2012-12-28 02:17:55 PM

FarkerinMN: Nutwrench"This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline."

seriously THIS!! That was the first thing I did when I removed my fuel oil tank, and I live in the country where this is VERY unlikely. I cant imagine trying to get the smell of diesel out of your house.


Things I learned by watching Holmes on Homes: Heating oil is considered a hazardous material. It ha$$$ to be removed by a certified Hazmat abatement contractor.
 
2012-12-28 02:18:17 PM
Brad knows their pain: Pops
 
2012-12-28 02:26:20 PM

Mentalpatient87: I agree with everyone who says to fill in/weld shut the pipe, but I also think it'd be nice for the delivery guy to jump out, knock on the door and check in before pumping.

Two things that can be done to avoid these stories. I'd put a little more weight into the owner capping the pipe, though. It is his house.


Yea, because everyone is home waiting for the oil delivery guy to show up. Or that the oil delivery guy works second shift.
 
2012-12-28 02:28:28 PM
This happened at our house when I was about 6 or 7. We still used oil but there were two fill pipes and the guy used the wrong one.

/We rented I think
 
2012-12-28 02:30:43 PM
How could anyone say that the home owner is responsible in the least? Would you be defending a rapist because of what the girl was wearing? I don't care if the home owner had a sign with an arrow pointing down to the pipe saying "oil goes here." The fact is he/she did not request the oil nor was the oil going to that property. It's their property and it's their choice to do what they want with it. If they choose to cap it to save time and money when accidents such as this happen, then that's fine, but for them to be responsible for any of the burden is illogical.
 
2012-12-28 02:35:39 PM
This happened to a friend of mine, it took a year before the house was declared fit for occupancy.
 
2012-12-28 02:39:24 PM

pinchpoint: I worked for an oil company a long time ago, and while you're correct the homeowner still bears some responsibility for not plugging the fill with cement, or removing it completely.


That's about as logical as claiming that if my neighbor down the street was getting roofing done and the crew showed up at my place and started stripping my shingles, it's my fault for having a roof that they mistook for the correct one.
 
2012-12-28 02:44:55 PM

THX 1138: pinchpoint: I worked for an oil company a long time ago, and while you're correct the homeowner still bears some responsibility for not plugging the fill with cement, or removing it completely.

That's about as logical as claiming that if my neighbor down the street was getting roofing done and the crew showed up at my place and started stripping my shingles, it's my fault for having a roof that they mistook for the correct one.


This actually happened, by the way.
 
2012-12-28 02:45:37 PM

dofus: This happened at our house when I was about 6 or 7. We still used oil but there were two fill pipes and the guy used the wrong one.


Same thing happened at my house we had 2 fill pipes because a tank was replaced, my father capped the old pipe and painted it red and stenciled NO TANK on the side, the oil guys still tried to fill it and spilled about 50 gallons all over the yard, not only did the oil company try to get out of paying for the clean up they tried to charge him for the 50 gallons of oil.

/As to why the old pipe wasn't removed it was too cold to patch the concrete foundation until summer.
 
2012-12-28 02:47:57 PM
Uh...why would they sue for $50k when the cleanup could cost up to $60k.
 
2012-12-28 02:50:17 PM

THX 1138: pinchpoint: I worked for an oil company a long time ago, and while you're correct the homeowner still bears some responsibility for not plugging the fill with cement, or removing it completely.

That's about as logical as claiming that if my neighbor down the street was getting roofing done and the crew showed up at my place and started stripping my shingles, it's my fault for having a roof that they mistook for the correct one.


It would be your fault if you didn't cement your shingles down. That's why I cover everything I don't want messed with in cement. I filled my water meter access with cement so that no one would accdently turn it off, covered my A/C fan with cement so that it wouldn't be removed, and filled my mailbox with cement so that I wouldn't get bills for other people.

/Actualy I did get my water shut off. Someone at 2011 [streetname] lane didn't pay their bill, so they shut off my water at 2011 [streetname] road. Cost me a $50 'turn on fee' to get it back despite the fact they screwed up. They said they had to charge me 'because that's policy', but they would credit the charge to my account. And I couldn't do this over the phone, I had to take off work, go to the city treasurer office, stand in line for 45 minutes, and I ended up being without water for almost 2 days.
 
