Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Miami Herald)   Guess which state lets dumb children into Advance Placement classes and wonders why they don't score higher on tests   (miamiherald.com ) divider line
    More: Florida, Advanced Placement, high schools, College Board, ETS, adult educations, credit hours, class size, Broward Schools  
•       •       •

8668 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Dec 2012 at 9:12 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



126 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2012-12-24 10:57:52 AM  

Wulfman: I've got to run (gym in 26 minutes) but I suspect we're not so much at odds here as I initially thought. I don't agree with the above, however. Stats are such a great way for politicians and salesmen and advertisers to manipulate the innumerate, I don't see how schools can justify not offering it. That and basic econ would be much more useful than calc, regardless of the field the student intends to pursue. Hell, I used stats more than calc even when I worked as a physicist.


I will agree that stats should be taught more actively as it is infinitely more relevant to life than calc ever was.
 
GBB
2012-12-24 10:57:53 AM  

Marcintosh: GBB: That's because AP is the new Honors
'B's are the new 'D's
PhDs are the new Masters Degree
Going-to-college is the new getting-a-job-straight-out-of-high-school

As a university & college prof, lecturer, instructor, I would like to point out that higher education was never meant for anyone other than the rich.
Think about that when you send your snowflake off to an eternity of debt.

No worries though, I'll be 77 before my loans are paid off - no lie - so I'm in the same boat


Good thing my employer offers tuition reimbursement. Bachelors in Accounting, which means the best I can hope for is Bookkeepper.
 
2012-12-24 11:08:10 AM  

walkerhound: New York.  I remember having a couple tards in my AP classes.  Made the rest of us feel better about ourselves.


Did one of those tards happen to go by the name Mambo Bananapatch?
 
2012-12-24 11:11:00 AM  

lilplatinum: Macular Degenerate: It's useless if you're planning on working a McJob for the rest of your life. But if you want a job that actually pays a decent wage, you're probably going to be working with budgets, figuring out percentages and proportions, and maybe figuring out some kind of simple algorithm.

I work as a ship broker, I have to run voyage calculations, figure out my commission, etc. Everything is done on a computer in about 5 seconds. Anyone with even the vaguest understanding of math could do it since you are not required to calculate anything yourself. I also use more math than the majority of people, "McJobs" or not.

Communications skills are infinitely more important to having a good job than being able to calculate things, unless you want to be an Engineer or so...

If I went into a restaurant and asked my dinner companions to tell me what was on the menu because I couldn't read, people would look at me like I had three heads. But if I ask them to help me calculate the tip because "I suck at math," I'd hear rounds of sympathy from around the table. "It's OK - I suck at math too." We've allowed it to become acceptable to be math illiterate in this country, and that's farked up if you ask me.

Yes, because reading is a more important skill and one that cannot be made up for by an app on your farking phone as of yet.


No, there are apps that can make up for your inability to read. They're mostly designed for the legally blind, but there's no reason the illiterate couldn't use them as well. And I'll bet you use math (including some that's well beyond the capacity of many high school students) on a daily basis without even realizing it. Ever estimate your gas mileage? Or device which can of beans is a better deal? Or make sure the cashier gave you correct change? Or figure out when to take your next dose of medicine?
 
2012-12-24 11:26:11 AM  

Death Whisper: walkerhound: New York.  I remember having a couple tards in my AP classes.  Made the rest of us feel better about ourselves.

Did one of those tards happen to go by the name Mambo Bananapatch?


I LoL'ed
 
2012-12-24 11:34:05 AM  
I'm looking forward to the day when devices are so long-lasting, that when they finally break down and need to be replaced, there will be nothing but bloated, pasty dummies asking in words of one syllable, "How fix? How fix thing?"
 
2012-12-24 11:37:52 AM  
LAUSD does this too, under the guise of "every child should have access to the same educational opportunities."

Because failure doesn't make a student who works up the nerve to take the class want to just throw in the towel altogether, AMIRITE?
 
