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(Slate)   Eight years ago today, the Earth was slammed by a cosmic explosion that partially ionized the atmosphere... from 50,000 light years away   (slate.com) divider line 27
    More: Scary, light-years, Earth, neutron stars, magnetic fields, Death from the Skies, gamma-ray, logarithmic scales, integral  
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5377 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Dec 2012 at 4:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-27 03:32:27 PM
Farking magnetars, how do they work?
 
2012-12-27 04:00:11 PM
FTFA: ...23 on the Richter Scale.

So...this may forever mark me as a nerd, but...the Richter Scale doesn't really work that way. You can't use it to measure large aisles, since it is defined by the wave amplitude in a quake, ie it would actually have been almost zero in this case because the neutroneum would not in fact have moved all that far. He actually should have said moment magnitude scale, which measures the energy. :p
 
2012-12-27 04:06:19 PM
Space is awesome.

Scary, but awesome.
 
2012-12-27 04:09:16 PM
illegal.tender: Space is awesome.

Scary, but awesome.


Good thing we live inside it.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-12-27 04:14:38 PM
Ions in the upper atmosphere? Earth is doomed!
 
2012-12-27 04:19:29 PM
Somebody went under a dock
And there they saw a rock
It wasn't a rock
It was a rock lobster

// first lobster ref in a magnet thread, for shame farkers, for shame.
 
2012-12-27 04:23:04 PM
I actually remember that.
 
2012-12-27 04:42:46 PM

Sybarite: Farking magnetars, how do they work?


I just looked them up on wikipedia and I still have no idea


/Those things have a solid crust? What in the hell?
 
2012-12-27 05:05:10 PM
Let me get this straight:

50,008 years ago, Galactus belched.
 
2012-12-27 05:06:13 PM
[adds another layer of tinfoil to bedroom walls]
 
2012-12-27 05:29:40 PM
Interesting that this cosmic explosion hit the earth less than one day after the massive earthquake in the Indian Ocean that caused the devastating tsunami. Phil mentioned in TFA that the explosion "caused the earth's magnetic field to ring like a bell". That effect was reported in the days after the earthquake, but the media attributed that to the effect of the earthquake, not the cosmic wave. I'd like to know specifically how far apart in time the two events were.

Yeah, I know they're most likely not related, but it's one heck of a coincidence.
 
2012-12-27 06:08:28 PM
This cracking magnetar will kill us all.
 
2012-12-27 06:46:22 PM

SVenus: Let me get this straight:

50,008 years ago, Galactus belched.


Heaven help us is he is gassy.
 
2012-12-27 07:10:13 PM

The correct answer is...: Interesting that this cosmic explosion hit the earth less than one day after the massive earthquake in the Indian Ocean that caused the devastating tsunami.


The key word there is "after". The energy from that blast was travelling at ~99% the speed of light, so with the earthquake occurring before then there is literally no way at all they could possibly be related or connected in any way - and it'll be another 33,300 years or so before any of the material ejected from that blast reaches us.   It was a coinky-dink that the blast wave arrived the day after the earthquake - that's all.
 
2012-12-27 07:14:55 PM

The correct answer is...: Interesting that this cosmic explosion hit the earth less than one day after the massive earthquake in the Indian Ocean that caused the devastating tsunami. Phil mentioned in TFA that the explosion "caused the earth's magnetic field to ring like a bell". That effect was reported in the days after the earthquake, but the media attributed that to the effect of the earthquake, not the cosmic wave. I'd like to know specifically how far apart in time the two events were.

Yeah, I know they're most likely not related, but it's one heck of a coincidence.


strange
look hard enough and you will always find a correlation with something
but some correlations are causal, the fact that we dont have any understanding today, doesnt mean it didnt happen

toss in the fact that we currently have a zero success record at predicting earthquakes implies that we have little to no clue what all of the contributing factors are.
massively fluctuating magnetic field is going to massively move the magnet in the earth
a magnet that big doesnt have to move far to release enormous amounts of energy
 
2012-12-27 07:18:54 PM
The bad news, if there was intelligent life on that side of the galaxy.  We know when it died.
 
2012-12-27 07:33:36 PM

Makh: The bad news, if there was intelligent life on that side of the galaxy.  We know when it died.


Or,

when it woke up.
 
2012-12-27 07:52:24 PM

MurphyMurphy: Makh: The bad news, if there was intelligent life on that side of the galaxy.  We know when it died.

Or,

when it woke up.


Or, when it had a population boom.
 
2012-12-27 07:53:19 PM

illegal.tender: Space is awesome.

Scary, but awesome.


Space has a terrible power.
 
2012-12-27 08:07:37 PM

buckler: illegal.tender: Space is awesome.

Scary, but awesome.

Space has a terrible power.


My house has no stairs.
 
2012-12-27 08:41:03 PM
Damn Bugs!
 
2012-12-27 09:07:06 PM

Sybarite: Farking magnetars, how do they work?


They draw you into their magnetar pit trap.


/so sorry
 
2012-12-27 10:41:53 PM
Still no explanation for the Oh-My-God Particle
 
2012-12-27 10:46:40 PM

Makh: The bad news, if there was intelligent life on that side of the galaxy.  We know when it died.


Would a magnetar be able to wipe out life on a planet, though? Everything I have read says it mainly would effect satellites, even if it were a lot closer. And wouldn't it have to be pointed in the right direction even if so (like a GRB)?
 
2012-12-27 10:50:20 PM

machoprogrammer: Makh: The bad news, if there was intelligent life on that side of the galaxy.  We know when it died.

Would a magnetar be able to wipe out life on a planet, though? Everything I have read says it mainly would effect satellites, even if it were a lot closer. And wouldn't it have to be pointed in the right direction even if so (like a GRB)?


Actually, just read wiki. It says they do product GRBs, but that they would need to be pretty close to wipe us out (Wiki says 10 light years, which seems low).
 
2012-12-27 11:17:35 PM

machoprogrammer: Actually, just read wiki. It says they do product GRBs, but that they would need to be pretty close to wipe us out (Wiki says 10 light years, which seems low).


I think that's for destroying all life or damn near all of it.  It says the effect would be 12.5 KT TNT at 7.5 km.  Or one Hiroshima bomb.

Considerably less, would put a major dent in our civilization, destroy bigger lifeforms, if not completely sterilize us.

Glad to know it's not as bad as it seems though.  However, that's just a 1 cm shift in the crust.  Yeeps.
 
2012-12-28 12:55:39 PM
I love being a scientist, being able to confidently state that a magnetar 50,000 LY away had an "earthquake" that "probably shifted [the crust] by only a centimeter".
It matters not that we regularly misinterpret how planetary geology works within the planets of our own solar system. After all, nobody will be able to disprove this interpretation in the next dozen generations.

We are the New Priesthood of the modern age!
 
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