2012-12-28 03:05:00 PM
$60k to dig up dirt and dispose of it? WTF are they doing with it? Burying it in Yucca Mountain under 10 feet of concrete????? I think the homeowner is looking for a money grab.
 
2012-12-28 03:05:40 PM
This thing seems to be happening all the time. There is a house down the road from me (suburbs of Philly), and the same thing happened over 6 years ago at this one property. While it seems like everything was cleaned up (but maybe not completely), the family 'abandoned' the house and its been sitting ever since.

\There's been a For Sale sign in front of it for like a year now. Still asking a ridiculous price for a house that is likely going to have to be demolished.
 
2012-12-28 03:06:11 PM

MythDragon: They said they had to charge me 'because that's policy', but they would credit the charge to my account.


http://i.imgur.com/hlpY2.gif

/ too large for fark, but only appropriate response
 
2012-12-28 03:14:55 PM

THX 1138: buzzcut73: Every year you read a few stories like this one, that could have been prevented by a $4 bag of Quickcrete and a $10 pipe cap added to the cost of replacing the oil system and removing the tank.

Seems to me that it could also have been prevented by the delivery driver reading the address correctly, which would have cost even less than your proposal.


You think implementing a system that would result in absolutely ZERO address errors wouldn't be expensive?
 
2012-12-28 03:19:18 PM

Cataholic: THX 1138: buzzcut73: Every year you read a few stories like this one, that could have been prevented by a $4 bag of Quickcrete and a $10 pipe cap added to the cost of replacing the oil system and removing the tank.

Seems to me that it could also have been prevented by the delivery driver reading the address correctly, which would have cost even less than your proposal.

You think implementing a system that would result in absolutely ZERO address errors wouldn't be expensive?


Would it cost less than $60,000?
 
2012-12-28 03:25:31 PM

oryx: There's some irony: Reliable Oil Company. They are now the liable oil company.


True. He can now name it the Triple Reliable oil Co.
 
2012-12-28 03:27:33 PM
There was a case of such a mistaken delivery (delivery on previous owner's account right after new owner switched to different heating) and they had to tear down the house and rebuild.

Technically they'd have to do this too, it's nasty stuff.
 
2012-12-28 03:27:40 PM
100% the fault of whoever removed the tank and didn't weld the cap.
 
2012-12-28 03:29:59 PM

Billy Bathsalt: 100% the fault of whoever removed the tank and didn't weld the cap.


Yeah, blame them for leaving that sexy cap all unwelded like that, just waiting for some oily hose to spill its load all up in it.
 
2012-12-28 03:31:41 PM

vudukungfu: NutWrench: This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline.

Yeah, they did that to a buddy of mine's up in Vermont.
Dan (won't say his last name) is a good guy and you never see him angry at anyone for anything, but I thought he could murder when he told me what happened. Then I had a company from S.A. (not mentioning names) do me a spill of 400 gal. of kero on my private wetland in Franklin county, and had the audacity to try to charge me for it.
They ended up not only losing a customer but barely avoiding costly litigation by arbitrating with me.
Same assholes that are over charging for Gas in northern VT.


What happens? Does the furnace get all explody?

CSB:
In college (and after) I lived in a 4 unit building with 2x300 gallon #2 tanks in the basement. The fill pipe was rusted and leaked every time they came to fill it up, and since most of it ended up in the dirt a fill would only last us about 2 months. Every once in a while I'd come home to that stench and assume the pest control people had been in my apartment spraying for bugs. 6 years later as I was moving out the movers commented on the smell of heating oil and it wasn't until then I realized I had been living on top of a bomb for the better part of a decade (all of the electrical disconnects and water heaters were down there too).
/CSB
 
2012-12-28 03:33:30 PM
Black gold? It's not crude oil, you dummies.
 
2012-12-28 03:38:07 PM

Billy Bathsalt: 100% the fault of whoever removed the tank and didn't weld the cap.


Really?! Pumping 300 gals of oil into a pipe sticking out of the ground, no matter why it's there, isn't a bit litigious on the pumper's part? It's not the home owner's fault that the driver was there at all, tank or no tank.

