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(Telegraph)   In a bid to compensate for something, China launches world's longest bullet train   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 45
    More: Interesting, Chinese leaders, Wuhan, high-speed rail  
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3186 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Dec 2012 at 4:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-26 08:15:59 PM
Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?
 
2012-12-26 10:03:22 PM

Apos: Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?


You need to progress to see changes happen. China has completed something, a high speed rail network, earlier than most western countries have been able to coming complete a decent one.

Australia's been talking about it for a quarter of a century. Still can't get it done.
 
2012-12-26 10:26:48 PM

Apos: Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?

"


"Is There a Chance the Track Could Bend?"
 
2012-12-26 11:11:25 PM

gopher321: Apos: Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?"


"Is There a Chance the Track Could Bend?"


Not on your life, my Hindu friend!
 
2012-12-27 04:29:02 AM

jake_lex: gopher321: Apos: Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?"


"Is There a Chance the Track Could Bend?"

Not on your life, my Hindu friend!


What about us brain dead slobs?
 
2012-12-27 04:47:36 AM
When I was in Taiwan an important professor at Tsinghua University said the twenty first century belongs to Asia. His evidence was that China was prepared to build a complete high speed rail line between Singapore and Beijing.

He's farking right.
 
2012-12-27 04:53:30 AM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: When I was in Taiwan an important professor at Tsinghua University said the twenty first century belongs to Asia. His evidence was that China was prepared to build a complete high speed rail line between Singapore and Beijing.

He's farking right.


China is in a good position to do well, but they also need to avoid economic collapse and their real estate market doesn't look too promising for that right now.

It'd be nice if the USA were doing more for our infrastructure, but at least ours is typically very safe (which coincidentally is part of why we can't afford to upgrade much.)
 
2012-12-27 04:56:09 AM
2300km at 300km an hour average COULD get that 8 hour trip, but 35 stops... You'd have to go much faster than 300 km per hour.
 
2012-12-27 04:56:49 AM
http://gizmodo.com/5971356/huge-shark-tank-breaks-inside-chinese-mall- 15-people-injured
 
2012-12-27 05:01:29 AM
What I means is that its designed to brake, because of the way that system works,

20 Million project will regardless have a guy that get 5usd a truck of cement to ignore that its not the official blend ect. and so on
to many have invested interest in not making it the best possible,

Likely we have bigger crash inside the 6months ( but I hope not )
 
2012-12-27 05:17:20 AM

wildcardjack: 2300km at 300km an hour average COULD get that 8 hour trip, but 35 stops... You'd have to go much faster than 300 km per hour.


Some are probably express trains with few or no stops along the way. Others will run as local trains and serve at 35 stops.

That's basically the plan for California so that not every train stops in every small town along the way, but it reduces local opposition (in the US, not that it matters in China) and puts the track to more use.
 
2012-12-27 05:21:57 AM
img156.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-27 05:23:45 AM

Apos: Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?


According to China, they intend to have safety inspectors on the tracks every night when the train is not running to identify and fix any problems and they have an impressive looking control room that can fix any trains on the wrong tracks.

I'm 99% sure I saw all that on China Central Televison's English news-broadcast so of course they'd say it's safe. We'll have to see how it works out.
 
2012-12-27 05:37:24 AM
I'm actually really excited to be able to try this high-speed railway. I live about 2 1/12 hours from Beijing by the fastest train they have- the "Dongche" or D-train. The new Gaotie, the high-speed G-train, is supposed to cut that time to 90 minutes. The downside is the increase in price- from Shijiazhuang to Beijing, a D-train second class seat costs 88rmb, or about $10. The G-train will cost roughly 150rmb, which is closer to $15.

For price comparison, they have several other train classes- T, K, L, and some others I can't remember. I took a T train to Beijing while they finish the new train station here (D-train lines aren't open yet) and it cost me 44rmb, but I had to stand for 3 hours. The K train runs the same distance in 4 hours, and the further down you go the more stops they take and the less it costs.

Train travel can go anywhere in China, where plane tickets and cars are so far out of the price range of the common people it's not even funny. A plane ticket to Dalian Liaoning from here cost me 1000rmb round-trip, about $150, roughly a quarter of the average income of a family of four in my city.

So, all in all I'm probably going to keep taking the D-train for my trips- it's fantastic quality, it's clean, and it's cheap. I might look into taking the G-train for longer trips- don't have the hassle of baggage check and security is way lighter. Why spend an extra 60rmb (about two days worth of meals) just for an extra hour less in transit?