2012-12-24 11:38:43 AM  

lilplatinum: And yes, one is a more educated consumer of media if one understands how polls work, but for the average day to day life of the average American this is a fairly academic point.


IE, the country can keep on in more or less the same level of informed discourse as it has been.
How's that been working out for you? Oh, wait; you said you're in finance.

media.tumblr.com



lilplatinum: I will agree that stats should be taught more actively as it is infinitely more relevant to life than calc ever was.


Unfortunately, stats ties to probability, which has ties to calc unless you stick with discrete distributions, in which case the math gets harder than continuous distributions.

This is without even getting into the opportunity costs resulting from an inability to recognize a logistic curve when it's chafing their nads, or the resistance to learning basic propositional logic.

CreamFilling: And I'll bet you use math (including some that's well beyond the capacity of many high school students) on a daily basis without even realizing it. Ever estimate your gas mileage? Or device which can of beans is a better deal? Or make sure the cashier gave you correct change? Or figure out when to take your next dose of medicine?


Most of those are still at the level of addition/multiplication arithmetic.
 
2012-12-24 11:39:04 AM  

CreamFilling: lilplatinum: Macular Degenerate: It's useless if you're planning on working a McJob for the rest of your life. But if you want a job that actually pays a decent wage, you're probably going to be working with budgets, figuring out percentages and proportions, and maybe figuring out some kind of simple algorithm.

I work as a ship broker, I have to run voyage calculations, figure out my commission, etc. Everything is done on a computer in about 5 seconds. Anyone with even the vaguest understanding of math could do it since you are not required to calculate anything yourself. I also use more math than the majority of people, "McJobs" or not.

Communications skills are infinitely more important to having a good job than being able to calculate things, unless you want to be an Engineer or so...

If I went into a restaurant and asked my dinner companions to tell me what was on the menu because I couldn't read, people would look at me like I had three heads. But if I ask them to help me calculate the tip because "I suck at math," I'd hear rounds of sympathy from around the table. "It's OK - I suck at math too." We've allowed it to become acceptable to be math illiterate in this country, and that's farked up if you ask me.

Yes, because reading is a more important skill and one that cannot be made up for by an app on your farking phone as of yet.

No, there are apps that can make up for your inability to read. They're mostly designed for the legally blind, but there's no reason the illiterate couldn't use them as well. And I'll bet you use math (including some that's well beyond the capacity of many high school students) on a daily basis without even realizing it. Ever estimate your gas mileage? Or device which can of beans is a better deal? Or make sure the cashier gave you correct change? Or figure out when to take your next dose of medicine?


I'm pretty sure there are apps and devices to do math for one's self, too.
 
2012-12-24 11:43:21 AM  

abb3w:
IE, the country can keep on in more or less the same level of informed discourse as it has been.
How's that been working out for you? Oh, wait; you said you're in finance.


Improving math skills is not going to somehow impart political wisdom in the plebians. If anything the lack of knowledge in politics arrives from an atrocious lack of basic civics education in school.

CreamFilling: And I'll bet you use math (including some that's well beyond the capacity of many high school students) on a daily basis without even realizing it. Ever estimate your gas mileage? Or device which can of beans is a better deal? Or make sure the cashier gave you correct change? Or figure out when to take your next dose of medicine?

Most of those are still at the level of addition/multiplication arithmetic.


Hell, determining which can of beans is a better deal is just counting...
 
2012-12-24 11:46:10 AM  
My step daughter is in the same boat. She's dumb as a post but is always ready to brag about how she is in the gifted program. She can't spell, reads books more suitable for 6 year olds (she's 12) doesn't know history science math or geography yet she is I. The gifted program? Gtfo. We live in South Carolina and she couldn't find Georgia on a map or tell me what states we had to drive thru to take her to her sperm donors in Maryland this Christmas...
 
2012-12-24 11:48:43 AM  
"More minority students are taking the classes. Broward and Miami-Dade have gotten top honors in the country for Hispanic and black students' participation and performance(inflated scores) on AP. "

Yay. We're more equal!
 
