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(SFGate)   Game wardens regret killing cougars, now feel they were moderately hittable   (blog.sfgate.com) divider line 52
    More: Sad, Half Moon Bay, game wardens, cougars  
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5759 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2012 at 1:17 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-22 01:24:42 PM
Maybe Santa can bring her back to life
 
2012-12-22 01:32:45 PM
Not sorry to see dead cougars:

i202.photobucket.com


/Hail Satan!
 
2012-12-22 01:34:08 PM
Not only did they kill the cubs, but they were orphaned and could have been saved because they had been discovered in time. That's pretty tragic.
 
2012-12-22 01:41:32 PM
Just in time for Caturday?
 
2012-12-22 01:54:02 PM
It's kind of neat that we're to a point where we can get all upset over the deaths of two animals who normally would've died in the wild anyway.

/too bad they were killed, but the perspective is encouraging.
//we've come a long way.
 
2012-12-22 02:09:52 PM
chacecharmz.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-12-22 02:09:55 PM
I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.
 
2012-12-22 02:18:06 PM

Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.


Yep... just minding your own business and one of those just farking appears and pounces on you... or your horse.

/RIP Buttercup

www.peoww.co.uk
 
2012-12-22 02:36:38 PM
The reality:

i1-news.softpedia-static.com
("hot")
 
2012-12-22 02:41:00 PM
4 MONTHS OLD SUBBY!
 
2012-12-22 02:46:31 PM
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
/fixed
 
2012-12-22 02:54:25 PM
I don't care how old it is. A mountain lion should be shot on sight.

Are we really wanting to live with cougars in our midst again? WTF? These things are not cuddly little kittens, they will kill a child if given the chance. My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off. Wait until one wanders up into a backyard and gobbles a five year old. Probably won't make any difference to the anthropomorphic animal rights crowd.
 
2012-12-22 03:07:26 PM

Insatiable Jesus: Are we really wanting to live with cougars in our midst again? WTF? These things are not cuddly little kittens, they will kill a child if given the chance. My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off. Wait until one wanders up into a backyard and gobbles a five year old. Probably won't make any difference to the anthropomorphic animal rights crowd.


Anyone else read this and imagine that he was talking about the MILF-y characters?

/Managed to actually find a "cougar" in a tree pic
//Damnable that it's NSFW
 
2012-12-22 03:18:51 PM
yeegrek: Not sorry to see dead cougars:

[i202.photobucket.com image 400x304]


/Hail Satan!


YAY blood orgy
 
2012-12-22 03:21:07 PM

UltimaCS: Insatiable Jesus: Are we really wanting to live with cougars in our midst again? WTF? These things are not cuddly little kittens, they will kill a child if given the chance. My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off. Wait until one wanders up into a backyard and gobbles a five year old. Probably won't make any difference to the anthropomorphic animal rights crowd.

Anyone else read this and imagine that he was talking about the MILF-y characters?

/Managed to actually find a "cougar" in a tree pic
//Damnable that it's NSFW


Well there's these vicious beasts, in these deep crevasses, and they sure look like pumas. And these railroad men were sore afraid...
 
2012-12-22 03:45:23 PM

UltimaCS: "cougar" in a tree


Good God, Man, post the link (sorta NSFW)

/Amateurs
 
2012-12-22 03:49:00 PM

Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.


THIS.

I grew up mountain biking in northern Idaho, I now live in Colorado.

I've been "lucky" enough to see 2 in the wild. The first time I saw one will stick with me forever. The beast was massive, looked at me, paused and continued on its way. Perfect hunters indeed. Hair on my back of my body stood up as I hammered down the hill away from the kitty. I rarely feel like I'm at the bottom of the food chain out in the woods but that time I totally felt like food.
 
2012-12-22 03:53:46 PM

Insatiable Jesus: I don't care how old it is. A mountain lion should be shot on sight.

Are we really wanting to live with cougars in our midst again? WTF? These things are not cuddly little kittens, they will kill a child if given the chance. My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off. Wait until one wanders up into a backyard and gobbles a five year old. Probably won't make any difference to the anthropomorphic animal rights crowd.