/pump it into my basement, I could use a new trailer (manufactured home)
// accidental fire? I would think so
 
2012-12-28 03:39:25 PM
i make our drivers read this.
it starts out with a tanker driver going to the wrong place, ends with 5 dead (i mainly make them read it for the other mistakes the driver made).

Link
 
2012-12-28 03:44:53 PM

data195: Cataholic: THX 1138: buzzcut73: Every year you read a few stories like this one, that could have been prevented by a $4 bag of Quickcrete and a $10 pipe cap added to the cost of replacing the oil system and removing the tank.

Seems to me that it could also have been prevented by the delivery driver reading the address correctly, which would have cost even less than your proposal.

You think implementing a system that would result in absolutely ZERO address errors wouldn't be expensive?

Would it cost less than $60,000?


I cannot envision a fool-proof system without involving RFID tags for pipe caps, and mobile GPS systems for drivers which were checked against all available public databases to ensure that the person who called and ordered the oil actually lived there. So, no.
 
2012-12-28 03:45:12 PM

oakleym82:
CSB:
In college (and after) I lived in a 4 unit building with 2x300 gallon #2 tanks in the basement. The fill pipe was rusted and leaked every time they came to fill it up, and since most of it ended up in the dirt a fill would only last us about 2 months. Every once in a while I'd come home to that stench and assume the pest control people had been in my apartment spraying for bugs. 6 years later as I was moving out the movers commented on the smell of heating oil and it wasn't until then I realized I had been living on top of a bomb for the better part of a decade (all of the electrical disconnects and water heaters were down there too).
/CSB


Heating oil, if Diesel fuel, is not explosive. It doesn't form explosive vapors. It's actually pretty damned hard to ignite even when you're trying to.

Gasoline is the opposite.

Big difference between spilling some heating oil, and someone putting gasoline where heating oil is supposed to be.
 
2012-12-28 03:46:16 PM

NutWrench: This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline.


I came in here to say this. It's protocol around here to yank the pipe when you remove the oil tank. My place converted to an electrical boiler, and they pulled the fill pipe out of the wall at the same time as they removed the tank specifically to avoid this type of nonsense.
 
2012-12-28 03:48:11 PM

jigger: Black gold? It's not crude oil, you dummies.


It is 300 gallons of #2 diesel with red dye in it.
 
2012-12-28 03:52:37 PM

Mister Peejay: oakleym82:
CSB:
... I had been living on top of a bomb for the better part of a decade ...
/CSB

Heating oil, if Diesel fuel, is not explosive. It doesn't form explosive vapors. It's actually pretty damned hard to ignite even when you're trying to.

Gasoline is the opposite.

Big difference between spilling some heating oil, and someone putting gasoline where heating oil is supposed to be.


He didn't mention the part about him storing his fertilizer down there too.
 
2012-12-28 03:55:48 PM
only a retard would blame the owner for not removing the pipe, standard practice or not.
 
2012-12-28 03:57:05 PM

THX 1138: pinchpoint: I worked for an oil company a long time ago, and while you're correct the homeowner still bears some responsibility for not plugging the fill with cement, or removing it completely.

That's about as logical as claiming that if my neighbor down the street was getting roofing done and the crew showed up at my place and started stripping my shingles, it's my fault for having a roof that they mistook for the correct one.


What basic, inexpensive precautions can a roof-owner take to prevent this mistake from happening?
 
2012-12-28 03:58:57 PM
First thing I thought of:

"Uh, yeah. Inconvenience for you. I'm sorry. Wrong Mr. Pickford altogether."
 
2012-12-28 04:04:11 PM

kvinesknows: only a retard would blame the owner for not removing the pipe, standard practice or not.


It should of been welded shut though. i'm sure the landlord is wishing he did that right now.
 
2012-12-28 04:11:10 PM

Superjew: I kind of feel like the oil company could counter-sue on the basis of the still-functioning oil pipe to the basement. Seriously, people, cap yo' shiat.


They went to the wrong address. I'm not sure how you can blame anyone but the asshole that pumped oil into the wrong house.
 