I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.
 
2012-12-27 05:57:34 AM

Happy Hours: Apos: Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?

According to China, they intend to have safety inspectors on the tracks every night when the train is not running to identify and fix any problems and they have an impressive looking control room that can fix any trains on the wrong tracks.

I'm 99% sure I saw all that on China Central Televison's English news-broadcast so of course they'd say it's safe. We'll have to see how it works out.


Indeed. I'll be paying close attention.
 
2012-12-27 06:04:32 AM

Kuroutesshin: I'm actually really excited to be able to try this high-speed railway. I live about 2 1/12 hours from Beijing by the fastest train they have- the "Dongche" or D-train. The new Gaotie, the high-speed G-train, is supposed to cut that time to 90 minutes. The downside is the increase in price- from Shijiazhuang to Beijing, a D-train second class seat costs 88rmb, or about $10. The G-train will cost roughly 150rmb, which is closer to $15.

For price comparison, they have several other train classes- T, K, L, and some others I can't remember. I took a T train to Beijing while they finish the new train station here (D-train lines aren't open yet) and it cost me 44rmb, but I had to stand for 3 hours. The K train runs the same distance in 4 hours, and the further down you go the more stops they take and the less it costs.

Train travel can go anywhere in China, where plane tickets and cars are so far out of the price range of the common people it's not even funny. A plane ticket to Dalian Liaoning from here cost me 1000rmb round-trip, about $150, roughly a quarter of the average income of a family of four in my city.

So, all in all I'm probably going to keep taking the D-train for my trips- it's fantastic quality, it's clean, and it's cheap. I might look into taking the G-train for longer trips- don't have the hassle of baggage check and security is way lighter. Why spend an extra 60rmb (about two days worth of meals) just for an extra hour less in transit?

I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.


Yes, because China is far more densely populated with large cities closer together. High speed rail from LA to NYC will never make sense.

Also, in the US, airlines have been deregulated and cheaper air flight is possible. (I will mention I have met Chinese who railed against the high speed rail fixation and said more airports were needed...so its not just furriners who think this way.)

Finally, driverless cars will eat into rail as well. It might take an hour longer to get there, but the car will go to your actual destination and can be used for other side trips where the rail line cannot.

(I also enjoy high speed rail, but its not for everywhere.)
 
2012-12-27 07:08:56 AM
Well, that's nice, but the US is such a large country and so spread out, there's no way we could make rail a viable option.

/OrSomethingLikeThat.
 
2012-12-27 07:11:55 AM
As someone who lived in Guangzhou for seven years, all I can say is this appears to be a great way to get the fark out of Guangzhou faster.

/but Beijing sucks as well. How about a bullet train to Hung Hom in Kowloon?
 
2012-12-27 07:29:46 AM

Kuroutesshin: I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.


I'm the same way in Japan.  I'm going to be one sad person when I have to go back to the US and don't have the trains anymore.

/I get to go play on the Shinkansen in the morning
 
2012-12-27 07:43:55 AM
Cobataiwan:
Yes, because China is far more densely populated with large cities closer together. High speed rail from LA to NYC will never make sense.

Also, in the US, airlines have been deregulated and cheaper air flight is possible. (I will mention I have met Chinese who railed against the high speed rail fixation and said more airports were needed...so its not just furriners who think this way.)

Finally, dri ...

Yeah, China is more dense than the US, but high speed-rail isn't really for village-to-village transit, there's a graduate system of train classes to cover that sort of transit. I don't see why cross-country transit in the US won't make sense in the future- we just lack the political will and infrastructure to do it. The Chinese have developed their infrastructure in a different way than the US.

American infrastructure is a shambles. Say what you will about Chinese quality, they're building things really, really quickly. Taking on a lot of debt to do it, but no one can deny it's putting people to work and building the economy.
 