Yes, we are. cougars do a service in culling deer, bear, raccoons, and possums. They aren't after your children, nor bicyclists unless they decide to folic in the cougars area. For the most part, cougars shy away from humans. Like all things in life, situational awareness (like knowing prime cougar habitat and habits) will prevent most cougar attacks. We gotta learn to live with the local wildlife if'n we're gonna move into their neighborhood
 
2012-12-22 04:01:35 PM
...and where's the time stamp based out of? Bombay? Mumbai?
 
2012-12-22 04:03:17 PM

Insatiable Jesus: I don't care how old it is. A mountain lion should be shot on sight.

Are we really wanting to live with cougars in our midst again? WTF? These things are not cuddly little kittens, they will kill a child if given the chance. My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off. Wait until one wanders up into a backyard and gobbles a five year old. Probably won't make any difference to the anthropomorphic animal rights crowd.


There's been two fatalities in North America in the ten years from cougars. How much do you want to ban? Guns? Pit bulls? Goddamn deer kill more people than cougars. Get over it.
 
2012-12-22 04:09:40 PM
Spent the first half of my childhood in cougar country (it's the local state school mascot FFS).  Never saw one, never had a cougar scare, never was a single attack.  And this was farmland nestled in a river valley next to just the sort of hills they'd prowl.  You know what the neighborhoods were scared of?  Rattlesnakes.  They were everywhere and some of us kids damn near got bitten because we were running around the hills flipping over rocks and chasing grasshoppers.  I faintly remember the neighbors hunting down a particularly big one because it had wandered into the suburbs, and on another occasion my mother damn near had a heart attack when my sister found a rattler's nest -- with young.

Being scared of cougars in general is like being scared that holding a goddamn gun to your head and pulling the trigger will kill you.  Yeah, it will, but you have to be spectacularly stupid to die that way, and even stupider to express any sort of social concern.
 
2012-12-22 04:33:09 PM

litespeed74: Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.

THIS.

I grew up mountain biking in northern Idaho, I now live in Colorado.

I've been "lucky" enough to see 2 in the wild. The first time I saw one will stick with me forever. The beast was massive, looked at me, paused and continued on its way. Perfect hunters indeed. Hair on my back of my body stood up as I hammered down the hill away from the kitty. I rarely feel like I'm at the bottom of the food chain out in the woods but that time I totally felt like food.


Mountain lions were very rare in California up to the late sixties. Then the bounty was removed, and hunting of them banned. Their numbers began a rapid recovery, and by 1990, Fish and Game (run by experts who dedicate their lives to this sort of thing) were on the verge of allowing limited hunting of them once again. PETA types, outraged by this, sponsored a ballot initiative banning all hunting (many people still had the impression that it was an endangered species), and it passed. Now there are too many mountain lions, and not much to be done about it. It will probably take having a child snatched in broad daylight to bring back a limited hunting season.

A co-worker was recently stalked by one when he was deer hunting. He fired a warning shot, and it kept coming! He was trying to hit it with his second shot - whether he did or not, it then jumped up, and ran into the thick brush. He ran at full speed back down the hill back to his truck. It is becoming more common. I did lots of hiking alone in the woods in northern California when I was a kid. Even as an adult it's becoming a bad idea, much less for a child.

Years ago, another co-worker had one running around his neighborhood in Magalia California. F&G came, and set up a trap. He talked with one of the officers, who told him it's perfectly legal to kill them in self defense. And that the chances of anyone killing one being questioned too closely by F&G about the circumstances are pretty remote. They know there are too many, but their hands have been tied by the initiative. He actually cracked off a shot with his 1911 after it had been on the roof of his house, then jumped into the back yard. But he said it moved way too fast, and his dog was getting between him and the cat. I believe it was finally caught in the trap.
 
2012-12-22 05:40:21 PM
It kind of takes away the "protecting the public" pride when you find out the threat still had some if its milk teeth.
 
2012-12-22 05:57:37 PM
There seem to be a lot of mountain lions in California and they seem, for the most part, to deliberately avoid bothering  the humans. The humans for the most part avoid bothering the mountain lions.
The mountain lions are more conscientious about not bothering us than we are about not bothering them.

Which species is considered an animal?
 
