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(Outside Online)   What it feels like to freeze to death   (outsideonline.com) divider line 8
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14468 clicks; posted to Main » on 29 Dec 2012 at 11:13 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-29 10:50:43 AM  
5 votes:
img832.imageshack.us

Vhat killed da dinosauhs?

DA ICE AAAAAAAGE! ARHRAHRARHBWARHAGUGHRHRAHGHGGH
2012-12-29 12:24:05 PM  
2 votes:

LabGrrl: First Chill-Then Stupor-Then the Letting Go

As someone who froze half to death once, it's like this...

First you're wondering where you are, but you're not freezing to death, so it's okay.
You ask yourself questions, because you're near no human:

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

Then you start to get mildly confused, for example, starting to think that the local animals are talking or having complex thoughts.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

The auditory hallucinations are the first ones. The silence of the snow starts to make noises. Now you're more confused...now you think the animals are capable of asking questions.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

You start to repeat things, wondering if you've said it before, first just phrases, then whole sentences.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.


Once you're at the repeating sentences stage, you decide to take a lay down in the snow since you're so sleepy. It ceases being cold to you, then you die.


Jesus. I think you just broke Robert Frost for me.
2012-12-29 11:59:01 AM  
2 votes:
First Chill-Then Stupor-Then the Letting Go

As someone who froze half to death once, it's like this...

First you're wondering where you are, but you're not freezing to death, so it's okay.
You ask yourself questions, because you're near no human:

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village, though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.


Then you start to get mildly confused, for example, starting to think that the local animals are talking or having complex thoughts.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.


The auditory hallucinations are the first ones. The silence of the snow starts to make noises. Now you're more confused...now you think the animals are capable of asking questions.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.


You start to repeat things, wondering if you've said it before, first just phrases, then whole sentences.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.


Once you're at the repeating sentences stage, you decide to take a lay down in the snow since you're so sleepy. It ceases being cold to you, then you die.
2012-12-29 07:27:53 PM  
1 votes:
We pop our cat into the freezer when we got out of town and then thaw him out near the woodstove-aside from the wet fur he doesn't seem to mind.
2012-12-29 06:59:55 PM  
1 votes:
When I was about 4 years old we found our neighbors dog froze solid on our back porch. My mom was all freaked out that the dog was dead or dying so we propped him up, stiff as board next to the fireplace. I still remember to this day the dog thawing out, springing to life and running around shaking his wet fur all over the house. Mom was not impressed.
2012-12-29 12:29:57 PM  
1 votes:

Abox: After a day of skiing I always remove my jacket and fleece before I get in the car for the drive home but I always think about what would happen if I had a car wreck going over the mountain pass...would I be able to reach my outer layers and put them on while waiting for rescue.


No. Does that answer your question? Open the windows and keep your clothes on.

I understand cold. I have traveled through cold. I have slept in snow routinely. There is a very short list of things not to do in cold. Let's look. Do not remove your clothes.
2012-12-29 11:51:31 AM  
1 votes:

FarkTorrance: BiffDangler: On a related note: As I understand it most of what we know about hypothermia, medically speaking, is the result of Nazi experiments on Jews where they deliberately exposed them to freezing water to try to understand hypothermia. Many died of course.

Yeah, they mention in the article some test results from experiments at Dachau. That's actually my biggest gripe about the article: by including that sort of thing, it seems to me that you're validating the scientific "merit" of such experiments. I don't think those d-nozzles deserve to have anything they did put forth as having scientific value, period. Any actual scientists who feel like stepping forward to argue that point, please feel free.


Ever hear the old adage "even a blind pig finds mud once in awhile"? Information is information. It was terribly gained but we have it now and ignoring it only serves to disrespect the dead who had their lives stolen from them to get the information.

FarkTor, you sicken me.
2012-12-29 11:20:45 AM  
1 votes:
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
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