2012-12-27 08:38:08 AM
In a bid to compensate something

www.thebigvoyage.com
 
2012-12-27 08:42:01 AM
Starting about 5 years ago, we spent 3 years building a manufacturing facility in Beijing, that was an eye opening experience.
China only has building codes if someone is looking. They never reinforce concrete unless there's a few children nearby to toss into the mix.
They pour a full two story wall of solid concrete colored "whatever" and then let loose three guys to hand chisel cutouts for plumbing and electrical.
Any building in mainland china over about 5 stories tall scares the sh#t out of me.
The workers make their own tools. Hammers, chisels, picks, wheelbarrows, all homemade. They all stand around in a huge crown in the morning and when they open the gates its a free for all (with police present) and whoever gets in, gets to work that day, so there is no consistency in who does what.
They have no safety regulations, no environmental agencies, government payoffs are the only "requirement" in any large undertaking.
The air in Beijing made California look like a fresh clean Alpine village. Each day you literally had a layer of god only knows that on you, it was disgusting. During the Olympics they went to draconian lengths outlawing burning of any kind in an attempt to keep the air as clean as possible...
There were many days that you literally could not see two blocks.
Our "guide" and translator lived in a dumpster behind a strip joint and was one of the most disgusting people I have ever seen. If you turned away, he would take your food right off your plate and eat it.
Google "China's Ghost Cities" for an interesting story.
China's corrupt communist government only cares about growth of it's GDP at any cost. They have been building on average about ten entire cities a year for the past decade complete with Apartments, malls, theaters, restaurants, parks, and airports that nobody can afford to live in, but it pumps up the GDP.
Hundreds of millions of Apartments sitting empty. They have already started to rot and hardly a human has ever set foot in them.
China cannot support itself from inside, it requires the rest of the world to consume it's products.
When the economy tanked 4 years ago and we stopped buying stuff for a minute, China was closing down 66,000 factories a WEEK.
The government is still hunting down factory owners that packed up all the cash and walked out the door leaving the employees to their own devices.
When their bubble pops, it will make our bubble look like a ride at disneyland.
The people in China have this really strange addiction to spitting. They spit constantly. I believe they even tried to outlaw it, but it was really gross.
If you throw garbage in a trash can, you get yelled at. by throwing your garbage on the ground, you are giving another person a job to come around and pick it up.
All of China's main rivers have been declared clinically dead.
It's unfortunate. China woke up, but too late. It's a country full of the most amazing, talented people, completely smashed under the thumb of a horribly corrupt government that will never allow the people to be free.
My only fear is that when their bubble pops, the're going to come knocking looking for their 16 trillion dollars (which we subsequently devalued to about 4 trillion) and when they don't get a check...they will either nuke us, or invade.
we just might need all these evil guns that we currently posess.
 
2012-12-27 08:55:38 AM

Gunny Walker: Well, that's nice, but the US is such a large country and so spread out, there's no way we could make rail a viable option.

/OrSomethingLikeThat.


Boston-DC is as built-up and compact as most places in Western Europe. Seattle-LA nearly as much so.

It's just an economics thing. But high speed rail needs Government subsidy everywhere - France, Germany and Japan included.
 
2012-12-27 08:59:59 AM

wildcardjack: 2300km at 300km an hour average COULD get that 8 hour trip, but 35 stops... You'd have to go much faster than 300 km per hour.


If you didn't go faster than 300kph, you'd never manage to average that speed.
 
2012-12-27 09:01:53 AM

LadyBelgara: Kuroutesshin: I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.

I'm the same way in Japan.  I'm going to be one sad person when I have to go back to the US and don't have the trains anymore.

/I get to go play on the Shinkansen in the morning


First, we don't have the money anymore because the 2/3 of our federal budget that isn't borrowed is committed to the liberal entitlement state.

Second, bullet trains make no sense except in a couple of corridors on the East and West coasts. And with all the subsidized rail going other places already, one can only guess what a political mess would be created by putting them only in those places.

The US has the best transportation in the world for a nation its size, and that will still be true when China finishes its bullet trains.
 
2012-12-27 09:12:50 AM
I'm bored of the "compensating for something" jibe. I reckon there are only 2 people that make it. Men with small dicks who want to deflect attention onto others, and women who only know one joke.

Animatronik: The US has the best transportation in the world for a nation its size


The best transportation in the world? I don't think you're familiar with the subject, or the language you're using to communciate.
 
2012-12-27 09:17:13 AM

Animatronik: LadyBelgara: Kuroutesshin: I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.

I'm the same way in Japan.  I'm going to be one sad person when I have to go back to the US and don't have the trains anymore.

/I get to go play on the Shinkansen in the morning

First, we don't have the money anymore because the 2/3 of our federal budget that isn't borrowed is committed to the liberal entitlement state.

