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(Daily Mail)   See if you can find these camouflaged animals   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 76
    More: Cool, Kruger National Park, telephoto lens, trunk, depth of field, Honshu, predators, new perspective  
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7405 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Dec 2012 at 9:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-27 08:07:32 PM
Thanks for that, subby. Those were pretty excellent. :)
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-12-27 08:26:16 PM
Some birders told me there was a snowy owl among the chunks of ice along the shore. I took their word for it, aimed my camera at a chunk of ice that looked just like all the rest, got a picture, came home, looked closely, and sure enough there was an owl there. I never would have spotted it on my own.

In the insect world, some katydids and treehoppers are great at pretending to be leaves and thorns.
 
2012-12-27 09:19:01 PM
Soon....

i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2012-12-27 09:19:35 PM
Cuddle fish fail.

Also, I spotted this one right off the bat

i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2012-12-27 09:28:52 PM
www.boxcarmarketing.com
This demonstrates the value of not being seen.
 
2012-12-27 09:37:19 PM
Can you spot me? A Leopard conceals herself

Leopards are notoriously camera shy. Spent a week in Tanzania and got a TON of pics of lions, cheetahs, jackals, hyenas and other wildlife. They just don't seem to give a shiat if you get near them. But leopards? This was the best pic I could get:

i49.tinypic.com

i45.tinypic.com
 
2012-12-27 09:41:10 PM
Great article.

The article gives these animals a lot of agency in knowlingly camoflaging themselves by hiding in certain areas. But which of these animals actually have any understanding that they or their species has some specific look to them, and which know precisely where to camoflage themselves. I think very few.

Article sucked.

/nah, seriously, great article.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-12-27 09:48:03 PM
But which of these animals actually have any understanding that they or their species has some specific look to them, and which know precisely where to camoflage themselves.

The crab spider Misumena vatia turns that around. It picks a flower then changes color to match.

If you live near a roadside or field with flowers all summer long, take a walk in late summer and look for a fly or bee that isn't moving. There may be an invisible spider sucking its guts out.
 
2012-12-27 09:51:35 PM
What, behind the ninjas?
 
2012-12-27 09:54:34 PM
I can't see the damn snipe.

And I'm holding the bag and everything.

/where'd everyone else go?
 
2012-12-27 09:58:52 PM

ZAZ: But which of these animals actually have any understanding that they or their species has some specific look to them, and which know precisely where to camoflage themselves.

The crab spider Misumena vatia turns that around. It picks a flower then changes color to match.

If you live near a roadside or field with flowers all summer long, take a walk in late summer and look for a fly or bee that isn't moving. There may be an invisible spider sucking its guts out.


The Misumena Vatia community frowns on your revealing of their secrets.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-12-27 09:59:15 PM
You shouldn't trick me into snipe hunting, Johnny. My scoutmaster tricked me into snipe hunting, once. ONCE!
 
2012-12-27 10:00:18 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-27 10:14:08 PM
img442.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-27 10:15:58 PM
I'm developing computer vision applications and it's pretty interesting that although I can spot these animals, I can hardly find the logic in my perception. There are some clues like changes in texture, shape, colors, and symmetry. The scary thing is that I can also find these animals if the pictures are grayscaled and downsampled to a ridiculously low resolution.
 
2012-12-27 10:16:08 PM
Came here for the "how NOT to be seen reference," not disappointed.

*fistbump for fusillade762*
 
2012-12-27 10:18:20 PM
While cool, I don't think any of those were difficult to spot quickly... Then again the tablet screen was a little over a foot away from my face.
 
2012-12-27 10:20:24 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-27 10:20:39 PM
Spot the lizard:

leftofzen.com
 
2012-12-27 10:20:55 PM

RoyBatty: The article gives these animals a lot of agency in knowlingly camoflaging themselves by hiding in certain areas. But which of these animals actually have any understanding that they or their species has some specific look to them, and which know precisely where to camoflage themselves. I think very few.

Article sucked.


Yup.  TFA even admits that the guy goes out of his way to frame the shots to make it harder to see them.  If I take a panoramic of a huge snow covered field with one snowhare in it, of course it will be harder for someone to spot the hare right off the bat.  I prefer shots of animals intentionally camouflaged, like moths, insects and octopodes.
 