2012-12-22 06:01:45 PM

cloud_van_dame: There seem to be a lot of mountain lions in California and they seem, for the most part, to deliberately avoid bothering  the humans. The humans for the most part avoid bothering the mountain lions.
The mountain lions are more conscientious about not bothering us than we are about not bothering them.

Which species is considered an animal?


We're both animals. The difference is, we're persons. They won't be persons until they end up intelligent and capable and willing to do all the responsibility stuff that comes along with rights. Then they'll get that, hopefully, and start paying taxes.
 
2012-12-22 06:03:42 PM
There's been two fatalities in North America in the ten years from cougars. How much do you want to ban? Guns? Pit bulls? Goddamn deer kill more people than cougars. Get over it.

So much this..........
 
2012-12-22 06:22:37 PM

Pray 4 Mojo: Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.

Yep... just minding your own business and one of those just farking appears and pounces on you... or your horse.

/RIP Buttercup

[www.peoww.co.uk image 450x292]


That's why you don't name the horses. You'll feel worse when they die.

The horses in that game were trolls anyway. You'll whistle for them to try to escape a gun fight... so they'll run over, and run at the exact same speed as you, in the exact same direction as you, 12 feet in front of you. Farkers.
 
2012-12-22 06:42:57 PM
Glen Martin, Chronicle Staff Writer

Mountain lions may be pushing endangered Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep to extinction, and wildlife biologists say they are unable to do anything about it.

The scientists maintain that a simple solution to the problem exists but that it cannot be carried out because of the growing trend of crafting public policy -- including wildlife policy -- at the ballot box.

Cougars were given sweeping protection in a 1990 state ballot initiative after widespread popular concern about the stability of their population. The big cats multiplied dramatically, and they began gobbling up the bighorns with a vengeance.

Wildlife biologists would like to eliminate a few of the most voracious cats to give the sheep a little breathing room. But the 1990 initiative allows cougars to be killed only if they threaten people, pets or livestock. Endangered species are not covered in the exemption.

And to the frustration of the scientists, supporters of the big cats are fighting any moves to change that part of the law. ``They have no vision of conservation,'' said bighorn expert John Wehausen, a biologist with the University of California's White Mountain Research Station, in criticism of the Mountain Lion Foundation, his primary opponent on the issue.

``They're an animal rights group, not an environmental group,'' said Wehausen. ``We (wildlife biologists) are concerned with habitat preservation and maintaining rich biodiversity, but they're concerned with the life of a particular animal in a particular place. They essentially reject science.''


Cougars Wiping Out Sierra Bighorn Sheep, Scientists Say
 
2012-12-22 06:43:25 PM
What a load of bullshiat. It's none of their farking business. Can't they just for once, let nature run it's course and stop interfering?
 
2012-12-22 06:47:00 PM

The Jami Turman Fan Club: Insatiable Jesus: I don't care how old it is. A mountain lion should be shot on sight.

Are we really wanting to live with cougars in our midst again? WTF? These things are not cuddly little kittens, they will kill a child if given the chance. My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off. Wait until one wanders up into a backyard and gobbles a five year old. Probably won't make any difference to the anthropomorphic animal rights crowd.

There's been two fatalities in North America in the ten years from cougars. How much do you want to ban? Guns? Pit bulls? Goddamn deer kill more people than cougars. Get over it.


If its not completely safe then it needs to be banned. So, like, everything except pillows.

Wait...I receiving word people have been suffocated with pillows...well...ban everything.
 
2012-12-22 06:47:53 PM

Insatiable Jesus: My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off.


Citations please. Near where I live, we had one cougar attack on a hiker, a relative saw one hiding under a car in her neighborhood (nobody got hurt), and there was also an incident where somebody's small barky dog treed a mountain lion. I have never heard of a mountain lion jumping on a bicyclist from a tree. Also they got into someone's yard in Los Angeles and had to be shooed away, and there was the one in Santa Monica that thought an office building might be a suitable territory. It was shot.

Yes, they will eat your livestock or your pets.
 
