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(CBS News)   Upscale Texas cattle ranch reveals its secret ingredient: Beer-soaked hay. Apparently the cows like it better than the regular kind   (cbsnews.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Texas, IPAs, cattle feeding, Kobe beef, ingredients, Sam Adams  
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6015 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Dec 2012 at 12:14 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-28 12:55:07 AM  
2 votes:

Brian Ryanberger: WTF is that? Is that supposed to turn somebody on? It's half fat


What distinguishes kobe beef is the meat's extensive marbling, tenderness and taste. While American beef is rated on the USDA scale of Select, Choice and Prime, kobe beef is not rated on the USDA scale because it would require it's own category. As such, kobe beef is rated by the Japan Meat Grading Association from a scale of A1 to A5, with A5 being the highest grade of meat. To get an idea of the richness, kobe beef fat will actually begin dissolving at 77F degrees, which means the meat will literally melt in your mouth. This is why most preparation styles call for a quick sear, usually in the form of sukiyaki or shabu-shabu. In fact, if prepared as steak, kobe beef cannot be cooked more than medium rare, as it would otherwise liquefy.

As if that wasn't enough reason to order up a plate, kobe beef has far less saturated fats than typical American Angus, while having high levels of oleic acid - the good fatty acid found in olive and canola oils that reduce bad cholesterol. In addition, strict guidelines dictate that kobe labeled beef also be free of hormones
2012-12-28 02:49:07 AM  
1 vote:
Brian Ryanberger:

I had it at Ruth's Chris and was unimpressed to say the least. What idiot thought that making Beef into Veal was a good idea? Oh wait lemme guess that he is from an island also known for it's tentacle porn and schoolgirl panty vending machines.


Umm, Ruth's Chris is a step or two above Outback, far overpriced for what you get and nowhere near as good as they'd like you to believe. Just because you had a subpar steak there doesn't mean that the steak itself was subpar, but rather that the 18 year old kid in the kitchen didn't know what he was doing. Try someplace that isn't a chain and has a better reputation and then complain.
2012-12-28 02:10:47 AM  
1 vote:

Brian Ryanberger: red5ish: Brian Ryanberger: WTF is that? Is that supposed to turn somebody on? It's half fat

What distinguishes kobe beef is the meat's extensive marbling, tenderness and taste. While American beef is rated on the USDA scale of Select, Choice and Prime, kobe beef is not rated on the USDA scale because it would require it's own category. As such, kobe beef is rated by the Japan Meat Grading Association from a scale of A1 to A5, with A5 being the highest grade of meat. To get an idea of the richness, kobe beef fat will actually begin dissolving at 77F degrees, which means the meat will literally melt in your mouth. This is why most preparation styles call for a quick sear, usually in the form of sukiyaki or shabu-shabu. In fact, if prepared as steak, kobe beef cannot be cooked more than medium rare, as it would otherwise liquefy.

As if that wasn't enough reason to order up a plate, kobe beef has far less saturated fats than typical American Angus, while having high levels of oleic acid - the good fatty acid found in olive and canola oils that reduce bad cholesterol. In addition, strict guidelines dictate that kobe labeled beef also be free of hormones

I had it at Ruth's Chris and was unimpressed to say the least. What idiot thought that making Beef into Veal was a good idea? Oh wait lemme guess that he is from an island also known for it's tentacle porn and schoolgirl panty vending machines.


You were served knock-off beef. You cant get Kobe beef outside of Japan.
2012-12-28 01:53:36 AM  
1 vote:

ongbok: Isn't the whole "Kobe" designation of beef in Japan reserved for beef that comes from cows that are raised in a certain traditional area of Japan, and by tradition are only raised off of pesticide free grass and water from that area? Isn't it basically just another distinction of having organically raised beef?


