If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Gizmodo)   How one person became a tech writer, thanks to Calvin & Hobbes   (gizmodo.com) divider line 21
    More: Cool, technical writers, Bill Watterson  
•       •       •

3263 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Dec 2012 at 7:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



21 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-12-26 04:06:10 PM
What happens if the edge of the record approaches the speed of light?
 
2012-12-26 04:30:45 PM

AssAsInAssassin: What happens if the edge of the record approaches the speed of light?


The record will lose structural integrity well before that happens.
 
2012-12-26 07:14:10 PM
Crap, now I'll be up all night trying to figure out why people would find this confusing.
 
2012-12-26 07:27:55 PM
When you realize this is how the wings on a plane generate lift it becomes even more mind bending.
 
2012-12-26 07:32:56 PM
Ummm, the two points are moving at the same speed. At least in radians.
 
2012-12-26 07:48:11 PM
Author may be a tech writer but they're not a very good writer. There is writing on, about or for a given field of technology. And there is technical writing, such as instruction booklets, assembly directions and how-to sheets. Fa lalalala, lalalala.

wildcardjack: Ummm, the two points are moving at the same speed. At least in radians.


that's why this white boy walks 'pimp roll' style. my love moves in different times at different places, and the effect is fine.
 
2012-12-26 08:11:46 PM

AssAsInAssassin: What happens if the edge of the record approaches the speed of light?


It will set somewhere near Flagstaff
 
2012-12-26 08:35:48 PM

ArkAngel: AssAsInAssassin: What happens if the edge of the record approaches the speed of light?

It will set somewhere near Flagstaff


Is that is why all the rocks in AZ are red?
 
2012-12-26 08:43:41 PM

Lighting: ArkAngel: AssAsInAssassin: What happens if the edge of the record approaches the speed of light?

It will set somewhere near Flagstaff

Is that is why all the rocks in AZ are red?


Yep. But only after the world turned to color in the 1930's.
 
2012-12-26 09:07:58 PM
I broke open my old C&H books just a few weeks ago and read some of them -- the first time I'd done so in damn near 20 years.

They're still funny, but this time I regarded them with a more seasoned and mature perspective: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and its mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him out of it, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover, that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.
 
2012-12-26 11:02:13 PM

ArkAngel: Lighting: ArkAngel: AssAsInAssassin: What happens if the edge of the record approaches the speed of light?

It will set somewhere near Flagstaff

Is that is why all the rocks in AZ are red?

Yep. But only after the world turned to color in the 1930's.


You must be from money. The world in my area wasn't color till at least the early 40's.
 
2012-12-26 11:21:15 PM
If you measure the coastline of an island with a six inch ruler, will you end up with a longer coastline measurement than you would using a yardstick?
 
2012-12-26 11:50:52 PM
.. for Gizmodo though?

-1 for Calvin & Hobbes.
 
2012-12-27 10:31:16 AM
Why aren't things reversed vertically in a mirror? What's so special about the horizontal axis?
 
2012-12-27 10:52:55 AM

LiberalWeenie: Why aren't things reversed vertically in a mirror? What's so special about the horizontal axis?


because your eyes aren't one over the other, they are horizontal.
 
2012-12-27 11:25:26 AM

Ishkur: I broke open my old C&H books just a few weeks ago and read some of them -- the first time I'd done so in damn near 20 years.

They're still funny, but this time I regarded them with a more seasoned and mature perspective: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and its mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him out of it, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover, that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.


or he is supposed to be a child with an active imagination.

there is that.
 
2012-12-27 01:56:15 PM

EatHam: LiberalWeenie: Why aren't things reversed vertically in a mirror? What's so special about the horizontal axis?

because your eyes aren't one over the other, they are horizontal.


mind = blown
 
2012-12-27 01:57:47 PM
But no, that's not the answer.

Though I honestly don't know what is, I'm embarrassed to say.
 
2012-12-27 03:18:25 PM

frepnog: Ishkur: I broke open my old C&H books just a few weeks ago and read some of them -- the first time I'd done so in damn near 20 years.

They're still funny, but this time I regarded them with a more seasoned and mature perspective: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and its mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him out of it, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover, that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.

or he is supposed to be a child with an active imagination.

there is that.


Not to mention there were times when certain events happened independent of Calvin's presence. He might just be able to manifest his Imagination into reality to a noticeable degree. Which is cool.
 
2012-12-27 04:51:02 PM

LiberalWeenie: Why aren't things reversed vertically in a mirror?


Not sure if serious, but...

They're no more or less reversed horizontally than they are vertically (depending on your definition of "reversed").

One could argue that there's no reversal going on, since shiat that's on the left is also on the left in the mirror. Same goes for right, top, and bottom.

If you're just talking about letters looking backwards, then that happens vertically too. Take sign and hold it horizontally, then vertically. Letters look farked up either way.
 
2012-12-27 06:03:21 PM

frepnog: Ishkur: I broke open my old C&H books just a few weeks ago and read some of them -- the first time I'd done so in damn near 20 years.

They're still funny, but this time I regarded them with a more seasoned and mature perspective: Calvin is a certified schizophrenic.

It's played for laughs that he sees Hobbes (and snowmen and the cardboard box and everything else) differently than others and its mostly just chalked up to having a harmless yet occasionally destructive imagination, but when Calvin carries on in his fantasy world and never breaks character, is never talked or reasoned out of it, and each new input stimuli -- from his parents to teachers and other authority figures -- simply reinforces his fantasy narrative instead of snapping him out of it, there is a seriously deep, highly sinister and very disturbing mind inside that head of his.

He simply cannot distinguish between reality and his psychosis. He's not pretending that Hobbes is alive, he thinks that Hobbes really IS alive and moreover, that he habitually gets into fights with and frequently loses to. Even in the presence of others, he carries on conversations and interactions with Hobbes as if Hobbes is a living thing.

Watterson always played off the nature of Hobbes' identity as "Calvin sees Hobbes one way and everyone sees Hobbes a different way", but that's a very understated way to say that Calvin is legitimately insane.

But what is Hobbes really? Well, the answer's obvious: Hobbes is Tyler Durdin.

or he is supposed to be a child with an active imagination.

there is that.


Agreed, part of the issue is that we're being told the story from different perspectives, both within and without the "reality break".There's also the fact that usually somewhere in the themed strips is the trigger event, either at the outset or the ending, that caused Calvin to spin into a fantasy character or a fight with Hobbes to begin with. Cavin fantasizes about being Spaceman Spiff blasting into a dimension where TIME HAS NO MEANING, and then we zip back to him being bored in class. The persistence of stuffed animals implies that all kids are schizophrenic, because for a certain number of years, these animals to a degree ARE real to children, and we don't always have the complete window into how their imagination translates them into real creatures. Imaginary friends are the next step, and then when you're in your teens or twenties and you're talking to invisible animals or people, that's when we reach for the lithium. Developmental milestones, people.

It's all a matter of perspective. We're seeing the imagination of a child defined with the constraints of the adult drawing it. The thing that made C&H so good was that Watterson understood all of it, and it was wonderfully written and drawn. My only fear is that we'll never look upon his like in a comic strip again.
 
Displayed 21 of 21 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report