2012-12-22 06:49:51 PM
With lion populations continuing to rise, and increasing numbers exploring their shrinking habitat, it doesn't take a genius like Hornocker to predict the future. "There are more people and more lions, and thus more opportunity for people and lions to come into contact," he says. More confrontations, he adds, "are inevitable." But what to do about this inevitability is another matter, and the more time you spend in lion country, the more you realize how tricky-and potentially tragic-it will be for large numbers of lions and people to share the same turf.

Hearing the agonizing, muffled screams, Magnuson jumped on his bike and pedaled down the trail through an S-curve. At the end of this curve, on the right side and raised a few feet (less than a meter) over the trail, stands a bush six feet (two meters) high. Anne Hjelle, 30, one of the two women who'd passed Magnuson, was the first to reach it, her friend Debi Nicholls a good 30 yards (27 meters) behind. As she pedaled by the bush, it exploded. Hjelle saw a flash of reddish-brown, and in a single leap of muscle, fur, teeth, and claws, a lion was on her back, locking her helmeted head and neck within its jaws.

When Nicholls caught up to her, Hjelle was on her back, her helmet in the lion's mouth, the lion dragging her into the brush. Nicholls dismounted and threw her bike at the lion. She grabbed Hjelle's leg-and held on. For an instant, the lion released Hjelle's head but then bit her face, and resumed the tug of war with Nicholls.

"I'm going to die," Hjelle said.

"You're not. I will never let go."

"Dear God, dear God," Hjelle moaned, and blacked out.

When Magnuson pedaled up, he found Nicholls pulling on something in the bushes. Realizing it was her friend, and that Hjelle's head was engulfed in a lion's mouth, its white whiskers smeared with her blood, he grabbed a softball-size rock to throw at the cat.

Four other bikers-Mike Castellano, Diego Lopez, Jeremy Collins, and Duane Jenkins-arrived. As they frantically threw rocks at the lion, Magnuson pulled out his cell phone and dialed 911. Finally, one of them hit the lion square on the head and it bounded off. Nicholls pulled Hjelle slightly up the slope. She was limp, a rag doll, the left side of her face mostly torn off.

Mountain Lions Vs. Outdoor Enthusiasts?
 
2012-12-22 06:58:49 PM
Ah, the Whiting Ranch incident.  That is the one attack I was referring to. Thought it was a hiker that got killed. There are still hikers, bikers, and mountain lions in that park, no incidents since 2004.

I see more blood and gore driving on the freeways here in SoCal.
 
2012-12-22 07:02:22 PM
Of course, these encounters are all because of people encroaching on the mountain lion's natural habitats of suburban golf courses and neighborhoods.
 
2012-12-22 07:09:03 PM

cloud_van_dame: Ah, the Whiting Ranch incident.  That is the one attack I was referring to. Thought it was a hiker that got killed. There are still hikers, bikers, and mountain lions in that park, no incidents since 2004.

I see more blood and gore driving on the freeways here in SoCal.


Man is still, by far, the most potentially dangerous animal you might encounter in the woods. As a motorcyclist, I'm in much more danger of being killed or seriously injured by hitting a deer than I am from a mountain lion attack. That doesn't change the fact that there are already too many of these cats in California, and their numbers are increasing, and the threat is growing. I suppose that there are some who think the best way to check the increasing numbers of mountain lions would be to reintroduce grizzly bears. Of course, anyone who thinks that is insane.
 
2012-12-22 08:52:04 PM
www.collectorsquest.com

I have nearly the full run and am still looking for 2 or 3 issues.
 
2012-12-23 12:01:46 AM

Repo Man: litespeed74: Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.

THIS.

I grew up mountain biking in northern Idaho, I now live in Colorado.

I've been "lucky" enough to see 2 in the wild. The first time I saw one will stick with me forever. The beast was massive, looked at me, paused and continued on its way. Perfect hunters indeed. Hair on my back of my body stood up as I hammered down the hill away from the kitty. I rarely feel like I'm at the bottom of the food chain out in the woods but that time I totally felt like food.

Mountain lions were very rare in California up to the late sixties. Then the bounty was removed, and hunting of them banned. Their numbers began a rapid recovery, and by 1990, Fish and Game (run by experts who dedicate their lives to this sort of thing) were on the verge of allowing limited hunting of them once again. PETA types, outraged by this, sponsored a ballot initiative banning all hunting (many people still had the impression that it was an endangered species), and it passed. Now there are too many mountain lions, and not much to be done about it. It will probably take having a child snatched in broad daylight to bring back a limited hunting season.

