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(Miami Herald)   Guess which state lets dumb children into Advance Placement classes and wonders why they don't score higher on tests   (miamiherald.com) divider line 10
    More: Florida, Advanced Placement, high schools, College Board, ETS, adult educations, credit hours, class size, Broward Schools  
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8645 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Dec 2012 at 9:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-24 10:37:36 AM
3 votes:

lilplatinum: And they are right, math is fairly useless for the vast majority of people.


It's useless if you're planning on working a McJob for the rest of your life. But if you want a job that actually pays a decent wage, you're probably going to be working with budgets, figuring out percentages and proportions, and maybe figuring out some kind of simple algorithm.

If I went into a restaurant and asked my dinner companions to tell me what was on the menu because I couldn't read, people would look at me like I had three heads. But if I ask them to help me calculate the tip because "I suck at math," I'd hear rounds of sympathy from around the table. "It's OK - I suck at math too." We've allowed it to become acceptable to be math illiterate in this country, and that's farked up if you ask me.
2012-12-24 10:04:50 AM
2 votes:

Macular Degenerate: I tutor remedial-level math at a large, public comprehensive university. The students coming to us from high school are functionally illiterate in math. 60% of entering freshman need remedial math to start the college level curriculum - that's the national average and we meet it dead on. Our lowest level remedial math course starts at 6th grade math, and students are flunking it in record numbers. These are students who, no joke, need a calculator to multiply and divide and add or subtract more than 2 numbers.

The majority of the problem doesn't lie in high schools. The problem starts much earlier than that. Students don't understand the fundamentals of math like arithmetic, fractions, and postive/negative numbers, so when they get to high school level work - Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Precal - they are completely bewildered.


Problem lies with the push to get all students into college.
2012-12-24 09:21:43 AM
2 votes:
Typical libtard reaction toward the dumb kids, so at least their *feelings* won't be hurt by being placed on the little bus.

/dnra
2012-12-24 02:58:50 PM
1 votes:
The reason why college degrees are "required" to get a good job is because there is no faith in the high school system to produce graduates who can read, think, and do basic math. HIgh school should be all the education a person needs to function as a responsible, productive, adult and the curriculum needs to change with the focus on teaching life skills.

As far as math is concerned, the first priority for high schools should be to make sure every student understands fractions, negative numbers, and coordinates. When they can demonstrate understanding of it, teach them statistics and finance. Specifically, show lots of examples of how statistics can be misleading and teach them how stocks, bonds, and other common financial products work. Every adult should be familiar with the "Rule of 72" since it will help them save for a house, retirement, etc. Keep Algebra 1 and maybe geometry as required courses, but algebra 2, trig, and calculus should all be optional. I think algebra 1 is a good tool for teaching logic and critical thinking skills and geometry helps with spatial thinking. Kids should be exposed to higher math, but then it should be optional if they want to continue to pursue it.
2012-12-24 12:12:48 PM
1 votes:

lilplatinum: abb3w:
IE, the country can keep on in more or less the same level of informed discourse as it has been.
How's that been working out for you? Oh, wait; you said you're in finance.

Improving math skills is not going to somehow impart political wisdom in the plebians. If anything the lack of knowledge in politics arrives from an atrocious lack of basic civics education in school.

CreamFilling: And I'll bet you use math (including some that's well beyond the capacity of many high school students) on a daily basis without even realizing it. Ever estimate your gas mileage? Or device which can of beans is a better deal? Or make sure the cashier gave you correct change? Or figure out when to take your next dose of medicine?

Most of those are still at the level of addition/multiplication arithmetic.

Hell, determining which can of beans is a better deal is just counting...


Unless you're doing polling, statistics is just addition/muliplication arithmetic, so I don't see the point of saying that.

You need to know basic finances and statistics. While you may not use them every day of your life, the decisions you do make with them will affect every day of your life. Just ask anybody who had a balloon payment four years ago.
2012-12-24 10:41:33 AM
1 votes:

Wulfman: Macular Degenerate: I tutor remedial-level math at a large, public comprehensive university. The students coming to us from high school are functionally illiterate in math. 60% of entering freshman need remedial math to start the college level curriculum - that's the national average and we meet it dead on. Our lowest level remedial math course starts at 6th grade math, and students are flunking it in record numbers. These are students who, no joke, need a calculator to multiply and divide and add or subtract more than 2 numbers.

The majority of the problem doesn't lie in high schools. The problem starts much earlier than that. Students don't understand the fundamentals of math like arithmetic, fractions, and postive/negative numbers, so when they get to high school level work - Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Precal - they are completely bewildered.


Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations. It doesn't help that pop culture depicts math as something you either magically "get" or you don't (Beautiful Mind, Good Will Hunting, etc)that only socially awkward nerds get.


ftfy
2012-12-24 10:37:39 AM
1 votes:

Macular Degenerate: I tutor remedial-level math at a large, public comprehensive university. The students coming to us from high school are functionally illiterate in math. 60% of entering freshman need remedial math to start the college level curriculum - that's the national average and we meet it dead on. Our lowest level remedial math course starts at 6th grade math, and students are flunking it in record numbers. These are students who, no joke, need a calculator to multiply and divide and add or subtract more than 2 numbers.

The majority of the problem doesn't lie in high schools. The problem starts much earlier than that. Students don't understand the fundamentals of math like arithmetic, fractions, and postive/negative numbers, so when they get to high school level work - Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Precal - they are completely bewildered.


I tutored math 302b which was theory of counting for teachers. You know why students fail the fundamentals with that class. Converting base 10 to any other base is the basis of the final. That class is the number one repeated class at my alma mater. Teachers don't understand fundamentals, how can their students.
2012-12-24 10:19:07 AM
1 votes:

Wulfman:
Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations.


And they are right, math is fairly useless for the vast majority of people.
2012-12-24 10:18:11 AM
1 votes:

Wulfman: Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations. It doesn't help that pop culture depicts math as something you either magically "get" or you don't (Beautiful Mind, Good Will Hunting, etc).


I cringe every time I hear grown adults say "oh I'm bad at math" and most people just agree that's a reasonable thing to be bad at. If someone said "I can't read very well" most people would suggest they enroll in a class or get some self-help materials because they'd realize illiteracy is a big problem that will affect someone's life greatly.
2012-12-24 09:16:29 AM
1 votes:
I was going to say "Texas", then I remembered there aren't enough smart kids in Texas to warrant an Advance Placement program. Then I saw the Florida tag and thought, "Hey, that makes sense."
 
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