2012-12-24 12:01:13 PM  

lilplatinum: Wulfman:
Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations.

And they are right, math is fairly useless for the vast majority of people.


I don't need no maths, the cash register dun do it subtraction for me!

/JudgeSmails.jpg
 
2012-12-24 12:05:50 PM  

HighlanderRPI: lilplatinum: Wulfman:
Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations.

And they are right, math is fairly useless for the vast majority of people.

I don't need no maths, the cash register dun do it subtraction for me!

/JudgeSmails.jpg


Its 2012, who the fark uses cash?
 
2012-12-24 12:11:14 PM  

lilplatinum: Its 2012, who the fark uses cash?


* raises hand *

Although, that has more to do with my "Where's George?" bill-tracking habit....
 
2012-12-24 12:12:48 PM  

abb3w: Most of those bookkeepers are still at the level of addition/multiplication arithmetic.


And most CPAs, accountants, bookkeepers, and auditors had great qualifications* when they were hired in 1937.

*Great gams.
 
2012-12-24 12:12:48 PM  

lilplatinum: abb3w:
IE, the country can keep on in more or less the same level of informed discourse as it has been.
How's that been working out for you? Oh, wait; you said you're in finance.

Improving math skills is not going to somehow impart political wisdom in the plebians. If anything the lack of knowledge in politics arrives from an atrocious lack of basic civics education in school.

CreamFilling: And I'll bet you use math (including some that's well beyond the capacity of many high school students) on a daily basis without even realizing it. Ever estimate your gas mileage? Or device which can of beans is a better deal? Or make sure the cashier gave you correct change? Or figure out when to take your next dose of medicine?

Most of those are still at the level of addition/multiplication arithmetic.

Hell, determining which can of beans is a better deal is just counting...


Unless you're doing polling, statistics is just addition/muliplication arithmetic, so I don't see the point of saying that.

You need to know basic finances and statistics. While you may not use them every day of your life, the decisions you do make with them will affect every day of your life. Just ask anybody who had a balloon payment four years ago.
 
2012-12-24 12:22:29 PM  
Took AP Calculus AB in 11th grade. Scored a 4 out of 5. Took AP Calculus BC my senior year, probably barely got the 3 out of 5. The teacher was insane for both.

/csb
 
2012-12-24 12:26:42 PM  

Genju: Took AP Calculus AB in 11th grade. Scored a 4 out of 5. Took AP Calculus BC my senior year, probably barely got the 3 out of 5. The teacher was insane for both.

/csb


Wait you took both classes or both tests?
 
2012-12-24 12:32:25 PM  

Nofun: Dnrtfa

The schools get extra funding for each student in AP classes, so they pack them in as much as they can.

This is what happens when legislatue gives financial incentives for student "performance."


It's what happens if they do it badly. What if the school gets financian incentives based on the number of students who pass?
 
2012-12-24 12:40:55 PM  

Enigmamf: Nofun: Dnrtfa

The schools get extra funding for each student in AP classes, so they pack them in as much as they can.

This is what happens when legislatue gives financial incentives for student "performance."

It's what happens if they do it badly. What if the school gets financian incentives based on the number of students who pass?


They'll just put more and more in unless you include the percentage as part of the calculation. Currently there are thousands of students taking AP classes who have no interest in the class and no intention of going to college.
 
2012-12-24 12:45:33 PM  

Mambo Bananapatch: I was going to say "Texas", then I remembered there aren't enough smart kids in Texas to warrant an Advance Placement program. Then I saw the Florida tag and thought, "Hey, that makes sense."


Coming from a "closeted" Qubec'r, I question your use of the word "thought".
 
2012-12-24 12:46:43 PM  

Subtle_Canary: My step daughter is in the same boat. She's dumb as a post but is always ready to brag about how she is in the gifted program. She can't spell, reads books more suitable for 6 year olds (she's 12) doesn't know history science math or geography yet she is I. The gifted program? Gtfo. We live in South Carolina and she couldn't find Georgia on a map or tell me what states we had to drive thru to take her to her sperm donors in Maryland this Christmas...