2012-12-28 04:29:16 PM

MythDragon: Actualy I did get my water shut off. Someone at 2011 [streetname] lane didn't pay their bill, so they shut off my water at 2011 [streetname] road. Cost me a $50 'turn on fee' to get it back despite the fact they screwed up. They said they had to charge me 'because that's policy', but they would credit the charge to my account. And I couldn't do this over the phone, I had to take off work, go to the city treasurer office, stand in line for 45 minutes, and I ended up being without water for almost 2 days


Happened to me as well. They incorrectly shut off my water and wanted me to wait a few days for them to come and turn it on (was on a Friday). For whatever reason, the previous owner of my house had the tool to turn water meter valves. I went out to the street and turned my water back on, but never told the water company.

Also had cable disconnected when they were doing work in the box in my neighbors yard that feeds like ten house. I knew they had been working and after they left I went over and saw my cable (was labeled with my address) was not connected to the feeder post. I called the company verified that I was supposed to be hooked up. A week lead time to get someone out to fix it. Told them to send the guy over whenever. Right after that, I plugged my feed back in.

Unless the stuff is locked down, its really not that complicated to turn much of those feeds back on. Just make sure you are in the right to do it.
 
2012-12-28 04:32:15 PM

kvinesknows: only a retard would blame the owner for not removing the pipe, standard practice or not.


While it is not his fault, the home owner certainly could have prevented it from happening by removing the pipe, or having it sealed when the tank was removed. That should have been SOP for the company that took the tank out in the first place.
 
2012-12-28 04:43:11 PM

Cataholic: data195: Cataholic: THX 1138: buzzcut73: Every year you read a few stories like this one, that could have been prevented by a $4 bag of Quickcrete and a $10 pipe cap added to the cost of replacing the oil system and removing the tank.

Seems to me that it could also have been prevented by the delivery driver reading the address correctly, which would have cost even less than your proposal.

You think implementing a system that would result in absolutely ZERO address errors wouldn't be expensive?

Would it cost less than $60,000?

I cannot envision a fool-proof system without involving RFID tags for pipe caps, and mobile GPS systems for drivers which were checked against all available public databases to ensure that the person who called and ordered the oil actually lived there. So, no.


We aren't talking about dropping a FedEx or UPS package off on the doorstep of some house. We are talking about dumping hazardous material into someone's home. If anything there should be a double and triple check sections of human interaction in regards to the address so that is not the point of failure. Perhaps when it was ordered they could mail something to home address that they sign and return to verify the address. When the company gets there, they could make a simple phone call to the owner to verify the address. There could be a lot done here that could assure that it doesn't happen without the fancy equipment and GPS systems.
 
2012-12-28 04:46:09 PM

NutWrench: This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline.


Yeah, I thought code required the pipes to be disabled by some means so this couldn't happen.
 
2012-12-28 04:49:12 PM
It's hard to feel sympathy for homeowners who neglect to do anything about their pipe after removing their oil tanks. Every year there are dozens of stories of heating oil being delivered to the wrong addresses and yet homeowners continue live in a fantasy world where they think this won't happen to them. It doesn't take much time or money to fill the pipe with cement and insure that it'll *never* happen to them (unless, of course, they believe that the oil company, upon finding the sealed pipe, will simply bust out a basement window and pour oil directly into the basement).

Sure, the oil company was at fault. But in this case, the oil company apparently doesn't even have insurance. So now it goes to the court system all the while the home has a lingering stench of oil and the homeowners or their insurance company is out the funds needed to clean up the mess to the EPA's satisfaction. Seems like an awful lot of headache that could have been avoided with a $4 sack of cement and 30 minutes' worth of time.
 
2012-12-28 04:50:47 PM

wingnut396: Unless the stuff is locked down, its really not that complicated to turn much of those feeds back on. Just make sure you are in the right to do it.


I was moving into a rental house, and asked the landlord to leave the water on for me since I would be moving in on a Saturday. He said "Sure, no problem" and then promptly had the water shut off. I call the water company and they said I could come in Tuesday and open an account, and they'd have in on by thursday. I thought 'fark this' and grabbed a wrench and turned it on my damn self.