2012-12-27 10:22:34 PM
img194.imageshack.us

Almost.
 
2012-12-27 10:36:37 PM
i4.ytimg.com

Approves
 
2012-12-27 10:37:52 PM
The giraffe one fooled me.
 
2012-12-27 10:48:11 PM

HotWingAgenda: RoyBatty: The article gives these animals a lot of agency in knowlingly camoflaging themselves by hiding in certain areas. But which of these animals actually have any understanding that they or their species has some specific look to them, and which know precisely where to camoflage themselves. I think very few.

Article sucked.

Yup.  TFA even admits that the guy goes out of his way to frame the shots to make it harder to see them.  If I take a panoramic of a huge snow covered field with one snowhare in it, of course it will be harder for someone to spot the hare right off the bat.  I prefer shots of animals intentionally camouflaged, like moths, insects and octopodes.


Two things:

1) I am ashamed I wrote knowlingly
2) Yeah, the octopodes. Wow.
 
2012-12-27 10:52:04 PM

whatshisname: Spot the lizard:

[leftofzen.com image 350x510]


Left to the center there are a few similarly shaped and symmetric spots. Must be a lizard. Or the sponge tool.
 
2012-12-27 11:08:20 PM

SavageWombat: I can't see the damn snipe.

And I'm holding the bag and everything.

/where'd everyone else go?


First thing I thought, too. Where the phuq is the snipe?
 
2012-12-27 11:08:31 PM
Very cool, took a little while to find the snipe.

What?
 
2012-12-27 11:09:52 PM

Tumunga: SavageWombat: I can't see the damn snipe.

And I'm holding the bag and everything.

/where'd everyone else go?

First thing I thought, too. Where the phuq is the snipe?


Look for a webbed foot.
 
2012-12-27 11:17:19 PM

aerojockey: The giraffe one fooled me.


Me too, I scanned it left to right, went to read the caption and went

'hoshiat, there's a giraffe there!'
 
2012-12-27 11:18:07 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2012-12-27 11:25:15 PM
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-12-27 11:35:45 PM
farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-12-27 11:38:41 PM
Those were really cool, but they should have trolled us by putting out a pic that didn't have a animal in it.
 
2012-12-27 11:40:36 PM
I really thought that the snipe was a joke-- you know 'going snipe hunting..'
 
2012-12-27 11:41:10 PM

RoyBatty: [i.imgur.com image 623x399]


Thank you. I was beginning to wonder if that was a snipe hunt joke.

On the other hand, I kept going back to that area because it seemed "off", but I couldn't resolve it until you circled it.
 
2012-12-27 11:43:19 PM

TripSixes: I really thought that the snipe was a joke-- you know 'going snipe hunting..'


Fish in a Barrel: Thank you. I was beginning to wonder if that was a snipe hunt joke.


So did I until I googled for Common Snipe and found one listed in the wiki, and I STILL WONDERED IF I WAS BEING PRANKED.
 
2012-12-28 12:01:50 AM

RoyBatty: TripSixes: I really thought that the snipe was a joke-- you know 'going snipe hunting..'

Fish in a Barrel: Thank you. I was beginning to wonder if that was a snipe hunt joke.

So did I until I googled for Common Snipe and found one listed in the wiki, and I STILL WONDERED IF I WAS BEING PRANKED.


This is why that whole "snipe hunt" concept never made much sense to me. A snipe is at least a real thing; the true pranking achievement is getting someone to go out hunting for some creature that doesn't even exist, like a heffalump or something. The people doing the prank without knowing what a snipe is are the ones looking foolish.
 
2012-12-28 12:15:52 AM

fusillade762: Can you spot me? A Leopard conceals herself

Leopards are notoriously camera shy. Spent a week in Tanzania and got a TON of pics of lions, cheetahs, jackals, hyenas and other wildlife. They just don't seem to give a shiat if you get near them. But leopards? This was the best pic I could get:

[i49.tinypic.com image 730x547]

[i45.tinypic.com image 850x639]


I was on a camera safari many years ago and someone asked if we would see leopards.  The guide replied, "We may or may not see Leopard, but Leopard will see us."