I've seen this too.

Kids that were clearly behind their peers, talking about their having made the honor role.

They're not bieng made aware of just where they sit on the curve it seems.
 
2012-12-24 12:51:19 PM  

lilplatinum: I have used nothing I learned past 6 grade in the 13 years since.


Well the world needs ditch diggers too.
 
2012-12-24 12:53:11 PM  

abb3w: lilplatinum: For the average schmuck with no aspiration to be a good poker player? Figuring out statistics is probably not a very common activity..

Probability is a slightly different branch than statistics, though they're related.

However, statistics kind of basic to understanding the significance of opinion polls... and understanding that your personal circle of acquaintance are likely to be a somewhat different from a representative sample of the US.


Which nearly nobody does correctly anyway.
 
2012-12-24 12:56:10 PM  
Seems to me that over my lifetime kids have had less and less expected of them in school. All sorts of basic skills fell by the wayside as they were blamed for discriminating against some people who were (allegedly) just as able but for some reason can't cope with revision / final exams / spelling / grammar / handwriting / essay writing / textbooks ... and maths. Kids who still couldn't cope for some reason or another found it increasingly easy to get "diagnosed" with a "learning disability" for eg extra time on tests (usually dyslexia ...). University professors everywhere are now complaining about the lack of basic academic skills in their first-year undergraduates, and having to waste valuable time teaching basics such as writing essays and school-level maths. There's been a huge increase in the percentage of people going to college. The thinking behind all of this seems to be that nobody is "really" any more able than anyone else.

I'm sure the genuinely bright kids are suffering through all of this. My daughter actually keeps complaining about how little homework they get given at her school. She's not some kind of Einstein, either. Just an average-bright kid. Since when did kids themselves complain about the work they got given being too easy and not enough? That's just weird. She gets quite upset and angry about it, but there is nothing I can do. Textbooks simply don't exist as we remember them any more - the best you can get is these "workbook" things which look like the kind of thing we were given when we were 6. Apparently not even 16 year olds can cope with a page of writing without a cartoon or two - and the writing is only a paragraph.

/dnrtfa
//rant
 
2012-12-24 12:57:17 PM  
Wives resemble Pacific salmon...they spawn and they are done.
 
2012-12-24 01:01:28 PM  

lilplatinum: Working in a largely financial field I would estimate that my personal circle of acquaintance involves more math activities than the majority of Americans working in non technical jobs.
.


You need to broaden your circle of acquaintances or improve your estimation skills....
Visit pretty much any DC or manufacturing facility and you will find that anyone from the floor lead/supervisor role on up will have a solid understanding of math because they are drilled on performance metrics on an hourly basis. The same goes for the upstream supply chain folks that do demand and supply forecasts. Don't forget the accountants and finance types as well. As well as the downstream folks like retail managers, etc. Many of those jobs aren't really technical and require nothing more than a BS/BA to get into.

But if I ever interview anyone and they say they course work that they are weakest on or like the least is math, they have a zero percent probability of getting the job.

/zero percent means they won't get the job...in case you needed help with that
 
2012-12-24 01:02:36 PM  

StashMonster: Seems to me that over my lifetime kids have had less and less expected of them in school. All sorts of basic skills fell by the wayside as they were blamed for discriminating against some people who were (allegedly) just as able but for some reason can't cope with revision / final exams / spelling / grammar / handwriting / essay writing / textbooks ... and maths


At least they know how to properly abbreviate singular nouns...
 
2012-12-24 01:05:08 PM  
Guess which submitter wrote "advance placement" instead of "advanced placement."
 
2012-12-24 01:05:37 PM  

lilplatinum: StashMonster: Seems to me that over my lifetime kids have had less and less expected of them in school. All sorts of basic skills fell by the wayside as they were blamed for discriminating against some people who were (allegedly) just as able but for some reason can't cope with revision / final exams / spelling / grammar / handwriting / essay writing / textbooks ... and maths

At least they know how to properly abbreviate singular nouns...