I should have added organically raised grass raised beef.
2012-12-28 01:44:56 AM  
1 vote:

Likwit: red5ish: Brian Ryanberger: WTF is that? Is that supposed to turn somebody on? It's half fat

What distinguishes kobe beef is the meat's extensive marbling, tenderness and taste. While American beef is rated on the USDA scale of Select, Choice and Prime, kobe beef is not rated on the USDA scale because it would require it's own category. As such, kobe beef is rated by the Japan Meat Grading Association from a scale of A1 to A5, with A5 being the highest grade of meat. To get an idea of the richness, kobe beef fat will actually begin dissolving at 77F degrees, which means the meat will literally melt in your mouth. This is why most preparation styles call for a quick sear, usually in the form of sukiyaki or shabu-shabu. In fact, if prepared as steak, kobe beef cannot be cooked more than medium rare, as it would otherwise liquefy.

As if that wasn't enough reason to order up a plate, kobe beef has far less saturated fats than typical American Angus, while having high levels of oleic acid - the good fatty acid found in olive and canola oils that reduce bad cholesterol. In addition, strict guidelines dictate that kobe labeled beef also be free of hormones

There's just as much myth in what you're saying as the beer and massages stuff. Shabushabu is the opposite of searing, sukiyaki would hide the flavor of great beef, and if the fat "dissolved" at 77 degrees it would melt right off the cow.

There's a lot if fake Kobe and Matsusaka beef, and even very upscale restaurants will often have fine print on the menu saying that regular kuroge wagyuu is mixed in. The whole mystique surrounding Kobe beef is stupid; Japanese food snobbery at its worst. Any country that considers raw abalone and mayonnaise pizza delicacies can't be fully trusted when it comes to stuff like this.

I'm only half trolling here, folks.


Isn't the whole "Kobe" designation of beef in Japan reserved for beef that comes from cows that are raised in a certain traditional area of Japan, and by tradition are only raised off of pesticide free grass and water from that area? Isn't it basically just another distinction of having organically raised beef?
2012-12-28 01:36:31 AM  
1 vote:
Friend of mine told me once about how his friend's marijuana crop got 'accidentally' harvested with the cow feed (don't remember what they were growing).
He swore that that particular batch of silage smelled different...and produced some very mellow cattle.

No report on how the beef tasted however.
2012-12-28 01:29:28 AM  
1 vote:

red5ish: To get an idea of the richness, kobe beef fat will actually begin dissolving at 77F degrees, which means the meat will literally melt in your mouth.


I know the silliness of what you said has already been pointed out, but I just wanted to complete the smackdown by stating for the record that the average body temp of a cow is 101.5F. Thus, the cow would be considerably past the heat required for melting while it was, you know, walking around being a cow and stuff.
2012-12-28 12:38:36 AM  
1 vote:

mrlewish: It's not the cut it's the chef.


It's both.

I don't how good of a weaver you are, a silk shirt will always feel better than a burlap shirt.

Same goes for steak.
2012-12-28 12:33:21 AM  
1 vote:

The Southern Dandy: [i.imgur.com image 617x348]

[a2.ec-images.myspacecdn.com image 347x303]


Think my taste buds are getting erections.
2012-12-28 12:24:27 AM  
1 vote:
Well, duh. ANYONE would prefer beer-soaked hay to regular hay. Or beer-soaked anything, for that matter.
2012-12-28 12:21:04 AM  
1 vote:
Well, Moofakringooo.
2012-12-28 12:15:45 AM  
1 vote:

AverageAmericanGuy: When you hear the term, "Kobe beef," a few things are likely to come to mind: the velvety, fatty richness of the meat, the extraordinarily high price of a steak and the lavish lifestyle of the cattle. The pampering these cows receive is renowned and the image of beer-chugging bovines has been seared into the popular imagination.

But it turns out that the imagination is where such tales belong. So says Yoshinori Nakanishi, a Kobe cattle farmer who's been in the business for nearly 40 years. "Neither I nor any beef farmer I know would ever dream of giving cows beer," he says.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/fs20100826a3.html


So you're saying they've been doing it wrong?
 
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