Later when I went to open account, they said it was a turn on fee of 50 bucks. Conversation when like this.
Water:You will have to pay a 50 dollar turn on fee.
Me: No thanks, it's already on.
Water: What do you mean it's already on?
Me: I turn on the tap, water comes out. It's on.
Water: It shouldn't be.
Me: I know, I thought it was kinda strange myself. But life is weird like that sometimes.
Water: Well you still need to pay the turn on fee.
Me: For what? It's on.
Water: Well we have to send a guy out to verify.
Me: Why would I lie about this? What could I possibly gain for paying you for water service I don't have?
Water: We just want to make sure your water works.
Me: I took a shower this morning. Unless an invisible genie was pissing on me, I am quite positive the water is on
Water: But company policy is that you can't get water until you pay a turn on fee.
Me: But. The. Water. Is. Already. On.
Water: Then. We. Will. Turn. It. Off.
Me: You guys are straight up crooks.
Water:...
Me:....
Me: Do you take debit?
 
2012-12-28 04:58:23 PM

arcas: Seems like an awful lot of headache that could have been avoided with a $4 sack of cement and 30 minutes' worth of time.


I solve a lot of problems like that.
then again, I live by a deep lake.
 
2012-12-28 04:59:04 PM

MythDragon: wingnut396: Unless the stuff is locked down, its really not that complicated to turn much of those feeds back on. Just make sure you are in the right to do it.

I was moving into a rental house, and asked the landlord to leave the water on for me since I would be moving in on a Saturday. He said "Sure, no problem" and then promptly had the water shut off. I call the water company and they said I could come in Tuesday and open an account, and they'd have in on by thursday. I thought 'fark this' and grabbed a wrench and turned it on my damn self.

Later when I went to open account, they said it was a turn on fee of 50 bucks. Conversation when like this.
?


Yeah, I agree it a bit different when you go to turn on a service. When they turn it off by mistake and will 'fix' that mistake days later for free, eh, I can do it myself.
 
2012-12-28 05:05:12 PM
How to get even with fart face neighbors: Drive a section of filler pipe into the ground next to their foundation (when they are away). Then call the oil company and ask for a delivery to that address. Stand back and watch the fun!
 
2012-12-28 05:27:18 PM

Billy Bathsalt: 100% the fault of whoever removed the tank and didn't weld the cap.


Or the guy that went to the wrong address. It's 100% of something somewhere.
 
2012-12-28 06:11:58 PM

FarkerinMN: Nutwrench"This is why you should weld the damn caps shut or remove them if there's no tank on the other end.
Could be worse. Last winter, one company filled about a dozen homeowners oil tanks with gasoline."

seriously THIS!! That was the first thing I did when I removed my fuel oil tank, and I live in the country where this is VERY unlikely. I cant imagine trying to get the smell of diesel out of your house.


You can't. Not really. I work for a remediation company, and this (sadly) often results in a demolished house, huge excavation, pump and treat, etc. Hundreds of thou.

The worse was the one house, beautiful, freshly built, never moved in, home owners to move in next week. Tanks were filled, someone broke in and tried to siphon fuel, damaging the tank. New house torn right down, excav to bedrock.

Damn.
 
2012-12-28 06:18:17 PM

wingnut396: MythDragon: wingnut396: Unless the stuff is locked down, its really not that complicated to turn much of those feeds back on. Just make sure you are in the right to do it.

I was moving into a rental house, and asked the landlord to leave the water on for me since I would be moving in on a Saturday. He said "Sure, no problem" and then promptly had the water shut off. I call the water company and they said I could come in Tuesday and open an account, and they'd have in on by thursday. I thought 'fark this' and grabbed a wrench and turned it on my damn self.

Later when I went to open account, they said it was a turn on fee of 50 bucks. Conversation when like this.
?

Yeah, I agree it a bit different when you go to turn on a service. When they turn it off by mistake and will 'fix' that mistake days later for free, eh, I can do it myself.


When I moved into the house I'm in now, the city didn't even turn anything on for the $48 I was charged to turn on the water and gas, all they did was unlock the meters, I had to use my own damn wrench to actually turn them on. Bastards.
 
2012-12-28 06:22:09 PM
Around the block where I live, I saw a deposit pipe for home heating oil on the side of a house, and its homeowner apparently decided taking a magic marker and writing "don't put oil in here" was sufficient.
 
2012-12-28 06:56:41 PM

Superjew: I kind of feel like the oil company could counter-sue on the basis of the still-functioning oil pipe to the basement. Seriously, people, cap yo' shiat.