That's a British thing. They don't just learn one math, they learn multiple.
 
2012-12-24 01:06:43 PM  

Eponymous: lilplatinum: Working in a largely financial field I would estimate that my personal circle of acquaintance involves more math activities than the majority of Americans working in non technical jobs.
.

You need to broaden your circle of acquaintances or improve your estimation skills....
Visit pretty much any DC or manufacturing facility and you will find that anyone from the floor lead/supervisor role on up will have a solid understanding of math because they are drilled on performance metrics on an hourly basis. The same goes for the upstream supply chain folks that do demand and supply forecasts. Don't forget the accountants and finance types as well. As well as the downstream folks like retail managers, etc. Many of those jobs aren't really technical and require nothing more than a BS/BA to get into.

But if I ever interview anyone and they say they course work that they are weakest on or like the least is math, they have a zero percent probability of getting the job.

/zero percent means they won't get the job...in case you needed help with that


Because they don't like math as much as other subjects, that's a dealbreaker?
 
2012-12-24 01:08:22 PM  
When people talk about the utility of math, they like to talk about how they don't need to learn it because a calculator can do it for them. Well, that is sort of true of arithmetic, but that's only taught now because it helps understand the higher levels. A calculator can't do algebra for you, or geometry, or help you solve word problems - you won't know what to put into it to get the proper result.

Fortunately I think most people know more math and solve more math problems than they realize - they're just framed differently enough they don't realize they're doing math at the time. Things like working out budgets, or coming up with mental estimates of things.
 
2012-12-24 01:09:52 PM  

Eponymous: You need to broaden your circle of acquaintances or improve your estimation skills....
Visit pretty much any DC or manufacturing facility and you will find that anyone from the floor lead/supervisor role on up will have a solid understanding of math because they are drilled on performance metrics on an hourly basis. The same goes for the upstream supply chain folks that do demand and supply forecasts. Don't forget the accountants and finance types as well. As well as the downstream folks like retail managers, etc. Many of those jobs aren't really technical and require nothing more than a BS/BA to get into.


Very few of those jobs involve actually doing any financial calculations yourself. I deal with daily voyage calculations - how much fuel a vessel will consume, all the relevant costs, revenues, etc. Everything gets plugged into a spreadsheet/voyage calc program. I read market reports/etc. and track freight/cargo rates, etc - but all of that is looking at charts..

Sure, I understand whats going on but very rarely will I actually perform any sport of mathematical operations myself, nor do I actually believe that any of the people of the above jobs really do (aside from some people on the finance sides).
 
2012-12-24 01:10:45 PM  

lilplatinum: Yes, because reading is a more important skill and one that cannot be made up for by an app on your farking phone as of yet.


Funny you would think there would be one on the market years ago.
Just take an OCR to scan in the menu, and a text to speach program to play the words. add in a translator for when traveling abroad and poof no need to be able to read. all he options can be done with symbols...
 
2012-12-24 01:11:09 PM  

CreamFilling: lilplatinum: StashMonster: Seems to me that over my lifetime kids have had less and less expected of them in school. All sorts of basic skills fell by the wayside as they were blamed for discriminating against some people who were (allegedly) just as able but for some reason can't cope with revision / final exams / spelling / grammar / handwriting / essay writing / textbooks ... and maths

At least they know how to properly abbreviate singular nouns...

That's a British thing. They don't just learn one math, they learn multiple.


I know, it is one of my pet peeves. The only thing worse is "Drink Driving" - WTF is that? An anthropomorphic drink driving?
 
2012-12-24 01:12:02 PM  

sjmcc13: lilplatinum: Yes, because reading is a more important skill and one that cannot be made up for by an app on your farking phone as of yet.

Funny you would think there would be one on the market years ago.
Just take an OCR to scan in the menu, and a text to speach program to play the words. add in a translator for when traveling abroad and poof no need to be able to read. all he options can be done with symbols...