A co-worker was recently stalked by one when he was deer hunting. He fired a warning shot, and it kept coming! He was trying to hit it with his second shot - whether he did or not, it then jumped up, and ran into the thick brush. He ran at full speed back down the hill back to his truck. It is becoming more common. I did lots of hiking alone in the woods in northern California when I was a kid. Even as an adult it's becoming a bad idea, much less for a child.

Years ago, another co-worker had one running around his neighborhood in Magalia California. F&G came, and set up a trap. He talked with one of the officers, who told him it's perfectly legal to kill them in self defense. And that the chances of anyone killing one being questioned too closely by F&G about the circumstances are pretty remote. They know there are too many, but their hands have been tied by the initiative. He actually cracked off a shot with his 1911 after it had been on the roof of his house, then jumped into the back yard. But he said it moved way too fast, and his dog was getting between him and the cat. I believe it was finally caught in the trap.


So... the hunter freaked out at being hunted?

Awesome. I love it.
 
2012-12-23 12:10:39 AM
So... the hunter freaked out at being hunted?

Awesome. I love it.


Do you have something against hunters?
 
2012-12-23 01:02:32 AM

Repo Man: Glen Martin, Chronicle Staff Writer

Mountain lions may be pushing endangered Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep to extinction, and wildlife biologists say they are unable to do anything about it.

The scientists maintain that a simple solution to the problem exists but that it cannot be carried out because of the growing trend of crafting public policy -- including wildlife policy -- at the ballot box.

Cougars were given sweeping protection in a 1990 state ballot initiative after widespread popular concern about the stability of their population. The big cats multiplied dramatically, and they began gobbling up the bighorns with a vengeance.

Wildlife biologists would like to eliminate a few of the most voracious cats to give the sheep a little breathing room. But the 1990 initiative allows cougars to be killed only if they threaten people, pets or livestock. Endangered species are not covered in the exemption.

And to the frustration of the scientists, supporters of the big cats are fighting any moves to change that part of the law. ``They have no vision of conservation,'' said bighorn expert John Wehausen, a biologist with the University of California's White Mountain Research Station, in criticism of the Mountain Lion Foundation, his primary opponent on the issue.

``They're an animal rights group, not an environmental group,'' said Wehausen. ``We (wildlife biologists) are concerned with habitat preservation and maintaining rich biodiversity, but they're concerned with the life of a particular animal in a particular place. They essentially reject science.''

Cougars Wiping Out Sierra Bighorn Sheep, Scientists Say


©1998 San Francisco Chronicle

Nice you used a recent study.
 
2012-12-23 01:05:33 AM

cloud_van_dame: Insatiable Jesus: My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists, she says for some reason bicyclists seem to really set them off.

Citations please. Near where I live, we had one cougar attack on a hiker, a relative saw one hiding under a car in her neighborhood (nobody got hurt), and there was also an incident where somebody's small barky dog treed a mountain lion. I have never heard of a mountain lion jumping on a bicyclist from a tree. Also they got into someone's yard in Los Angeles and had to be shooed away, and there was the one in Santa Monica that thought an office building might be a suitable territory. It was shot.

Yes, they will eat your livestock or your pets.


They missed one.

Rats!
 
2012-12-23 01:09:34 AM

Repo Man: With lion populations continuing to rise, and increasing numbers exploring their shrinking habitat, it doesn't take a genius like Hornocker to predict the future. "There are more people and more lions, and thus more opportunity for people and lions to come into contact," he says. More confrontations, he adds, "are inevitable." But what to do about this inevitability is another matter, and the more time you spend in lion country, the more you realize how tricky-and potentially tragic-it will be for large numbers of lions and people to share the same turf.