Big cats are cool.
 
2012-12-28 12:31:21 AM

Clockwork Kumquat: RoyBatty: TripSixes: I really thought that the snipe was a joke-- you know 'going snipe hunting..'

Fish in a Barrel: Thank you. I was beginning to wonder if that was a snipe hunt joke.

So did I until I googled for Common Snipe and found one listed in the wiki, and I STILL WONDERED IF I WAS BEING PRANKED.

This is why that whole "snipe hunt" concept never made much sense to me. A snipe is at least a real thing; the true pranking achievement is getting someone to go out hunting for some creature that doesn't even exist, like a heffalump or something. The people doing the prank without knowing what a snipe is are the ones looking foolish.


The prank is the fact that everyone thinks it's a prank but it's really not a prank.  It's a meta-prank.

/prank
 
2012-12-28 12:34:17 AM
Taolie

You can always tell a Milford man.
 
2012-12-28 12:41:57 AM
traylor: I'm developing computer vision applications and it's pretty interesting that although I can spot these animals, I can hardly find the logic in my perception. There are some clues like changes in texture, shape, colors, and symmetry. The scary thing is that I can also find these animals if the pictures are grayscaled and downsampled to a ridiculously low resolution.

Worked on pattern recognition software, the only one of these that gave me trouble is the snipe.

// for me, the dead giveaway is anything eyeball like and patches where the patterns don't match properly.
 
2012-12-28 12:55:47 AM
Damn. I knew right about where it was going to be, but I still couldn't actually see the snipe until RoyBatty pointed it out.
 
2012-12-28 12:58:52 AM

aerojockey: The giraffe one fooled me.


I thought it was great. How does something that big conceal itself without a passport and a ticket to a non-extradition country?
 
2012-12-28 01:04:13 AM
Damn snipe took me forever to find, thought it was a joke. Glad I am not the only one.
 
2012-12-28 01:12:15 AM

HotWingAgenda: RoyBatty: The article gives these animals a lot of agency in knowlingly camoflaging themselves by hiding in certain areas. But which of these animals actually have any understanding that they or their species has some specific look to them, and which know precisely where to camoflage themselves. I think very few.

Article sucked.

Yup.  TFA even admits that the guy goes out of his way to frame the shots to make it harder to see them.  If I take a panoramic of a huge snow covered field with one snowhare in it, of course it will be harder for someone to spot the hare right off the bat.  I prefer shots of animals intentionally camouflaged, like moths, insects and octopodes.


We get it, the owl has sharp knees and you know of a much better nature camouflage photographer but we've probably never heard of him.

It takes two special farkers to become overly critical asshats over some cool looking nature pictures.
 
2012-12-28 02:12:09 AM
Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener

Came here for the "how NOT to be seen reference," not disappointed.

Likewise.

home.earthlink.net

home.earthlink.net
 
2012-12-28 03:10:08 AM
A resounding meh..

Only one's I didn't see right away it was a matter of perspective of the shot, meaning the scale of the picture. I'm not all that great with plants, so not knowing how big or large a given plant is creates a depth illusion of sorts when you don't even know what you're looking for. Big, small, bird, mammal?

Glance down and see "deer" in the caption and it's instant, I see the deer before I even finish looking up from the words.

It's incredibly easy to camo- in a still shot, and as others mentioned, the picture taker purposefully took them from the right angles.

/the dark grey owl was awesome
 
2012-12-28 03:13:17 AM
Some of these are photos of animals covered in their surroundings. Can you really claim cayman under water plants or a snake covered in sand are 'camouflaged'? Well hidden, yes. Using coloring and optical tricks to blend in with it's environment, no
 
2012-12-28 04:10:16 AM
It took me 5 seconds or less for me to spot every animal 'hidden' in the picture. However, I do believe that in the animal kingdom, 5 seconds is the difference between life or death.
 
2012-12-28 06:52:55 AM
omeganuepsilon: Only one's I didn't see right away

I saw that apostrophe right away. One is? One was? Something belongs to a "one"?
 
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