Google is working on it (and I assume others), but automated translation is still a problematic technology.
 
2012-12-24 01:27:12 PM  
My son's middle school began an Academic Academy this year. The kids had to have a certain percentage last year to qualify. They also began an intermediate math class. Last year, for 8th graders, it was regular math or Algebra (which is high school credit). They've made all 4 core classes pre-AP and added a pre-AP 8th grade math.

My kids all take dual credit classes in 11th and 12th grades. They are AP, but they don't take the test, and they graduate with several college credits. My eldest had 24. My daughter, who is a Senior now, should have enough to be a Sophomore when she graduates. Band is her only non-DC class right now. She took math and Biology at the local University and will have Historical Geology next semester.
 
2012-12-24 01:30:08 PM  
I have it on good authority that a tax increase from 35% to 39.6% is a hike of 4.6%

citation : Link
 
2012-12-24 01:32:30 PM  
Anyone ever listen to MOST teenagers speak nowadays? They're retards. It's a wonder they manage to tie their own shoes w/o help!
 
2012-12-24 01:35:52 PM  

Buffet: Anyone ever listen to MOST teenagers speak nowadays? They're retards. It's a wonder they manage to tie their own shoes w/o help!


The grammar kills me.
 
2012-12-24 01:41:18 PM  

beefoe: FTFA: The curriculum exposes them to more information. Students generally have to write more and under tight deadlines. The format is supposed to spur critical thinking, independent study and confidence.

God forbid that students try to challenge themselves and actually learn. FU Floriduh!!!


AP courses are not a format to learn, nor is critical thinking or independent study. Perhaps, and this is unlikely due to the numerous deadlines, high pressure, and significant body of knowledge to be learner, confidence is raised, but the others cannot exist in a classroom of strict rote memorization.

The only purpose of AP courses is academic creep: increasing the amount of schooling, especially higher education, supposedly necessary and compactjng all of this.
 
2012-12-24 02:02:56 PM  

lilplatinum: Genju: Took AP Calculus AB in 11th grade. Scored a 4 out of 5. Took AP Calculus BC my senior year, probably barely got the 3 out of 5. The teacher was insane for both.

/csb

Wait you took both classes or both tests?


AB is the equivalent of Calc 1. BC is the equivalent of Calc 2. Took Calc 3 once I left for university.

/probably missed the 4 out of 5 in BC because of some of the crazy set theory crap that I can't remember anymore
 
2012-12-24 02:11:42 PM  

Genju: lilplatinum: Genju: Took AP Calculus AB in 11th grade. Scored a 4 out of 5. Took AP Calculus BC my senior year, probably barely got the 3 out of 5. The teacher was insane for both.

/csb

Wait you took both classes or both tests?

AB is the equivalent of Calc 1. BC is the equivalent of Calc 2. Took Calc 3 once I left for university.

/probably missed the 4 out of 5 in BC because of some of the crazy set theory crap that I can't remember anymore


Its been a long time since high school but I recall people going straight from pre-cal into BC as it covered all the shiat from AB plus some.

Did they change it?
 
2012-12-24 02:15:46 PM  
I've never known anyone who can calculate lottery odds to be willing to buy lottery tickets or lose in Vegas. It's x!/(n!/(n-x)!) so for our local state lottery it's (6/53)(5/52)(4/51)(3/50)(2/49)(1/48)= 4.3558788e−8 or 1 chance in 22,957,480 that you're going to select the correct 6 numbers out of 53 choices. Probability should be taught at least as much as geometry.
 
2012-12-24 02:20:50 PM  

StashMonster:
Since when did kids themselves complain about the work they got given being too easy and not enough? That's just weird. She gets quite upset and angry about it, but there is nothing I can do.


Homeschool. Seriously.