Hearing the agonizing, muffled screams, Magnuson jumped on his bike and pedaled down the trail through an S-curve. At the end of this curve, on the right side and raised a few feet (less than a meter) over the trail, stands a bush six feet (two meters) high. Anne Hjelle, 30, one of the two women who'd passed Magnuson, was the first to reach it, her friend Debi Nicholls a good 30 yards (27 meters) behind. As she pedaled by the bush, it exploded. Hjelle saw a flash of reddish-brown, and in a single leap of muscle, fur, teeth, and claws, a lion was on her back, locking her helmeted head and neck within its jaws.

When Nicholls caught up to her, Hjelle was on her back, her helmet in the lion's mouth, the lion dragging her into the brush. Nicholls dismounted and threw her bike at the lion. She grabbed Hjelle's leg-and held on. For an instant, the lion released Hjelle's head but then bit her face, and resumed the tug of war with Nicholls.

"I'm going to die," Hjelle said.

"You're not. I will never let go."

"Dear God, dear God," Hjelle moaned, and blacked out.

When Magnuson pedaled up, he found Nicholls pulling on something in the bushes. Realizing it was her friend, and that Hjelle's head was engulfed in a lion's mouth, its white whiskers smeared with her blood, he grabbed a softball-size rock to throw at the cat.

Four other bikers-Mike Castellano, Diego Lopez, Jeremy Collins, and Duane Jenkins-arrived. As they frant ...


That one was 2004. Do you have any recent ones? Maybe within two years?
 
2012-12-23 01:13:31 AM

Repo Man: So... the hunter freaked out at being hunted?

Awesome. I love it.

Do you have something against hunters?


Do you have something against the hunters being hunted?
 
2012-12-23 01:31:08 AM

saturn badger: Repo Man: So... the hunter freaked out at being hunted?

Awesome. I love it.

Do you have something against hunters?

Do you have something against the hunters being hunted?


Yes. My natural sympathy is of course going to lie with a fellow human.
 
2012-12-23 01:33:21 AM
That one was 2004. Do you have any recent ones? Maybe within two years?

A man camping in the Nevada City area has been released from the hospital after being attacked by a mountain lion early Sunday morning.

The state Department of Fish and Game confirmed that the 63-year-old man had been the victim of a mountain lion attack after investigating the scene and checking his wounds. The man has requested the Department of Fish and Game keep his identity anonymous.

"As you can imagine, he got beaten up pretty badly," said Patrick Foy, game warden.

According to a press release by the Department of Fish and Game, the man was in his sleeping bag next to the Yuba River northeast of Nevada City. Around 1 a.m. Sunday, the man awoke to feel what he believed to be a paw on top of his head, the release said.

"When he reacted to the paw the attack immediately started," Foy said.

The man told Fish and Game the attack lasted about two minutes, during which the mountain lion clawed and bit him through his sleeping bag.

Foy said the man had bite and claw marks all over his head, arms and back. The scalp appeared to have sustained the worst of the injuries, he said.

Hiker attacked by mountain lion near Nevada City
 
2012-12-23 02:40:37 AM

Insatiable Jesus: My friend in CA says they are already a problem where she is, they like to sit in trees and jump onto bicyclists


So they're kinda like drop bears, then?
 
2012-12-23 03:09:15 AM

Repo Man: litespeed74: Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.

THIS.

I grew up mountain biking in northern Idaho, I now live in Colorado.

I've been "lucky" enough to see 2 in the wild. The first time I saw one will stick with me forever. The beast was massive, looked at me, paused and continued on its way. Perfect hunters indeed. Hair on my back of my body stood up as I hammered down the hill away from the kitty. I rarely feel like I'm at the bottom of the food chain out in the woods but that time I totally felt like food.

Mountain lions were very rare in California up to the late sixties. Then the bounty was removed, and hunting of them banned. Their numbers began a rapid recovery, and by 1990, Fish and Game (run by experts who dedicate their lives to this sort of thing) were on the verge of allowing limited hunting of them once again. PETA types, outraged by this, sponsored a ballot initiative banning all hunting (many people still had the impression that it was an endangered species), and it passed. Now there are too many mountain lions, and not much to be done about it. It will probably take having a child snatched in broad daylight to bring back a limited hunting season.