Second, bullet trains make no sense except in a couple of corridors on the East and West coasts. And with all the subsidized rail going other places already, one can only guess what a political mess would be created by putting them only in those places.

The US has the best transportation in the world for a nation its size, and that will still be true when China finishes its bullet trains.


Best transportation in the world? I think the word 'third' belongs in there somewhere.
 
rbt
2012-12-27 09:24:33 AM

wildcardjack: 2300km at 300km an hour average COULD get that 8 hour trip, but 35 stops... You'd have to go much faster than 300 km per hour.


It's scheduled for 8 to 10 hours. There are two 8-hour express trips per day and one 10 hour trip making all stops.

Business class seats are about $360 CAD per direction.
 
2012-12-27 09:31:44 AM

wildcardjack: 2300km at 300km an hour average COULD get that 8 hour trip, but 35 stops... You'd have to go much faster than 300 km per hour.



t2.gstatic.com

'So I heard Lana likes choo choos. TIme of your life, eh kid?'
 
2012-12-27 09:37:21 AM

wildcardjack: 2300km at 300km an hour average COULD get that 8 hour trip, but 35 stops... You'd have to go much faster than 300 km per hour.


http://www.beijingchina.net.cn/transportation/train/train-from-guangz h ou.html
Schedule, 3 trains travel the route, one is express and takes 8 hours the other two stop periodically and take 9.5 hours.
 
2012-12-27 09:38:33 AM

MindStalker: wildcardjack: 2300km at 300km an hour average COULD get that 8 hour trip, but 35 stops... You'd have to go much faster than 300 km per hour.

http://www.beijingchina.net.cn/transportation/train/train-from-guangz h ou.html
Schedule, 3 trains travel the route, one is express and takes 8 hours the other two stop periodically and take 9.5 hours.


Fixed Link
 
2012-12-27 09:55:14 AM

computerguyUT: Starting about 5 years ago, we spent 3 years building a manufacturing facility in Beijing, that was an eye opening experience.
China only has building codes if someone is looking. They never reinforce concrete unless there's a few children nearby to toss into the mix.
They pour a full two story wall of solid concrete colored "whatever" and then let loose three guys to hand chisel cutouts for plumbing and electrical.
Any building in mainland china over about 5 stories tall scares the sh#t out of me.
The workers make their own tools. Hammers, chisels, picks, wheelbarrows, all homemade. They all stand around in a huge crown in the morning and when they open the gates its a free for all (with police present) and whoever gets in, gets to work that day, so there is no consistency in who does what.
They have no safety regulations, no environmental agencies, government payoffs are the only "requirement" in any large undertaking.
The air in Beijing made California look like a fresh clean Alpine village. Each day you literally had a layer of god only knows that on you, it was disgusting. During the Olympics they went to draconian lengths outlawing burning of any kind in an attempt to keep the air as clean as possible...
There were many days that you literally could not see two blocks.
Our "guide" and translator lived in a dumpster behind a strip joint and was one of the most disgusting people I have ever seen. If you turned away, he would take your food right off your plate and eat it.
Google "China's Ghost Cities" for an interesting story.
China's corrupt communist government only cares about growth of it's GDP at any cost. They have been building on average about ten entire cities a year for the past decade complete with Apartments, malls, theaters, restaurants, parks, and airports that nobody can afford to live in, but it pumps up the GDP.
Hundreds of millions of Apartments sitting empty. They have already started to rot and hardly a human has ever set foot in them ...


we would absolutely destroy china in a war. they have next to zero force projection. They are good at making our toys. We are very good at making war.
 
2012-12-27 10:04:44 AM

Cobataiwan: I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.

Yes, because China is far more densely populated with large cities closer together. High speed rail from LA to NYC will never make sense.


This rail is 1400 miles long. That's further than San Diego to Seattle or New York to Chicago. NYC to LA may never make sense, but there's a lot of routes that do.

All transportation is subsidized. If we spent the money making high speed rail that we spend making airports, we'd carry more people cheaper.
 
2012-12-27 10:12:59 AM
i212.photobucket.com

Why do it with trains?
 
2012-12-27 10:45:11 AM

Animatronik: LadyBelgara: Kuroutesshin: I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.

I'm the same way in Japan.  I'm going to be one sad person when I have to go back to the US and don't have the trains anymore.