Is it against the law to have said pipe?
 
2012-12-28 07:00:43 PM

MBrady: Mentalpatient87: I agree with everyone who says to fill in/weld shut the pipe, but I also think it'd be nice for the delivery guy to jump out, knock on the door and check in before pumping.

Two things that can be done to avoid these stories. I'd put a little more weight into the owner capping the pipe, though. It is his house.

Yea, because everyone is home waiting for the oil delivery guy to show up. Or that the oil delivery guy works second shift.


Do you order pizza to your home while you are away? Why the fark would you be away for this kind of delivery? Need to be at the gym?
 
2012-12-28 07:47:15 PM

MBrady: Mentalpatient87: I agree with everyone who says to fill in/weld shut the pipe, but I also think it'd be nice for the delivery guy to jump out, knock on the door and check in before pumping.

Two things that can be done to avoid these stories. I'd put a little more weight into the owner capping the pipe, though. It is his house.

Yea, because everyone is home waiting for the oil delivery guy to show up. Or that the oil delivery guy works second shift.


Ahh yes, the Shaggy Method of customer service: nervously declare nobody to be home to avoid doing shiat..

/zoinks, Scoob
 
2012-12-28 07:56:19 PM

data195: Cataholic: data195: Cataholic: THX 1138: buzzcut73: Every year you read a few stories like this one, that could have been prevented by a $4 bag of Quickcrete and a $10 pipe cap added to the cost of replacing the oil system and removing the tank.

Seems to me that it could also have been prevented by the delivery driver reading the address correctly, which would have cost even less than your proposal.

You think implementing a system that would result in absolutely ZERO address errors wouldn't be expensive?

Would it cost less than $60,000?

I cannot envision a fool-proof system without involving RFID tags for pipe caps, and mobile GPS systems for drivers which were checked against all available public databases to ensure that the person who called and ordered the oil actually lived there. So, no.

We aren't talking about dropping a FedEx or UPS package off on the doorstep of some house. We are talking about dumping hazardous material into someone's home. If anything there should be a double and triple check sections of human interaction in regards to the address so that is not the point of failure. Perhaps when it was ordered they could mail something to home address that they sign and return to verify the address. When the company gets there, they could make a simple phone call to the owner to verify the address. There could be a lot done here that could assure that it doesn't happen without the fancy equipment and GPS systems.


What you describe is still not fool-proof. By itself, the owner giving the wrong address would probably happen at least once in the tens of thousands of occurrences. On top of that, you would have situations where the driver was certain he was at the correct address when in fact he was not (poorly marked houses, houses on corners, half addresses, street signs that had been turned, street/court/ave/way mixups, etc.).

When people don't remove or adequately plug these pipes when they remove their tanks, they are leaving themselves susceptible to human error which cannot reasonably be prevented 100% of the time.
 
2012-12-28 08:58:37 PM

ReverendJynxed: Is it against the law to have said pipe?


Heating paraphernalia in plain sight.
 
2012-12-28 09:23:16 PM
We simply must ban high capacity oil trucks.
 
2012-12-28 10:55:41 PM

kvinesknows: only a retard would blame the owner for not removing the pipe, standard practice or not.


Nobody is blaming the owner here. Everyone with half a brain is recognizing that the owner could have saved a butt-load of trouble had he just capped the pipe like he was supposed to.

The oil company will have to pay up, but this is going to be a way bigger headache for the owner than the 30 minutes it would have taken to prevent.
 
2012-12-29 12:02:19 AM
"Now when you go down to find something it's like 'I wonder where everything is,' " Ruthi said.

I thought that's how basements were meant to work.
 
2012-12-29 12:16:54 AM

italie: kvinesknows: only a retard would blame the owner for not removing the pipe, standard practice or not.

Nobody is blaming the owner here...the owner could have saved a butt-load of trouble had he just capped the pipe like he was supposed to.


Nobody is saying it was the owner's fault, but it was the owner's fault.
 
2012-12-29 07:17:43 AM

ReverendJynxed: MBrady: Mentalpatient87: I agree with everyone who says to fill in/weld shut the pipe, but I also think it'd be nice for the delivery guy to jump out, knock on the door and check in before pumping.