Here's my CSB:
My daughter is in second grade. For kindergarten and 1st grade she went to the local public school. My wife was very active at the school and got a job as a sub. While subbing, she got a really good look at the school system and what our daughter would face in the coming years. The school system is 100% aimed at getting kids to pass the standardized tests. If your kid can pass, they get ignored. All the effort is spent on getting the lowest performers to pass. And the teachers won't/can't fail kids; they just get shuffled on up to the next grade - elementary grades don't count in the long run, so who cares if they really earned whatever grade they're given?

Our school system has also implemented the dumbing down of AP classes. It's now to the point where AP is for the "normal" kids and regular school is for the problem kids.

For second grade, we decided to give homeschooling a shot. So far it's working great. There's lots of different curriculums available, from touchy-feelie rainbows & butterflies to the classical trivium. We joined a co-op that helps provide structure and accountability.

My daughter is now reading on a 5th-6th grade level, memorizing multiplication tables to 15, diagramming sentences, and doing a lot of other stuff that she'd never get in public school.
 
2012-12-24 02:31:33 PM  

Wulfman: Macular Degenerate: I tutor remedial-level math at a large, public comprehensive university. The students coming to us from high school are functionally illiterate in math. 60% of entering freshman need remedial math to start the college level curriculum - that's the national average and we meet it dead on. Our lowest level remedial math course starts at 6th grade math, and students are flunking it in record numbers. These are students who, no joke, need a calculator to multiply and divide and add or subtract more than 2 numbers.

The majority of the problem doesn't lie in high schools. The problem starts much earlier than that. Students don't understand the fundamentals of math like arithmetic, fractions, and postive/negative numbers, so when they get to high school level work - Algebra, Geometry, Trig, and Precal - they are completely bewildered.


Math is treated as an obstacle by most students and most parents, even a lot of smart and successful parents, and they view the ability to do math without a calculator about the same way that most people regard navigation by stars and compass - a pointless exercise that isn't seen as relevant to anybody's life going back several generations. It doesn't help that pop culture depicts math as something you either magically "get" or you don't (Beautiful Mind, Good Will Hunting, etc).


I am one of those college students, and I went to an excellent, math-focused high school (dropped out due to illness.) I can tell you that my math issues started much earlier than that: probably in the third or fourth grade, and largely due to the issues already stated. (although we weren't allowed calculators, so I can at least do that.)

A lot of my personal issue was dyscalculia: while I understood the principles, I tended to reverse numbers, and so the calculations never came out correctly: I never learned to trust my understanding, because it always "came out wrong."

Plugging in the hours needed now to develop the skill is tough: it's how I'm spending my winter break, for one. I wish it had been done much earlier; my life would have been very different.


/really has reeled herself all the way back to trig for the winter, so cool
 
2012-12-24 02:58:50 PM  
The reason why college degrees are "required" to get a good job is because there is no faith in the high school system to produce graduates who can read, think, and do basic math. HIgh school should be all the education a person needs to function as a responsible, productive, adult and the curriculum needs to change with the focus on teaching life skills.

As far as math is concerned, the first priority for high schools should be to make sure every student understands fractions, negative numbers, and coordinates. When they can demonstrate understanding of it, teach them statistics and finance. Specifically, show lots of examples of how statistics can be misleading and teach them how stocks, bonds, and other common financial products work. Every adult should be familiar with the "Rule of 72" since it will help them save for a house, retirement, etc. Keep Algebra 1 and maybe geometry as required courses, but algebra 2, trig, and calculus should all be optional. I think algebra 1 is a good tool for teaching logic and critical thinking skills and geometry helps with spatial thinking. Kids should be exposed to higher math, but then it should be optional if they want to continue to pursue it.
 
2012-12-24 03:20:21 PM  

CreamFilling: Currently there are thousands of students taking AP classes who have no interest in the class and no intention of going to college.



[citationneeded.jpg]
 
2012-12-24 03:50:12 PM  

Mambo Bananapatch: then I remembered there aren't enough smart kids in Texas to warrant an Advance Placement program.


About 65% (two-thirds) of children in Texas are black or hispanic. Is that what you mean?
 
Displayed 50 of 126 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter








In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report