/I get to go play on the Shinkansen in the morning

First, we don't have the money anymore because the 2/3 of our federal budget that isn't borrowed is committed to the liberal entitlement state.


You seem to have taken a wrong turn on your way to the politics tab...
 
2012-12-27 11:19:36 AM

opiumpoopy: It's just an economics thing. But high speed rail needs Government subsidy everywhere - France, Germany and Japan included.


So do roads and ATC as they are not 100% user-fee supported.

Rail costs the least to operate and maintain and reduced the load on roads and air-cargo. It's an infrastructure investment to support the economy, not a profit center. Other developed countries have already figured it out -- like centralized healthcare -- costs less.
 
2012-12-27 11:33:03 AM

maggoo: In a bid to compensate something


Well played but I believe on average Asian men have smaller bullet trains than America's Saturn 5 rockets.
 
2012-12-27 12:45:14 PM
Next Weeks headline.
China crashes world's longest bullet train
 
2012-12-27 12:47:29 PM

Apos: Uh huh.....And what about their creaky railway safety record?


t.qkme.me
 
2012-12-27 01:13:00 PM
In the meantime here in the US.. we can;t even built a damn 10 km track for the subway w/o 100 people bickering and corrupt local politicians wanting forget their fair share of their their cuts etc!

/serious
 
2012-12-27 01:17:03 PM

SuperNinjaToad: In the meantime here in the US.. we can;t even built a damn 10 km track for the subway w/o 100 people bickering and corrupt local politicians wanting forget their fair share of their their cuts etc!

/serious


Probably because here corruption hides in the shadows. Elsewere in the world everyone knows and expects the wheels to be greased. It makes it easier when everyone knows what is expected of them.
 
2012-12-27 02:46:27 PM

LadyBelgara: Animatronik: LadyBelgara: Kuroutesshin: I dreams of China's rail system being duplicated in the US. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, though.

I'm the same way in Japan.  I'm going to be one sad person when I have to go back to the US and don't have the trains anymore.

/I get to go play on the Shinkansen in the morning

First, we don't have the money anymore because the 2/3 of our federal budget that isn't borrowed is committed to the liberal entitlement state.

You seem to have taken a wrong turn on your way to the politics tab...


It's ok, he spends most of his days demanding the government keep its dirty mitts off Medicare.
 
2012-12-27 03:32:35 PM
I'm nearly 95% certain we're going to be hearing about this again in just a few short weeks, something akin to "World's Largest Bullet Train Derailment" and/or "Dozens Killed".
 
2012-12-27 08:44:36 PM

SuperT: computerguyUT: Starting about 5 years ago, we spent 3 years building a manufacturing facility in Beijing, that was an eye opening experience.
China only has building codes if someone is looking. They never reinforce concrete unless there's a few children nearby to toss into the mix.
They pour a full two story wall of solid concrete colored "whatever" and then let loose three guys to hand chisel cutouts for plumbing and electrical.
Any building in mainland china over about 5 stories tall scares the sh#t out of me.
The workers make their own tools. Hammers, chisels, picks, wheelbarrows, all homemade. They all stand around in a huge crown in the morning and when they open the gates its a free for all (with police present) and whoever gets in, gets to work that day, so there is no consistency in who does what.
They have no safety regulations, no environmental agencies, government payoffs are the only "requirement" in any large undertaking.
The air in Beijing made California look like a fresh clean Alpine village. Each day you literally had a layer of god only knows that on you, it was disgusting. During the Olympics they went to draconian lengths outlawing burning of any kind in an attempt to keep the air as clean as possible...
There were many days that you literally could not see two blocks.
Our "guide" and translator lived in a dumpster behind a strip joint and was one of the most disgusting people I have ever seen. If you turned away, he would take your food right off your plate and eat it.
Google "China's Ghost Cities" for an interesting story.
China's corrupt communist government only cares about growth of it's GDP at any cost. They have been building on average about ten entire cities a year for the past decade complete with Apartments, malls, theaters, restaurants, parks, and airports that nobody can afford to live in, but it pumps up the GDP.
Hundreds of millions of Apartments sitting empty. They have already started to rot and hardly a human has ever s ...


"I want to complain about China. Here is a list of things that I don't like."
"We could totally destroy them if we wanted to."

WTF is wrong with you people?
 
2012-12-27 08:51:10 PM
When oriental guys hold it with 3 fingers they get 2 wet.
 
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