How are you defining too many mountain lions? Over-populations of animals is typically caused by humans doing things like predator removal, such as killing mountain lions. Since mountain lions are apex predators the only thing needed to keep them naturally in check is each other. Mountain lions are highly territorial and cannibalism is well documented, which is why the Florida panther population is stuck around 50, any more and they start killing each other. So, at least from a healthy ecosystem level, you're not going end up with to many.

The ones that end up in suburban areas, and typically the ones that end up attacking people, are young males that were recently driven off by mom. The young males will often go 300 to 400 miles in search of a new place to call home. The fact they end up in places with people isn't as much a result of there being to many pumas as it is them just being inexperienced and/or lost.

Can mountain lions be sustainably hunted? Yes. Is there any point in hunting them since they do not need population control and no one eats them? No. Are Puma populations less resilient to hunting than herbivores? Yes. Are typical hunting practices such as only hunting males or having a limited hunting season to prevent the orphaning of kittens applicable to mountain lions? No.

And that's why I don't support hunting them. It would strictly be for sport and the idea of kittens that haven't opened their eyes yet starving to death due to their mother being shot simply so the hunter can have a trophy I find reprehensible.
 
2012-12-23 09:51:33 AM

Thorny: Repo Man: litespeed74: Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.

THIS.

I grew up mountain biking in northern Idaho, I now live in Colorado.

I've been "lucky" enough to see 2 in the wild. The first time I saw one will stick with me forever. The beast was massive, looked at me, paused and continued on its way. Perfect hunters indeed. Hair on my back of my body stood up as I hammered down the hill away from the kitty. I rarely feel like I'm at the bottom of the food chain out in the woods but that time I totally felt like food.

Mountain lions were very rare in California up to the late sixties. Then the bounty was removed, and hunting of them banned. Their numbers began a rapid recovery, and by 1990, Fish and Game (run by experts who dedicate their lives to this sort of thing) were on the verge of allowing limited hunting of them once again. PETA types, outraged by this, sponsored a ballot initiative banning all hunting (many people still had the impression that it was an endangered species), and it passed. Now there are too many mountain lions, and not much to be done about it. It will probably take having a child snatched in broad daylight to bring back a limited hunting season.

How are you defining too many mountain lions? Over-populations of animals is typically caused by humans doing things like predator removal, such as killing mountain lions. Since mountain lions are apex predators the only thing needed to keep them naturally in check is each other. Mountain lions are highly territo ...


When you got mountain lions wandering in to Berkeley, and downtown Santa Monica, that's a symptom of an underlying problem. They are being spotted in suburban parks all over the state. A woman has her dog snatched while out for a walk in Carmel. Woman is attacked while jogging in Lake Arrowhead. When you have the same story, but the victim is a two year old child instead of a dog, what do you think is going to happen? Reducing their numbers a bit, and teaching the survivors to fear man would be a good thing. Pro mountain lion people dispute that a hunt would make them more cautious, but I'd like to try it and see. F&G agreed with me, but prop 117 tied their hands.
 
2012-12-23 12:37:28 PM

Repo Man: Thorny: Repo Man: litespeed74: Alys: I do a lot of backpacking through the Sierras and in the local mountains around Los Angeles, and mountain lions are the only thing that scare me. Black bears are cowards and will generally only attack you if you do something very stupid to provoke them, but with mountain lions you never see them coming. They just jump out of the bushes, chomp down on your neck from behind, and then it's lights out.

They embody all the spite and misanthropy of regular housecats, in a size large enough to eat you for dinner.

THIS.

I grew up mountain biking in northern Idaho, I now live in Colorado.

I've been "lucky" enough to see 2 in the wild. The first time I saw one will stick with me forever. The beast was massive, looked at me, paused and continued on its way. Perfect hunters indeed. Hair on my back of my body stood up as I hammered down the hill away from the kitty. I rarely feel like I'm at the bottom of the food chain out in the woods but that time I totally felt like food.

Mountain lions were very rare in California up to the late sixties. Then the bounty was removed, and hunting of them banned. Their numbers began a rapid recovery, and by 1990, Fish and Game (run by experts who dedicate their lives to this sort of thing) were on the verge of allowing limited hunting of them once again. PETA types, outraged by this, sponsored a ballot initiative banning all hunting (many people still had the impression that it was an endangered species), and it passed. Now there are too many mountain lions, and not much to be done about it. It will probably take having a child snatched in broad daylight to bring back a limited hunting season.