Two things that can be done to avoid these stories. I'd put a little more weight into the owner capping the pipe, though. It is his house.

Yea, because everyone is home waiting for the oil delivery guy to show up. Or that the oil delivery guy works second shift.

Do you order pizza to your home while you are away? Why the fark would you be away for this kind of delivery? Need to be at the gym?


It's called automatic delivery asshole.

The oil company uses a computer program to calculate things like air temperature, amount of previous usage, and probably other factors to figure out when my oil tank is low. After a delivery, the amount of oil delivered also goes into the program. Some people use more oil than others, so instead of running around to every house once a week or so, the computer program spits out the names of the customers who it thinks need oil.

Some people don't have automatic delivery, but they are not considered "customers," as they are buying the cheapest oil when they need it. Most of the time it works, but I'd rather pay a little more and know that I am going to get oil to heat my house. We pre-pay in September and usually get a $0.25 or more discount.

And no, I don't get pizza delivered at home because of moronic assholes like you.
 
2012-12-29 07:19:46 AM

Mentalpatient87: MBrady: Mentalpatient87: I agree with everyone who says to fill in/weld shut the pipe, but I also think it'd be nice for the delivery guy to jump out, knock on the door and check in before pumping.

Two things that can be done to avoid these stories. I'd put a little more weight into the owner capping the pipe, though. It is his house.

Yea, because everyone is home waiting for the oil delivery guy to show up. Or that the oil delivery guy works second shift.

Ahh yes, the Shaggy Method of customer service: nervously declare nobody to be home to avoid doing shiat..

/zoinks, Scoob


see my previous reply to your idiot asshole butt farking buddy, you might want to know what owning a home is like before you try and bust someone's balls num nuts.
 
2012-12-29 08:06:47 AM

Lurk sober post drunk: i make our drivers read this.
it starts out with a tanker driver going to the wrong place, ends with 5 dead (i mainly make them read it for the other mistakes the driver made).

Link



Wow, that guy sounded like a major fark-up all the way down the line. Amazing how he skates through each training job. That first one nailed him. Shouldn't there be some kind of list you can check!?
 
2012-12-29 11:24:28 AM

MBrady: see my previous reply to your idiot asshole butt farking buddy, you might want to know what owning a home is like before you try and bust someone's balls num nuts.


Settle down, sparky. You'll pull something straining to be mad like that. All I suggested is that the driver check that he's in the right place before pumping shiat into people's houses. This is some horrible offense to you, apparently. So much so that you start gnashing your teeth, spewing vitriol, and making stupid inferences about people's lives. You might want to slow that down a bit to avoid looking like a rage filled twat.
 
2012-12-29 11:59:30 AM

ZzeusS: Lurk sober post drunk: i make our drivers read this.
it starts out with a tanker driver going to the wrong place, ends with 5 dead (i mainly make them read it for the other mistakes the driver made).

Link


Wow, that guy sounded like a major fark-up all the way down the line. Amazing how he skates through each training job. That first one nailed him. Shouldn't there be some kind of list you can check!?


in hindsight, i actually blame the safety director for this happening. the man should not have been hauling fuel. as far as list though...CDL with HAZMAT endorsement, and pass DOT physical? that kinda is the list. there are arguments to be made about standards, but...
 
2012-12-29 12:03:15 PM

Mentalpatient87: MBrady: see my previous reply to your idiot asshole butt farking buddy, you might want to know what owning a home is like before you try and bust someone's balls num nuts.

Settle down, sparky. You'll pull something straining to be mad like that. All I suggested is that the driver check that he's in the right place before pumping shiat into people's houses. This is some horrible offense to you, apparently. So much so that you start gnashing your teeth, spewing vitriol, and making stupid inferences about people's lives. You might want to slow that down a bit to avoid looking like a rage filled twat.


Sorry. I didn't get the gist of your humor.

You were agreeing with me. Mea culpa.
 
2012-12-29 02:50:27 PM

MBrady:

It's called automatic delivery asshole.


Is that slang for irritable bowel syndrome?
 
2012-12-29 02:59:29 PM

Mister Peejay: MBrady:

It's called automatic delivery asshole.

Is that slang for irritable bowel syndrome?


no it's a euphemism for ripping off your head and shiatting down your throat
 
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