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(Wired)   Shockingly enough it turns out that people don't want to tweet from their TV. Or read books. Or Fark. Because as it turns out, smart TVs pretty much suck   (wired.com) divider line 10
    More: Obvious, Apple TV, college kids, SimCity, Google TV, reading a book, Design for Loving, highlights  
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2582 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Dec 2012 at 10:10 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-28 10:17:37 AM  
3 votes:
Slow, horrible UI. Crappily written software. Whodathunk?

Then Apple will come out with their full Apple TV offering and it will sell like crazy and 'experts' will wonder why Apple is so successful and all the other manufactures will get their shiat together and start copying Apple when all they had to do for the last 5 years is do it better first and not let them into the market deep breath end rant.
2012-12-28 03:37:20 PM  
1 votes:

Great Janitor: Again, let me repeat this, and I'm typing it slowly so you can read it, tablets are not going to kill the laptop, they are only going to be replaced by laptop users who don't need anything beyond surfing the internet and netflix. For everyone else, that is, the majority of the population, laptops are going to remain. Companies like Dell which decide to switch from laptops to tablets means nothing beyond that there is going to be one more tablet maker and one less laptop maker. That's it. And it doesn't mean that this is a shift from laptop to tablet. That means that Dell would rather take a slice from the pie that is the tablet market instead of taking a slice from both the laptop and tablet pie.


I hope you're right. I'm somewhat concerned about the gradual decline of the general purpose computer and the fragmentation of the device market into multiple, incompatible, closed ecosystems. I hope that ten years from now I'll still be able to buy a generic laptop or desktop and run the OS and software that I choose, but the market seems to be heading away from that.

I have a tablet and just recently upgraded my laptop. I'm finding the tablet increasingly fussy for anything but reading and light web surfing, and appreciating my laptop more. I would probably do fine with just a smartphone (gotta have something to read when I'm pooping) and the laptop for portable computing.
2012-12-28 01:00:49 PM  
1 votes:

pdieten: Unless you're going to keep your videos on your iToy forever you're SOL. I can't believe Apple doesn't have a storage server in the works that will automatically slurp media off the iToys and stream them back.


iTunes on a computer does that. You can access anything in iTunes on any computer on your network via the AppleTV.
2012-12-28 12:08:50 PM  
1 votes:

WhippingBoy: If I drop a couple grand on a TV, I don't want it to be obsolete in a year or two because the "smart features" are obsolete.


Essentially, TV manufacturers are trying to break the sense people have of a TV-as-an-appliance, and instead force people to think of them as gadgets. Once upon a time, you bought a TV and used it until it broke. Then you bought another one. Maybe you saved up to buy a bigger one, but for the most part, you weren't buying new TVs much more frequently than you were buying new refrigerators or washing machines.

When the HDTV switchover happened, the people making TVs suddenly saw a huge uptick in sales as people upgraded. And they don't want to go back. They want you buying a new TV every five years.
2012-12-28 11:22:32 AM  
1 votes:
Okay, apparently we keep making this mistake, so here's the lesson (again):

Computers can do what televisions can do and more
televisions shouldn't do what computers can do.

Just because I can check email and tweet and surf the internet from my ipad, laptop and phone doesn't mean everything should, the tv does just what it should do, a device for television shows, movies and video game consoles.

/failed in the 1990s with Interactive TV
//failed later with Current TV
///just doesn't work
2012-12-28 11:11:08 AM  
1 votes:

meanmutton: wholedamnshow: I can't imagine the interface or anything of a smart TV being any better than my Roku. I get Netflix, HBO GO, Amazon Instant Video, and Hulu Plus if I decided to sign up for it. I also use Pandora when I'm having a party and Epix if I wanna watch a more recent movie.

What can a Smart TV do that my $80 Roku can't?

Not cost you the extra $80, not require an extra plug in your powerstrip, not require one extra cable to your TV. It's basically a Roku built into the TV.


Browsing on Amazon right now, Smart TVs seem to cost more than $80 than their non-smart equivalents.
2012-12-28 11:06:46 AM  
1 votes:

janeuner: I just set up a Viera E50 as a standalone media renderer in my family room. It replaced an LCD+HTPC setup.

Once folk get a sense of the capabilities, TFA will be dead wrong. The Netflix/Amazon/Pandora apps get used daily, but those really aren't the hook. The sweetness of the deal is the DLNA client plus the availability of cheap, huge HDDs. One can use MakeMKV to get raw rips of their DVD/Bluray collection for immediate playback, then queue up Handbrake to compress them down to storage size (800mb for 480p DVDs, ~3GB for 1080p Bluray).

But I'll admit; an XBMC client app for the TV would be effin sweet. I wonder if the legalese would bar such a thing from Panasonic's app store....?



2.bp.blogspot.com


Do you really think the average person cares about any of that stuff? Everything you said after "Netflix/Amazon/Pandora," 99.9% of the population doesn't give a shiat about.
2012-12-28 11:01:23 AM  
1 votes:

janeuner: I just set up a Viera E50 as a standalone media renderer in my family room. It replaced an LCD+HTPC setup.

Once folk get a sense of the capabilities, TFA will be dead wrong. The Netflix/Amazon/Pandora apps get used daily, but those really aren't the hook. The sweetness of the deal is the DLNA client plus the availability of cheap, huge HDDs. One can use MakeMKV to get raw rips of their DVD/Bluray collection for immediate playback, then queue up Handbrake to compress them down to storage size (800mb for 480p DVDs, ~3GB for 1080p Bluray).

But I'll admit; an XBMC client app for the TV would be effin sweet. I wonder if the legalese would bar such a thing from Panasonic's app store....?


You're the reason why Smart TV's suck (and I don't mean that as an insult, merely an observation). What you think is cool is completely beyond the abilities (or desires) of a typical TV consumer. Unfortunately, it's people like you who are currently designing Smart TVs. This is one of the reasons why Apple is so successful: they design products that your 68 year old mother in law can use, not products that are only useful to a fourth-year computer science major.
2012-12-28 10:42:34 AM  
1 votes:
It's all about the user interface, most "internet capable" devices have horrid UI's. Hell even the comcast on demand interface is a miserable experience, it really doesn't seem like it should be all that complicated.
2012-12-28 10:15:20 AM  
1 votes:

Earpj: Hmm... I want to get one (once the kids get the x-box out of my living room) for Netflix. Do they do Netflix ok?


Just get a regular TV and a Roku box. You'll probably come out ahead.
 
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