How are you defining too many mountain lions? Over-populations of animals is typically caused by humans doing things like predator removal, such as killing mountain lions. Since mountain lions are apex predators the only thing needed to keep them naturally in check is each other. Mountain lions are highly ...


Except for the fact that I already explained that young males naturally go weird places. Young males show up in suburbia in Indiana, several 100 miles from viable mountain lion populations. Nothing wrong, just basic large carnivore ecology. As I already stated most attacks are attributed to young males so it isn't really a lack of fear from the overall population, just those that wouldn't know better with or without hunting pressure.

Also, only nine people have died in the US in the last 100 years from mountain lion attacks. Given that rate we are safer with mountain lions since their primary prey source, deer, cause around 130 deaths a year in the US from vehicular collisions.

I have no idea why you think they need to be hunted (deer hunter?) but without being allowed to use dogs to tree them California might as well be giving out Sasquatch tags.
 
2012-12-23 01:34:04 PM
Also, only nine people have died in the US in the last 100 years from mountain lion attacks.

It's great that you use that base period. The preferred period for people downplaying the dangers of mountain lions in California is 1890 to present, with fourteen verified attacks. I guess things such as the Lake Arrowhead woman being treed by one, and only rescued from a serious mauling or death because some guys heard her screaming don't make the count. Going back to when mountain lions were hunted to near extinction (and when there were relatively few humans) is of course going to make attacks very rare. The estimate I've read for the low point of the population in California is 600. The present estimate is between 4,000 to 6,000 ( DFG ) in California. Attacks/encounters have increased dramatically since the early nineties. If their population continues to exceed the carrying capacity of the wilderness areas in California, there will only be increasing numbers of encounters with humans. It's one thing to know that you have to be careful when hiking in the back country. But in Berkeley?

She was taking her daily walk, accompanied by her three-year-old son and their dog, a male boxer, when she saw the big cat sitting "completely still" on a landing beside the home, she said.

At first she thought it was a statue and even paused to point it out to her son. Only when it moved did she realize that it was live cougar, at which point her heart began pounding as she took off running with the stroller and dog, she said. The mountain lion loped off in the opposite direction, toward the front of the house facing Lake Drive, she said.

After safely reaching Grizzly Peak Boulevard, she called 911, got put on hold, and was finally routed to a Richmond police dispatcher who told her to call animal control, she said. She happened to have the Kensington police dispatch phone number on her cell phone and called it instead. An officer showed up within three minutes, she said. The mountain lion was long gone.

Linda Lipscomb, a member of the Kensington Police Protection and Community Services District, sent a notice to her neighbors, urging them to be careful when using the trail. Another Kensington resident contacted Patch urging publication of an article since some school children use the path.

"I walked that trail for 12 years and I never saw anything like that," Yilmaz recalled Tuesday in an interview with Patch.

Parts of Lawrence Berkeley Lab received a shelter-in-place alert Thursday afternoon after authorities said a mountain lion was spotted in the area, according to Berkeleyside.


Mountain Lion Sighting Prompts Shelter-in-Place at Berkeley Lab

The sighting also caused McMillan Road to close down temporarily.

Staff received an email alerting them about the sighting around 1:47 p.m. The area was cleared by authorities around 2:30 p.m.

A number of mountain lion sightings have been reported around the lab and Berkeley campus and in other areas of the East Bay hills, including those in El Cerrito.

The lab reported another mountain lion sighting the day before, Wednesday, about 6:10 a.m.



No, I don't believe that people living in Berkeley should have to worry about their children getting snatched by a mountain lion on the way to school. This is in the San Francisco Bay Area, not the Sierra foothills. What solution do you have that does not involve killing mountain lions? Pretend that there's no problem? If present trends continue, it's only a matter of time.
 
2012-12-23 01:42:29 PM
And no, I'm not a deer hunter. My attitude toward deer is pretty close to that of Louis CK. Stupid people feeding deer at their homes are part of the mountain lion problem, as that draws them in to residential areas. It's stupid, it's illegal, and it's very common.
 
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